35 Burst results for "Disruptor"

Charlie Gasparino: Elon Musk Is Really Good at Disrupting

The Dan Bongino Show

01:58 min | 4 months ago

Charlie Gasparino: Elon Musk Is Really Good at Disrupting

"Charlie he said you know I saw a CNBC I was watching earlier Cheating a little bit and Becky quit I was going to say you want to get a cheating I know Just did someone slipped in a cut and said hey check this out Even Becky quick over there noticed what he said Elon in his letter to the board where he said quote I will reconsider my position Now that's obviously not an idle threat He knows that's going to go public He's got enough issues going on with the SEC He has leverage here Charlie It's not like he's some weak need little child I mean he has 9.2% of the company right now He liquidates his holdings I mean he suffers a little bit too It's kind of like the problem we have with China and their holdings of us right now But he's got leverage I mean he sells a lot of these executives are paid in options and warrants and all kinds of things They can do some real damage here Yeah and by the way he sells this My guess is that Tesla shares will go up Tesla shares the Tesla people don't like this I think he spread too thin anyway So I mean he might be on the back end if he sells these shares His Twitter stake Listen this is the 5th inning Anybody that says they know what he's doing They don't know him I don't know if he knows what he's doing other than being a disruptor And that's what he's really good at If you followed his career which I have I never met the guy before I haven't sat down and smoked the joint with him unlike Joe Rogan But I'm telling you that if you follow him what he's really good at is disrupting Now he made $200 billion disrupting the electric car vehicle market He's still disrupting And what's fascinating about him is you would think he's totally woke right Electric vehicle is wokeness He comes out and says listen electric vehicles are good for certain people and that not for the masses We can't stop drilling I mean this is Elon Musk That's why the left is so scared

Becky Charlie Tesla Elon Cnbc SEC China Joe Rogan Twitter Elon Musk
Defending Ukraine: How Did We Get Here?

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:49 min | 6 months ago

Defending Ukraine: How Did We Get Here?

"You remember that Mitt Romney said that Russia was our number was the number one threat. Yes, enemy. You think he said what I mean? What could be more bizarre? I mean, I find it not just wrong, but bizarre. Well, there's money flowing around, okay? Defense contractors are the ones who paid people who like Mitt Romney and Brent's Fred scowcroft, I know for sure. To create the committee to expand to expand NATO up to the borders of Russia. And then you had a lot of well meaning Americans of Polish and Ukrainian and Lithuanian descent who said, that sounds good. You know, we don't want to be dominated by the Russians. Yeah, let's move NATO up there. So it was leftover Cold War sentiment. Hatred of Russians as Russians and greed, people in the military contractors throwing money around to Republican candidates to say things that sounded patriotic and hawkish and pro defense. Yes. Oh, yes, America will never step back. We will defend every square inch of free Europe. I mean, do you know in the Baltic states that we're going to lock all the citizens in their homes under COVID? That's freedom. I mean, the whole idea that we are defending freedom while political prisoners are rotting for January 6th in solitary confinement without charges. Rotting in jail is political prisoners in gitmo on the Potomac. We are hardly the poster boys for political freedom. John, isn't that the point that we have had such a drastic realignment? Because of Trump, the disruptor, everything has changed, and we can now see things, at least some of us can see things as they are more clearly, we can see that much of what we were persuaded was true is not true.

Mitt Romney Fred Scowcroft Russia Nato Brent Baltic America Europe Gitmo Potomac John
CEO of X2, Mark French, on How His Product Has Disrupted the Market

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

02:06 min | 11 months ago

CEO of X2, Mark French, on How His Product Has Disrupted the Market

"Now. A couple of questions. I have here for you one. Is you guys are operating this business. And i would say that it is. It is disruptive what you're doing from what i can tell. The brand seems to be disruptive. What do you accredit the the rapid growth to do. What do you attribute the rapid growth to why is it. Being such a disruptive success. I would say there's more people coming to the category now right so there's certain people that would never try an energy drink right that more health conscious consumer really was not interested in putting in other bodies some of these beverages that had you know some you know ingredients that you can't even pronounce so as more people. Are you know looking for energy solutions. Whether it's a coffee drinker. That wants something. A little bit cleaner lighter Or you know somebody that might be drinking other energy drinks but is trying to live a healthier lifestyle. You know. i think that's really where the disruption comes in also. There's never really been a brand that you know was built in the locker room in this energy category right so you know. We're really fortunate that Death net recently featured us as a sports drink. Innovator we're not really a sports drink. We're not a hydration drink or something that you might take Before you want to do some exercise or if you wanna just have a little bit more energy and focus throughout the workday but you wanna have it with clean healthy ingredients and you know the other reason why people might consider us to be somewhat. Disruptors is just because of you know this athlete a model. there really haven't been athletes like saquon. Barkley labonte david kawhi leonard and now kendall tool who's one of the top peleton athletes That are joining a company like ours as shareholders and partners in the business. I think it's just you know shedding some light that there is renovation innovation in the energy category and that's where we could probably be looked at as being somewhat

Barkley Labonte David Kawhi Le Kendall
Biden Addresses U.S. On Afghanistan Exit, Taliban Takeover

The World: Latest Edition

01:26 min | 1 year ago

Biden Addresses U.S. On Afghanistan Exit, Taliban Takeover

"President biden spoke this afternoon from the east room of the white house on the rapidly deteriorating situation in afghanistan he defended his decision to pull out troops and said he would not repeat the mistakes of the past. I know my decision won't be criticized. But i would rather take all that criticism and pass this decision onto another president of the united states yet. Another one a fifth one bite and said the scenes unfolding today in afghanistan our gut wrenching. This morning. we saw chaotic exit from the kabul airport. Hundreds of afghans flooding the tarmac running after departing. Us air force planes. Some people were clinging to the side of aircraft biden late part of the blame on the trump administration for forcing his hands so quickly into his presidency with an agreement for a may withdrawal biden. Also blame the afghan government and military for what's happened. American troops cannot and should not be fighting in a war and dine in a war that afghan forces do not willing to fight for themselves. The president said that six thousand american troops are being deployed to remove americans as well as allied personnel and vulnerable. Afghans biden said that if the taliban were to interrupt that process there would be consequences as we carry out this departure. We've made it clear to the talent if they attack our personnel or disruptor operation

