37 Burst results for "District Attorney"

Fresh update on "district attorney" discussed on AP News Radio

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "district attorney" discussed on AP News Radio

"Prosecutors say they don't expect to file charges against any Philadelphia train riders who witnessed the sexual assault last week but did nothing to intervene the Delaware County district attorney's office says prosecutors want witnesses to come forward rather than be afraid of possible prosecution as it investigates the October 13 attack on a septa train camera show the victim repeatedly groped by suspect fished in Norway for over half an hour minutes after he ripped her pants open officers boarded the train and caught him in the act transversal is estimated 10 people may have been sitting or standing near the victim's seat and some appear to be filming the attack on their phones but experts say under Pennsylvania law bystanders don't have a legal duty to intervene I am Jackie Quinn

Delaware County District Attor Philadelphia Norway Pennsylvania Jackie Quinn
Charges unlikely for riders who saw Philadelphia train rape

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 2 hrs ago

Charges unlikely for riders who saw Philadelphia train rape

"Prosecutors say they don't expect to file charges against any Philadelphia train riders who witnessed the sexual assault last week but did nothing to intervene the Delaware County district attorney's office says prosecutors want witnesses to come forward rather than be afraid of possible prosecution as it investigates the October thirteenth attack on a septa train camera show the victim repeatedly groped by suspect fished in Norway for over half an hour minutes after he ripped her pants open officers boarded the train and caught him in the act transversal is estimated ten people may have been sitting or standing near the victim's seat and some appear to be filming the attack on their phones but experts say under Pennsylvania law bystanders don't have a legal duty to intervene I am Jackie Quinn

Delaware County District Attor Philadelphia Norway Pennsylvania Jackie Quinn
Fresh update on "district attorney" discussed on Bloomberg Surveillance

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:44 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "district attorney" discussed on Bloomberg Surveillance

"Protection Certainly paid family and medical leave is a priority of ours and we're trying to figure out how to make sure it stays in there Jayapal says the president is being very helpful in the Senate senator Joe Manchin says they should be voting on parts of the plan where there is agreement In San Francisco I'm at Baxter Bloomberg radio New York City will require that all municipal employees get vaccinated against COVID-19 the city will eliminate the option for testing Mayor Bill de Blasio's announcement would mean more than 160,000 city workers need to get their first shot by October 29th or potentially lose their jobs The drop organization already under indictment in Manhattan is said to be facing a new criminal inquiry According to The New York Times the Westchester county district attorney's office is examining financial dealings at a golf course the company owns Global approval of U.S. leadership rebounded to match a record during the first year of Joe Biden's presidency snapping back from all time lows in 2020 Live from the Bloomberg interactive brokers studios This is global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quick take powered by more a 2700 journalist and analyst and more than.

Jayapal Senator Joe Manchin Baxter Bloomberg Covid Mayor Bill De Blasio Westchester County District At Senate New York City San Francisco Manhattan The New York Times Joe Biden Golf U.S. Bloomberg
Justice Department won't charge officer who shot Jacob Blake

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last week

Justice Department won't charge officer who shot Jacob Blake

"Hi Mike Rossi reporting federal authorities will not seek charges against a police officer in the Jacob bleak shooting the justice department has announced a no federal charges will be filed against a white Kenosha Wisconsin police officer who shot and paralyzed the black suspect Jacob lake last year the shooting triggered several nights of protests that included an Illinois man shooting three people killing two the justice department determined there wasn't enough evidence to prove officer Rustin Chesky used excessive force or violated Blake civil rights the federal findings mirrored a determination by the Kenosha county district attorney in January in August twenty twenty can OSHA officers responded to a call from a woman who said her boyfriend wasn't supposed to be at her home when officers arrived the woman told them Blake was trying to take her children and her S. U. V. Blake resisted as officers tried to take him into custody and was subsequently shot hi

Mike Rossi Jacob Lake Justice Department Rustin Chesky Kenosha Wisconsin Blake Kenosha County Illinois Osha S. U. V. Blake
Author Matt Palumbo of 'Man Behind the Curtains' Discusses George Soros' Secret Network

The Dan Bongino Show

01:07 min | 2 weeks ago

Author Matt Palumbo of 'Man Behind the Curtains' Discusses George Soros' Secret Network

"We're talking to Matt Colombo author of a I'm telling you folks who will not be disappointed It's going to be a book of the year Demand behind the curtain by Matt Colombo It's about George Soros's secret network Are you telling me that he's going local Austin races local district attorney races Because his money can make a big difference in the success rate is higher because that makes a lot of sense Yeah but you know the thing is like if presidential elections it's hundreds of millions of billions of dollars to move the needle It takes quite a bit If I'm running in a DA race and a 100,000 people vote in it if you drown a candidate in one or $2 million that is immense success And a lot of these source prosecutors actually are household names You know chase of boudin every week we're seeing open shoplifting in San Francisco That's him That's a source back here Kim Fox who went across to Jesse Smollett He saw us back In fact there was a case last week where there was a gang shooting in public about a dozen people involved She wouldn't cross the committee claiming that it was mutual combat So because both parties wanted to open fire and broad daylight well we can't prosecute that So these are the kind of people he's back

Matt Colombo George Soros Kim Fox Austin Jesse Smollett Boudin San Francisco
Author Matthew Palumbo: George Soros Dropped $500K to Keep Austin Police Defunded

The Dan Bongino Show

01:12 min | 2 weeks ago

Author Matthew Palumbo: George Soros Dropped $500K to Keep Austin Police Defunded

"Mad what the hell is your sorrow and his interest group money Do we isn't living Austin Texas Why is he getting involved to defeat a measure to hire more police in Austin Why is he going local Well it's not just awesome It's actually everywhere and the longest chapter in the book is actually titled George Soros goes local where I just go through all these prosecutors He's trying to fund And it's sort of like a dual case where one it seems it's just literally seems like they wanted to destroy Law & Order in America and they don't care what the consequences is Obviously someone like George Soros is private security But at the same time the dual purpose and that they're going to push this narrative that cops are racist America's I mean you see this are you against police but go back 300 years in history when they're talking about it if they want to push this narrative that everything this country is rotten from the core And it really just seems like they kind of want to destroy everything and start over And in terms of local politics you know we've been talking about Soros influence groups and his role of presidential elections but thank God Presidential elections He's about 50 50 in a success rate With local election is well over 90% because these are often races And it's been a district attorney races

George Soros Austin America Texas Soros
Suspected arson wildfire forces evacuations in California

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 3 weeks ago

Suspected arson wildfire forces evacuations in California

"Thousands of people in northern California are under evacuation orders and a woman is charged with setting a fire that chase them from their homes fire officials say at least four thousand people in the Shasta county community of mountain gate north of Redding had to flee and a number of homes have already burned the flames erupted Wednesday when a woman emerged from the brush with a lighter in her pocket near a quarry workers reported seeing thirty year old Alexandra super Neva acting strangely before she approached by our fighters and ask them for medical help the Shasta county district attorney says the woman's being charged with felony arson to wildland and is being investigated in connection with other fire sat in the county and other parts of the state I'm Jackie Quinn

Shasta County Northern California Alexandra Super Neva Redding Jackie Quinn
Larry Elder's Name Mysteriously Missing From Some California Ballots

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:10 min | Last month

Larry Elder's Name Mysteriously Missing From Some California Ballots

"Election was not without fraud. There were several instances of people calling me and telling me that they tried to vote for larry elder and his name wasn't on the ballot in places like elk grove which is by sacramento down. It wasn't on the ballot. He was not on the ballot. In fact the woman that called me from riverside to report. This said that she had to write him in as a candidate and the most visible the literally the most visible challenger to nancy's nephew how is he not on the ballot. Exactly how is he not on the ballot and And what was going on to prevent him from being there. That sounds more than just a coincidence to me. There were lots of people that called and this was documented. Not just on conservative. Talk radio but in the mainstream news media that showed up to vote and they were told that they had already voted. So look this male couple of lessons to learn from this. There are silver linings. Take that is that california. Has its fightback we have recalls still percolating against people like george gascoyne are very liberal district attorney. I think california is more motivated than ever. Because we've seen how this is done. So i do think that there is some positive here. I think it is our job in talk radio to hold the gop accountable at three people on the gop yesterday against better judgment. Look i know a lot of republicans are angry with gop but you have to ask them and we have to have them on our programs holding them accountable to out what they are doing to secure our elections and every single one of them. And i had confirmation of this said that there were a lawyers deployed on the on the tab of the gop the national office of the gop throughout the state watching the vote counts. That's a good step in the right door. They were they were they. Watching the the the votes were they. Counting the votes from november. Is that why they were there. That's right there still there. You have back on november. But certainly the i think at the end of this we're gonna see that republicans were able to turn out more voters than they did when president trump was on the ballot against president biden. And so i think we can make some positive steps. We've sent a message to the rest of the country that there's pushback in california but we have to get a handle on the mail in ballots

GOP Larry Elder George Gascoyne Elk Grove Sacramento California Nancy President Trump President Biden
Trevor Bauer’s Paid Administrative Leave Is Extended by MLB for an Eighth Time

The John Phillips Show

00:22 sec | Last month

Trevor Bauer’s Paid Administrative Leave Is Extended by MLB for an Eighth Time

"Leave is being extended by Major League Baseball. The leave for the Dodgers pitcher is extended through next Friday. The L. A County district attorney's office is determining whether to file sexual assault charges against him. He last pitched June 28th the day before his accuser filed for a temporary restraining order. Bauer denies her allegations. On Wall Street, The

Major League Dodgers Baseball Bauer
Ex-Prosecutor Indicted for Misconduct in Ahmaud Arbery Death

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last month

Ex-Prosecutor Indicted for Misconduct in Ahmaud Arbery Death

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting an ex prosecutor has been indicted for misconduct in the death of a mod armory a former prosecutor in Georgia has been indicted on misconduct charges related to the Ahmad armory case former Brunswick judicial circuit district attorney Jackie Johnson was indicted by a Glynn county grand jury Thursday on charges of violating her oath of office and hindering a law enforcement officer armory was gunned down in February twenty twenty after being pursued by white father and son Greg and Travis but Michael Greg McMichael had worked as an investigator in Johnson's office the indictment says Johnson directed that Travis McMichael the alleged shooter should not be placed under arrest hi Mike Rossi

Mike Rossi Ahmad Armory Brunswick Judicial Circuit Dis Jackie Johnson Glynn County Georgia Michael Greg Mcmichael Travis Johnson Greg Travis Mcmichael
 RFK Assassin Sirhan Wins Parole with Support of 2 Kennedys

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

RFK Assassin Sirhan Wins Parole with Support of 2 Kennedys

"Hi Mike Ross you're reporting a California parole board panel rules in favor of releasing Robert F. Kennedy's assassin Sirhan Sirhan senator Robert F. Kennedy's assassin has been granted parole a two person panel of the California parole board recommended Sir Hans release after his sixteenth parole hearing two of RFK's son spoke in favor of Sir Hans release and prosecutors declined to participate were opposed his release under a policy by Los Angeles county district attorney George GASC own however released for the seventy seven year old Sir Han is not assured the ruling by the two person panel will be reviewed over the next ninety days by the California parole board staff it will then be sent to the governor who will have thirty days to granted reverse it or modify the ruling hi Mike Rossio

Sir Hans California Parole Board Sirhan Sirhan Senator Robert F Mike Ross Robert F. Kennedy George Gasc RFK Sir Han California Los Angeles County Mike Rossio
RFK Assassin Sirhan Seeks Parole; DA Won't Challenge Release

