25 Burst results for "Distinguished Professor"

A Civil Rights History Lesson

In The Thick

02:14 min | 5 months ago

A Civil Rights History Lesson

"Today we have a very special guest joining us from brooklyn. New york is gene. Theo harris distinguished professor of political science at brooklyn college a historian and author of the rebellious life of mrs rosa parks. She's co editor of the new book. Julian bonds time to teach the history of the southern civil rights movement gene. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me so today. We're going to honor one of the leaders of the civil rights movement and i. I actually met julian bond. I just can't remember where it's going to say that you probably did. I did meet him. And now i'm like you know i think it was before we had cameras in our phones. I mean bond is just a hero and a giant in the civil rights movement. He was an incredible human bean with. I mean his humanity just should out. He was an activist. He was an an educator he did. Pass away in two thousand fifteen. He was a founding member of the student. Nonviolent coordinating committee snake He had a political career. He served in the georgia house of representatives. He had to fight for his seat because of his opposition to the vietnam war and he was the first african american to be nominated as vice president though he withdrew his name and julian bond was an outspoken activist who fought his entire life whether it was civil rights to beaten way out of other people on the question of lgbtq rights all the way to protesting to shut down the keystone pipeline. Let's listen to julian bond in his own words to start off this show. This is from two thousand and two interview that julian did with phyllis leffler of the explorations in black leadership project at the university of virginia. Everything my parents. I told me about responsibility to others everything. I've learned that. The george school about speaking truth to power everything i learned about daring to stand up to powerful people and say no to them. Whatever the consequences. All of that came together when lonnie king came up to me and asked me if i would join this Movement

Julian Bond Theo Harris Mrs Rosa Parks Brooklyn College Georgia House Of Representativ Brooklyn Julian New York Phyllis Leffler Vietnam University Of Virginia George School Lonnie King
"distinguished professor" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

06:53 min | 5 months ago

"distinguished professor" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"What was missing or in need of Morrell Emphasis about Hamptons life with us to discuss is author historian and Chicago native Jacoby Williams. His book is titled From The Bullet to the Ballot, the Illinois chapter of the Black Panther Party and Racial Coalition politics in Chicago. He's also the roof and hauls distinguished Professor at Indiana University Bloomington. Professor Williams. Welcome to recent. Thanks for having me you have been a scholar of Fred Hampton and the Black Panther Party for Over 20 years, and now you've watched the film Judas and the Black Messiah. What do your first thoughts of the movie Well, let me first begin by saying I do not endorse or promote the film. As a definitive history off Fred Hampton. I suggest folks watch the murderer Fred Hampton and or read my books on the murder of Fred Hampton. Actually, we found on YouTube. This is a movie about William O'Neal and Neil's ordeal. Which is betrayal, Fred Hampton's assassination. So there's some positives and some pros and cons, of course, But I suggest that folks look elsewhere to get real history of the history of Fred Hampton. We'll We'll get more into that in just a moment. But am I correct in saying that your book was actually used as a source for Warner Studios and in making this film Yes. So soccer King, the one of the script writers. We lie heavily upon my book for the film. So there's a catch 22 for me. I can't tell people the movie's trashed otherwise be calling my work trash. But there are some Mr Bleeding episodes. So when a movie's states that, uh, it's based on true events, it gives the facade that everything that folks are watching in the film may be true, and that's the danger about how they were films. We got an historical icons. So the movie is being characterized to be clear as this bio pic of Fred Hampton. And it certainly does cover the story around his death. And I think you agree with that. But how much would you say Professor that it spends on his life in your opinion. Where it touches on some key components and highlights his charisma. His oratory skills, his fear, radical philosophy, the ways in which he's a great community organizer and motivator. Those things come through in the film quite starkly, but I would not classify it as a bio pics of his history off his group his life. It is a documentation of his murder. Does that quite effectively? What friend happen. It was more than justice. Murder into your point Earlier, you mentioned William O'Neal. The movie does put a lot of focus on Willow Neela. They refer to him as bill throughout the film. The FBI agent who Infiltrated the Black Panther Party and gave the FBI the floor plan of Fred Hampton's apartment. Arguably he was the main character. What did you think of the material? So I think that could Stanfield Hey, was the best actor in this film? As far as I'm concerned, he played with them on their way to a T. But this film is a film about William O'Neill. It is not a film about Fred happen. I want to emphasize that William O'Neal is not sympathetic figure he was a willing Participant who was not apologetic about his role is not in the form. It is actually infiltrator, and he did his role quite well. He produced over 4000 pays Valium for the FBI. Just one friend happen alone. What do you What do you mean? He wasn't an informant for when the former There's someone who snitches like you can be an anonymous informant. You can just provide information. I infiltrated this one Who like another kind of police officer, You infiltrate the organization. Try to get high it up to the records You can, which He did it and became friend happens and head of security. We went everywhere friend happened. That's what the emperor traitor does. So no, he is not a sympathetic figure. He's a willing participant that takes on a whole different kind of connotations. So no, this is why I do not endorse it. Promote this film anything from about William or Neil, This is not the family about Fred Hampton. Clearly so pleased with some of the historical portrayals in the film, and I'm thinking, you know, as the studied historian, that you are, professor you, of course. Would have spotted Maurin Accuracy is in this film. Then we probably have time to dig into today. But can you for the purposes of this conversation? Give us you know, one or two others that really stood out to you Like if someone was looking to learn Maura about Hampton and the Black Panthers in Illinois, and they watch this movie. What misconceptions? Are you saying that they're gonna walk away with Well, many misconceptions is they are in some ways Still relegated is a violent problem Organizations. The movie does a great job, especially the beginning allowed the Panthers to speak for themselves, document their history, their intentions to purpose. They're not a terrorist organization, so that's very, very great about the film, and I appreciate that. However, many misconceptions in the film are the ways in which security waiting now processes. There's very little mention of Mary Daly in Chicago Politics Chicago political machine, the Rainbow Coalition. Their stated over which is one of the main reasons for it happens, just targeted for assassination. And that coalition is primarily concerned about the daily Democratic machine. More so than it is about a revolution. They're dealing with their communities, their neighborhood, Chicago City neighborhoods, and then the people who actually murder him. Yes, there's enough credence and correction there. We got in the world of the FBI, but it is the Chicago police and the administration that actually murders them, and that is nowhere in the film. So it's not enough information given to History of Chicago, Chicago Repression, police brutality. Some of the reasons the Panthers actually formed in the city of Chicago. You say there was too much gun violence in the film. What do you think, is the impact of that? Well, it it makes my work a little more challenging. One who gets us many path of scholars of written over 57 books on the subject started class one of Brad counterpart for 20 years. How much of our work could you spare those misconceptions of the focus on the God But this Hollywood, so that's what sells pictures. You have to have Some of those representations in there. They didn't do a good job of the movie that is for trained the road of the violence on behalf of the state. So that comes through quite starkly. But the idea that the Panthers were not just heavily armed but focused mostly on the gun is misleading. The Panthers would have the greatest internal threat to security of the nation because of that community service programs. Self determination, socialist policies and the ways in which they were able to train others, regardless of race or how to be self sufficient. That's what made them the threat to the internal security. Didn't feel me that's like this. He's done toting violent prone, hyper militant individuals. Yeah, and something else that you say that the film got right. I was reading article that you wrote for Time magazine. And you said it was, ah, quick glimpse that it gave us of the Panther Party's community health work and a free ambulance.

Mary Daly William O'Neal Willow Neela William O'Neill William FBI Neil 20 years Judas and the Black Messiah Fred Hampton Jacoby Williams Chicago City Black Panther Party Panther Party Maura Brad Warner Studios Morrell Hamptons Williams
"distinguished professor" Discussed on Raising Good Humans

Raising Good Humans

07:28 min | 8 months ago

"distinguished professor" Discussed on Raising Good Humans

"Parents own executive function predicted. How a tony support they are. They were which in turn predicted the todd executive function ray. So if you struggle with this putting your efforts onto getting hold of your executive function skills or just paying attention to that will help like we. We do need to pay attention to our on. But i mean. That's i think true in most things with parenting right so yeah so slowing down ourselves. You know having that space between know when something cabins that seems to call for a response or reaction putting space between that end the reaction itself or response itself. Mindfulness is really effective. Were cultivating executive function skills in adults and warm researchers suggesting that same is true for adolescents and children as well so there are things that adults definitely do. It's never too late to work on developing executive function skills. And you know couldn't well benefit your children if you do. Is there something that parents can do to be reflect self reflective to notice if they are bending a little too controlling or a little too laissez faire is to get them to the. Goldilocks just rate. Parenting attraction. i think if parents could ask themselves is just starting to matter. More to me than to my kid. You know. who's this for. That's a great question to ask ourselves. Yeah i'm sorry. I forgot your other point of your question. Well really that was. That was on the controlling side. And then if you're trying to be autonomy supportive but you're actually being laissez-faire like it's not because you're not paying attention engaged but you genuinely just thinking will i. I want them to do it for themselves. Is there some some measure that you can question that you can ask yourself to be reflective to recognize if your child just needs a little bit of support which may be brings us into the other thing that i wanted to touch on which is stress and balancing the just right amount of stress and maybe that is the reflection you can have. I'm not sure I think we can all like start to or learn to recognize signs in our own kids of when they're hitting the overload. Mrs this has now transitioned from being effort full and and moderately challenging to something that is about to lead to a total breakdown or About to really crush their their confidence and being attuned to those signs of nonverbal and verbal signs in your own child and there are individual differences to mike. It like. it's a very different from one another but you can kind of help help foster resilience in them by knowing the signs of when to push further Hold back because if stress does turn toxics so to speak than we do know that that is harmful for these brain networks that are underlying executive function skills. Some mild stress is actually beneficial for the development of these skills. And it's part of the challenges daily hassles figuring out how to manage. those Is strengthening those does executive function skills and resilience but when it's uncontrollable stress and chronic. You know end can event at a chaotic chronic uncontrollable pervasive stress. dan Unfortunately that type of stress is more often seen in poverty related life experiences adverse adverse childhood experiences scenario other topic. So i can. We can close up this one but yeah that's another one. You're in really amazing. Your research is so incredible. And i'm so thrilled that you're also moving it towards practical applications for families in in schools in the way that you are an that you have an app that will eventually come out. That's so rates for all of us. Thank you thank you. And i really want to say how impressed i am with the mount sinai parenting center. I mean it's the course that i got to review the course i know i so appreciate you guys Just didn't incredible dominance so happy that pediatricians. Which is that's the. I nine ninety plus percent. Thanks on dot kids. Regardless of economic status will see pediatrician Several times in this first few years. And the fact that you guys are communicating. Educating at that point is really a really heartening and I'm just so happy that we're able to share some of this information that you you know with alan's help. I'm sure you can guess considered this that it's not it's not just about elite. Do a great job on lake sleep and toilet training and everything does not. But that's not just rate but this you know the fact that their psychological development not just emotional but their psychological development is something that you know. You're you're taking seriously educating these Physicians about so that then teachers and And you know psychologists and clinicians you know. hopefully we'll have have it a little bit easier. We have some resources for families there. Great okay so families can go to reflection scientists. Now yes yes we have a free thirty minute is thirty. Might be sixty But we've a free course on executive function for parents in talks about a lot of the things in much briefer form Than i talked about much more efficiently. I'm sure Articulately that course is something that parents can access in. There's also activities guide of things you can do at home is for preschool. Aged kids can a two to five things that you can do at home to build executive actions. So i'll put those in the show notes. Sure people can click on the link and go for it. That's wonderful thank you..