President Biden Kabul Airport Afghanistan Biden Afghan Government White House United States Taliban
A New Player in the Transatlantic Market

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

01:54 min | 1 year ago

A New Player in the Transatlantic Market

"So it's an exciting day today for one of america's most liked airlines jetblue flight w seven and airbus a-3 three twenty one l. Narrow body landed at london heathrow this morning after departing from jet blues new york. Jfk base last night that flight launched jet blue's entry into the transatlantic market beginning with daily service from jfk to heathrow and then adding daily service to london gatwick ultimately following with Boston to london. Ceo robin hayes. A former executive at british airways has promised to create a permanent and disruptive effect in the transatlantic market. So joining me today to discuss. What that could mean are two of my aviation week network colleagues north american air transport editor but ben goldstein and kepler senior analyst for the americas laurie ransom. Hey ben laurie great to have you on this. Thank you so to start off by just looking at that whole history that we know all too well of Long haul low cost carriers Starting up especially in the transatlantic market and more often than not failing What do you think might make this a different prospect with a jet blue and will this like jetblue like robin says be transatlantic disruptor. What are your thoughts laurie. Well i think as you said. Jetblue is one of america's most light brands and they have strongholds in new york and boston so they have strong point of sale here in the us. And i think that's a little bit different than some of the point to point carriers that had tried to do this in the past where if by bodies

Jetblue Ceo Robin Hayes Ben Goldstein London Heathrow Americas Laurie Ransom Ben Laurie Airbus London JFK Gatwick Heathrow British Airways New York United States Kepler Boston Robin Laurie
Natalie Monbiot on Virtual Humans Automated Video Production and More

The Voicebot Podcast

01:39 min | 1 year ago

Natalie Monbiot on Virtual Humans Automated Video Production and More

"Mambazo. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you brat. Thrilled to be. Well i'm happy to have you here as well. So we're talking virtual humans but with a twist today and so. I think this is going to be very educational. A lot of the folks who are listening As you know this community oftentimes is really focused on the ai aspects particularly the conversational aspects But all of this area is is important to the folks who listened to voice by podcast. So you have different type of story to tell. And i'm i'm really excited to delve into that. So why don't we start with a little bit about you and what you're doing and maybe give people a high level overview of what are one is show thing So i'm not won't be i am the head of business strategy at our one. I joined the company at the start of two thousand nineteen just as it was being founded At at just as i was leaving the agency wild our i had spent almost by career and various cities around from london to san francisco to la. New york had a field day being kind of a disruptor within the agency while boys you know trying to find new ways solve existing problems often more often than not through various emerging solutions In the fields of ai and other emerging technologies. and i cut my teeth that way and developed kind of a way of thinking that was kind of a. What if we could to this differently with. What's newly available to us. So i really really enjoy that kind of territory

San Francisco LA London New York
"disruptor" Discussed on a16z

a16z

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"disruptor" Discussed on a16z

"I would add to it. Boasts legacy companies have been built vertically in business by functional leaders the world today as more of a horizontal world where changes happening rapidly. You've gotta be able to look outside your own industry or outside your own function to be effective and a lot of our classes. Just teaching students not to be afraid of today. Actually embrace it fantastic. I love what you said. I never thought of it. As a conglomerate and i think it's really interesting you say that because in the world we're in today. I often bank to myself. that drove. Affirm is conglomerates like people are in denial that we live in the ecosystem. This way schmuck. I'm one of these guys. That looked at our debates. Together's been stronger at love meghan. Love john donahoe. I love jack. I've known all the players. But i look at it and say shit that's red Actually died grew. Jeff completely funny. John reached out when the activists were making his life miserable. And i asked to meet on a saturday. And i sat down and goes listen. I'm getting all this pressure is separate them. You're the person who manage them. Both what do you think i was making. The pitch came together. In my view. Everything ends up being a system. And if you don't understand it and recognize it it will manage you. What i loved about ebay was it was a self contained system. Ebay was as close to a perfect economy as eating. I've ever encountered by talked to a number of economists including the edina the stanford business school who did research on ebay with respect to competition theory. You change the pricing incentives. It changes the quantity changes of loss..

john donahoe meghan jack Jeff ebay John stanford business school edina
"disruptor" Discussed on a16z

a16z

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"disruptor" Discussed on a16z

"Charleston's launching the iphone needed content and the two most desirable properties were thirty rock and saturday night live both which nbc and so we actually asked my dollar price point and that was the one moment where we had pass bor versus the subsequent years. Where are as dissipated. Everybody else is ryan disney days. Way back when. I worked at disney in the nineties. The studios were furious. That cable television had been built on top of their content just repackaging their content and all of the value move on the studios into the hbo's of the world..

ryan disney Charleston nbc disney hbo
"disruptor" Discussed on a16z

a16z

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"disruptor" Discussed on a16z

"Now the community of users executing on the transaction the last forty years of strategy was about the four which was pick your business. Stay focused was more about when you couldn't do or shouldn't do strategy today at a key. Part of the systems leadership is about the end. You know it's about doing this. And that one of the coz we had the issue is the ceo peleton at every. Turn his vc's tolling dump backward in a crate. Don't be an installation. Don't get in contact yet. He did all so i think. We're in the generation whether your legacy company or ura startup. that's what you have to be thinking about either as part of an ecosystem or do it yourself. And i think that's a key point because very few companies can do it all themselves that people will hold up tesla apple. They look. they're doing everything that's great. If you're steve jobs. Tim cook or eli on. But most companies can't do it so you're gonna end up doing some level of partnering with other people and so the question leaders need to ask themselves. What are the things. They need to bring in house that they need to own. Because it's kind of part of that core competency but where can they more effectively partner with others to still deliver that great experience to customers. And when jeff jordan talked about kind of being able to influence other parts of the ecosystem. That's actually a key thing that leaders need to figure out to do. If they don't control the resources in the assets. I would put apple in that bucket. One is they don't do any of the manufacturing all they do is designed it in california and then it's fulfiled globally and secondly the the gap store is full of third party. Developers who apple enables and takes a high cut of their salaries their orchestrating multiple eco-systems. I would push back on that apple controls more things than most companies right. Look at the store..