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

RFK Assassin Sirhan Seeks Parole; DA Won't Challenge Release

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting when Robert F. Kennedy's assassin goes before a parole hearing Friday the district attorney won't be there to challenge his release Sirhan Sirhan was convicted of the nineteen sixty eight assassination of U. S. senator and democratic presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy goes before a two person panel of the California parole board Friday it will be the sixteenth parole hearing for Sirhan but for the first time no prosecutor will be there to argue for his continued incarceration Los Angeles county district attorney George GASC gold who took office last year is sticking to his policy that prosecutors have no role at parole hearings the last parole hearing for the seventy seven year old Sir Han was in twenty sixteen commissioners concluded Sir how did not show adequate remorse or understanding of the enormity of his crime hi Mike Rossio

Mike Rossi Robert F. Kennedy Sirhan Sirhan George Gasc Gold Sirhan U. Los Angeles County California Sir Han SIR Mike Rossio
Democrats Like Andrew Cuomo Obsessed With Pardoning Murderers

Mark Levin

01:59 min | 2 months ago

Democrats Like Andrew Cuomo Obsessed With Pardoning Murderers

"And yet we have Democrats who are obsessed with pardoning. Killers. Jimmy Carter did it. Bill Clinton did it. Obama did it. Cuomo has done it. He marked his Final day in office Monday by handing out four sentence computations and one pardon. He also made a parole board referral for a 76 year old man. Over his role in the deadly 1981 Brinks armored car robbery. David Gilbert, a weather underground member. Now this is the thing I told you about the weather underground in the attack on the Capitol building and my brother. Crucial buildings. And they're pardoned by a Democrat. Another attack on the Capitol building shots fired From the gallery. Part by a Democrat. David Gilbert, a weather underground member who was convicted of three counts of second degree murder and four counts of first degree robbery for his role in the crime. The resulting in the deaths of Nyack police Sergeant Edward O'Grady, an officer Waverly Brown, as well as a Brinks guard Peter Page. He was serving a sense of 75 years to life in prison. With no possibility of parole until 2056 Gilbert's son. Do you know who his son is? He's the district attorney. San Francisco. Boudin sound familiar? Boutin. Had lobbied Cuomo for his release. His announcement, Cuomo said Gilbert would be referred to the parole Board for potential release and praised his significant contributions to AIDS education as they always do. He contributed, said No. He murdered people He was involved in it.

David Gilbert Capitol Building Cuomo Jimmy Carter Brinks Bill Clinton Edward O'grady Waverly Brown Peter Page Barack Obama Nyack Boutin Boudin Parole Board For Potential Rel San Francisco Gilbert Aids
Reuters Confirms the Sham Investigating of January 6 Events

Mark Levin

01:59 min | 2 months ago

Reuters Confirms the Sham Investigating of January 6 Events

"And yet we have Democrats who are obsessed with pardoning. Killers. Jimmy Carter did it. Bill Clinton did it. Obama did it. Cuomo has done it. He marked his Final day in office Monday by handing out four sentence computations and one pardon. He also made a parole board referral for a 76 year old man. Over his role in the deadly 1981 Brinks armored car robbery. David Gilbert, a weather underground member. Now this is the thing I told you about the weather underground in the attack on the Capitol building and my brother. Crucial buildings. And they're pardoned by a Democrat. Another attack on the Capitol building shots fired From the gallery. Part by a Democrat. David Gilbert, a weather underground member who was convicted of three counts of second degree murder and four counts of first degree robbery for his role in the crime. The resulting in the deaths of Nyack police Sergeant Edward O'Grady, an officer Waverly Brown, as well as a Brinks guard Peter Page. He was serving a sense of 75 years to life in prison. With no possibility of parole until 2056 Gilbert's son. Do you know who his son is? He's the district attorney. San Francisco. Boudin sound familiar? Boutin. Had lobbied Cuomo for his release. His announcement, Cuomo said Gilbert would be referred to the parole Board for potential release and praised his significant contributions to AIDS education as they always do. He contributed, said No. He murdered people He was involved in it.

David Gilbert Capitol Building Cuomo Jimmy Carter Brinks Bill Clinton Edward O'grady Waverly Brown Peter Page Barack Obama Nyack Boutin Boudin Parole Board For Potential Rel San Francisco Gilbert Aids
"district attorney" Discussed on Scott H Silverman's Happy Hour

Scott H Silverman's Happy Hour

06:53 min | 2 months ago

"district attorney" Discussed on Scott H Silverman's Happy Hour

"Of their spirit sometimes it's ju- addiction and other things sometimes is due to abuse in the numbing using addiction. I saw that. I knew my life would be devoted to having less people have that especially girls in women having that hopeless helpless look. I wanted to help. So i did what people do which is figure out how i can help. Hard can use might mighty skills best and I decided that becoming a prosecutor using the the law as a sword and a shield to protect the most vulnerable was the bab from me. And while i got a lot of knows. Because i'm you can tell on the podcast. But i'm pretty small at the time this is you know more than thirty years ago most da's as prosecutors mail and they were you know bigger and they didn't. I didn't quite the bills. So i got a lot of rejections because people like to judge a book by its cover and i get going around dead. I became a research attorney. We applied finally. I got in and became a deputy district attorney one in nineteen ninety and little. Did i know the journey that it would take but i then in twenty eighteen. I rose through the ranks to become chief deputy. I got elected as the da. Which was the first time in. Sandy was history that someone just took that linear route all the way through the baby steps to become the da. But i still view the job the same way you know. Which is it's bigger. It has a lot of people that that are amazing. That i work with within my team in the community but i look at it as service as as bringing the smartest on methods to serb this because sometimes you can have a heart for service. But you're not doing things using the data you're using stereotypes. Reusing what you'd think works bringing the best methods to the job and so this is pretty big or bigger than twenty one states about eighteen cities in san diego a ton of unincorporated areas but the beauty of it is almost somewhere in san diego is gonna look like the rest of the nation or the rest of the world. We've got so many international on an just feels amazing to be of service to be the people's prosecutors to the da is charged is kind of the primary people's prosecutor anytime a felony is committed in san diego county. The da's office is involved is engaged. So that's kind of where we are but we. We did bring a different lens to it. When i became the da. I thought that on just prosecuting wasn't mike off. I thought were really making communities safer. We needed prosecution at the Fusion we needed prevention And thus my work with you and we needed protection of people that are monitorable and we needed to partner with the community. Sort of four p.'s. Approach that has really been showing good numbers or us. That's great so so talk a little bit more. About how. How your role of the da doolittle deeper dive for us and how you work with the other higher level criminal justice ranking system like the attorney general and the us attorney. 'cause a lotta people again i think they kinda co mingled things and think to your point. You're on the ground and you're in you're talking to the people and there's court systems that go on then most people don't even really realize the scope of the work but i don't think one of the things i know being a native here in the work i've done. Is this community worked together. So well all the community you know the community down Groups and criminal justice side. And you know with the da and the cross border issues and you are needed by the way uh summer. It's okay. that's a really good question. I think the key word here that you used his were on the ground so your everyday pain. That happens to people in harm you know. Ah people are getting sexually assaulted or robbed or beaten or engaged in drug trafficking or suffering from an overdose that was as a result of. Somebody's selling them bendon. All most of the time. That's the case that we take that torney. General is removed a little bit from the round. Lago show if we have a case where we have a conflict. And that's very rare. You know where the let's say one of our own use becomes a victim of a crime that might go to the agenda jowls office. We might work on things together like recently. We worked on a large fraud scheme. That targeted our veterans where they were selling them insurance. They didn't need and you know taking their their money. And it was refrigerant means while we had this fraud happening in our county. It was also happening. Statewide so cooperated with the attorney. General made sense so that we can help. Every all our veterans across the state the us attorney has jurisdiction sometimes that crosses with our jurisdiction but for the most part their crimes in bulk federal law. They involve Crimes across state lines or they cross international lines so it's not your everyday grind of Of what is happening. When you know a someone's burglarized a child is molested. A human trafficking issue happens while we cooperate together with the us attorney again like the attorney general of the collaboration in the leverage that we have in san diego which is to work together in task forces to.

san diego da Sandy san diego county bendon torney mike Lago us
"district attorney" Discussed on Scott H Silverman's Happy Hour

Scott H Silverman's Happy Hour

07:36 min | 2 months ago

"district attorney" Discussed on Scott H Silverman's Happy Hour

"Sermons happy hour. I'm michael glenn. More scots goes scott. How you doing today is a pretty hot there in san diego. It is michael. It's hot everywhere. I think on the west coast and whatever is an overwhelmingly muggy and overheated. It's you know we've got so many fires unfortunately going on my heart goes out to so many communities and families that are suffering from this right now and so it. Yeah it's hot. And it's just the beginning of august and our fire seasons come up in front of us so but you know all good families healthy and the kids still take my calls And i take so. I feel i feel blessed. I feel blessed. How about you michael. How's your week going pretty good at the same here. It's pretty hot. So we're i'm in louisiana when it's hot. It's usually hot and sticky so because of the humidity and so so bad but supposed to get rain tonight. So maybe that'll help. Cool things down a little bit good. Glad to see them all right well. Welcome to scott his settlements. Happy hour again. My phone number is six one nine nine nine. Three two seven three eight. I want you to call or text me if something's going on wherever you are in this country no matter. What time of day is i do. Put my phone up at night. And it's in a different room for my own personal ability to get some sleep please. Don't hesitate to call. Please don't hesitate detects. There's always hope there's always help out there and the way things are going today trying to do life alone in my opinion is really hard so i don't try. There's no reason to. And if i can't help you find someone who can will navigate together so today is You know i. I don't even know how to say. We've probably got one of the most famous people we've ever had on the podcast and i save famous. Not only because she's somebody that everybody knows and respects but has a heart of gold. Every time i hear our district attorney talk to people interview with the media get quoted. You can feel her heart and everything she does. And i don't know if that's appropriate to say or not but it doesn't matter this is my show and i'm saying it and she is so well respected and she is such a kind and so approachable. It's so funny. When i get a text from the da. I get so excited. My day is just made so summer. You keep those up even if it's the tell me to shut up stop what i'm doing. It's so nice to hear from you. Anytime because i know i understand. You're down to about one hundred and twenty hour work week and so funny i got. I got questions from your staff questions of you and poor. Patty feels like you know the the. Da's been so busy this week. And i can't imagine what your schedule looks like. And you know rumors are. You haven't slept in three years and i'm hoping this summer you're gonna get a chance to read a couple of things and i know you probably get tired of hearing but i think it's important for our viewers on listeners. Who may not know who you are. And san. diego is america's eighth largest city. We have a little over three point. Three million people and summer stephens job as a district attorney in our community is significant robust overwhelming. I'm sure at times and something that not many people can do and she does a great wonderful job at it. So i'm going to read this. Because i can district attorney summer. Stephan is devoted her life to protecting children and families providing justice to the most vulnerable as a national leader in the fight against human trafficking sexual exploitation summers folk focused on advancing public safety through a fair and equal justice bringing solutions to complex issues with unique data driven commonsense approach that works to address the root causes of certain crimes driven by mental illness and addiction. As district attorney she leads second largest. Da's office in california managing a professional staff of one thousand employees serving as the people's prosecutor for sending county and there's more than three million residents. Summer leverage are extensive courtroom management leadership experience to get clear public safety priorities in collaboration with law enforcement and the community keeping the Keeping santio county where the safest urban regions united states rose to the ranks to become elected district attorney as trial prosecutor. She tried more than one hundred jury. Trials including cases of complex homicides sexually violent predators child-molestation sexual assaults school shootings human trafficking related cases she chief. Da's north county branch chief of the sex crimes human trafficking division a special victims unit. She pioneered in june of two thousand eighteen. The county voters overwhelmingly elected summer as district attorney. I don't even know how you can't sleep at night with the kind of work that you do. that's amazing. There's a couple of paragraphs here. But i i'm not gonna read them not because i don't want to have people experience it because it'll be with your segment when we get recorded but i wanna take time i want to delve into who you are and i also So question number one. Who is summer stephan. And then the second part of that question is our next question is going to be. Tell us about the da. And what a what people here da. They probably don't know the difference between ag and us attorney. And you know lieutenant this and you know captain that so tell us who summer stephan is a little bit about who you are personally You know about your family and anything else you wanna share with us. Because i'm sure you don't get a chance to normally do that in those four minute interviews on the networks where you know they want to get you in trouble somehow so they can find a way to spin it so we don't want to spend it today. We want you to spin it so tell us about summer stephan by the way. Welcome to the happy hour. You look great. You look relaxed almost like you've got a good night's sleep so i'll make that assumption all your summer while scott. It's great to be with you as it is great to be with you. Michael and One of the reasons that i really wanted to say yes in and we worked on fitting the sand is because of your heart you know for service and for helping anywhere everywhere to whoever needs it so when i see people like that in our community that's like a treasurer that you wanna make sure that you support and that You say yes when when people like that like you ask so you know. I know people kind of laugh when i stayed. This is miami. Know i look really good on paper. You just read some of the Poll but you know. I'm i'm a regular person who Somehow at twelve years old. That was an avid reader. And i was reading the national geographic. I know that's really weird for a twelve year old. But i did love. Just the words of the national geographic. I love the images. They take some of the best. Photographs capture lean everything that is important in the world and they had this image of some girls in sioux cadre north africa. That had this look in their eyes. They looked about my age. And while i had all this hope and love in my life on great parents in all of that. They looked pretty hopeless. There was this. This look sadly you. My work is district. Attorney and deputy district attorney. I've come to recognize. That's when the world comes along and it takes the light out of people's eyes out.