sixty thirty two thirty minute Goldilocks five things mike nine ninety plus percent mount sinai parenting center dot kids first few years
"distinguished professor" Discussed on Raising Good Humans

Raising Good Humans

07:23 min | 8 months ago

"distinguished professor" Discussed on Raising Good Humans

"Before before we embark on the next show. Let's think about what your plan is for when you to give it to your sister or a my confusing reflection and planning i think. I think they're very much intertwined in that Especially in that example of So planning is an act of pausing before initiating nachrichten were progress toward a goal and if you can add i at least helped them say it out loud than that helps with maintenance of the goal. In and with inhibiting distractions that might come. Come along with taking flexibly if they need to And then if you're using the example of of what happened prior you can use that as the reflection right remember. How how last time remember last time you didn't want to you know. Stop playing the tablet and you felt really upsets and than than this happened or something like that but in it all worked out in the end And something like that. In one of my favorite people in the world ellen gallinsky. Oh yeah. Of course how i know you in the first place. I forgot to she. I love her stories about her grandson and she always says to him today. What's your plan b. And i love that because it's saying okay. Let's Tablet time and you put a limit on it up front. It's going to be for x number of minutes rare until dinner ready or whatever the limited and you can anticipate that it's going to be difficult to to end this fun activity But she'll associated says to him. What's your plan b. Meaning when this gets taken away. And how are you going to manage that. Or if things don't go as planned how are you gonna. How are you going to manage that. And i think it's brilliant strategy teenagers or an. I mean kind of the emerging adolescence. The eleven to thirteen fourteen. I guess that's pretty much teenagers. Pretty deepen but Early teenage years. What you know as they're less interested in your reflection and your support their reflecting on what's happening are they're fun phrases like what's your plan b but don't piss off a teenager. I think if i have any i i know that most of the time my kids are like don't do your thing me then also. I have to be careful with my language. Because it's so as i imagine you experienced blake your kids knowing your work too much right. Yes and they you know they've been in the marshmallow test studies When they were growing up and they will say yeah when they were teenagers they would say may god. I know i know reflect. I know i know exactly reflection. Although i'm sure they did it any like it's like even the iras and the i know i know they still now like it's still a voice in their head right. Yeah and now that. They're my daughters in their early twenties. They they really appreciate it. I mean they they really did get through this idea and you can do more subtle ways to like i started buying blank journals Daughter and it was kind of like no pressure but they were sort of lying around you know and then eventually she started picking them up reflecting in a journal. I think and this is going to speak to the thanh piece of bit too but giving them responsibilities. Increasing age related age-appropriate responsibilities chores. If you will. is really beneficial to the development of autonomy and to developing feeling of self efficacy. And that's really what what we're trying to cultivate there and why that matters for executive function how that's related to executive function is that if kids feel alike they have some agency over their own actions and that their actions matter like their actions kind of make things happen in the world. Like you know here in minnesota. It's it's shoveling the walk you know and it's sort of like you know they get to look back on About it but they do look back on it Look at all the shoveling that that they accomplished in there. Is this feeling like okay. You know my actions matter. Even though it was an entirely their idea to do it was an obligation. They had their starting to develop a sense of responsibility. Taking pride in some of those things that they can do so those are in that is important in terms of cultivating this sense of control. So if you have a sense of Kind of i did it and you have a sense of. Oh wow and my actions matter then you start to develop a sense of Oh wow and i. I had a choice over which action to do. So i could. I could say yes to to mom on the i you know. Try or i could You keep saying no get in trouble And by choices start to matter and recognizing that you have a choice in how to act thinker feel breeds this understanding that an cultivates the ability to control how you act thinker feel it's evacuated beginning is defining executive function as conscious control over our thoughts actions and feelings and i think kids of all ages and adults need to recognize that they have some choice in how to act curfew and Then when they make decision they own it right in the own the consequences of it and it helps to to strengthen in make these skills more robust with practice. I won't say better than you. But my understanding is that autonomy supportive parenting is more closely linked with better developed executive function skills. So that stands to reason that if you're in if you're interested as a apparent in a child's executive function skill development. That's the kind of parenting that you want to cultivate. Not as like you're a bad parent or grandparent of you to just if you're interested in this these are some ways that you can cultivate that in the interactions that you have with your kids is.

ellen gallinsky today eleven minnesota one first thirteen fourteen twenties marshmallow
"distinguished professor" Discussed on Raising Good Humans

Raising Good Humans

05:49 min | 8 months ago

"distinguished professor" Discussed on Raising Good Humans

"We're building.

"distinguished professor" Discussed on Raising Good Humans

Raising Good Humans

06:45 min | 8 months ago

"distinguished professor" Discussed on Raising Good Humans

"Joins us. I couldn't i couldn't possibly but you had a little kid bear to inspire it. Yeah i think so but it is also serving as a working memory reminders. I never thought about it that way. I've always thought about it as just the routine of it. But of course i still do that by the way not with cleanup songs because i have teenagers and tweens and teens but with myself remember things i do often like we were saying the beginning walking up the stairs and thinking about what you had to do. Sometimes i'm just like i just if this is what i need to do right now. Do not go off course. And i keep saying to myself. Maybe i should disclose that but those tools. I still need an sure working at home especially when there are so many tasks then In these different categories of their homebase tasks in their work based tasks than. It's very easy to out. There is actually the heartening thing that fills elisa said. A couple episodes ago was zap Your colleagues but married colleagues just ruling. The world of executive function skill research. It's kind of extraordinary. But he said this time for kids an older kids who are doing online school. They do have to use their cognitive flexibility. This two completely different way of operating and maybe that will exercise those muscles. I thought that was heartening in an edit time. When there's you know i'll have. I'll hang onto anything that feels like it could be of benefit for sure. Yeah and there are a lot of Time kinds of activities to that can be beneficial even while. You're you're sort of struggling with all of the home based learning and screens the battle against yes screens But you know even even screen time can turn into something that can exercise these skills. So if even if the 'edu-tainment itself is not focusing on executive function explicitly there are of course all of the self-regulation tasks that happened around screen so for example there might be limits on how many minutes or hours a day eight minutes now hours. I know yeah and it has gone on average about an hour a day. Preschool kids non school non school related screen time but it creates a new opportunity to have some rules and regulations so that kids can learn how to self regulate and use scaffolds like timers and on sharing Turn taking with siblings and in terms of who gets. The tablet win created new opportunities at the same time that means behind love that i just love the that attitude in general that you can even think about emotion regulation as your preschooler has experienced the devastation over having like ending the show and having to return the tablet to sibling. Or whatever it is. That's that's a really Adaptive outlook. I so excited to hear that. Thank you and there are a lot of things you can do to With a preschool age child we talked about in the the the the running monologue and they can also help you at the same time where working memory for example if you're going to the store or or if you're ordering online you can tell your child. Okay we we need to remember three things and you can make an age appropriate so up to seven things with an older child. Decatur seven things that we haven't remember To to put on the lesser to get at the store. And can you help me and he can prep them before you go before you go in. He helped me remember what those two three five seven things are. Make a game out of it so kids really like to also catch you in making a mistake so if young blank blank on what the fifth thing was that you were supposed to get you know they love having the chance to show you so that gets us into school age kids i guess engaging them enlisting them to help with activities like that is a great example. What else can school age kids do or not so much. What can the school age kids do. What can the caregivers of school age kids do to create that environment. Well getting lots of practice. That's one thing is just you know what are some ways that you can give your child practice the skills and one of the principles that i'm sure colleague fills elisa mentioned is is reflection so opportunities for reflection on and what i what i mean by that is basically thinking twice. How can you. How can you get you help your child or yourself rethink something or just think about it again and that's because often are very first. Reactions to things are regrettable and if we get to think about it a second time we might react in ways that are more consistent with our goals so getting in that habit of throwing out the first pancake in a way exactly. So how. how early do you start that reflection. And how do you reflect. I mean that's ridiculous sounding but i think concrete examples of reflection. 'cause i think we take for granted that we reflect as adults but we often really don't so i think it's it's worth taking the time to think about how we can reflect him. What are those moments when you can. I don't know if interrupt is the right word but Get in there to to inspire reflection is it before a mistake is made is after a mistake is made. Is it not related to mistake. It's just part of the process. That's a great question and we're actually developing an app right now. That parents kids can use together..