Tim cook jeff jordan apple tesla steve jobs eli california
"disruptor" Discussed on The Truth

The Truth

08:20 min | 1 year ago

"disruptor" Discussed on The Truth

"What happens next in just a moment but first everyone needs to escape sometimes enter dipsy. Let yourself get lost in a world where good things happen. And where you're pleasure is the only priority dipsy is an audio app full of shorts sexy stories designed to turn you on each dipsy audio story features characters feel like real people and immersive scenarios. So feel like you're right there. Sometimes it's like a wave that start school. My waist stays there for a bit Was just different last in like a wave that built up until that washed all over me. They released new content every week. So there's always more to explore no matter who you're onto or what turns you on and for listeners of the show dipsy is offering an extended thirty day free trial when you gotta dipsy stories dot com slash truth. It's thirty days a full access for free when you get a d. i p. s. e. a. stories dot com slash truth dipsy stories dot com slash truth. The truth is sponsored by better help online therapy if you're struggling with relationships or having difficulty sleeping or difficulty meeting your goals if you're feeling anxious or stressed better help counselors can listen and help better better help. We'll assess your needs and match you with your own licensed professional. You can start communicating and under forty eight hours. It's not a crisis. Line is not self-help. It's professional counseling done securely online and our listeners get ten percent off their first month of online therapy at better help dot com slash the truth. That's better h e l p dot com slash the truth and now back to the disrupters play. Plays benjamin speaking benjamin haley. Are you on your backyard. The phones have been nonstop. I need you to do me a favor. Well i'm already doing your job so favor over the dance partner. That also work with us right. Could you please call her and just see if she never hears. I promise i will answer every phone call for a week. She's rally we know. Thank you lucy. Have you found the going on. Yeah they're tracking the cell phone number. Track it faster please. Hi i wasn't hear minute ago. Losing my mind yeah. I still haven't seen him. I i know. I need to your printer. We're really not supposed to do that. I totally get that. Here's the thing. I'm having the worst today. You know what i mean. I'm sure you've had them just like start to finish. It's it's just bad. I might even be fired in a few hours. So if you can empathize with that like like at all. I would really really appreciate it if you would. Let me use your printer. One assistant to another. What are you saying. Okay but only black and white yes. You are the best anyway to mess with benefit. Hello benjamin james corden reversal. I show downtown to the you serious against him. Be there for another hour. So thank you. Thank you so much ari. She's heading to the someone perfect. Okay once she's on we'll call her actually know what that's what you want me to do. Isn't a university. You want me to take the subway. Not gonna do that not gonna do that. Yeah lucy we sell some cabs kentucky. Now is a walking dammit. Okay okay what do you wanna do. Okay don installer lucy. You know where she's headed. Get out of that building four. She gets them okay universe. What's next you're going to hit me with a car. I know arm. Hi oh hey you remember me. Subway from omnia. You've got your back very strange us running into each other. After site big city small world is not what they say the app get sal. I see. i'm very lucky. I ran into you. Because i'm lost again jubilant showing me how to get to work sorry to slow down. Can't i'm working but it keep walking. And then i'll i'll tell you go roy. Okay hold on to catch my breath. Four cds a walker's paradise nightmare. If you don't use too isn't it You'll really gonna stop. Sorry i've got to do. I need to get to washington square park. It's behind you. Take a right. She goes all. We're set up here called an parade no way. I didn't know you had parade clearance. Are you kidding me up for. Don't taunts talk to me and you see. I can't hear anything but the parade. She just walking walking through the parade. Even though you can do that stay on her. Lucy status instead off the fire alarm with the rehearsal building remotely. Everyone should be clearing out. What else can we do. I can hear at all. I've lost contact with hailey done. I don't know what's going on. Maybe talk. I'm still stuck in his body. Eighty dollars on your eight now apartment building. I don't know how much time we have. Okay on out. I'm out i'm looking okay. Yes i see. I see the building. She's stalking someone actor. Oh okay it's hoped. I swear to god ends at a good day after everything we pulled. Oh my god. I'm haley wesleyan from From place oh we have any old actor as you actually do. This amazing is unacceptable. Can i help you with something. Yeah yes. I have your contract for resigning with us for next season with me. It's gucci drive if you want to just look it over and sign. It will all squared away. From what the hell's why are there. So many pitted kicking rain but it does the university university even like me through the if you ignore the birds and signed the contract seriously i can handle the get get get. Yeah get away. Yeah the thing is. I'm not resigning this year. Why yes sorry. I've been approached by another brand. And i'd like to switch things up. Are you sure began. I'm sure looks like people are being led back in the building. So i gotta go. I'm really sorry. Came all the way down here. Okay kidding well. That was lucky. Very lucky Re male biter great. Work everyone you can take the rest of the day off the parade. Hey mom i'm just not really in the mood to talk right now k. My career sorry. I have some bad news. Of course you do what is it. Not dis oh my god. Oh my god i'm so sorry mom. Thank you sweetie peaceful But i thought you'd wanna know thanks. It turns out he actually left you quite a lot of money. Why yeah i. I don't have all the details yet. But tweedy a lot of money like god. Are you serious. I didn't even. Oh my god that's amazing. I know who he gets the universes until against you. After all..