michael glenn scott michael santio county west coast stephan sex crimes human trafficking d san diego louisiana Da Patty united states Stephan stephens north county diego san california ag Michael
Caller Says His Hope Comes From His Wife Running for Local Office

Mark Levin

01:23 min | 2 months ago

Caller Says His Hope Comes From His Wife Running for Local Office

"To Mark Mark Phillips calling from Manassas City. Virginia. Mark Alright, Mark White. It is running for the city of monastic Treasuries position. And she is willing to give up her career to make whatever small teams we can in the small city that we live in. Because, as you know, Northern Virginia is just getting bluer by the day, so What gives me hope is my wife and my two boys, ages four and two. That you know, we're I don't know what tomorrow is going to bring in the schools and the CRT and everything is being shoved down our throats to feel like they're just using our kids against us, but from my wife wanted to make Such a drastic change. It really gives me hope that that is phenomenal. Would be better today. Mark that's incredible. And by the way, this is what our founders money. You know, I'm I say it all the time. What happens in your house is more important than what happens in the White House. We have to stop buying in to the mainstream media. The corporate propagandist in the media who continue we get stuck in this trap and continue telling us that The nation Lizard dies by who sits in the White House every four years? Well, we've been focusing so much on who wins every presidential election every four years. We've ignored our school boards. We've ignored our city, Treasurer County treasurer. Our our Our state's attorneys are district attorneys.

Mark Mark Phillips Manassas City Mark Alright Mark White Northern Virginia Virginia White House Mark Treasurer County
NY Lawmakers to Meet This Week to Decide Impeachment of Governor Cuomo

WBZ Afternoon News

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

NY Lawmakers to Meet This Week to Decide Impeachment of Governor Cuomo

"New York lawmakers are due to meet tomorrow and consider next steps in the possible impeachment of governor Cuomo. Meanwhile, Cuomo could face criminal charges in Albany County. The Albany County sheriff's Office says they've met with one of governor Cuomo's accusers, and they could soon be consulting with the district attorney over the possibility of criminal charges. I have a young lady that came in was alleging that she was victimized, and we're gonna do everything in our powers. Help. Sheriff Craig Apple says his investigators met with the woman identified as executive assistant number one, She's among the 11 women found by an independent investigation to have been sexually harassed by the governor. That was CBS News, Michael George, the aide says Cuomo reached under her shirt and groped her when they were alone in a room at the executive mansion last

Governor Cuomo Albany County Sheriff's Office Cuomo Albany County Sheriff Craig Apple New York Michael George Cbs News
Aide Who Accused Cuomo of Groping Speaks Out

Barnett Financial Hour w/ Rick Barnett

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Aide Who Accused Cuomo of Groping Speaks Out

"New York governor Andrew Cuomo could face misdemeanor charges if investigators substantiate a criminal complaint, accusing him of sexually assaulting an aide, Sheriff Craig Apple says he spoke for an hour with executive assistant number one identified in the state attorney general's report who says Cuomo groped her breasts and he plans to investigate further at that point, depending on the facts and the circumstances. We'll sit down with the district attorney and make a decision to move forward with a criminal charge. As for that possible criminal charge against the governor, it would probably be a misdemeanor, possibly a couple. He's promising a comprehensive investigation. We're not going to rush this because of who he is. We're not going to delay it because who he is promo denies groping the woman he's facing calls to step down and the possibility of

Sheriff Craig Apple Andrew Cuomo Cuomo New York
Albany Sheriff to Discuss Groping Complaint Against Cuomo

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

Albany Sheriff to Discuss Groping Complaint Against Cuomo

"New York governor Andrew Cuomo could face misdemeanor charges if investigators substantiate a criminal complaint accusing him of groping in aid according to the Albany County sheriff Craig apple says he spoke for an hour with executive assistant number one identified in the state attorney general's report who says Cuomo groped her breast and he plans to investigate further at that point depending on the facts and circumstances will sit down with the district attorney to make a decision to move forward with a criminal charge as for that possible criminal charge against the governor it would probably be a misdemeanor possibly a couple is promising a comprehensive investigation we're not gonna rush this because of who he is we're not going to delay it because who is former denies groping the woman he is facing calls to step down and the possibility of impeachment I'm Julie Walker

Craig Apple Andrew Cuomo Albany County Cuomo New York Julie Walker
Aide who says Cuomo groped her files criminal complaint

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

Aide who says Cuomo groped her files criminal complaint

"I might cross your reporting a criminal complaint is filed against the New York governor Andrew Cuomo a criminal complaint has been filed against the New York governor Andrew Cuomo in the first known instance of a woman making an official report with a law enforcement agency over alleged misconduct by Cuomo an aide who accuses Cuomo of groping her breast at the governor's state residents last November filed a complaint Thursday with the Albany County sheriff's office hours after the complaint was announced attorney Rita Glavine who represents Cuomo told reporters the governor has repeatedly denied that ever took place the Albany County sheriff told the New York Post global could be arrested if investigators or the county district attorney determined he committed a crime hi Mike Rossi up

Andrew Cuomo Cuomo New York Albany County Sheriff's Office Rita Glavine The New York Post Albany County Mike Rossi
Majority of New York State Assembly Support Beginning Process to Impeach Cuomo

First Morning News

01:21 min | 2 months ago

Majority of New York State Assembly Support Beginning Process to Impeach Cuomo

"Andrew Cuomo does not resign, State Assembly members are moving to impeach him. Assembly Speaker Carl Hasty says Cuomo can no longer remain in office following the state attorney general report accusing him of sexual harassment. They go across New York four separate district attorneys now launching criminal probes into governor Andrew Cuomo after a scathing state investigation found he's sexually harassed 11 women and turned his office into a cauldron of fear and abuse. Not a single prominent New York Democrat, is defending the embattled governor. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi agrees. So does President Biden. Cuomo himself has not been seen or heard from since releasing a recorded statement more than 24 hours ago, and as correspondent aerial Reshef Mayor de Blasio again calling on the governor to resign. Here's more on that from W won't want to. Scott Brancaccio says Cuomo needs to end the agony that he's putting New York State through and end the pain of the women. He hurt. The mayor not impressed with Cuomo's explanation, following the attorney general's report, accusing the governor of sexually harassing women stop with this attempt to say culturally, Somehow he's allowed to do what he did. No, it's not acceptable. He needs to resign. Let's get this over with because the entire state has spoken now the mayor notes. He thinks he will work well with Lieutenant governor Kathy Huckle, who would take over Should Cuomo step down or be impeached. I'm

Cuomo Assembly Speaker Carl Hasty Governor Andrew Cuomo House Speaker Nancy Pelosi President Biden Andrew Cuomo State Assembly New York Reshef Mayor De Blasio Scott Brancaccio Lieutenant Governor Kathy Huck
"district attorney" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

05:06 min | 3 months ago

"district attorney" Discussed on Houston Matters

"Were just quote keeping up with the times and weren't the only team doing things like that. Yeah that's that is. It's probably accurate. I mean this is. I think we all know that that's true. But you don't want to say that i mean that's like that's really not something you want to say because that's not anything anyone wants to hear. Nobody wants to hear you say will everyone was doing. That's that's something that when you if you're a child and you say that your parents your parents will say something like well if everyone is jumping off a bridge or you're going to jump off a bridge too. It's just not good logic to us a situation where fans know that you cheated. It doesn't matter if anybody else cheated. You got cost well despite maybe nobody waiting to hear that. We're gonna talk more about it and about cheating in sports town square. Today at three o'clock. I'm sitting in ernie I guess we'll be bob costas and the athletic seven drellich Who broke the science dealing scandal in two thousand seventeen. that's today The stroz are home against cleveland and texas this week. What intrigues me. Most about those matchups. Well cleveland's a pretty decent ball club. The astros swept them over the july fourth holiday and then of course the astros and the rangers have had an odd. You know series matchups this year. Of course it's going to be a feisty matchup between those two then they have the mariners come in after that. But i think all of these series are really just building towards the two series. They have on the road following those which is the giants and dodgers. Those two are really looming large to the astros going on the road in national league parks. Where pitchers are going to have to hit and they're playing against to the better teams in baseball. So we'll have this. This is i think all leading up to that. And i'm sure. La fans will be a delight to play though. I no doubt boy The summer olympics opening ceremonies in tokyo are this friday. What are you most looking forward to during the games. So you know. It's it's a good question. I i've been thinking about this quite a bit. And i really i want. There are so many athletes that i wanna watch. But they're five female athletes. That i'm really keeping my eyes on the i is is another simone and that is simone manual from here in sugarland arguably the fastest swimmer in the world One two goals in two thousand sixteen there's Christie meals and jane campbell both dash players who are playing for the us women's soccer team campbell and alternate They're actually six dash players in the olympics To them on the us women's soccer team and of course us women's soccer team is considered the favourite this year as they have been for a while. There's huge ing wang who is a houston table tennis player..

astros drellich cleveland bob costas national league parks ernie mariners rangers dodgers texas giants simone olympics baseball jane campbell tokyo La sugarland soccer
"district attorney" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