elisa eight minutes twice one first pancake two seven things first three things second time about an hour a day one thing five principles fifth thing A couple Decatur
"distinguished professor" Discussed on Raising Good Humans

Raising Good Humans

06:45 min | 8 months ago

"distinguished professor" Discussed on Raising Good Humans

"Dell push it because that's how doors open but instead they're starting to be able to do the problem solving to think flexibly got the goal. The goal is to get to the room or to get outside in. They're holding a goal in mind and the impulse is to push. Because i want my body to go forward and this door needs to get out of my way. Some in push it push forward. But what if it's kinda door that you have to pull to open right. What if it opens the other way and again you can kind of see their their minds started through and be able to think flexibly okay. My solution isn't working. what's a new way. What's another solution to this problem. And they'll start to one to three years of age will start to realize. Oh wait i can have to pull it up in this way and be be able to take a step back. Hold the door open and then go through so just little problems that they encounter throughout their daily lives. Some of it with modeling from adults reiten. That's very helpful if an adult can model for you how to do that But some of it is is thinking through on her own. Just wait a minute. My ways and working my usual a. isn't working anymore with another way that i can solve this problem and then as the caregiver if you notice that. They're solving a problem where they're sorting something out is if they're figuring it out are you naming that for them and giving words to that so that they can notice that they just solve a problem or is that more. If they're having trouble exactly. I think you know it's great if caregivers can be kind of running monologue of of what's happening because you're actually giving them the speech. The language that dell eventually internalize end start to stay to themselves so Whether they do it successfully or unsuccessfully you can comment on it and say Something like it's usually we push doors open but that's just not working this time or if they're playing with that That rocket tower puzzle thing where you have to. You have to put the reins on the tower in order. Otherwise you know. They're not all they're not going to fit. So if you put you had to put the largest ring on on fratton index largest and so forth and it's a really tricky problem for kids because they wanna put the to put the top piece. i right and so if you're watching your child that kind of think that through you can comment that. Oh that's you know that's ways working. I wonder if there's another way of thinking about this and That gives them as i said can the modeling for the inner speech that they'll eventually us that we use as adults to solve these kinds of problems every day. Do you really know it's in your multi-vitamin sugars. gmo's synthetic fillers artificial colorants not to mention animal by products like sheep's wool. And gelatin from hooves. And hides they're all ingredients. You might find it. A multivitamin but ritual is not your typical multivitamin rituals clean vegan. Friendly formula is made with key nutrients informs your body can actually use. None of the shady extras. I just started taking ritual vitamins. Because i was introduced to ritual through this opportunity and i am really hesitant to take vitamins because of all the garbage. That's in them. So i was incredibly excited to be introduced to vitamin that. I can trust and that is not putting bad stuff in when i'm trying to take good stuff. Also you'll always know where your nutrients come from when you take ritual because thanks to their one of a kind visible supply. Chain ritual is made traceable and it's available for women men and teens ritual multivitamins are scientifically developed to help support different life stages. You deserve to know. What's in your multivitamin and you certainly deserve to know what is going into your teenagers body. That's why ritual is offering my listeners. Ten percent off during your first three months visit ritual dot com slash humans to start your ritual today. Okay forgive me. i'm just gonna keep going in age order and then we'll go. We'll go back. Let's think about a preschooler. Is it more expanding on that narration. Yeah so preschoolers Will encounter a lot of executive function challenges throughout the day at even though you know their skills are developing but they're starting to explore ever new ever more challenging kinds of problems and they're also starting to be asked if any kind of any kind of a early education setting starting to be asked to stay seated for a while or to pay attention to the same thing on the same activity for awhile and that presents a new challenge for preschool aged kids in in a group setting where there might be a little bit more competition for toys and attention so modeling again that narration giving them opportunities to talk through their own problems to hold a goal in. Mind a really good way to do that. Is to keep saying it out loud and to not let yourself get distracted so for example if goal is to clean up these toys right now. Before you go to the next activity than you can introduce cleanup song in the cleanup song. Everybody knows the cleanup ray. Cleanup song is keeping the goal active. So anna it's fun to sing and to listen to other thing. It.

Dell Ten percent first three months today one three years of age anna dot com reiten
"distinguished professor" Discussed on Raising Good Humans

Raising Good Humans

07:45 min | 8 months ago

"distinguished professor" Discussed on Raising Good Humans

"I think so so we fortunately now have a number of the segments of executive function and starting as young as two years of age. And they've been able to use these measures to trace the developmental trajectory executive function skills in what we tend to see in the essentially using the same measure across the lifespan. Is this very steep improvement from about two to six years of age and at immunes like vertical line then it starts to taper off. A little bit is still continuing to grow substantially until early lessons. Tapers off more But is still continuing to grow more slowly and may see the peak of executive function on these neuro cognitive assessments Around the early twenties or twenty five years of age or so um and then unfortunately we do see this line. Start off and start to turn down down and that is a gradual decline. Until the oldest age that we've assisted enorm- d- these measures of eighty five. So it's what's called inverted you because it it's like if you were to take a few inches kind of turn it upside down you'd see this Steep improvement followed by canova a steadying plateau and then a gradual decline. Cy i know that's on average so not everybody beyond twenty experiences decline of executive function but it is true on average. And that timing. I assume coincides with your prefrontal cortex getting to its fullest. Is that the right way of describing it. Well it's it's at its most efficient bank pressing at that point and we start to experience a lot of interference as we age because of all that wisdom ripe and so the interference can also cause some cognitive load and our prefrontal cortex and neural networks. Are not as efficient as they were when we were younger. And so that could be harder to slowing well. I want to focus on caregiving influences on executive function skill development. Because that feels like the only thing we can control ourselves but maybe briefly. Can you talk about really when you come into this. World are some people more hardwired to have a more developed. Executive function skilled trajectory or. Is it something everybody can grow. Absolutely something everybody can grow and Experience plays you know not not a supporting role but like the lead role. Wow okay of executive function. I like i like that. Say that one. More time. I love that. Experience is not just a supporting role in the development of executive function. it's playing the lead role. Genetics have been implicated in executive function as with many many behaviors and skills. However we have seen that it depends largely on experience starting very early. So even though. I'd mentioned measurement beginning around age two. You can start developing cultivating these skills much earlier than that and the role of of early experienced. Just can't be overestimated. So can we talk about some of those experiences For those for people listening have babies. Great you can start right now and then we can get into well. What if you just heard about this today and you have an eleven year old. But let's start with the zero to three or zero to two. I think you said those early experiences when thing that babies are looking for from us is some kind of understanding the patterns of interaction so this helps build a predictable world for them and everything is new at the beginning right at a mentioned executive action is something that you tend to need to engage when you're in a new environment are novel situation early in life. Of course everything is new one of the ways to actually help build. Executive function skills is to create routines to create some expectations in the infant. So for example. Some of the common games. That you that you play in terms of communication with your infant so even though they can't talk to you they of course can respond to you and there's a little bit of a proto conversation that you have kind of a an almost conversation that you have with your infant where you think cooing sound or you speak to to your baby. The baby makes some kind of a response made a smile. Maybe it's a coup or something like that and you can actually take turns with each other and that turn taking is starting to to develop a sense of expectation in the invent the. Oh i get this. This is this game works and partly why they love peekaboo or things. Where there's now there's gonna be a surprise introduced to this routine and introduce something. Novel surprise like peekaboo. They laugh. because you've changed it up. They didn't expect that rain. But it's almost like you can see their neurons growing developing these connections happening when you play games like peekaboo so now they're starting to say. Oh i get it sometimes. We can play this game differently. That kind of conversational turn taking game that we had that serving return game that we had sometimes mom or dad is gonna shake it up and so that's really starting to help set set the stage for development of understanding cognitive flexibility Of sometimes do this this way with. Sometimes we didn't that way be can't you can't develop that sense of surprise and shifting until you. I help them understand with the routines right. The predictable stable gives them the space to be open to change the flexibility. Exactly yeah into reflect on that change. Eventually with language they can start to reflect on that changing. I was kind of putting words in the babies. Now it's like oh get played this way right now. We're gonna play that way. Of course they're not capable yet of putting it that way but it's setting the stage for the with with the onset of language to be able to to have that kind of inner self talk Okay so now. There are a toddler. Okay so with toddlers. They're going to start exploring a lot more and they're gonna run into problems so just trying to figure out for example they'll want to walk through a door like go to door and.

two twenty five years three today zero six years twenty experiences one eleven year old eighty five a few inches about two twenties two years of age age two peekaboo around
"distinguished professor" Discussed on Raising Good Humans