Eighty dollars thirty day today washington square park thirty days benjamin james corden eight under forty eight hours Lucy first month One assistant benjamin haley this year ten percent gucci each dipsy lucy benjamin Four cds first
"disruptor" Discussed on The Truth

The Truth

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"disruptor" Discussed on The Truth

"So she's just about oughta fabulous goes looking forward and not yet but i was able to hack into the security cameras at the studio. So he's not there he's not here. No sorry who are you again. I worked for one of his sponsorship brands. I'm supposed to have him signed something. Do you know any he will be. It's really important. Well kind of varies. He comes in on fridays. Usually so i think a message tomorrow. Now it's too late. Do you have any idea where he might be right now. Not really no tablets question on it. That's okay if you do see him. Can you have sorry. Here's my card had a carton here Whenever i'll just write down the number okay. i'm sorry. My pen isn't working. Can i borrow a pen here. Penn is either sorry here. You know what i have a copy of his contract with me. It's just a renewal. He works with us a lot. So i'm just gonna leave it with you and you have him. Sign it if you see him and then you scan it and send it. Miss your leaking. What the bottom of your purse. It's leaking what i don't. I don't even remember putting drinking my bag. Oh my god it's okay. Hey we have paper towels no no. It's not okay. It's not okay because the freaking contract was in my freaking purse and now look at it. It's totally ruin. Jesus you have to stop yelling practices going on right. I am so sorry. It's just like it's okay. no it's not. It's really not stupid.

tomorrow Jesus fridays one Penn
"disruptor" Discussed on The Truth

The Truth

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"disruptor" Discussed on The Truth

"Oh i i can't talk right now. Mom i'm running -ly tweedy again. My alarm didn't go off again. Even though i sat five. So automakers broken again even though he just got here one. That's okay. No matter what i do. I cannot have a bad day. Give yourself as second paker breath. Slow down we got. I don't what don't have enough money on my subway cards. I can't get through and of course there's a huge line at the machine okay. So you're a little late okay. You'll be yup nobile. Except i have job with benefits for the first time in my life and i'm trying to grow up and be an adult and responsibility but i swear universally plotting against me at every opportunity sweetie. You're having a bad morning her. What your great kids. You've got a great job. And i'm sure you can turn this around. Thinks i assume hello mom a little quicker next time please. That almost turn into a pep talk is monitoring it closely enough done tower on your good head. I'm a couple of people ahead of coffee. Take as much time as you need. I wanted to miss at least one more train. Go sorry sorry. Everyone foster cabinets machine doesn't wanna read. My debbie called good work team attracted making sure haley west then has another terrible day is not just. The things aren't going right. It's almost feels like it's on purpose. Someone or something is out to get you and they're doing everything they can to make you suffer. I'm jonathan michelle. This is the truth and today the universe is against halio wesland before we get started. We're in the final days of our radio. Tope yep fundraiser. Thank you to everyone who has already donated. We are so grateful. And if you haven't done any yet there's still time to join your fellow listeners. Before the fundraiser ends on june twenty second and in the past year radio topiary shows in total have released six hundred forty eight new episodes across the network. And if those episodes meant something to you if you got something.

Tech Stocks: Strong Earnings and Weaker Prices Suggest Investment Opportunity

Money Sense at Opening Bell

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Tech Stocks: Strong Earnings and Weaker Prices Suggest Investment Opportunity

"Chart It does suggest there could be an opportunity here. Technologies Price charged. Remains at the bottom of a long term up trend Channel, which has been historically a good place to buy check. And the PE ratio for Tech is now much lower than it was a few months ago. Because Hurrying have been strong. So you've got strong earnings. And weaker prices. And that in theory Is something that could be compelling. And then what about Disruptive tech. What about, for instance. You know this Ark. Theatrics. Arc stock. Kathy Woods innovation Investments. Down. Quite a bit. The average stock is now 15% below its 50 day moving average. So you could see a bounce back. And what should we invest in our disruptors? Yes. Let Teladoc LendingTree Square. Um Lot of companies you probably haven't even heard of. Modify.

Kathy Woods Innovation Investm Teladoc Lendingtree Square
Caitlyn Jenner Releases First Campaign Ad for Governor of California

John and Ken on Demand

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Caitlyn Jenner Releases First Campaign Ad for Governor of California

"Finally have something from caitlyn jenner. It was apparently introduced on abc news. This morning it's a near three minute video ed for her run for governor. Here is the audio. I've always been a trimmer. California was once the envy of the world. We had what everyone else wanted. The american dream grew up here and their policies have destroyed that dream. It's been locked away closed. Shudder left in the dark burned down. The government is now involved in every part of our lives. They've taken our money. Our jobs and our freedom california needs a disruptor a compassionate disruptor came here with a dream forty eight years ago to be the greatest athlete in the world. now i enter a different kind of race arguably my most important one yet to save california. I wanna carry the torch for the parents who had to balance work and their child's education for business owners who were forced to shut down for pastors who were not able to be with their congregation for the family who lost their home. In a fire burn entire generation of students who lost a year of education. This past year has redefined our career politicians as elitists and the people of california as the warriors the kings and the angels. We never take kindly to glass ceilings here instead shatter the trailblazer the innovative california's facing big hurdles. Now we need leaders. Were unafraid to lead to new heights. Wipe unafraid to challenge and to change the status

Caitlyn Jenner Abc News California Warriors Kings Angels
You Only Need to Interview One Person to Fill a Role with Jodi Brandstetter

Hire Power Radio

03:44 min | 1 year ago

You Only Need to Interview One Person to Fill a Role with Jodi Brandstetter

"How many resumes do you need to see to fill a role. I think this is step further. Do you need to interview free to fill that role. If you get one you are correct. What's wrong with gloria wanting to wait to interview more people before making a decision on the person that was just interviewed the answers everything waiting to interview other people's ridiculously clear beacon that you have a week interview process and not being able to gather enough data and make a decision within twenty four hours. Not only a waste of your time. But the other person's as well comparison shopping is how bad hiring decisions are made. I'm rick driving. Welcome to the higher power radio. Show we help entrepreneurs and business leaders win the right. Hire share insights from top performing rebel entrepreneurs disruptors and industry leaders like our guest today. Jodi brand staedtler she is the chief talent strategist of lean. Effective talent strategist llc. Jody is passionate about talaq position and uses design thinking in creation selection and hiring processes focused on people and business. She is certified through ideally. Oh you in design thinking. Jodi is the ceo and founder of lean effective talent strategies which includes the hiring blueprint talent acquisition consulting firm and talent acquisition evolution it community for recruiting professionals to connect learn and work together. Which is what makes jodi perfect expert for today's topic. Jody welcome to the higher power radio show today. Hi how are you. I'm doing fantastic. How are you living the dream. You stole my life. I loved now one today. We're going to talk about the dangers of comparison shopping when it comes to hiring and then we're going to give you guys a plan of tack to enable quick decision making for each individual that's interviewed not like. Let's just wait and see what else we get type thing. Because i don't know about you. I hate that. I think everybody hates it. Let's start with the issue here. The challenge is that some hiring managers in some entrepreneurs feel like hey look i need to interview a bunch of people before i make a decision. What's wrong with that. There are so many reasons that's wrong one. It just shows lack of confidence in the hiring manager capabilities of hiring a few have that perfect candidate has everything that you want for that role. You should be able to pull the trigger immediately and get that person on your team. Just common sense in my opinion by the way there is no perfect candidate and they're looking for candidates ideal candidate or strong yes. I've seen hiring managers who have literally the person they want and they still can't pull the trigger so it literally pretty much. Is that what you would call product candidate and they still can't pull the trigger until they talked to. I don't know maybe three five more people just in case someone else might be better. Wijesinghe is going to happen. Is you're gonna end up hiring your fourth pick because everybody else is gonna pass on you. Exactly you gotta treat it like a dating scenario. You might go out on a date and that's the interview. You decide after that one two maybe three day. It's like okay. I really liked this person. I want to hang out with you. Pull the trigger. Yeah think about that. You find someone you really like. You want to spend more time with you're to be like I'm going to wait and talk to three other people to see if they might be a better partner. Now you go with that person that you feel comfortable with and you need to continue. That relationship continued the dating now. We're not asking you to marry them. But you're asking to commit to moving forward tub being hired marriage in interviewing and hiring. I think are a little different. But they're still commitment there. And i think they can commit after the process that you just made that person go through because you know it's not just one interview that that person just went through to get to the hiring manager for them to make that decision