05:32 min | 3 months ago

"district attorney" Discussed on Houston Matters

"Wait for trial bennett. Contributing factor to the increased violence in our urban areas. So the spiking murder rate and robbery rate is not a mystery. It's because our court system is backlogged and there's too many dangerous people on bail fugitives from justice out on the street. Well i guess the the reason i bring it up that case as an example of something that relates to bail is that some really questioned the hundred thousand dollar bond. that rogers had to post Did that seem excessive to you. Of course in montgomery county. We see a very conservative bashing their and their government and in their prosecutorial philosophy and it couldn't be different from harris county. And it's this patchwork of inconsistency that throws texans off when it comes to their criminal justice system and that's why asking the legislature for a solution to this bail. Problem is really the right way to go now whether these bills are the right bills. It's hard to say. And i support The democratic opposition to voter suppression Which is what they feel. These bills are. I'm not in that section of government. I'm responsible in part for public safety in harris county. And let me tell you. That's enough of a job for me. So what they do in montgomery county on always agree with and the legislature can fix it whether they will or not out of my control. But i can tell you. The district attorney's office is working to curb this backlog working day and night. We have a plan. And we're going to solve. We're gonna get these violent criminals to trial. We're seeing twenty minute verdicts crash. People are angry and they wanna do their job by showing up for jury service. Thank goodness so houstonians. Keep you doing your job and we'll keep doing hours. Let's take a call. We have eric on the line from clear lake eric. What's your question or comment. hi Thank you for coming on and and explaining things for the public I'm a criminal defense attorney. And i wanted to address the issue of Discovery in from case information being made available to defense attorneys. I think you're probably right. There are some defense attorneys who may not be up to speed with technology. But i've even recently had the experience of you know pretty simple assault case with one responding officer being given a link for over a gigabyte of Video information that. I simply can't download so i have to Go to the. Da's office to get that information. Also with respect to some defense attorneys having show up courtney things the old fashioned way a lotta times that seems to be up to the courts how they want us to appear Some course they're having appear in person now some are still on zoom so in many instances. The defense bar is at the mercy of the different court. Policies i i. I would agree with you and i wanna thank you for calling. I think the defense bar and the professionalism that you all show and bring to this problem is a really important perspective. And i can tell you we included. We're very concerned about how we get you the discovery that we must get you for you to do your job so we're not perfect. We're trying to work with all the police agencies to try and get this technology to match. And i would say that insistence by us as a bar for these judges to get on the same page with regard to zoom and just The live web feed and then the hybrid system where they have us coming in..

harris county montgomery county legislature bennett rogers eric courtney Da
"district attorney" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

04:17 min | 3 months ago

"district attorney" Discussed on Houston Matters

"You mentioned the idea of prioritizing violent crimes and pursuing those prosecutions that also means when we're talking about a backlog of so many cases that there are some much lower level crimes that may be prosecuted yet That have been part of this backlog already for a very long time and i assume could be for much longer still. Are you concerned that some folks whose whose lives are thrown into disarray over some comparatively smaller offenses might see this as the. I'm getting my dan court and i've never this is going to hang over my head for years. Let me say that any defendant. Who wants their day in court. We welcome them. We're more concerned about defendants. Not showing up for court not having to really consider a plea offer until they're forced to trial so of course we're always concerned about collateral consequences for the accused but my greater concern our for the victims of violent crime whose cases are very important to get to trial and many times who's offenders are out on bail on the street so that gives them an opportunity to commit more crimes. We're seeing that multiple Defendants on multiple bonds. This is bad for public safety and it just makes sense that if somebody robs people repeatedly you cannot continue to release them in yet. That's what we're seeing in our bail system. That's what i've been opposing. I've supported the release of nonviolent low level offenders from the beginning and there's not a soul in our jailed who's a kid in there for a joint or even some low level amount of drugs who doesn't have an accompanying violent offense or very violent background. Our jails full of more than fifty five hundred violent offenders awaiting trial so we support our jurists in asking for more jury space. We support The courts of the commissioner's court idea of a funding. Additional associate judges. So long as it's done properly it can't be done without more prosecutors. I've been saying that for the last four years. And i'm gonna keep saying it. Because the people of harris county understand when they've been a victim of crime they want their case worked on and when are prosecutors have thousands of cases and the defense public defender is limited to one hundred fifty cases. There's just too big a disparity for victims and they deserve better and we want to give them more. You mentioned bail and and bail. Reform of course is a topic of much discussion in the state level though with house. Democrats breaking quorum in vowing to stay away for the entire special sessions. Unlikely that anything will move on it But one case not yours That has brought bail reform back into to focus. Is this prosecution by the texas attorney. General of hervas rogers. A man who Was registered to vote stood in line for hours to vote only learn after the fact that he should have been ineligible to even be registered. He was still completing parole after prison. Time served many years ago ag. Ken paxton decided to prosecute him in county even though the celtic took place in harris county. Your county Do you have any opinion on that do you. Do you think it makes sense to for this to be prosecuted there. Well i'm not. It makes sense to be prosecuted period. Because i haven't seen the evidence. So i'm not in position to comment but i can tell you. It has nothing to do with bail reform. Bail reform is really a misnomer. What people don't want our poor people stuck in jail for low level offenses. They can't afford and that ended for years ago in our administration in harris county. There's not a person in jail like that but what happened. Is that all of the judges including the district. Felony judges began giving people repeated. Bail here in harris county and in other large urban areas in the country and this is in part along with the delay in the..

harris county hervas rogers Ken paxton texas
"district attorney" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

05:41 min | 3 months ago

"district attorney" Discussed on Houston Matters

"Reflection on all of us as a society for not coming together And and getting this pandemic done with once-and-for-all Be had great success over the last few months getting a couple of accidents that not nearly enough and now are this situation where very few people are getting back to needed for a lot of At it again. It's just a shame and failure For for us as a society not to be able to come together And get this pandemic over with our all of the cases that you're seeing right now people who were not vaccinated. Yeah greg question so ninety nine percent when you look at across the texas medical center hospitals. I'm going to get to herself. Ninety nine percent of the people who are being hospitalized or those who have not been vaccinated in order to look more closely at our situation about two and a half three weeks ago. I looked at all of our covert nineteen fatalities since january one of this year. Just at harris health system That number was hundred. Nineteen unfortunately the hundred nineteen quoted related deaths in my hospital system not a single person but vaccinate fully vaccinated so one hundred percent of the people who had died you to quote nineteen Infection unfortunately were those who are not vaccinated and if that is not reason enough to get vaccinated. I honestly don't know what is well. Do you think they're the vaccines have been readily available now for some time to anyone over twelve years and over. Do you think there's any eligible houston left to hasn't gotten a vaccine. Who could still be convinced to do. So oh absolutely. I mean when you look at the numbers across the harris county the b. Are i think they're less than fifty percent of all eligible adults getting vaccinated now. Those percentages are much higher among early but money. Talk you about all eligible adults twelve years and older not just necessarily adults all eligible people who can get vaccinated across the harris across the harris county..

texas medical center greg harris harris county houston
"district attorney" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

04:41 min | 3 months ago

"district attorney" Discussed on Houston Matters

"The kovin positivity rate across texas climbed back over ten percent this weekend. It's the highest. It's been since february and horizon cases across greater houston's being felt at the areas public hospitals. I'm craig cohen today on houston matters. The head of the harris health system shares. What he's seeing intensive care. also this hour. The pandemics led to a backlog of cases and earth's county courts. We asked district attorney. Kim agua her office plans to do about it for. Welcome your questions for well. We'll also welcome your dog and cat care questions for veterinarian. Dr lori teller. We'll talk with her about a recent rise in cases of ratings and what to do about thunderstorms and pet anxiety. Plus the astros first series after the all star break didn't quite go to plan. Well accept whatever plans fans had led to another inflatable trash. kim. We'll discuss with jeff bauman. We'll start with the news update from npr news. Eighty eight seven. Stay with us. This.

craig cohen harris health system houston Kim agua Dr lori teller texas astros jeff bauman kim npr news
"district attorney" Discussed on Max & Murphy on Politics

Max & Murphy on Politics

05:34 min | 4 months ago

"district attorney" Discussed on Max & Murphy on Politics

"Have felt at the hands of district attorneys. And we can't we can't separate that out and another thing. I want to encourage us. To acknowledge is the difference between crime in harm because we know that there are a lot of things that are criminalize that aren't harmful in. There are a lot of things that are harmful that are not criminalizing. A lot of that has to do with what we look like how much money we have. What communities where a par on insulin we just say on this thing is a crime in. That's the will of the legislature you know. We know that it is the law. That slavery's abolished except punishment for a crime. And then after that several crimes were created in order to criminalise free. Black people like that. That is the history of of our criminal legal system in this country and it cannot be ignored and so we're not saying that there is no harm. We absolutely know that what we are calling for is for governments and and legal professionals to change the way we respond to the harm and look at root causes. The noticed. something. That district attorney's cannot do And it's something that they shouldn't do. There's no reason why district attorney should be gatekeepers for resources that community needs. We shouldn't have to go through district attorneys to get access to treatment to get access to to job services to get access to all of the things that should already be in communities. I'm in so yes. Do not prosecute lists are arm where and because it is a corrective to at this point. All the only thing that district china's can do for communities reduce heart in having these lists reduces the harms that community members bates again. I feel like the questions going to save a one about victims and again that even the dichotomy economy between victim and perpetrator ignores the fact that on any given nato that the same people say that could could. I jump in ben. Sorry i wasn this nisa victims say communities of color in my experience are not a monolith. I mean there are many many many people in low income communities and creators of color who come to the office. Come to the police and ask for lots of help. So this is not. I don't think it's a uniform position. And i'll also say that a lot of the crimes do not prosecute list had nothing to do with you know post jim. Crow trying to enslave people. You know commercial burglary which danica boo. She and dan court won't prosecute they just won't prosecute. I'm not sure why but you know. People are are burglarizing stores in midtown without physical injury with burglar's tools..

china danica nisa
"district attorney" Discussed on Max & Murphy on Politics

Max & Murphy on Politics

03:51 min | 4 months ago

"district attorney" Discussed on Max & Murphy on Politics

"Hello and welcome to a special discussion on race for manhattan district attorney. I'm ben max from gotham visit. Thanks so much for tuning in. I'm joined for this special discussion by three expert guests. They are rebecca. Roy who's a professor at new york law school and a former manhattan prosecutor. Thanks for being here. Rebecca daniel lonzo is a litigation partner at buckley. Lp a former federal prosecutor and served as chief assistant district attorney in manhattan during sivan's his first term. Dan thanks for being here extra. Hasn't been and kelly. Young is a lack christian lawyer community organizer in brooklyn native working towards black liberation. And she's the civil rights campaign coordinator at voices community. Activists and leaders known as vocal. New york in vocal york is part of the people's coalition from manhattan d. a. accountability. So thank you all for being here kelly. Thank you for having me. So this race from manhattan district attorney. The democratic primary is open to democratic voters in manhattan also known as new york county if you see that on your ballot. It's technically a state office. It's not part of the city government elections that are happening although it's happening at the same time so it has a little bit of different voting system as many should know ranked choice voting is at play in the primaries that relate to city government positions. But there's no ranked choice voting in manhattan district attorney election to pick your top choice yet. One vote when you go. Whoever gets the most votes wins even in this crowded race of eight candidates. Those eight candidates are gan court liza. Liz cotton diana florence tally for haiti and wine. Steel alvin brag. Lucie lang into honey bucci now. There is a discussion of the candidates and their stances that i hosted with a john bromwich order for the new york. Times and deanna. Paul order for the wall street journal at is also part of this special episode on the manhattan district attorney rates. So with this expert panel. We're not going to really dig in so much on the candidates and their platforms and what they're running on. Who they are as we are about broader issues of how manhattan district attorney office works. Why it's important Some of the calls for reform Some of the ways. The office deals with prime and many other issues. All right. so let's get into our discussion here rebecca. let's start with you. What's how do you see the role of manhattan district attorney. What is the job. And what do you make of service. Some of the calls around Changes to the office. How it should function what it should look like. So i think the manhattan district attorney's office is incredibly important. Office it Whoever inherits his role is going to affect the future of the city and because the city is the center of so much in the country It also has significance in that regard to Also think it's really important to think about the history of the office and this is an office that has had the history of Professionalism and i think excellence to sort of put it briefly and we are in the midst of an ongoing conversation about what those two things mean in the context of prosecution. And i think that's a really important conversation to be had what i think. Though is that to dismiss the entire office in the central mission of the office as a part of you know the on state violence or perpetuation of jim. Crow is mistaken and misguided so there is a way to think about this in an ongoing conversation..