Raising Good Humans

07:49 min | 8 months ago

"distinguished professor" Discussed on Raising Good Humans

"Goldilocks parenting that just rate space. That helps develop children's autonomy and talking about. This is professor stephanie. Carlton who is a renowned developmental psychologists. Her research has contributed to the scientific understanding of the development of children's executive function skills. And she is going to talk about. Executive function skills in the context of what parents can do to support that growth of children's executive function skills from bursts throughout childhood. So the approach to parenting most closely linked with children's executive function skill development is autonomy supportive of parenting. And that's something we can completely control. Because it's just about us. So i hope this is an empowering interview and if you enjoy this episode don't hesitate to subscribe rate and write a little review and thank you for listening so executive function refers to the bring basis of self control. So we know quite a bit about the development of the brain and particularly the prefrontal cortex front. Most part of the brain in this region of the brain is primarily primarily although not exclusively responsible for what we call executive action. So it's basically having conscious control over your thoughts actions feelings and we as adults use this These skills all the time including working memory being able to remember what you're doing Remembering why you came upstairs the way that exactly. That sounds silly and obvious but how many of us how many parents are like wait. What was i going to get. Why we Upstairs so that's a lapse of what we call working memory so where you're actively holding in mind. What your goal is another skill is inhibitory control so that kind of that impulse control or putting the brakes on your behavior and we see that with dieting or Trying to stick to an exercise program or something ask or not blurting something. That's inappropriate with your mother-in-law with cognitive flexibility or shifting this being able to think flexibly and getting unstuck on problem an example for an adult might be You kind of us will be used to drive to work You back vetted take the same route every day. Autopilot or go into the store or something. It's on autopilot. But if there is construction detroit that you have to shift think flexibly. Okay wait a minute. What's now what's the best way there was going to be asking nation and we use the skills in everyday life Ritually trying to solve novel problems. And like i said earlier. Waste when you get off auto pilot that you really need to engage executive function skills to be able to remember what you're doing control those impulses in think flexibly and kids do this in a variety of ways to allow it's even more challenging for them and with a young child preschool child for example. It's very common for them to forget what they're doing and it's the reason they can only handle on a one or two step instruction is because if you give them like a three or four step instruction they will only remember the first thing where the last thing that you said in. They don't remember all the other steps because you're just not able to hold that much in your memories actively they're very obviously obviously to struggle with self-control enthusiasm impulses so they're not going to delay gratification in general and they're not taking no for an answer or wait waiting for you to get off the phone waiting for whatever it is that they're trying to get your attention for waiting their turn for a toy waiting their turn in line and then with cognitive flexibility Children are notorious for getting really stuck on one way of thinking about something and the media trying to solve a puzzle or tie. Their shoes learning how to tie their shoes. Were trying to figure out a new way of of playing an old game and it'll be really hard for them until they have these skills more well developed in have experienced practicing the skills they will tend to struggle with with trying to shift their perspective to see this in in a social setting. Where when you're trying to understand somebody else's perspective that also requires cognitive flexibility. Young kids will tend to recall egocentric because they tend to impose their own view of things on everybody else and so this was called. Theory of mind requires that they set aside their own an ego centric perspective instead. Think wait a minute. What would it be. Like if i were in your shoes. And so executive functions really involved in all of those really important cognitive and social and emotional skills when it comes to protecting your family from cove ed and protecting other people from covid. Not all masks are created equal. You need masks. That provide superior protection and or comfortable enough for your kids will want to wear them. So that's why. I'm very glad that i found blueberries. Protection blueberry protection has a mask for every task with student masks for school three ply. Disposable kids masks an even matching mommy and me masks for kids who are having so much trouble understanding why they have to wear a mask. It makes it just a little bit more fun and right now. I have arranged an amazing special offer for my listeners. Fifty percent off fifty percent off but only for a limited time so go to blueberry protection dot com slash humans today and use my promo code. Humans h. u. m. a. n. s. It can be so challenging to get kids to wear masks and if you have kids who are passionate mask squares. Because they're at that age where they really want to save the world. It can feel really good to know that the mask that you're wearing is the right kind of mask that actually works and just in terms of comfort these are lightweight and breathable but they offer serious protection so that gives me a little bit of ease in this crazy time. Upgrade your family's masks with blue bear protection today and do not forget for a limited time. Only my listeners can get fifty percent off their order but only when you order today at blue bear protection dot com slash humans and use the promo code humans. That's blueberry protection dot com slash humans promo code humans. Hey girl hey. Welcome to taste of taylor. My weekly podcast. I'm your host taylor.

Fifty percent fifty percent Goldilocks one cove ed stephanie taylor three three ply blueberry protection dot com today two step four step first thing blue bear protection dot com blue bear covid blueberry dot com one way
What Your Brain Needs Right Now

Untangle

05:11 min | 10 months ago

What Your Brain Needs Right Now

"Hello everyone excited to bring you another incredibly special. Untangle as we know in untangled we love to talk about your experience of the world. Unpack it both. What happens emotional perspective a psychological perspective and and narrow scientific perspective and there is no one better that i could bring on to help you understand the experience that we're all going through right now. And why your emotions in your brain be reacting. The way they are and what you may be able to do about it today. We have dr lisa feldman barrett. She's an extraordinary neuroscientist with multiple awards. She's a distinguished professor at northeastern university with appointments at harvard medical school and mass general hospital. And she's also author of bestselling in very surprising book. How emotions are made. And she's a different way of thinking about your emotional experience than you may have considered before she also has a great book. That just dropped seven and a half lessons about the brain and here is dr lisa feldman barrett to share with us her insight on. What's going on inside your noggin. Welcome lisa hake you so much for having me on your show My joy and my pleasure so when you think about the brain you have kind of different perspective on the brain than most people do. Tell us what is brain. How does it work. How does it drive us. I think most scientists for a long time assumed that the most important thing that human brain does is think because thinking is something that humans are very very proud of and people assume that in brain evolution that there was this striving towards more and more and more complexity with the human brain at the very top so of course the thing that we value ourselves thinking in rationality at least in the west. This would seem to be a really good candidate for what brains the most sophisticated brains which people assumed for longtime hours would do but when you look back into evolutionary time which you can see is that and actually when you look at the structure of the brain. It supports this idea that the brains most important job isn't analogy. It's not feeling or thinking or even seeing your brains. Most important job is regulating your body and all the systems in your body and everything that you can you feel and you see and you hear and you smell and so on are in the service of regulating that body now. That is not the way we experience ourselves in our lives but that really does seem to be. What's going on under the hood. Very different approach so our perceptual experience of the world is in service of helping us regulate our body. Yeah pretty much so even vision for example is not free from the influence of. What's going on inside your body. There are many many experiments showed this that. What's going on inside your body influences sometimes. Literally what you see. And if you look at the connectivity in the visual system and its relationship to other systems in the brain you can see really clearly that vision is not like an objective window on the world by any means we have a sense about how our pre existing perception of the world can continue to shape our perception of the world. This is the whole echo chamber of the news that he thinks that everybody else's and currently i'm not an echo chamber but clearly there an echo chamber because you have a preconceived notion of what's going on and then you read information that with what's going on and that creates your tunnel vision of experience. Can you talk to us a little bit about how that's formed in maintained however echo chamber chamber. Yeah wow well. There's a lot to say about that. I think the thing ariel is there are two ways to answer it. There's a superficial way to answer it. Which is to say brains. Don't just react stuff that's happening in the world we're selecting would signal in. What is noise. Nuts i mean on a moment to moment basis and that certainly is true interesting but i think to me the more interesting the answer it has a little bit of setup and that is that your brain runs a budget for your body. What's the most expensive thing that you can do that you can spend on. It's either moving your body or learning something new especially when things are uncertain and so if your body budget is running a deficit you're not gonna spend as much and so you will be comfortably in a silo because it's more metabolic expedient for you and it will feel more comfortable that's why imparted feels more comfortable. So there's a superficial answer but there's also sort of a deeper answer that relates more to the larger culture that we live then. We have to design a cultural context bankrupt. A body budget would be the one that we live in.

Dr Lisa Feldman Barrett Mass General Hospital Lisa Hake Harvard Medical School Echo Chamber Ariel
Lisa Feldman On What Your Brain Needs Right Now

Untangle

04:56 min | 10 months ago

Lisa Feldman On What Your Brain Needs Right Now

"Hello everyone excited to bring you another incredibly special. Untangle as we know in untangled we love to talk about your experience of the world. Unpack it both. What happens emotional perspective a psychological perspective and and narrow scientific perspective and there is no one better that i could bring on to help you understand the experience that we're all going through right now. And why your emotions in your brain be reacting. The way they are and what you may be able to do about it today. We have dr lisa feldman barrett. She's an extraordinary neuroscientist with multiple awards. She's a distinguished professor at northeastern university with appointments at harvard medical school and mass general hospital. And she's also author of bestselling in very surprising book. How emotions are made. And she's a different way of thinking about your emotional experience than you may have considered before she also has a great book. That just dropped seven and a half lessons about the brain and here is dr lisa feldman barrett to share with us her insight on. What's going on inside your noggin. Welcome lisa hake you so much for having me on your show My joy and my pleasure so when you think about the brain you have kind of different perspective on the brain than most people do. Tell us what is brain. How does it work. How does it drive us. I think most scientists for a long time assumed that the most important thing that human brain does is think because thinking is something that humans are very very proud of and people assume that in brain evolution that there was this striving towards more and more and more complexity with the human brain at the very top so of course the thing that we value ourselves thinking in rationality at least in the west. This would seem to be a really good candidate for what brains the most sophisticated brains which people assumed for longtime hours would do but when you look back into evolutionary time which you can see is that and actually when you look at the structure of the brain. It supports this idea that the brains most important job isn't analogy. It's not feeling or thinking or even seeing your brains. Most important job is regulating your body and all the systems in your body and everything that you can you feel and you see and you hear and you smell and so on are in the service of regulating that body now. That is not the way we experience ourselves in our lives but that really does seem to be. What's going on under the hood. Very different approach so our perceptual experience of the world is in service of helping us regulate our body. Yeah pretty much so even vision for example is not free from the influence of. What's going on inside your body. There are many many experiments showed this that. What's going on inside your body influences sometimes. Literally what you see. And if you look at the connectivity in the visual system and its relationship to other systems in the brain you can see really clearly that vision is not like an objective window on the world by any means we have a sense about how our pre existing perception of the world can continue to shape our perception of the world. This is the whole echo chamber of the news that he thinks that everybody else's and currently i'm not an echo chamber but clearly there an echo chamber because you have a preconceived notion of what's going on and then you read information that with what's going on and that creates your tunnel vision of experience. Can you talk to us a little bit about how that's formed in maintained however echo chamber chamber. Yeah wow well. There's a lot to say about that. I think the thing ariel is there are two ways to answer it. There's a superficial way to answer it. Which is to say brains. Don't just react stuff that's happening in the world we're selecting would signal in. What is noise. Nuts i mean on a moment to moment basis and that certainly is true interesting but i think to me the more interesting the answer it has a little bit of setup and that is that your brain runs a budget for your body. What's the most expensive thing that you can do that you can spend on. It's either moving your body or learning something new especially when things are uncertain and so if your body budget is running a deficit you're not gonna spend as much and so you will be comfortably in a silo because it's more metabolic expedient for you and it will feel more comfortable that's why imparted feels more comfortable.