Jodi Brand Effective Talent Strategist Ll Lean Effective Talent Strategi Jody Gloria Jodi Rick Wijesinghe
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo under pressure in harassment probe

All Things Considered

04:28 min | 1 year ago

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo under pressure in harassment probe

"Harlem, is growing on where Andrew the kitchen Cuomo is busy. after a Even second if the front woman accused is empty, the Democratic This'll New York governor tiny of restaurant sexual has harassment. always relied heavily One former on deliveries. Cuomo adviser had previously But a couple of accused years ago, him of kissing Ding got her without tired consent. of the high fees The second on third woman party told APS The New York Times and that complaints when she was a from Cuomo customers aid, the governor about meals asked being intrusive late. questions So currently about her you sex see these life, orders hear including whether she it, slept but I didn't with order. older Ding men. chose to channel The governor most issued of his an apology deliveries on through Sunday a and service gave New York called State's Relay. attorney general Leticia This James, way. the power He to pays appoint grubhub an outside just investigator. for an order, not New a delivery. York State Senator He shows Alessandro me on his Biagi phone. And is then a fellow once Democrat I'm finished and with longtime this order, critic of Cuomo, and I she would joins just us now press welcome. it and drag it Thank to you for having ready me. and You were then one of the first a driver state Democrats is automatically to calm the governor assigned. to resign. You called Come him and pick a monster it up on really Twitter and also have said lawmakers lets him track should be removed the driver from office. so If they Ding don't can hold answer him questions accountable. from customers wondering Why not when wait to their see food what an is investigation coming. uncovers He can't first? do that on Grubhub So and other it's a APS. great place to start. I mean, Being I want pays I want to be really very a percentage clear about on where each order, I'm coming from. but estimates I it am cost a survivor 35% of sexual abuse. less I'm during a legislator, the pandemic a New Yorker than Grub like many hubs delivery chair of service. the ethics and Internal I think Governance I was just Committee, lucky that I found really and I also Before the am pandemic. someone who has a zero tolerance Ding also policy included for leaflets and each Sexual delivery, harassment in the urging workplace. customers It's one of the to most help him important save money issues by ordering to me. directly It's what I from ran his on. Web site. That's what I've been Overall, fighting for. It's the he legislation says, the we hand pass pulled in 2018 noodle not only survived Andre. 2020 Thank Lee. You know, It it's made part about of 5% why Albany more money has than in 2019. been calcified with the A number secrets of city of eateries abuse using that have relay really like lying jumped the 70% halls and so last in year, order according to to be Alex able Bluhm, to not only CEO rid Albany and of sexual founder harassment of the something New York the sexual based company. harassment working We group had like record Was created numbers of restaurants to do signing up We the have to only have but a zero tolerance is policy these restaurants and so that the are way signing that I'm up looking our restaurant at this that set typically of circumstances have never done is delivery, by and the totality those new clients of information didn't do that a lot I know of volume. about the governor's behavior, Bluhm says relays his revenues behavior declined and what's been described by 20% and also what I know last year from my own experience door working Dash there, and also others that offers I am. delivery You know, only you worked now, in his for office restaurants before looking you were an to elected lower their official fees. yourself. We should note. The delivery That's right. sector That's is right. one That's of very right. So I few was I city worked in industries his counsel's office. that hired more For roughly workers eight months during in 2017 the pandemic, It s would not O. I mean, be this unthinkable. is part of a pattern All of abusive the and manipulative behavior total numbers from him and now it's are It's also around part of a 80,000. bigger culture of fear that is Maria pervasive Figueroa throughout is director his administration. of labor You're and policy saying you speak research from first at hand the experience, Worker Institute But wouldn't there at be Cornell value University's in having a School thorough, of Industrial exhaustive and investigation Labor relations. so that you get things She's on basing the record that and find 80,000 out how widespread figure this on is the number and give of commercial the truth cyclists an opportunity who to were be registered aired? before Absolutely. the pandemic, Yes, plus Absolutely. an estimated Yes, I do increase. support an independent investigation. Like the restaurants. I believe that we're These going workers to be able to have needed that now, the APS since to survive, there will be a special and prosecutor they appointed felt by exploited. the attorney general, so They we include could many be thankful low for income that. immigrants But and people when of I color look at at the the greatest words that risk the governor of contracting used and the Cove. questions It that he asked You seen? Charlotte Aviano Bennett says she spent Which hundreds the governor of has dollars not denied on equipment things to deliver like food Do you on have her sex e with bike older men? company Do you and have sex not the outside of your mother, relationship, she and he repeated says the companies to her over don't and over pay again, for knowing anything. she was a sexual She abuse bought her survivor. own delivery bag, You helmet were raped and and winter abused gear. and attacked Deano and assaulted. lives in Washington Heights These are things and used to that work in a not restaurant. only did he say She to her switched personally to running deliveries and alone, but for he door said them dash while he and relay they were in a couple his of years office ago because in the Capitol she's got a young child in Albany, and wanted and more he flexible mentioned hours. that But you know, she as says his the work response got to this, harder it was meant in the to be pandemic. playful. Yeah, There is when no an gray abandoned area. me in Have you heard A from your Gemma constituents Donati about this? What the are hand they saying and Calvin to you? you, she I think that says there are restaurants people who won't are let her really use shocked their bathrooms that and she this has is to take you breaks know, coming outside in the cold. to the surface. Why? The workers Because justice ah project lot of people has been know organizing the governor delivery from drivers what they see on and television, its lobbying Right? Go the back city to Council last for March a law in April requiring and May and bathroom June and July breaks, the whole summer sick when pay the governor and was protective doing his press equipment. conferences about covert, Its which executive Provided director, a lot of Lee safety Hia Wolpe for people. It calls made them feel the apse really like disruptors. they were like, They're like not the governor really had paying their backs. minimum wage, The which problem is in New here York is that that's $15 the perception an hour. What that's the persona. they're offering is Behind opportunities the scenes, to especially work with Charlotte without Bennett, right. She describes a weight this happening and without during the essential, peak of Corbett. right. Because We these only workers have a minute are left, independent but I'm curious. contractors. You know, as a Democrat, Gord Cuomo Ash, is Grubhub your party's defacto and the others leader pay for in the state. each He's delivery been governor item for a decade, plus tips. and there's a gubernatorial Drivers say election they can make in New York $20 next year. an hour So what or more does when they're this busy, mean for but your party there's no in the state? guarantee I mean, I Relay think the most is unique important and thing paying that we a fixed can do as hourly legislators wage and as of members 12 of 50 any political plus party tips is collectively a few years ago have relay a zero settled tolerance a lawsuit policy after for being abuse. accused And of I think not that paying when we overtime. are confronted with these When kinds asked of whether issues it's independent we should contractors not should be To be classified thinking about as employees. party. We should be thinking Bluhm, about the people the CEO, who have been harmed said. They and usually how we're don't going want to get full them justice time hours, and also how right, So I think we will there's hold a huge accountable flexibility the people that who is actually overlooked caused these that harms. So frankly, for me, this it is would not be a political impossible issue. I know for it's being us seen to that keep way. if But I would have The the same reaction, employee no matter model who it was. got inserted. I