Roy kelly Rebecca daniel lonzo New york rebecca brooklyn Dan eight candidates Paul gotham ben max john bromwich three expert guests deanna two things first term One vote new york county Lucie lang christian
"district attorney" Discussed on Wrongful Conviction Podcasts

Wrongful Conviction Podcasts

06:58 min | 4 months ago

"district attorney" Discussed on Wrongful Conviction Podcasts

"Pillars are campaign platform. One of them was reducing reliance on incarceration ending mass incarceration focusing instead on root causes of crime to build safety second expanding victim services recognizing that resources need to get shifted from punishment to healing and third equal enforcement of the law that means not only using the power of the prosecutor to go after poor black and brown. Young men are also police accountability also civil enforcement against companies that steal from their employees or dump toxic waste in ways that all of us at risk in the first year. Here's what we have witnessed chase and his team accomplish firing of seven prosecutors a total restructuring of the office. The end of status enhancements three strikes or gang membership which has been a huge problem in california no longer seeking charges for contraband. Bound during pretextual stops supporting Victims of domestic violence during stay at home. Orders launched the economic crimes against workers unit diversion programs for primary caregiver. Parents charged with misdemeanors or non violent felonies. Replace cash bail with the risk based system called on california state bar to prohibit prosecutors from accepting police union campaign contributions Yeah pass a resolution to prohibit the rehiring of problematic officers in other jurisdictions a problem. That is a national problem and no charges wherein the sole evidence is the word of a problematic officer until approved by the da protecting immigrants from deportation creating a wrongful convictions unit. We don't have time to talk about all the things you're doing but it is important to note that you reduced the jail population in san francisco by around fifty percent in the first six months. I'm sure i hear a few people might like. Oh no that's gonna make stanford cisco so dangerous. of course there's always going to be climbed. But the fact is the jason crimewave never seems to materialize. In fact the opposite has happened in my right. That's right now. In that process. I put together a team of folks in my office. We worked with public defenders in the jail medical staff and probation and the sheriff's department and we went through on a daily basis. Everybody in the jail and we tried to identify people that maybe didn't have to be incarcerated and we some amazing thing. We've found some people who honestly never should have been in jail in the first place. Give you one example. We found a woman serving a jail sentence for misdemeanor conviction. It was her first ever criminal conviction and it was related to her use of dangerous drugs as is the case with about seventy five percent of people booked into our county jail drug addiction mental illness or both will. This young woman was pregnant and it was a high risk pregnancy. Now there is no reason in a decent caring humane society that cares about public safety that someone with a high risk pregnancy and no criminal. History should be serving jail time on a misdemeanor conviction reason whatsoever. In fact we sort of showed that in san francisco. It's possible to safely karsh rate that actually short periods of incarceration lead to more crime. Not less and so by reducing our reliance on incarceration. We've actually seen the crime. Rates fall overall crime. Since i took office is down by about twenty percent and certain categories of crime that are particularly important crimes like robbery. That are violent. Crime that is one of the highest frequency crimes in san francisco. That's down by about twenty percent assaults down by about fifteen percent rape down by about fifty percent theft and car break ins. Were down by about forty percent in two thousand twenty compared to the year before i took office now obviously a lot of that has to do with the pandemic and we're seeing major shifts in how we live our lives and people working from home but all the folks who said if you release people it will lead to an increase in crime. Actually we saw the opposite and it's a really important lesson as we think about what safety looks like and how we build healthier communities. What do you say to people. It's a big argument on the right. Right there's staff this low level theft taking place. Somebody walks into a store and just walked out with coat. Because they knew they weren't going to get prosecuted and like you know my thing is if somebody needs a coat that badly. Let's look at why they needed that coat. But okay. that's a separate story. What do you say about that. Well look you know. Keeping san francisco safe allowing our businesses to thrive allowing tourists to come enjoy our city. All of that is a critical part of my job and in my office takes it really seriously. But the fact of the matter is thefts are down by more than forty percent in twenty twenty down by another twenty percent so far twenty twenty one so yes we have ongoing problems with property crime in san francisco. That's not a new problem. that doesn't exist. Only because of my policies in the year when san francisco had the most auto burglaries wasn't twenty seventeen. And they've been steadily falling since then so first of all it's a bit of fearmongering exploitation sensationalization of crime to attack reform policies to undermine racial justice. Second of all. We know that we can never lock our way. Up out of problems like auto burglaries. Let me tell you. Why police in san francisco which is not a criticism of police. I wanna be clear. This is true in many other jurisdictions. These numbers are not unusual. Police in san francisco only make arrests in about three percent of thefts whether shoplifting or auto burglaries three percent that means ninety seven percent of the time that a faster car breaking occurs. It gets reported to police. Nobody's even being arrested. If we focus narrowly on really draconian harsh punishment for the three percent of people that are actually getting arrested. It's not going to change anything. It's simply going to move us backwards in time. To an era of mass incarceration that starves our law enforcement budget our public health budgets in our public education budgets of the resources. They need to prevent future crime in the long run. We need to focus on root causes of crime. As you said. Why is it that somebody needs that coat in the first place. Now we're not going to be able to solve all those problems from within the district attorney's office but we need to focus our resources on the crimes that have the most serious consequences for victims and the highest stakes for the people. We accused murder armed. Robbery weapons offenses. That's my priority violent crimes in when it comes to lower level offenses look cute crimes from shoplifting. All the way up to murder. Since i took office we filed over six thousand new criminal cases. We are prosecuting cases when police bring them to us. But we're not focusing on incarceration as a metric of success instead if someone gets arrested for shoplifting and they're on housed or have a substance dependence. That's leading to their arrests. We connect them with services housing drug treatment mental health care we have a wide array of diversion programs that help people engage with services.

san francisco ninety seven percent three percent twenty percent two thousand twenty twenty california first twenty seventeen about fifteen percent one example first year both about seventy five percent seven prosecutors first six months around fifty percent about fifty percent about twenty percent one
"district attorney" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

03:11 min | 5 months ago

"district attorney" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Outlets for being biased in favor of israel while the other side calls out media criticism of israel's actions since human rights abuses by governments elsewhere in the world go virtually ignored in the american discourse with me now to discuss how media coverage and social media takes on this conflict are being perceived particularly in american. Jewish communities is under sargon. Deputy opinion editor for newsweek and co host of newsweek's podcast. The debate nice to talk to you again by you. Gosh matt thank you so much for having me. It's our pleasure. Also with us. Is peter beinart editor at large for jewish currents and author of the beinart notebook on. Welcome back to the show. Peter thanks peter. Have you noticed. Any differences in how the current violence in israel and palestine is being reported and analyzed by the media here compared to previous instances of this violence. Yes i think that they're more palestinian voices that are present in in the kind of mainstream media than i remember. Let's say back in two thousand fourteen or in two thousand two thousand nine with were previous wars between israel and gaza. And i think that's part of a growing recognition in general in the us media about issues of representation. And so i think people have become more self conscious about the fact that palestinians have historically not been very well represented in this mainstream media discussion and then of course on social media. I think you have Even more representation of palestinian voices. And so i think together that does mark a significant shift. I it seems like this is the first major flare up in hostilities. Since the advent of social media being so universal on our lives right. Peter that that must be factoring into all of this. Yeah i suppose. Social media was was around but obviously it's prominence has grown and. I don't think you can divorce the kind of technological changes from the the fact that we have been really in recent years in a moment of real kind of surge of progressive activism across a whole range of issues in a way that was really not the case. Let's say during the obama years and although most of that activism is not around israel-palestine does have implications. I think for the way that people see israel palestine and for the because it it it it. There's a general kind of i would say kind of worldview perspective that does has implications for how people operate on this issue. Let's talk about this. Surge of this progressive worldview when it comes to this particular issue you recently wrote a piece entitled when woke kness comes for israel which criticizes several outlets for their coverage. What are your main issues with the way this has been handled. Yeah so it's funny. I'm not gonna disagree with peter. I actually agree that there was over. The course of the trump administration. What a lot of sociologists have called a great awoke owning And this didn't happen Among communities of colored happening among white liberals and and so. I do disagree with peter. That what we're seeing more palestinian voices. What we're seeing is actually. The mainstreaming of a woke worldview among our white liberals..

Peter peter beinart peter first two thousand Jewish palestine trump palestinian jewish obama israel kness two thousand nine matt newsweek american beinart fourteen palestinians
"district attorney" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

05:10 min | 5 months ago

"district attorney" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Pennsylvania is that Judges are Not only allowed but are more or less required to use cash bail system That is not what we want. I want cash bail eliminated but the true solution here is the pennsylvania legislature has to do what they did in washington dc thirty years ago. What they've done more recently in jersey and in kentucky and most recently illinois which the legislature has say Yo judges you can't use money. You either hold him because they are so dangerous. They need to be held before trial or you let him go where they have done that. For example in dc over thirty years about eighty eight percent of people get out and they don't have to pay any money to get out about twelve percent of people are held because they present such danger. Part of what is happening. Is that There are some on the left to believe. No one should be held pretrial ever Not someone who you know against whom you have very strong evidence of a spinal shooting that has paralyzed somebody not someone who's charged with homicide I don't agree with that. You know our position is that on the most serious crimes where people present a very serious danger to the community. They should be held before trial. And then what happens at trial happens and and we go from there so we accept criticism from people who believe that no one should be held. Pretrial we don't believe that that's the law and there's not one state in the united states that has embraced that notion we accept that and we and we respected as some ideal that you know perhaps someday will be possible under different circumstances but it's not possible now and so we do seek very high bail because it's the only tool we have for people who are charged with truly serious offenses and have a record that suggests appropriate such as paralysis shooting such as a first degree. Felony rape things of that sort. I've been watching this. Excellent docu series on pbs. About your first term philly. Da and documentary basically cleaned house at the prosecutor's office. Getting rid of all the attorneys didn't have your vision for reform including by the way you got a guy who just beat in the election on tuesday and so in the documentary one prosecutors shortly before she's demoted says quote. You don't have to destroy the system to get the results you want. And that's her criticism of you but do you have to destroy the system to get the results you want. You know it's to me. It's interesting to hear that. And no the woman to whom you are referring. She is someone who i like and respect in many ways. But here's i think what they're missing. Is that what happened in the last thirty to forty years. Was there destroying the system. If we look historically at levels of incarceration in the united states for decade after decade before around richard nixon becoming president which you see a steady and much much lower level of incarceration in the united states. That worked just fine. That's what we see. This whole thing. With which comes out of a coded racist conversation that richard nixon was having for his own political benefit..

richard nixon thirty years ago kentucky tuesday illinois united states dc decade after decade before about twelve percent last thirty washington dc eighty eight percent jersey first term united Pennsylvania forty years first degree one state one
"district attorney" Discussed on #SUNDAYCIVICS