Dr Lisa Feldman Barrett Mass General Hospital Lisa Hake Harvard Medical School Echo Chamber Ariel
"distinguished professor" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:40 min | 10 months ago

"distinguished professor" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Doubles in the winter Months distinguished professor of public health at the University of Arizona, Dr Richard Carmona worries these winter months will bring a wave to the health care. System that's already hanging on by a thread when we look at ICU, bed availability and regular bed availability. We never have been worried about it in a non covert year that we couldn't accommodate influx of national birds. But now because of covert, we do have concerned Allie Ventnor, Katya our news. Some a. A few students could win a million dollars after developing a mask that's comparable, functional and even stylish. The team ranked in the top 10 finalists for the prize with over 1000 entries. Be in another testament to issues innovative character on capabilities. But beyond that, we're hopeful that these innovations really do impact society because at the end of the day, that is our main goal. That's the killed of a from the student run luminosity lab vote for his team and he s u by going to X prize dot org's slash Mask and X is spelled with the letter X. Yeah, if you no. Pay me a million dollars all wear masks for the rest of my life for these papers for the rest of the year, But you're supposed to develop one. Not just wear one, though. There is that we're not scientists. It doesn't work that way. All right, 6 25. And my question is what was my wife gonna do with all these mass that she had Halloween themed, You know, Easter theme that put him on your Christmas tree. Don't say that, because they expect you could spend the tree around you around. You know what? Z not even go there detoured and help us out here. Stop us from talking and tell us about the mile ride so far from the Valley Chevy Dealers Traffic center. All right. It does look like we are in Turkey Travel mode.

Dr Richard Carmona Allie Ventnor distinguished professor Valley Chevy Dealers University of Arizona
This Miracle Molecule will Supercharge Your Health with Nobel Prize Winner Dr. Louis Ignarro

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

06:19 min | 1 year ago

This Miracle Molecule will Supercharge Your Health with Nobel Prize Winner Dr. Louis Ignarro

"Welcome to the broken brain podcast where we dive deep. Into the topics of Neuro Plasticity, EPA genetics, mindfulness, and functional medicine I'm your host droid and each week my team and I bring on a new guest who we think can help you improve your brain health feel better and most importantly live more. This week's guest is Dr Liu Ignarro. Dr Narrow is a medical research scientist who was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine for. His breakthrough discovery of Nitric Oxide, N., O. N., how it positively impacts health and longevity especially hard health his groundbreaking research on nitric oxide pave the way for among many other innovations Viagra. A Very well-known medication to a lot of individuals were recently by the way nitric oxide is currently being investigated over the world in hospitals and universities as a possible treatment and intervention for. COVID, nineteen Dr Narrow is a distinguished professor emeritus of molecular and medical pharmacology at the University of California Los. Angeles and he has his PhD in Pharmacology with over thirty years of experience in teaching doctor Dr Welcome to the brokering podcast. It's an honor to have you here with the honor is all mine drew. It's great to be here and I really look forward to. Talking about good health effects. Absolutely, in preparation for the interview, I was listening to pretty much all your content that I could get my hands on online and I've seen you mentioned in numerous. Speeches and talks about. Teaching is so central to who you are nothing fires you up more than explaining concept and then seeing a student that light bulb moment where they get it and I just want to say where did that come from before we jump into everything we're doing a passion for teaching come from while I can tell you clearly my passion for teaching, which is every bit as as large as my passion for a discovery or original research. My my passion for teaching came early when I was in elementary school and high school and you know why? Because I had lousy teachers and I would always sit there and wonder why can't these people explain something better than what I could. Read in the Damn Book. You know they're there to teach your up in front of the room teach and impart your information to this edens so that we can understand it and I swore that if ever the day came when I would be a university professor, I would not do it their way. I would do it my way and try to become the best teacher I could, and I've always had this passion for communicating with students I love that that's incredible and we'll come back to that. In your origin story. I want to take a moment to congratulate you because we're coming up on the twenty second anniversary of your Nobel Prize I believe you got the prize. In October. Twenty two years ago. Does that sound right? You very good at this very, very good. Yes. I the announcement of my Nobel Prize was an October twelve. Of One, thousand nine, hundred, Ninety, eight, and you know this coming Monday October fifth the Twenty Twenty Nobel Prizes will be announced. So get ready. You one thing I don't know who's going to get it. But I'M NOT GONNA get it a second time. That one is enough. One is fantastic. Especially one as powerful as the one that you've gotten, we should awe only hope and dream that we can have direction i WanNa talk about your basis of the work for receiving the Nobel Prize for discoveries concerning nitric oxide as a signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. Let's start off with the basics what is nitric oxide and how's it so fundamentally related to our health and function. That's a great question would require a about a week to answer but I will try to do it in a couple of minutes. Nitric oxide firstly, I want to remind everyone is not a gas I I mean is not a liquid or solid, but rather it's a gas. It's a gaseous substance that only lasts for a few seconds. It's very unstable. This is what made it so difficult to find in the in the human body, and that's why the discovery came. So late in the nineteen eighties and so essentially. What I discovered was that our bodies produce this molecule of nitric oxide which should not be confused with nitrous oxide. That's laughing gas, and that's what's used in a dentist office, for example, to relieve pain. Nitric oxide although it sounds the same is a totally different molecule and. What we discovered was that our arteries, our endothelial cells that line the arteries actually make this nitric oxide and what nitric oxide does is phenomenal. It's Vasil later. It widens the arteries and when it does that it lowers the blood pressure, it improves blood flow to different Oregon's was your dilating the arteries and. In addition, this nitric oxide can keep the inner lining of the arteries healthy so that blood does not clot a when it's not supposed to in the arteries also prevents cholesterol plaques from depositing in the arteries. So as long as you keep making nitric oxide in those endothelial cells, it will keep your vascular system very healthy. So one of the reasons we make nitric oxide is to protect our cardiovascular systems against high blood pressure. Stroke and heart attack.

Nobel Prize Twenty Twenty Nobel Nitrous Oxide Dr Liu Ignarro Dr Narrow EPA Research Scientist Viagra Oregon Distinguished Professor Edens O. N. Angeles University Of California Los Professor
"distinguished professor" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

Raw Talk Podcast

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"distinguished professor" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

"So it's not. So emotionally troublesome in persistence is reduced it again, there's mixed evidence this point, but there's at least some evidence suggesting that this may be a promising approach, but it's not really settled yet in the literature more. Extensive. Double Blind Studies. needs to be needs to be done to learn more about memory distortion, and it's practical effects we spoke to Dr Elizabeth Loftus, who is a distinguished professor at the University of California Irvine a cognitive psychologist, an expert on human memory. Her work has been crucial in shifting paradigms in the memory fields. Her research investigates how memory may be manipulated and modified by messages, ideas and suggestions. Dr Loftus Research has significant applications to the legal field eyewitness testimonies and courtrooms. We started out by asking Dr Loftus to define false memories. Yes false memories. A kind of.

Dr Elizabeth Loftus Dr Loftus Research distinguished professor University of California
Heaven and Hell with Bart Ehrman