Cuomo Bluhm Aps The New York Times Attorney General Leticia This Grubhub Ding York State New York Albany Maria Pervasive Figueroa Worker Institute Cornell Value University Alessandro Charlotte Aviano Bennett Andrew Andre
Sagittarius Daily Horoscope: February 22, 2021

Sagittarius Today

01:05 min | 1 year ago

Sagittarius Daily Horoscope: February 22, 2021

"The moon journeys through your house of transformation meaning the way forward is through your heart but his emotions take the driver's seat. The sun and pisces emphasizes the importance of belonging. If you're feeling like an outsider. Today try to tap into self compassion. Now take a moment to reflect on your relationships. Venus planet of love activate your house of communication making now the perfect time to ask for what you desire. Be careful that you don't take it too far though. Ask politely contemplate the work you do and your career. Saturn opposes the great disruptor uranus making now a difficult time to take daily routines to the next level. Expect the unexpected. When it comes to your everyday doings now is not the time to cling to old ways of achieving success. Think outside the

Saturn
Seattle-based Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos may step down without stepping away

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Seattle-based Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos may step down without stepping away

"Down and receives Jolin Kent has more After more than 25 years and billions and sales Jeff Bezos is leaving his post to CEO this summer, handing the reins of the massive disruptor he built to Andy Jassy, the current head of Amazon Web services. All our retail giant announced that CEO and founder Jeff Bases will transition into the role of executive chair he founded Amazon in 1994 and grew it into today's massive online Padma worth more than $1.6 trillion. In statement, The Miami

Jolin Kent Andy Jassy Jeff Bezos Jeff Bases Amazon Miami
Affect Your Mood (MM #3600)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Affect Your Mood (MM #3600)

"The minute with kevin mason. I saw news story the other day. That kind of almost made me cry. We all know that what we eat can have huge effects on our body not only in terms of weight. But in terms of mood and it's at ninety percent of our serotonin receptors are located in our stomach. So things that are gut healthy are better for us and actually our mood boosters. So i guess that means yogurt that helps our gut also boosts our mood while there's one food in particular that can do horrible things to our mood and of course it's one of my favorite foods could put you into a bad mood and that's what the research said and it's doughnuts. Yeah we all know. Doughnuts are bad for us. But i do love donuts. But your body doesn't love them because of all the sugar and the sugar crash. It could put you in a bad mood. Simple carbs heavy oils. Those are gut health disruptors again. Could put you in a bad mood. Your moods could be affected by eating doughnuts. Doughnuts are not good for me. I knew that but now much sadder.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Ninety Percent One Food One Of My Favorite Serotonin
Affect Your Mood (MM #3600)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Affect Your Mood (MM #3600)

"The minute with kevin mason. I saw news story the other day. That kind of almost made me cry. We all know that what we eat can have huge effects on our body not only in terms of weight. But in terms of mood and it's at ninety percent of our serotonin receptors are located in our stomach. So things that are gut healthy are better for us and actually our mood boosters. So i guess that means yogurt that helps our gut also boosts our mood while there's one food in particular that can do horrible things to our mood and of course it's one of my favorite foods could put you into a bad mood and that's what the research said and it's doughnuts. Yeah we all know. Doughnuts are bad for us. But i do love donuts. But your body doesn't love them because of all the sugar and the sugar crash. It could put you in a bad mood. Simple carbs heavy oils. Those are gut health disruptors again. Could put you in a bad mood. Your moods could be affected by eating doughnuts. Doughnuts are not good for me. I knew that but now much sadder.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Ninety Percent One Food One Of My Favorite Serotonin
Affect Your Mood (MM #3600)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Affect Your Mood (MM #3600)