#SUNDAYCIVICS

13:20 min | 2 years ago

"district attorney" Discussed on #SUNDAYCIVICS

"Sunday civics. I'm jay williams hope. You are enjoying class three guess my june. I'm taking note. Are you learning things. Some things okay <hes> before we get to the big question about <hes> the relationship between district attorneys and law enforcement. I wonder how you know from your. We're perspective. You've been a voter. You still are voter. You've had to vote for district attorney before you're a lawyer as is laurie. How did you you make the decision on which candidate to vote for when you went into a booth and your name wasn't on there but there were other names for district attorney when i let me let me just start off by this i grew up in brooklyn number oakland through and through grew up in east new york <hes> and in growing up in east new york all i really understood was the police and and what was going on in the streets in terms of brooklyn in in the eighties and nineties <hes> there was a lot of a lot of crime there was a lot of <hes> you know there was a lot of drugs and <hes> <hes> there was a lot of tension between the community. I lived in in the police when i went to vote for a. DA had no idea what the DA did right you know but because of the way politics works you know most of the time that <hes> position goes on primary dry days only one person to vote for so i think i voted for the DA a number of times because it was one person for me to vote for and and maybe not having been triple prime vote event go to all the primary vote <hes> when i was a kid a young person and so when i went to the general there was one person to vote for voted for her on the democratic ticket. We did not know who are. DA DA wasn't alone that it took me working in the district attorney's office before i really actually understood what the was responsible for because we you think the DA's only responsible for prosecuting cases but the DA like we've been talking about has so much more <hes> authority and discretion in how how to handle cases yeah so. Let's talk about what something that you would tell people that. DA's handle that no one sorta even thinks about. I mean how we deal with kids. Who get arrested in schools doesn't take those cases. You don't have to accept them. They they get arrested. We choose to accept those cases into the system. We could say we're not taking those cases you know unless an extreme act violence <hes> this so much of how we handle cases like we've chosen brooklyn not to handle summonses. I don't want to deal with people who get ticketed for c. summonses. We're not going to deal deal with this and when you mean some incentives we mean jumping the turnstile. Whatever whatever you can get a ticket for whatever the c. Summits is those pink tickets are <hes> we're not going to prosecute those cases the allow you to go to court and deal with the judge but we are not going to use our resources to prosecute people. I don't believe the district attorney should be a debt collector elector for the city on fines right so they're going to handle that the city will handle it on but i'm not going to use the a resources to collect money from people who <hes> all money to the city because they've been given a ticket by the police yeah all right larry you've been before <hes> in <hes> courtroom with <hes> prosecutors and what did you. How did you evaluate <hes> who you were voting for for district attorney. When you walked in the booth breath for me. It was a pattern what the communities overall what the impact of that prosecutor's decision or district attorney's decision was as a pattern over laying the the community so if we're dealing with an attorney who is running for a candidate for district attorney. I want to know like what have been some of the cases that you've been involved in. What if you have made public public statements and many attorneys don't <hes> outside of representing their clients. What have those public statements been. What are they've been about. What was the substance. What types of cases do you tend to take. Do you tend to take a take a lot of felling matters. You tend to see only one particular slice of the law. Those are the things that i'm always interested in for me. I find that it can be more challenging in the district attorney races and in judiciary candidate racist because oftentimes we prize minimal communication about beliefs and minimal communication communication about where you stand on a whole host of things and so that can be more challenging so i'm always interested in what associations are the part of. What affiliations do they have. What professional affiliations are they a part of who i know within the community but this is a privilege point because i'm an attorney who was in the community who has <hes> opinions about them. How have they tended to show up for their clients in court and a lotta times that can be information that is harder to get if you're not a part of the legal community and yeah yeah and i know that a number of <hes> a legal institutions asociation yes they just rate whether a person is competent not sara lee all of the additional things so you really have to and this is why. I say it's important. If you see in your community there are candidate forms for particular issues. Go and be present. Watch it if they're doing it. On facebook live we just did a a judicial official candidate forum and we made sure that we did it on facebook live so that people who wouldn't come out of their house you know and do it could actually go back and watch it to understand understand the different positions and you know i've taken your unusual steps of being very public about a lot of my positions <hes> so that people can get to know who will why as a prosecutor in what motivates mean how i view the world but i think <hes> one hundred percent most of the time signed many laws that say days are not allowed to express opinions. I'm not allowed to attend political events unless i'm running <hes> and so often the person is unknown for me. I've always looked at whether or not the person <hes> is involved in their community and you know my predecessor ken thomson and you know he was involved in a lot of things that actually benefited people in brooklyn and particularly people who lived in you know in his neighborhood his church <hes> you know for myself yama regular person. I think people are surprised to see me walking with my three boys. The little league's basketball going shopping <hes> because i actually live in the community that i serve <hes> an i have enough money. I could've moved to a a safer neighborhood a better neighborhood but i live in the same neighborhood. I live within blocks of where i grew up and that that think that is important <hes> <hes> because it shows that i'm committed to making sure that all the things i stanford. DA everyone is entitled to live in a safe neighborhood and everyone is entitled to actually have the who cares about their block and their thing and not because they live so far flung place so far away from the people they serve yeah mostly. <hes> you know we talk about the criminal. Justice system is two point six million people in brooklyn but the people mostly impacted by the criminal the justice system living five priests yeah so lastly. I'm gonna talk about the role the district attorney the relationship that the district attorney attorney's his office has with law enforcement so going back to our law and order reference right the police who investigate crime and the district attorney who prosecuted right so there is this relationship that district attorneys have that you have to rely on <hes> law enforcement did <hes> the local police departments sore others to provide the information they bring the cases to you in the first place right <hes> and essentially create the facts that are given over and yeah right right and so there has been a lot of conversation nationwide about focusing more on the position of district attorney particularly as it pertains to police misconduct police as involved shootings <hes>. How is your office responding to that and then what an overall reform standpoint. Do you think we have to be focused on in that regard life but i think you wanna make sure that your district attorney is independent of your police department because you're. DA supposed to be a check and balance on police action and they're supposed to review <hes> the policing tactics that are used in in in the way that it plays out the post to evaluate the law and when not probable collision due process has been followed so the person needs to be independent <hes> many of the progressive prosecutors who've come up you know kim fox in chicago chicago or kim gardiner or maryland mozambican baltimore. They had tremendous pushback from the police because they're challenging the old way of doing business. <hes> i created this year. In january a standalone we never believe in that we never had it in brooklyn a standalone law enforcement accountability bureau whose whose job is to look at police brutality look at <hes> shooting and killing of people in the county and just looking at corruption <hes> in the police department today we just announced the indictment of an officer for perjuring themselves during the regular course of the business they said someone did something and when we got the videotape was not true <hes> and so you know laying a marker down like i did by putting in establishing bureau over very dedicated and very experienced prosecutors say we also look at law enforcement as the role of the district attorney <hes> in regular question business and you'll so that changes in the alter the relationship with the police department because now you're also riding oversight over them yeah yeah you mentioned a good yet one more thing oh no so you had mentioned <hes> a number of other prosecutors across country kim fox maryland moesby most most of whom were that you mentioned where women of color how do you think the push back that you're gonna be getting or that you have already experienced from policing might differ based on the fact that you are not a woman of color <hes> and may have structurally a different relationship to to their concept of power so i think that black women prosecutors <hes> get the the most pushback in what they're doing. I i look at them and i compare them to other people. You mentioned philadelphia right. The work was also not a woman of color right and the pushback he gets. It's different. It's not it's not obviously <hes> these women deal with. You know very racial <hes> i. I think we had white nationalist marching on kim fox's office in chicago but it it's racial. It's misogynist dodging this. <hes> people deal with black women prosecutors in ways <hes> and they get pushed back differently than i do. I get pushed back on my pushback is different aren't as you know as a puerto rican men of and often the women are ill deemed to not be you know as intelligent or as is this right and so we have to stand up for them because they are really leading the way some of the most progressive prosecutors persecutors out. There are women of color who are doing tremendous things you know. Rich rollins in in <hes> in boston is new. She's just on the job <hes> but now she's getting a lot of pushback right now so we just need to make sure that we're supporting these women who are doing incredible work <hes> district attorney eric gonzalez. L. is from brooklyn woo. Thank you very much for joining us for this important lesson the first installment of our who when we elect series talking about all of those positions further down the ballot that we want you to walk into the booth. We want you before you even get their goto forums. Hold a form yourself as a community. If you had a charge if you had a community group or if you just want.

brooklyn DA attorney prosecutor kim fox maryland jay williams chicago sara lee Rich rollins new york facebook ken thomson boston laurie eric gonzalez baltimore
"district attorney" Discussed on #SUNDAYCIVICS