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

05:44 min | 1 year ago

Heaven and Hell with Bart Ehrman

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb and I'm Joe McCormick and this week. We are going to be featuring a couple of interviews. That I recorded last week because last week Robert, you were out of quote, the office you or at least you off work for a bit and so so I recorded conversations with authors of some books one book. That's already out this year in one book. That's coming up so on Thursday of this week. We're going to be airing a conversation that I had with the author of A. A fascinating upcoming book about the evolutionary biology of cancer, but today we're going to be exploring topic in the realm of ancient history and religion. If you've followed us for a while, I think you probably know this about us that one of our favorite kind of trails to go down his tracing the evolution of religious ideas through ancient history I mean I think I've outed myself on this podcast before. As a the kind of nonreligious person who loves the Bible. Can I love to read ancient religious texts and learn about them and see how the ideas from. From the ancient world of super filtered through to us today and shape to the societies we live in, and that's exactly the kind of thing. We're GONNA be diving into in this episode I'm talking with a secular Biblical historian named Bart Erman about his most recent book, which is called Heaven and hell a history of the afterlife. This book was released in March of this year by Simon. And Schuster, and it's all about the Christian ideas of life after death where they come from ancient history, what influence their development and how they changed over time so? So there was a part that cited in the intro of Bart's book where he talks about a pew research poll that was conducted a few years ago. I think. Maybe it was in two thousand fifteen. Where it found that seventy two percent of Americans believe in a literal heaven and fifty eight percent believe in literal hell, and yet I think most Americans would be deeply surprised, even shock to learn what historians can show about the origins of these beliefs in the strange thing. Is that like the historical conclusions that Bart's GonNa talk about in this episode? Are Not fringe or unusual among secular scholars of the Bible, in historians of the ancient Near East This is utterly mainstream, critical scholarship, and yet I think regular people are especially in the united. States, are going to find it very surprising. Yeah, absolutely, and I want to stress something here for everybody, so I just got back. To work this morning and I plugged into a pre production cut of this interview and it's really it's really excellent, so if you're even slightly scared away by the idea of an interview with a secular biblical scholar don't be because Barda is tremendous. He's he's funny. Very High Energy. I think you're really going to enjoy this chat. Joe Had with Bart here. Yeah, parts full of knowledge, good humor passion for his subject. I think you're really going to enjoy the episode, but before we can do it I'll just give a little bit of background on Bart's here's his biography Bart. D Ehrman is a leading authority on the New Testament and the history of early Christianity, and the author or editor of. Of more than thirty books, including the New York Times bestsellers misquoting Jesus, how Jesus became God, and the triumph of Christianity, and that last one's really interesting. It's about how Christianity took over the Roman Empire and went from a really small religion, too dominant religion of the empire, and just a matter of a few centuries anyway, so he is a distinguished professor of religious studies, the University of North Carolina Chapel, Hill and he. He has created eight popular audio and video courses for the great courses. He has been featured in time. The New Yorker The Washington Post and has appeared on NBC CNN and the daily show with Jon Stewart as well as the history channel National Geographic Channel BBC NPR, all the hits his most recent book is Heaven and Hell just one more thing before we get into it I. WanNa mention obviously we are dealing with. With the audio constraints of of remote recording in the age of Covid, nineteen, so for example around the twelve minute mark in the episode there is briefly some background noise that sounds like a fan was turned on or some rain. It only lasts for about a minute or so, and so please just put up with a little bit of background noise, and it's very brief I promise. It's not the sounds of hell right. Now audio recordings of the underworld leaking up through some sort of mining microphone right? The well to hell was not unleashed office. So yeah, I would say without any further ado. Let's jump right in. Bardem and welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks so much for joining us today. Yes, thanks for having me so your Book Heaven and Hell I just finished reading yesterday, and I I really really enjoyed it. and I want to say that I started reading this book. It very opportune time because though I didn't plan it this way. I'm also currently in the middle of rereading. Rereading the divine comedy, actually my wife and I are reading it together and of course, the divine comedy Dante his wonderful poetry, but it's also psychologically fascinating because when you go through the theology of Dante, you get the sense of somebody who is simultaneously ingenious and thoughtful, and in some ways very intellectually bold and open minded for his historical context, but in other ways. Dante's also very limited and provincial in a word medieval like the way you see him taking so much pleasure in designing horrific tortures for his enemies from these. Petty Thirteenth Century political struggles in Italy. Working with ancient religious texts do you find yourself encountering? This kind of irony embodied within the same author or traditional lot

Bart Erman Dante Robert Lamb Joe Mccormick New York Times Schuster A. A Simon Italy Barda Joe Had Ehrman Jon Stewart Bardem Roman Empire University Of North Carolina C Editor Distinguished Professor Hill
Reimagine

PODSHIP EARTH

05:04 min | 1 year ago

Reimagine

"The scope of the societal impacts, being both inflicted and uncovered by the Covid, nineteen pandemic, truly without precedence. At the end of June, thirty three million Americans, are receiving unemployment benefits nearly five times the peak during the great recession in parallel, the magnitude of racial injustices, being perpetrated across country is now in such cliff focus that the fight to eradicate racism has entered a new and powerful chapter. With every disaster, whether it's an economic collapse or damage inflicted by a wildfire hurricane would given a choice rebuild in the same pattern as before or reimagined a different future. The choice to rebuild is often fueled by a sense of nostalgia, a desire to reclaim what was lost as we think about our collective tomorrow. There's a lot of the past we need to leave behind. If a peaceful compassionate, equitable and sustainable future is our goal, then we must undergo a careful assessment to ensure that our path forward doesn't rebuild the systems of violence, inequality, racism, and pollution that a corroding our society from the inside out. Refashioning a new future is full of promise, but we often don't take the bold steps necessary because of a fear of uncertainty, that's where big thinkers can help us by navigating a path for they illuminate each of the steps of the journey giving us the confidence needed to climb the highest peak this week. We talked to Dr Manuel, Pesto. One those bold big thinkers Manuel is the University of Southern California's distinguished professor of sociology American Studies in ethnicity. He's the director of US's program for environmental, regional equity and the director of the Center for the Study of Immigration Integration. I've had the privilege of working with Dr on environmental justice issues for the past decade, and he is no ordinary academic. He worked directly with communities to gain their wisdom and advocates directly with policy makers to get them to move towards community goals. Doctor Pastor is the author of state of Resistance. What California's dizzying descent and remarkable resurgence means for America's future, and with Chris. Bene- the. This could be something big. How social movements regional equity a reshaping Metropolitan America and just growth inclusion and prosperity in America's Metropolitan Regions? Doug Pass is working with both Los Angeles and the State of California to develop policies to help move towards a more just equitable and sustainable post Kovic Future. Dr Pesto has been tracking the impact of the pandemic on African American and Latino Communities in California and nationally I stopped by asking about the data. That's just been released on this topic by the Centers for Disease Control. Well the incredible statistic, coming out today, was that for Latinos between the ages of forty and fifty nine, the rate of contracting cases of Covid as five times that for whites in the same age group. We're certainly seeing as in California's well where Latinos make up forty three percent of the population, eighteen to forty nine kind of prime work in age, but seventy three percents, deaths, and the reasons for this are pretty clear, you know Cova is the disease that reveals are fundamental. Illness has a society, the precarity of employment and the lack of assets that made a lot of people kind of rush back to work, says the only way to kick it income difficulties with legal status, which has been in particular. Her emigrated Latinos that they are worried about where their next dollars coming from. They're not getting a federal relief in terms of unemployment insurance to not getting the federal relief check and in fact. Fact if you're in a family where two people filed a tax return, one person with a social security number, and the other was what's called an individual taxpayer identification number I tim, which is our undocumented people filed tax returns. That family unit is excluded from the twelve hundred dollars per person checks, and so are their children who are not getting the five hundred dollar relief checks. So this is a population that's been particularly desperate to go to work now serve big disparities as well for African Americans, but I've been predicting that this is something that would ripped its way particularly to the immigrant Latino community, and that's what data released today from the CDC seems to be showing

Dr Manuel California Covid Dr Pesto America Hurricane University Of Southern Califor Centers For Disease Control Metropolitan America United States Professor Of Sociology America Los Angeles Doug Pass Illness Cova Study Of Immigration Integrati
The origins of the antiviral drug Remdesivir

Second Opinion

04:45 min | 1 year ago

The origins of the antiviral drug Remdesivir

"Vaccines and medications will be the ultimate weapon used to beat Kovic. Nineteen and there's a giant race to develop the first medications vaccine driven both by Prophet and prestige. The potential market is enormous. This week we learned about the limited effectiveness of a drug called rim disappear made by Gilead Sciences but the story of that drugs development is far more interesting than was reported. The story starts with a universally fatal illness in cats called Feline infectious peritonitis or F-. Ip this nasty disease is caused by a corona virus and is surprisingly common in cats. Who spent a lot of time in shelters or rescue facilities? Dr Neal Peterson is a distinguished professor of veterinary medicine at UC Davis and has spent his professional career beginning in one thousand nine hundred sixty four studying corona viruses in animals particularly in the cat. He tried for years to develop a vaccine for F. I. P. Vaccines have never been highly effective against corona viruses. So this is something that the human Researchers Heaven appreciated. They haven't taken seriously so without a vaccine. That left only the option of medication. Dr Peterson worked collaboratively with Gilead Sciences. To look at their existing compounds for chemicals that might help with F. I. B. and we found two drugs that were highly effective against F- IP virus in tissue culture and a second drug was called rim disappear. This is the drug that this week. Dr Vouch e touted as being a benefit to people infected with Kovin we have had our little pandemic. That's been going on for years and we've been treating patients with basically the same drug having high success rate and nobody has even mentioned that it exists. No one paid any attention to the veterinarian who had great experience with Corona Viruses. Gilead refused to allow him de severe to be made for cats because there was very little money in it gilead was waiting for something really big that could result in treatment for humans and generate significant money. They tested the drug as a treatment for Ebola but it failed so they waited. According to Peterson Gilead was afraid if the drug was approved for and it showed some side effects it could prevent future approval for humans and squelched their chance of making hundreds of millions of dollars so rendez severe sat on the shelf and could not be used for cats with F. I. P. But enter the Chinese who also had a growing problem with F. I. P. in their own cats they saw the potential of the drug rendez severe for cats and they began to produce it themselves and interestingly the scented covertly to pet owners here in the United States but then came cove and the Chinese saw the drugs potential for treating corona viruses in humans and perhaps the rest is now history with the recent trials showing it is moderately successful in treating Cova nineteen and Gilead stocks. Shooting up of course one lesson that might go. Unnoticed are the important gems that lurk in the world of animal science. They had evidence from the TAT. But you see nobody ever uses that. Nobody references those papers from the medical side. They all talk about some experimental bow. Study or some primate infection study but they never mentioned the cat. Human medicine is often unaware of what's happening in animal health. As we now rushed to find a vaccine for cove there are also important lessons. We risk missing. You realize that we've been vaccinating krona viruses in cats and in poultry and swine and even some of the other species for decades. We know all the weaknesses and strengths of vaccines. We've studied Corona virus infection and pathogenesis in detail. Do you ever see anything in the literature? Saying hey the poultry. Industry has been vaccinating for infections bronchitis for decades. They never mentioned any of that stuff. Perhaps this speaks to the enormous importance of the concept of one health. That is the interdependence of all living things.