"The minute with kevin mason. I saw news story the other day. That kind of almost made me cry. We all know that what we eat can have huge effects on our body not only in terms of weight. But in terms of mood and it's at ninety percent of our serotonin receptors are located in our stomach. So things that are gut healthy are better for us and actually our mood boosters. So i guess that means yogurt that helps our gut also boosts our mood while there's one food in particular that can do horrible things to our mood and of course it's one of my favorite foods could put you into a bad mood and that's what the research said and it's doughnuts. Yeah we all know. Doughnuts are bad for us. But i do love donuts. But your body doesn't love them because of all the sugar and the sugar crash. It could put you in a bad mood. Simple carbs heavy oils. Those are gut health disruptors again. Could put you in a bad mood. Your moods could be affected by eating doughnuts. Doughnuts are not good for me. I knew that but now much sadder.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings
The Power of Decentralized Marketing

Strength In Business

09:25 min | 1 year ago

The Power of Decentralized Marketing

"Of the centralized marketing gone are the days of critical thinking and freedom of speech. Those who don't comply with the mainstream narrative are d. monetize d platform and often labeled mentally. Ill it's time to leave the centralized marketing land of Facebook twitter youtube and all the other platforms and join decentralized networks. That welcome people who are bold enough to question everything. I joined twitter and facebook game. Twenty seven. I mean those were fun times because nobody really what we were doing. Social media marketing was a new term and the vast majority of people and businesses including major league corporations had no clue what to do with these platforms. I remember the first. At s-. I ran on facebook. I mean back then. Ads were approved instantly and costs. Were ridiculously low. Like in the good old days of email marketing everybody on facebook was clicking on your ass to find out more about this new feature along with whatever you were offering early internet marketers. Were mostly running ads for free e books. You can download from a website you were sent to. It was simple and straightforward marketing approach. That worked seamlessly then greed kick in and what used to be a peaceful place together with loved ones and like minded people turned into an ugly spot. That reminds us of certain behaviors and character's humanity rather knock made acquaintance with so here. We are today as more and more people awaken to the luge of this three d game which is designed so perfectly that a tricks even our most advanced spiritual teachers into believing it's trip for those of us who decided to go all in and up our level of consciousness in order to play this game to our utmost capabilities. We're now faced with incredible challenges. Those who think they can control this amazingly designed game by enslaving the entire planet when most likely encounter some cataclysmic surprises that being said. Let's leave the spiritual playfield for moments and discuss a few tangible marketing solutions to assist your transition from centralized to decentralized marketing networks. And i like to talk to you about the new marketing disruptor which is blockchain so library odyssey minds float p- research. None of these brands and companies are a household name remember two decades ago the same for facebook twitter and youtube the blockchain technology that underpins bitcoin therion coin and all the other cryptocurrencies is already changing the way we do marketing and promote our businesses the biggest difference between the centralized social networks and the decentralized blockchain based attorney tiv- that i just mentioned is that these companies reword users for using their product instead of gathering questionable personal data and selling them to third party corporations and even government entities. Now if you wanna find out more about library minds and flow for example. I highly suggest you listen to my other podcasts. And also check out the my blocks on strengthened business dot com especially the one aware i Wrote and i talked about minds adds that episode is called. Why bother with blockchain social ads. And you might want to hop over to strengthen business dot com and going to that block. Because i shared some a screenshots with you as to how i set up these ads on mines Although there are in the early stages of the platforms per se aren't sophisticated as aloud words any especially facebook but still a lot that he can do. Okay so here are some of the podcast episodes. That are highly suggest. You check out First one is where to go win. Centralized social media kicks off their platform. The next one as i already mentioned why bother with blockchain social ads and another one would be humans or machines. Whom do you create your content for so if you've been listening to strengthen business podcast simply search for these episodes the one with the centralized social media where to go with the kick you off their platforms was the episode that are recorded before this now a lot of my clients and also people that i talk to come to me and say okay. What now especially professionals medical professionals who have different opinion than big pharma. They'll like okay. How i wasted my entire life Or mine tire to last week. All the laws of decade posting on youtube and facebook and now that they banned me were the platform. me what do i do i mean. Have i literally wasted my time. And here's something that. I want to highlight an. I want to suggest That you do and first of all Something very critical in terms of thinking and mindset so first of all your time invested into f. a. m. g. is not wasted so in the past two to three decades f. a. m. g. with Fans for facebook. Amazon apple microsoft and google had a blast they seemingly appear out of nowhere. I mean that's what the majority's purposely deceived to believe and slowly but surely they gained control over our behaviors are thoughts are interest and social interactions. Now to this day. I recall the article written by robert booth with the title. Facebook reviews new speed experiment to control emotions. It was published in the guardian. On june thirtieth. Two thousand fourteen. I repeat facebook. Reviews newsfeed experiment to control emotions. If you're interested in that go to the guardian. It's on june thirtieth twenty fourteen. Very good article. You might wanna read it now. The offensive strengthened business. That was more than six years ago cake. Twenty fourteen now. What do you think happened in the meantime so knowing all these highly unpleasant and disturbing facts about facebook and all the other companies. Why do you think. I still suggest that you haven't wasted your time on social media. Look i've been running ads on the face of ecosystem since two thousand eleven. I educated hundreds of students in my life courses and workshops on how to run profitable ads on facebook instagram and messenger. I created their academy. Where i taught students how to opt game so that they can get the most for their buck went advertising on the social platforms. Now don't you think that. I learn quite a few things about targeting copywriting design call to action network interoperability and so forth that i can immediately apply to block chain advertising. You bet i can. Actually it makes things super easy as these platforms are still in the early stages. While facebook's advertising product is a behemoth in terms of complexity structure and data points compared to these platforms so facebook compared to minds as i mean. It's it's still a joke. Or if you take a p- researches which is a decentralized search engine keywords taking compared to google ad words or google ads. I mean early stages. There's so much that you can take away from everything that you learned on these platforms and apply to the blockchain. Now for you specifically this means the following if you have run ads on any of these platform. I don't care whether that's facebook. I don't care whether that's lengthen pinterest. Snap tiktok whatever you this if you have done. Follow management on twitter or instagram. If you have worked on improving your copywriting skills if you have learnt to shoot and edit videos an audience say for example for youtube if you have engaged in any kind of social media marketing and david these you most definitely can take all that knowledge and apply it one to one to the decentralized marketing networks based on blockchain technology. Remember their technology changes that is there is no one entity controlling whatever it is that you're saying you're putting up now. The only thing. I'd encourage you to do is to stay humble. Be open to learning new things. And more importantly to be willing to engage in marketing activities that are created for humans. Not some stupid machines. And they're all greats like in the early days everybody's setup their pages and all these. Seo thing for google please write for humans create content for humans