#SUNDAYCIVICS

11:13 min | 2 years ago

"district attorney" Discussed on #SUNDAYCIVICS

"You're missing this or hey. This is what they're there that you think is there is not really there when prosecutors are misguided or approaching justice from a perspective that they're going to uphold an oppressive system supposedly fighting for truth and justice. Where do you sit on how communities should respond to that. And where do you sit on the idea of removing or limiting some of the immunity that prosecutors currently enjoy so you know here's here's the thing first of all you have to convince prosecutors. Thousands and thousands of prosecutors across this country new york state actually has sixty two. We have five days in brooklyn plus a special. I'm sorry five days in new york. City plus a special precautions prosecutors <hes>. DA you i have to convince DA's. Is that supposed to have a wrongful conviction unit. That part of their job is actually to make sure we get it right and we make a mistake. We learn new information information. We go back and correct miscarriages of justice in brooklyn. You know we have one of the best conviction review units. We vacated twenty six wrongful convictions. I'm doing that work. I just hired new lawyers so that work has to be done and that's something that has to be promoted because most district attorney's offices across the united states still still do not do this work so it has to be a recognition at a like every other business. People make mistakes every other profession doctors have mistakes up air pilot politic crash. We make mistakes as prosecutors. We have to be open to go back and say we made a mistake. We have to fix it. We have to correct it. Regardless of of the fact that someone's reputation may be injured justice because his just and we also have to have a recognition. That's actually different. I mean that <hes> there's a concept laura finality when the case is ranked over. I don't believe in that <hes>. I believe that my my obligation is a prosecutor is to make sure i can stand by conviction ten years from now twenty years from now if something changed in between we have to go back and take a look at it so i created a post conviction conviction justice bureau that not only has conviction review but it has parole and clemency unit to take a look at these old cases to make sure that people who are imprison. Can we get them out. They ready to be released safely back into a community so we're doing that. We're looking at clemency. <hes> plate cases. I'm i'm going to prison. Visiting people in prison are being told them the first. DA to go there and twenty five years just to talk to people who belong to mike my constituency they from brooklyn they're in jail the helping them come out safely do reentry <hes> and then looking at ceiling convictions are going back and ceiling convictions because people people need to be able to move on with and in the final piece of this is looking at <hes> long sentences right. We give them out like it's candy wendy twenty twenty five years thirty years at some point when people have made cognitive behavioral changes necessary to reenter society we should do that so one of the things that i think is important is not only what we do in a case like this where we see a travesty and we have to go back and then review all those cases. We have to make sure that the people you're electing as district attorney or committed to doing this work. I'm going to tell you do that many. DA's are not <hes> it takes a lot of courage to go back and tell a family that you're you. We told you we convicted someone. We told you they were guilty. Guess what we were wrong. We got it wrong. They were innocent. We put you through that <hes> reputational harm. I'm to other prosecutors and police offices most. DA's office is choose not to create these units because it's difficult work in anyone who's considering considering voting for a. DA should asked is very exact question. You committed to doing this work. And are you committed to admitting when you've made mistakes. I think that's an an important part of justice right because you know you talk about <hes> the. DA talks about <hes> damage to reputation rant right and i would think like if i got something wrong that it actually speaks to my reputation to say i got it wrong and here's how we're going to fix it that there's some process for review knowing how much <hes> the ducks have been stacked against a lot of people knowing that gender discrimination exist this knowing that racial discrimination exists. I'm knowing that new technology exists one of the things that's most interesting to me is not a particularly with view. DA gonzales but in other <hes> prosecutor cases when new when DNA evidence right that that there may be a case where they're going just before a judge to even request dna tested and people are posted that and i'm like but is to get back to that finality like there's this concept in the law that wants a decision has been made the decision is final and everyone should be able to rely on that decision being the final where it's raw it's wrongheaded and you need me to fight against it and you know we are training our ADA's on one of the factors that lead to a lot of wrongful convictions which is biased confirmation which means that you have have a theory or the police have a theory some things kind of fit the pieces and then every two knows you just kind of force into that that theory 'cause i mean evidence. That's so you are the things that support your theory. <hes> you say are critical pieces of evidence and things that don't fit your theory saying well. You know you try to make explanations for it. There's a lot of things that lead to wrongful convictions. I think the one thing that i left out is it's not just enough to write these wrongs and get these men at mostly men at a prison risen <hes> and give them back to good name. All of that is very critical but what's so important about doing this work. Is that if you don't don't use the experiences that you learned from the problems will witness identification. The problems of false fed facts that lead to you know <hes> confessions that just made it up. If you don't do that stuff then you're going to repeat these mistakes and one of the things that i'm hoping to do in brooklyn is we've now vacated the number of cases over four years. We're going to be issuing reports so that we can add to the world of prosecutors. These are the mistakes have been made on these cases aces and this is what can be learned in. ADA's police officers and defense attorneys because some of the mistakes have been made by defense attorneys need to be trained on this so we don't keep repeating these mistakes in these AM listen there. I've been told that they estimate about two percent error rate in criminal donal cases but two percent of two point three million people is a lot yeah. There's a lot of innocent people in jail today and we need to get them out and you you see in contrast and in thinking about civil cases or you know as we framed a white collar crime or and things like that and it's a completely different ballgame and terms of how justice is determined in one. We know it's a moral issue right because people there is something you can clearly understand someone taking someone's life <hes> someone who rate someone someone. You know those kinds of things you. There's a very clear like this person is bad and we must you know <hes> proceed this way but then in thinking about civil crime <hes> and you know there are crimes that are white collar crimes or civil crimes but they do immense damage <hes> to communities to the families to individuals and yet the response may be like six months or her right or pay some fine which is lower than what you the value of the thing that you did in the first place. You know i recently talking about how i'm trying to change how my office operates right. We were considering office that handled handled street crime ordinary street crime violent street crime but we've been trying to changes so very recent. I can't get into all the facts of the case but there was a a mitchell lama cooperative building in brooklyn where <hes> let's mitchell lama. It's a housing program to let your middle-class affordable families. He's you know get into an apartment building in either. The city or the state subsidizes the rent at some point <hes> very valuable right the rents in brooklyn a crazy and beyond crazy and we had a case in brooklyn where there was a board of directors in part of the management company that would take bribes and skipped over the waiting list and people who did not deserve to live in this building that harmed ordinary working class people and often often. DA's office is didn't get involved in things like that. Let them. HP handle that let but these are the kinds of cases that caused people to be able to be forced out of the communities these people who deserve to get housing get cheated out of housing and someone makes a profit and those are considered to be cases that don't you know not violent but they have tremendous impact to communities yeah yeah anytime somebody tells me any fraud about a housing lottery immediately upset considering during that <hes> my husband and i were on list we finally get called after i've been i've personally been on a list for housing for at least twelve years give there and then we make <hes> one hundred one thousand nine hundred ninety seven dollars over the limit and i was like i'm always bitter growing up in williamsburg bushwick east new york. Gotta defend bush record earlier. You you know what i think is that i just you know you've been in a community. I was in bed stuy four sixteen years right built my political career there my community unity there right and then you immediately go to another community now organize wherever i am like that that the the issue is just like you know like you haven't i haven't built a a community there yet and when i always tell the story when my husband and i did premarital counselling before and before we got married and we determine what we need when you live in a space like he needs amenities needs laundry to be right there. He needs jim to be around the corner all that kind of stuff for me. I need community. I need like you know parents. Yes i can text and say let's go to the park. Whatever so i haven't built that yet in bushwick but maybe maybe that can happen over the summer. I'm gonna slip you my yeah all right. We'll be right back with more of sunday civics. We still have one or two more questions <hes> to discuss and then our last question is now. You have all of this information. How do you evaluate candidates for district attorney. We'll be right back. Welcome back. Welcome back the.

brooklyn prosecutor new york ADA DA gonzales united states bushwick donal HP mitchell lama bush jim fraud two percent five days one hundred one thousand nine twenty twenty five years four sixteen years
"district attorney" Discussed on #SUNDAYCIVICS

#SUNDAYCIVICS

11:26 min | 2 years ago

"district attorney" Discussed on #SUNDAYCIVICS

"The struggle well. Thank you very much for <hes> joining us for class as we call it where educating people about the political political process because civics is not just election day sort of they're all of these interconnected systems and you have been brooklyn district attorney for how long since january of two thousand eighteen i was elected. I served as the acting the a after ken thomson passed away in october of two thousand sixteen yeah <hes> and that's where we met <hes> in office when you were working in the office <hes> therein you assumed <hes> after his untimely passing and so you've been a friend too much as a district attorney giving your friend. I feel like weird like sometimes people are like can you call the. DA induce up i was like i feel like that go to for that liberty bell i can. I go to jail for calling a. DA case want to welcome you all back to this conversation. We're talking about the role of your local district attorney now. This position is not to be confused with your state attorney general or your. US state attorney the district attorney's are the most powerful position in your local go criminal and legal system. Another term. We use for lary is prosecutor. That's right and what did we learn from law and order police investigate crime but district attorneys honey's prosecute the offenders. Thank you very much these something. <hes> and i bet you get <hes>. DA that a lot of people people <hes> particularly. I do know that you go out and community. Try to educate people about the process are no your staff does your ADA's do i'm sometimes i am in those conversations and people are you know basically quoting law and order how frustrating must be to you for me l. Joy the way that prosecutors have traditionally handled <hes> their jobs is foreign foreign to me. It's about in the past. We prosecute cases in cordon. We review the work of the police department but much of work of prosecutors prosecutors have been in the past about punishing people for doing you know a committing a crime doing something wrong. <hes> i view my job fundamentally different sprint than that <hes> i view my job as trying to help promote safety in the community and come with the understanding that <hes> simply <hes> punishing people does not uplift communities. They don't make communities stronger. They'll make them healthier that we have to work to make sure that when someone makes a mistake that yeah they're held accountable but it's not done in a way that actually ruins the rest of their lives hurts their family and hurts the entire community and so it's a change in brooklyn from how things used to be done. I think we are trying to change what people think prosecutors <hes> and that's why i'm out in the community as much as i am so one of the things that <hes> is told <hes> to folks that you know our criminal justice system is supposed pursue justice and district attorneys or prosecutors are so post to pursue justice but it does seem as you mentioned that justice has now <hes> come to mean for a lot of people <hes> is that punishment right is that you have to either be taken or ripped from the community go to jail or you have to pay this. You know that it's more of a system of punishment and so when you're talking about changing the way that we're even perceived. How how do you even begin to do that. When this system is stacked up on punishment so one of the first things that we have to do is do we have to break the myth that that our community especially low income communities and communities of color rate actually safer because we're sending people to jail and we send someone to jail we bring them back ninety five percent of people who go to jail return right back to the same block the same community and if we don't help them with the issues that caused them to commit crime in the first place we bring them back for worse than we sent them the other thing that we have to break his at we have to break the perception that we care about victims of witnesses a crime and the way we show that love is by putting someone else in jail we have to change our criminal justice system that witnesses and victims of crime their services provided to them and the putting of someone to jail should not be a measure of how seriously we took what happened to them that we took. We you take seriously what happened to them. How we treat them by how we service their needs and ultimately how we deal with the trauma that crime is caused them. There's been in a lot of discussion just run criminal justice reform advocate people who are really looking at different ways of addressing what's happening within the system as it pertains injustices and you came into office obviously under very particular circumstances but i'm you have some some compadres or some some colleagues who are really helping to shift the way we think about <hes> the prosecutorial function in our criminal justice system. I'm thinking about like the. DA in philadelphia for example <hes> there are a number of folks have just sort of released drawn a line in the sand that said we're going to have a re formulation of how we determine what is justice and what is not and part of that conversation has been prison abolition and really moving away from the car system as a way of resolving harms to the community. What do you think about that line of conversation. And where do you sit as someone who has sort of position position yourself as a more progressive district attorney depending on who you're talking to obviously <hes> and how do you see the role of abolition as it pertains to criminal justice reform broadly. It's a great question and i think what we see is the abolition movement it like many other social. Justice movements are pushing people to really think about about the you know where they fit in what they believe in you know i've come to the conclusion that jail should be used only as a last resort that you know the reversion should not be the last resort but jail should be the last resort and we should only jail people when public safety demands that we do so when someone is so oh violent so dangerous that we don't think we can safely monitor them on the outside than jail. I think has a place and there's gonna be cases where i'm sending someone to jail for accountability because of the home that they've caused another person or a community but in the majority of cases gel is just being i used as as a punitive sanction and we really have to move away from it. I'm part of a group of prosecutors who openly speak about trying aimed to change the narrative around punishment. It should be about providing help to communities <hes> and i think we're i differ than some of the the other folks is that i think a lot of the solutions to our criminal justice system actually contained within our own community. You know will the reason why people different justice is because we're having someone else to find what safety fan is. Injustice look like for different communities as we have to allow each community kinda define. What's a safe and fair community. Look like what's a just result in this case. If a person is an outsider the person who does not live in the community <hes> that person really does not understand the values of that particular community entity and they're with their version of justice may look like may not resonate with the communities of that member and so one of the things that i'm really trying to do is say our criminal justice system has to reflect the values of every community and it's a mistake to think is only one thought of adjust outcome will look like justice will depend on a lot of factors <hes> and so we need to bring as many voices into the system as possible now criminal. I mean you thinking about as you talk about public safety <hes> people think of prosecution as prosecuting murderers and rapists. You know that what is the broadband anytime. We're fighting for reform or reducing the amount of people going to prison. That's was thrown back at communities right as like oh you want. Murderers rapists deepest in everybody to run the streets but the attorney does a lot more than that in terms of pursuing justice. We're talking about <hes> fraud <hes> we're talking about. I'm and <hes> neglecting communities as pertains to foreclosures and deed that often you know there are a lot of other things in a lot of other harn that happens to communities entities other than <hes> rapists and murderers and <hes> that kind of public safety response right and we really have to take advantage of the situation and we currently have in this city and in brooklyn where violence is waning where we're getting safer we last here we had the fewest number of homicides in brooklyn in my lifetime <hes> in <hes> we had the fewest number of shootings over the last several years robberies down down the salzer down <hes> if we can't make the transition to dealing with crime different way today. We'll never gonna make that transition. We have after us this moment. It also allows me like we stop prosecuting marijuana cases in brooklyn. Thank you what those resources can now go to deal <hes> with other cases in vulnerable populations one of the things that i learned growing up. I grew up in east new york. One of the things that i learned in east new york where crimes didn't get solved there there as much as they got solved another neighborhoods because the will and the resources were not provided to solving those cases so when we take back a whole category gory of cases and say we're no longer going to use our resources we can use that for other things one of the things we've been doing at brooklyn is deed fraud and prevailing wages taking care of our workers who are being defrauded by bad employers now and i know just from the constituencies that we serve that having a more expansive <hes> <hes> understanding of what justice looks like is really really important particularly when we're thinking about outcomes and solutions and long-term patterns and really being critical about how the justice shows up on a regular basis for our community and i'm reminded overdue for nays when they see us was recently released on and it has been i think it's now the number one viewed series on netflix which shout out to her but one of the things that's come as a result of that has been a real <hes> increase in amplification the voices who are saying that the prosecutors who are integral in jailing these five children should now have to have their cases reopened should now be possibly removed from positions and some of them in fact have actually no they are no longer affiliated with some of the professional institutions. Where do you sit on the idea of prosecutorial immunity. If an prosecutor is getting it wrong or an office is getting it wrong <hes> despite the warning signs despite the hey listen..