Dr Neal Peterson Gilead Sciences Kovic Dr Vouch E Ebola Distinguished Professor Uc Davis United States Cova
"distinguished professor" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

11:29 min | 1 year ago

"distinguished professor" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Distinguished professor of electrical and computer engineering at Baylor University for whom a my respect what up enormously after you all be a K. you yes that was that was interesting awesome is what it was it was awesome and I'm I'm a member of the yeah I'm here in the big twelve with you with that look for you know a much smaller case date but we we celebrated that when that our head coach just quit for a football team no yeah he went to the NFL no yeah the Bucks adamant no that's right I'm not here that's right I forget some the lately college head coaching is become kind of a revolving door so it's hard for me to keep track of where people were but I did hear that and the NFL needs it because they got a bunch of they got a stick built coaches there they got to keep up but that's part of the same thing here too it's we always have to be forward thinking and always thinking what what is not what necessarily we're facing today but what we could be facing five years from now and in your book which by the way is is available free if people want to they can link up to that it caused because the M. dot com and get a free copy of the case for killer robots is that this is a again work we're we're arguing about some sort of convergence point in the future between what we need to have in our arsenal and what others are going to have in there yes and I think in order to do that we need to have a nice sober informed discussion about the limits of a hi right I think the way things are informed in the media there is this idea of the A. I. Sunday will be sentient or be creative for understand no it will never do any of those things that's that's back pretty solidly by evidence and computer science so once you put that aside and look at artificial intelligence and formed a sort of matter manner you can actually see some of the limitations that are going to be imposed on on artificial intelligence of the weapons of the future it's never going to become like sh kind at the terminator movie right never going to become like the matrix where Roman bath tubs of blue and live right virtual reality world to difference in my life right now by the way so I'm not sure he can make that claim but but when you say that I also have to point out though that although you are right and we know it I mean it's still sometimes easy to you put everything down a level say that media but however we look at movies TV you know they're still stories that come out take out of Japan where they're working on by robots that mimic human emotions so they may not generated but there does seem to be an interest in some levels of science to create at least in a fact of of of human empathy or sympathy or if it to fulfill a function and and that that that this would be part of some future development of artificial intelligence well the mimicking at selfie mimicking of human emotion is not really that difficult it turns out that we are pre wired as little babies my daughter just had twins so I know a lot about being Mazel Tov yeah I think and they they can actually see about a foot in front of them and their brains of pre wired to a notice see since and this gives rise to something called the uncanny valley hypothesis and if it has to do with the different regression curve but basically the idea is that the emotional response to things which are close to you men are much more severe than if they don't relate to humans think back to the nineteen thirty two movie Frankenstein with Boris Karloff Sir he kind of walked around really slowly and if you were on crutches you could out run the guy probably Mike Tyson could take them out with a couple of punches but he he was creepy and he still gives you the creeps because he resembled a human being please science fiction author Isaac Asimov actually coined the term the Frankenstein effect and that is the the fear of the we have of robots or anything that looks human yeah and I think that that that that is the kind of up but that it was a a human version of an automaton which had already existed in our culture and in our cultural imagination so whether we were creating you know essentially a call arcade features that were very realistic looking automatons Assyria basically very complicated clock but one that sort of gave the affect of of a human interaction or if we even go back and we look at in in religious war about the creation of a of a mindless automaton that was you know created out created in flash the this is this is what people fear because we've always feared it is your point but I don't know that it is it is entirely without basis of fearing it when we look at people who are modern computer scientists who are still trying to come up with robots that will that will do better than that and will appear empathetic and not scary and they will appear very sweet and they might be able to cradle the baby and to be able to comfort that they be instead of just having some bassinet rocking back and forth yeah absolutely one of the things that always needs to be defined as what is meant by being better better and watch French yeah I I think you actually meant the into cradling of the robot like terms of artificial intelligence the artificial intelligence itself has little to do with the packaging so you can package artificial intelligence and a robotic sort of hint not a robotic but a humanoid sort of four sort of right like like the transformers or you can package artificial intelligence in in muscles so the actual artificial intelligence has little to do with the packaging and some of these things that I see in the media I don't know if you've heard of the robot Sophia she she's supposed to be able to have conversations with you and express human emotions and actually I mean she's not that impressive because basically what she does is it his raises an eyebrow does a little grimace and these are things again the were tuned to recognize and Sir using the program and background is and conversational skills were kind of on the level of a lecture right right but it but look how much Alexa is taking over that you know homes in many ways to help people I have you know I I'll grant you that the human interaction with Alexa is something that Alexa is not aware of may not in any sentient way but we do what with that type of technology what we do with dogs I'm pretty sure my dog completely understands why I was bothered by having to write for sila by yesterday I'm pretty sure that he completely got my point and that was wrong they have to do in one day but you know he's looking at me you know what I'm talking about but I feel like he knew and I think this is where maybe this is the the great challenges not getting the media to articulate it better although that there's truth to that look we're trying to do it right now but it's whether science is going to be with the people who are developing it are going to continue to be as engaged with the public and making their case for its necessity instead of doing that ivory tower thing which is we're gonna go do this thing and we'll let you know later on when we finished well if you actually think about it you and we are really blessed with artificial intelligence today I think some of the things we're kind of numb to buy familiar familiar already right you have a lecture we got burned right some search engines Amazon shop right the point so we have artificial intelligence all around us that is doing some great wonderful things so that's the challenge though that when we talk about this in a military context is that what will how will great and wonderful interprets to military artificial intelligence or will it only feel great and wonderful when it's our drones doing the killing and not us being killed by enemy drones or here's the unfortunate conclusion I would submit is we do not have the option in terms of pursuing the artificial intelligence development again warning to history technology has actually increased the posture of of nations it is one Morris is shortened wars the comic mom shorten World War two and as did the Norden bomb site as to the decoding of the **** enigma code all of these were technology technological things which helped shorten the war a big one was actually radar that we that the enemy didn't know about the finances you know the Japanese knew about until the day of Japan's surrender but I had an uncle that was in the Pacific theater and he was supposed to jump behind enemy lines yeah for a twenty four pounds of explosive on his legs he was he was a paratrooper he was supposed to go behind enemy lines and blow up stuff but he was so happy when he heard about the bomb the atomic bombs because he was able to come home to West Virginia where I'm from and raise a family and live to a ripe old age of ninety four in jumping behind the lines would be of them the suicide mission now the atomic bomb killed I think about two hundred and twenty thousand people just terrible but if you look at his story and it's one of them was Phil Jenkins he's a story on her the alert he estimates that the dropping of the bomb saved ten million lives not only the allies invading Japan not only the Japanese fighting back and they they actually had deaths over surrender in their in their philosophy but all of the occupations of Japan was doing with China and North Korea and there was a standing order and incarceration caps that in case the campus to be over run all the prisoners would be killed sure any of the extra million so this is an unfortunate but it is unfortunate that aspect of the of the nature of man but we have to do it but I really like we have no choice okay but this is I think I think you're actually making a case against your point and I'll tell you why personal bike as chance would have it I too had an uncle that was in the Pacific theater and he shared the same feelings with me many times hi even even though he's very much of a pacifist in other respects he had fought alongside he was in Patton's army in Italy and he had was being transferred to the South Pacific and he felt his luck could just run out he had survived you know a year or in Europe which was on her he was the most senior guy and his little you know group and he thought there's no way he was going to survive a Japanese invasion and so there was always part of from that was grateful for that bomb but I think this is the point is that we still humans still selected that target right so that's my point that I say I think that's where again we come back to something which might undermine a little bit.

Baylor University Distinguished professor
"distinguished professor" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"distinguished professor" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Of beacon research and Darren Shaw university distinguished professor at the university of Texas both members of the fox news decision team we discussed how fox news conducts its polling what voters can gather from some of our recent polls and more first I want to talk Darren about how we structure our polls there's a lot of you know we always have to do pull pulling one oh one I think every time we go back into an election cycle how do you choose the people we are contacting for pole I'm sure this latest poll had about a thousand respondents well when we're doing a national survey we're doing something used to be referred to as a random digit dial just to get way down in the weeds of what we want to do is identify population in this case would be you know registered voters in the United States and we want to select a representative sample and what happened this is where you know my students of your listeners to the podcast fears of fox news have a little bit of trouble getting their heads around the notion that if you randomly select a thousand people that that's a sufficient number to represent opinion all across the United States for you got you know three hundred thirty three and forty million people but what happens is is that let's just say on a question like attitudes towards president trump if forty six percent of people approved by means forty six percent of people out there in the population generally hold of the favorable or approving opinion of the president if you randomly sample people the chances that you're going to come across people with that sort of common opinion or pretty significant in the more people you interview the more likely you are to encounter that opinion so what you're doing what everybody should visualize is you know every person that's interviewed contributes towards a broader estimate of the structure of opinion in America the more people you interview the more likely you are to represent that effectively the key here is randomness right everybody has to have an equal probability of getting selected you know in the the more you do that the more likely you are to build an accurate estimate of opinion that actually exist so if we were only to do a hundred people would be a significant margin of error were not very confident that there isn't some you know just kind of random skew you know you can flip a coin ten times and get seven heads out of ten that doesn't mean there's a seventy percent your chance that heads is the is the true distribution that way so we end up doing a thousand because when you get to a thousand people the end up having an estimate of opinion if you do things right the house plus or minus about three percentage points and that's something that we feel we can live with yeah so Chris I want to just a couple more questions on methodology when people see a break down of self identified forty eight percent Democrats forty percent Republicans twelve percent independence and they say wait a second is this skewed towards Democrats this poll sure yeah that's a that's a great question and one thing that we always remind people that it's sometimes hard to get their heads around is that party ideology is not a fixed characteristic in in it changes over time in it intends to follow the trends in in in politics and we we pay.