prosecutor brooklyn attorney ken thomson fraud US new york ADA lary marijuana netflix honey philadelphia ninety five percent
"district attorney" Discussed on #SUNDAYCIVICS

#SUNDAYCIVICS

12:59 min | 2 years ago

"district attorney" Discussed on #SUNDAYCIVICS

"Joy williams welcome class this sunday morning and this morning will indeed be class. This sunday is the beginning of a series. I've been waiting a long time time to introduce to you. The theories is called. Who we elect now this series highlights the numerous elected positions on the state and local level and what their responsibilities abilities are <hes> these elections for these positions often. Take place in off years and appear further down your ballot so let me tell you about it. This way election day comes be at your primary your general election you walk into the polling booth with a very clear plan who you're voting for from maybe mayor governor owner congressman alderman congresswoman but when you get in the booth and start making your choices you're starting at the top of the ballot and you start to make your way down the line and you ask yourself what the heck is a labor commissioner a superintendent of schools or a state committee. Remember what the heck is that. Nobody told me what that position is or. I never even met a candidate for that position well. This is why you have a civics teacher because that american working government class back in tenth grade did not prepare you for this but l. joy williams will over the summer. We'll be exploring these download down ballot positions what role oh they play in our communities and how you evaluate the candidates to make your decision. The first elected position. We're tackling is district attorney and we'll bring a sitting district attorney to the front of the class to join us in the discussion about the role he plays but firs- i got my thorough with girls with me june like the month moses like the bible hey joe. Hey l. joe ramsey. Should i call you. <hes> carmen sandiego because i feel like the world is l. Jay williams like every day. I'm like stalking your own a. I'm her assistant. I'd stock twitter line to see where she even though you have access to my calendar you don't know where i am. Okay all right. <hes> also also with us is larry. Daniel favors our social justice and adding in missed. Y'all you ran away. <hes> <music> feeling unloved in no is never a lack of love. It is however for lack of time so yeah. It's very good to be back. I missed you yeah well. I did get to see a little bit because <hes> our daughters are in the same <hes> dance school and so they're <hes> recital their first recital was this <hes> landbank span. Yes it was less than a day date. I'm going to write a personal letter because i'm upset said about bogey bogey eight guide so who don't follow me on twitter my child was in the middle of her her second number and looked around so we didn't know this at the time but we're watching her do the dance or whatever and then she exits the stage lights left like like not just exit you runs across the space to exit on the other side because she ran and ran all over on those and so we didn't know what happened. Is you have to use. The bathroom. Mazda was like wait. What what does happen should be glad to baby going off like we knew we were all looking at whether or not we gotta run. Whatever you say wildlife versus running for the whole crowd so i mean but then she comes comes out like half a minute she comes out half a minute later. So then we started saying just like that moment where you think you left the stove on or whether or not her rider wasn't altogether altogether like you know all these things so anyway so she does it was four different performances they did so we you know she comes off the stage and we ask current car like t- wh why did you run off the stage and so she was like they didn't put the right in my it was set up my san alleged. Go go which you have to do so all she cared about was what she cared about was the outfits that she got she. She didn't care about the dances she did. She did her bed as a three year old to participate in certain things or whatever she didn't on her own time for her the audience at one point she turned around and was dancing for the drummer. I'm i'm talking to the spirits of the drums but what would concerned her was that when she went out on the second thing everybody else had neon green bows and they hadn't switched her bowl from the tap tap dance and so she still had a red bow and so what she wanted was and need to have my outfit together yes. I'm not mad at her. I stand alleged alleged. Isn't that you know to my husband. He was like did you happen. She was like i got to wear my costume. All he cared cared about and i was like all right so we pay money for you to just like roy who stay and i can't wait to see her when she grows up because that personality is going to be everything everything i live for. I'm glad that she had this on tape and pictures of it because when she is twenty or doing something extra and we you can just like you just like oh. This is such a thing to do this. Though you've been i never have that child and no mismatch socks because she will let you know she will let you unless he chose chose. It is very like in terms of her wardrobe. Things going together even when she's playing because she has like the play drawer and and so she doesn't wear them on top with a different thing no because no the moana top goes with the moana bottom do not wear these are the facts with things exactly though she said enough for life of protest in analytical takeover so so when when i started when i started the show opened the show talk about this series which i'm like again. I'm really ecstatic about because i'm a nerd <hes> and <hes> have you gone in the booth before and knew who you were voting for orme or something like that and then you get down at the bottom and you're like what the heck is this. What about the flip it over because there's also the flip over a whole paragraph rabat's stuff and you got to pick something and a lot of people. I don't know what that is and then they go. Why don't we have any money because it was on the other side doing this l. toy. Thank you so much because now maybe everybody will join us in the pool of super voters where we come out and vote all day every day up and down the line all across actually know who all the names are not just that there are judges running guests or people running for a judgeship. Let you know like who they are and what they actually stand on as opposed to trying to determine how ethnic okay is this name and which ethnicity does to admit i have done that when it comes to judicial candidates in one way or the other or how do i mean. I'm very active and engaged now. That's the real question but i remember the first you know first time. When i was building my prime voter status and i knew who i was voting for governor i knew who i was voting for for assembly or for senate and then they'd be like surrogate court judge judge and i'm like johnson and don't let your place and i had no wifi. You can't use nothing i know also before when if you took a little bit longer in the like in the booth lights and look and stuff like people would be like you are right. You need help fall out googling. Thank you thank you but at that big. She on the wall actually has has all the broken down. Now you do need a magnifying glass but all of that is on the wall. They provide yes new. They do provide a magnifying glass as someone who teaches poll work. I worked opole also yes. Let me let me help you with this flat magnifying thing that we can lay against the wall which you can see what's going well. Hold on let me get a republican. We're gonna read it together. Everybody in some places you have to have both a republican and the democrats just can't be one so there's no electioneering <hes> but you know all those things so what we are doing with who we elect series is i. I want you to walk in fully informed into a polling booths and that doesn't mean educating you five minutes before it's time for you to vote on the or even a week before his time to vote. Maybe you know through this who we elect series over the summer. We are preparing you a whole year. You know in advance of your your <hes> state and municipal elections or your county election so you know what the position are then. You also know how to evaluate the candidates candidates is not the tingle is not the tangled up. Your accent is the same accent that i use. His last name is johnson so he may be black or jackson so he really might be but ooh article in the times about a white person with a black. You say her name. He didn't like the handshakes because they were complicated. There was a bit this listen. Someone recently told me they were like well. You know because i'm married to a puerto rico just like oh well you. Can you can run in that district. If you use your actual actual married and i feel like best completely pandering muscles see when you turn a bus is going to be the issue because then you if you don't have the afro latino tina accent because my name is joe moses i send you to resume. I walk into door. Just imagine everybody space fall on the floor going. I'm sorry everything is full. We're full in the position has been filled. Yes yes. I'm moses are moved from my beloved bed. Stuy still mourning still mourning <hes> to bushwick which is your is in unison more spacing clauses girl dining room and entertaining space. There's there's a dunkin donuts on the way to the crib so i can stop here and get some donuts and throw you a diet out the window. Yeah it's anyway. I have been in bushwick now and listen where we live is predominantly latino foes end. Listen my corn. The the lady in mma corner store refuses to talk to me english. She was gonna learn espanola. We import dante. She led you and they all know that. My mother-in-law mother-in-law is fluent in spanish. Whatever so how do you not know. Sadly you all know that my landlords are like in their seventies from puerto rico narrow like you can learn today winning. It was like you live here. You can't do this. You're gonna learn not gonna be like these hipsters or something like that so my husband and i are taking a classes over the because he doesn't can you imagine the heat..

twitter puerto rico johnson bushwick Joy williams l. joy williams Mazda l. joe ramsey congressman alderman Jay williams moana bottom stalking senate joe moses larry mma corner commissioner Daniel
"district attorney" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"district attorney" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"And the district attorney's decision could have even large. Implications KF because Joe Michaels joins us live in studio with details. Joe Mike is initially reported by the San Jose. Mercury news. The Santa Clara county DA's office says it will no longer filed charges against most people arrested or cited solely for possessing small amounts of illegal drugs, slower doing really recognizing natural line between public safety and public health and within the misdemeanor drug cases. We are cutting out first and second time, offenders from the criminal Justice system, and providing them resources outside of that system to get drug treatment offenders, who have three or more cases or who pose a public safety risk will continue to have cases filed as normal Deputy District Attorney Brian buckling says it comes down to a question of whether the DA's office should be involved in public, health and personal medical matters. It doesn't matter to us, whether it's pills, or cocaine or marijuana the key is to get these folks into treatment outside of the criminal Justice system where we don't expend all this money and have all these spoke. Monitoring their treatment. Many of whom are not trained in it their goal. We hope to kind of liberate a population whose extensively under the thumb of the criminal Justice system, and have them deal with their medical issues and their drug treatment issues in a more private way in a way that doesn't involve the government that doesn't involve the threat of incarceration. And give folks that opportunity as the program will remove four thousand five thousand defendants currently in Santa Clara county drug treatment court allowing turns to focus on cases involving public safety or narcotics unit has eight felony attorneys. In addition to the drug treatment, court attorneys, and attorneys are hard working, and they're working on cases that really affect people in effect communities. They're working on cases involving drug dealers cartels organized crime firearms cases involving dangerous to children. That's the important work that we're doing, and it's important work that we're going to have more resources to work up in follow up on and prosecute. If we are liberated from monitoring individ-. Usuals health treatment programs for their individual addictions that do not rise to a public safety problem KF became legal analyst and attorney Bill port. Nova doesn't like the idea. The problem with the law as it will be enforced is that the officer has to make a decision as to whether or not this person is simply, possessing it, because they are social user partier, or are they somebody who's a drug addict, who has their drugs on the middle and who's combing neighborhoods looking for things to steal looking for houses and cars to break into even so number of prosecutors in Washington, state, and Texas have already stopped filing charges for similar low level drug crimes. And Philadelphia's district attorney has reportedly said he wants to getting. All right. Joe Michaels there. Thank you..

Joe Michaels Santa Clara county Deputy District Attorney Brian Joe Mike San Jose analyst cocaine Philadelphia Nova Bill port Washington marijuana officer attorney Texas