Darren Shaw university distinguished professor university of Texas forty six percent forty eight percent seventy percent twelve percent forty percent
"distinguished professor" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"distinguished professor" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"All right, guys. Let's get back to the show. So I've talked to quite a few people on talk nerdy up to this point. Because we're in the like two hundred thirty something forty something numbers of episodes now. And when I talk to people about black holes, for example, I find that. There are similarities across the conversations. But I also find that they're very unique perspectives from different people depending on their field of astronomy. So you, you know, you're currently the distinguished professor in the department of astronomy at the university of Arizona, what type of astronomer are you like, obviously, you are focused on cosmology. But are there I've talked to let's say string theorists, for example of fairy different views on black home. Then, you know, people who are studies of Einstein's equations and things like that. So I mean first of all truth in advertising for a couple of years. I've been in associate dean, so I'm sort of administrative droid for half of my time. So my mom, the pleasurable astronomy part and using telescopes is less than it used to be. But I that makes me enjoy it more, actually. Absolutely. And it it means that you get to make bigger decisions about funding and the people who get to tell these important stories into this important research. So I want to just update right here in my notes that you're the associate dean R I. So yes, so I'm an observer. And I I. Cut my teeth. I'm Brett, and I did my undergrad and grad work in London and Edinburgh. And so I've been an optical infrared observational astronomer, and I got taken by the these very luminous. Oh, we're talking about black holes in their range of masses. So the extreme ones are the are billion or more solar masses? And they're the centers of large galaxies. And the most extreme of them are the ones that are showing down on gas and stars and emitting huge amounts of energy. So that that's another little paradox built into black holes. People think well, they're dark nothing can escape. So how do you see a dark thing? Well, many of them are dark and hard to detect but a small fraction of three percent are very active because they're they're feeding their fuelling through an accretion disk. So it sort of matters falling onto them going into this Equatorial disk and then funding into the black hole, and they end up being incredibly bright. So when they do that, they become quasars this one of the terms for these. The active black holes. And that's an extraordinary thing. So I earlier in my career I was drawn to that. Because what a quasar is is it's a nucleus of a galaxy. It's a the region around a billion solar mass black hole where energy is being pumped out because of Chretien power and shines up two thousand times brighter than the entire galaxy. That contains it so I like to use the analogy of matching you're.

associate dean university of Arizona distinguished professor dean R Einstein Chretien Brett London Edinburgh three percent
"distinguished professor" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

People's Pharmacy

03:50 min | 3 years ago

"distinguished professor" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

"And friends but when the emotions associated with food get tangled there can be serious health consequences how can we change our emotional reactions to eating we're talking with dr cindy bulich she's distinguished professor of eating disorders in the department of psychiatry in the school of medicine at the university of north carolina chapel hill and is professor of nutrition at the gillan school of global public health she hopes the first endowed professorship in eating disorders in the united states and is the founding director of the unc center of excellence for eating disorders dr bulich there are some people for whom food is just so important i mean every family get together is like a huge occasion but even just dinner i mean it has to be just right the food has to be perfect and that's all they think about this like eating eating eating and they may not even be overweight but it's just you know focus on food and then there are other people for whom a food is really i mean it's a holiday that you have to eat in order to survive but that's pretty much it there's no further interest how do people reach such very different places and how how do we help them if they start getting into trouble at those extremes i think the issue of people not really caring one way or another about food is really pertinent especially for older people so even people who might have really enjoyed food when they were younger often sort of just become sort of indifferent to eating you know part of that is because our sense of taste diminishes a little bit over time the most common reason for that is actually depression we see a lot of older people who get depressed when they're older especially if they lose a spouse and they're just cooking for one now and it's like why should i go to the bother of doing that just for me so weight loss and malnutrition in older people is really important and actually i think under attendant to issue in the medical field and definitely in terms of research and that's not the only way eating can go awry when you're older one of the other things that happens especially in system living facilities and nursing homes is there's a lot of of use of things like laxatives and dia radic's and whatever and so there's actually some evidence that you start seeing more lex to abuse in people as they are in these sorts of facilities so you know i've been looking through the course of my career i've looked at little kids i've looked at it lessons i looked at grownup people and now i'm getting really interested in looking at the other end of the age spectrum abe because they're more of us now and to because we're in situations where we can't always monitor what people are eating we're expecting other people to monitor what they're eating for us but they're not actually paying all that much attention they're more worried about falls and you know other things like right exactly and of course you would think that the physician who sees these people in and usually older people are seeing a doctor at least ocassionally that they would be paying attention but they might not always be no in fact one of the things that i get particularly upset about is one of physician will just write a symptom off saying oh look you're getting older that's just something that happens when you get older and i think wait is one of those things either going up or going down and i think it's we don't have enough geriatricians in this world there's no question about and the geriatricians that we do have really need to have more training and nutrition and monitoring these weight changes and impending eating disorders no i'd like.

dr cindy bulich
"distinguished professor" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"distinguished professor" Discussed on EconTalk

"Now wait till the end station we'll we'll put a link up to yeah because if what you're saying is there's absolutely no way it's not a matter of if it's a matter of when it will be very soon we will have exhausted various kinds of resorts which using exponentially and his point is human beings don't undestand exponential growth they the famous thing that you put bacteria in jive eleven clock and it doubles every minute and come back at twelve o'clock and it's full when eleven fifty nine and would back to in that jar allies to go to program eleven fifty eight the joe is seven it was eight full living fifty six on the sixteenth little but that was four minutes for it hit the buffers so we're in that kind of a world and this foam all to world than just having more years you mentioned long evidence is that necessarily good that we can get more stuff is that necessarily good do you think we're happier the evidences we're not happy the evidence is that actually people who lead lives that we in somewhat patronizing way think oh very basic and simple may have more stabilize this ince's funeral filled and be as happy happier than we are is not as straightforward it reminds me of i told colleague of mine is distinguished professor of saying catches the research which shows particularly that we don't any happy and there's a strong case with north as happy as we wear in say the nineteen fifties sixties when you know life was relatively uncomfortable on the on the terms you've described and he said but that can't be right they've all washing machines and i'm sorry what you just gave me and pink says is version of vocal washing machines.

joe ince distinguished professor four minutes
Gop, President and Congress discussed on This Week with George Stephanopoulos

This Week with George Stephanopoulos

01:26 min | 4 years ago

Gop, President and Congress discussed on This Week with George Stephanopoulos

"Have on it which of america's most prominent economist paul krugman nobel prizewinning economists now a columnist for the new york times distinguished professor at city university of new york and glenn hubbard dean of the columbia business school chair of the council of economic advisers under george w bush we just saw president trump right there he also put up a tweet yesterday saying that tax cuts will increase investment in the american konomi and in us workers leading to higher growth higher wages and more jobs paul krugman your response lots of people all basically all serious studies say not so much there's gonna be maybe a little boost but not very much we had the university of chicago survey forty two economists provole political persuasions only one thought it was going to have a significant effect on economic growth and i've been looking at what are the markets thick which kind inching so we have a chart here if you can short so never mind the stock market right he's going to cut taxes on corporations you'd expect stocks to go up a better judge would be look at the dollar because if this bill does what it they say it's gonna do skads money will pour in corporation will bring money back home invested here all of that should lead to a surge in the dollar in fact the dollar has done nothing the dollar rose when trump was elected because they thought the people thought the infrastructure plan was going to happen then went back down again it's actually lower than it was on election day and what the markets are saying is this is a big nothing burger the markets are saying they don't really expect any significant economic boost from this

GOP President Trump Congress Petrie Gaspard
"distinguished professor" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

People's Pharmacy

02:30 min | 4 years ago

"distinguished professor" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

"Emily and friends but when the emotions associated with food get tangled there can be serious health consequences how can we change our emotional reactions to eating we're talking with dr cindy bulich she's distinguished professor of eating disorders in the department of psychiatry in the school of medicine at the university of north carolina chapel hill and is professor of nutrition at the gillan school of global public health she hopes the first endowed professorship and eating disorders in the united states and is the founding director of the unc centre of excellence for eating disorders dr bulich there are some people for whom food is just so important i mean every family get together is like a huge occasion but even just dinner i mean it has to be just right the food has to be perfect and that's all they think about this like eating eating eating and they may not even be overweight but it's just focus on food and then there are other people for home a food is really uh i mean it's acknowledge that you have to eat in order to survive but that's pretty much it there's no further interest how do people reach such very different places and um it out how do we help them if they start getting into trouble at those extremes i think the issue of people not really carrying one way or another about food is really pertinent especially for older people so even people who might have really enjoyed food when they were younger often sort of just become sort of indifferent to eating you know part of that is because our sense of taste diminishes a little bit overtime the most common reason for that is actually depression um we see a lot of older people who get depressed when they're older especially if they lose a spouse and there'd his cooking for one now in it's like why should i go to the bother of doing that just for me uh so weight loss and malnutrition in older people is a really important than actually i think under attended to issue in the medical field and definitely in terms of research and you know that's not the only way eating can go awry when you're older m one of the other things that happens especially in assisted living facility is an nursing homes is there's a lot.

distinguished professor gillan school public health united states founding director medical field Emily university of north carolina c unc
"distinguished professor" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"distinguished professor" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Today magee giovanni is a selfproclaimed space freak and a delighted elder and adored voice to hip hop artis and the new forms of social change this generation is creating you're enjoying being in her seventies i sent abdulah i recommend had i love it and i love how you are discontinuing the russell and change your mind and your vision is disconsolately evolving but everybody's is only different twin me and most people is about let of rate to talk up without the fifth i'm chris to tip it and this is on being nikki giovanni has received numerous awards for her books of poetry and her works for children she's a university distinguished professor in the english department at virginia tech where she's taught since 1987 i spoke with her in two thousand sixteen one of the most striking things said just jumped out at me all the way through your writing an and writing about you and in all the way to the latest volume of poetry if published in two thousand thirteen is how how from the very beginning you were held in cherished and taught by courageous loving women um your mother you were named a refer seem as your launda rates income nato used to be when when mommy past il ahead it legally changed to nicky just because that's what everybody knows where i would have never donna when mommy was year isis i wouldn't i wouldn't want her to think i didn't wanna carry her name amnon landed junior so how old we were you when you change your name legally them.

magee giovanni university distinguished profe virginia tech nicky donna