Facebook Twitter Youtube Robert Booth Pharma Google Amazon Microsoft Apple Pinterest Instagram David
How Uber Makes And Loses

CNBC's Fast Money

01:28 min | 1 year ago

How Uber Makes And Loses

"Welcome back past Monday check shares of Uber cruising higher. Today on the back of some comments from the company's CEO let's get to Deirdre boasts with details depot. The level he said this morning that recovering rides is being led by Asia while US volumes they remain down. You also commented on the worker classification battle in California on the plus side, Uber is starting to figure out what its business could look like if they lose that November third ballot measure prop twenty two, and if they have to reclassify drivers as employees caused by said, the prices for consumers. They would increase by twenty five to one hundred percent though the size and scale of its business will be what he calls a big question mark in California so that backs away from the notion that Uber could lead the state entirely if it doesn't go their way but guys on the other hand, such a move changes. Uber's entire business model and could also set the tone for other states considering similar. Legislation in turn making Uber Look less like a tech upstart more like delivery or taxi company when Uber was valued at seventy, six, billion dollars in private markets just a few years ago. It was considered a disruptor with big ambitions at freight and autonomous driving among other moon shots. CEO Derek shot he though he has since taken a different tack scaling back on those ambitions and considering a new regulatory. Landscape which guys would have been unthinkable in the Travis Kalanick's era its market cap. Now around sixty four dollars may reflect that shift back

CEO California Derek Deirdre Travis Kalanick United States Asia
Newt Minow on the Presidential Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

06:07 min | 2 years ago

Newt Minow on the Presidential Debates

"Hi everybody I'm John Donvan and this is intelligence squared US part of our discourse disruptor series and what we're going to be focusing on. Our the coming presidential debates they are coming sort of starting September twenty-ninth, the first of three. And of course, because everything's different this year, the debates are going to feel different almost certainly going to be. In some fashion remote, maybe the debaters, the candidates won't even be in the same place. There's only going to be one moderator. We're not gonNA live audience because you can't have that many people in one space in this dangerous time. Also what we have going on as a conversation simultaneously with which is focused on, maybe we shouldn't have debates maybe it's time to wrap up that whole institution and go back to a time of no debates. And when I say go back did you know that for most of American history this institution that we know is the debates did not exist that for most of our history, there were no debates and did you know that once we started having debates that in the first series, there was a remote debate the candidates were not in the same place and there was no live audience. And there was only one moderator. So maybe things are circling back. There's a lot of history here and we are interested in that because. At intelligence squared, we are very interested in history and we are also very very interested in debates. So that's what we want to focus on and we want to focus. In this case of discourse disrupters with an excellent source of information about the past and the present and potentially the future, and that is a gentleman named Newton Minot and Newton Minnow is an old friend of intelligence squared us and he's also known as the father of American presidential debates and we'll talk a little bit about why that is. But first, let's bring Newt Minnow into the conversation newt. Thank you so much for for joining us. It's really a pleasure to be back in communication with you. John I. LOOK FORWARD TO I. Admire your work or the intelligence squared very very much. Well, thank you. Can I ask before we start everything else I find it interesting that for folks who don't know you have lived through some very, very disruptive times and this one in your nineties a comes at the after a long series of other adventures. I mean, you have lived through I, think twenty three presidential elections. At this point, you have seen twelve cycles of the debates that we're GONNA be talking about. You lived through the major disruption called World War to. Use served overseas you went into politics You're an aide to ally Stevenson who ran for president does the Democratic nominee twice in the nineteen fifties. So you saw two elections then you joined John Kennedy's administration and you saw the trauma of his assassination and then you were very close friends with Robert Kennedy and you saw his assassination and lived through that and and now this. Just just to take a moment is, is this disruption different in dramatically in kind from all of the others you've seen so far? Well, I lived through all that, but then I had another. Exposure to politics with Obama, the because Michelle worked for our firm and and Barack came to be a summer associate and they fell in love and so we got. So we had another round politics with with with the OBAMAS. About that but all throughout, I would say the last fifty years of this you have been intersecting with this institution that we call the presidential debates take us back to nineteen, fifty, nine, nineteen, sixty, where as an aide to at least Stevenson. You actually were involved in the idea of pushing forward the idea that there there. He did not get to take part in that kind of debate but was interested in enemies interested because you are suggesting it. You have a very strong faith in the idea of technology. To be a force for good and for communication and you saw television as this, you're right as this big thing happening in the sixties. Well, it actually was in the fifties in when. In in the fifty six. Presidential, election. The incumbent President President Eisenhower. Having a heart attack. And there was a big question whether he would be able to run again. And I suggested to adly that instead of the candidates. Rushing. All over the country and speaking crowds that that. Now, we have television which reached every home. And that instead of traditional debate that. There'd be a series of joint appearances or debates between the presidential candidates. As they considered that his advisors thought it was a gimmick and it was he never suggested it. The Federal Communications Act when it was originally passed during the new deal. Required equal time for political candidates. The law said section three fifteen FA broadcaster gives or sells time to one candidate. At must give ourselves time to the opponent on the same basis. As a result that was interpreted by the Federal Communications Commission to mean any use of the air by a candidate including being in a news program. So the broadcasters were pressing to get news programs exempt. From the equal time requirement and they finally succeeded in the late fifties. But debates were not regarded as a news program.

Stevenson President President Eisenhower John Donvan Barack Obama Newton Minnow Federal Communications Commiss John Kennedy United States Newton Minot Robert Kennedy John President Trump FA Summer Associate Michelle
"disruptor" Discussed on Activate Your Wealth Show

Activate Your Wealth Show

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"disruptor" Discussed on Activate Your Wealth Show

"When we chose to incarnate here, we chose to follow the pulse. Of evolutionary consciousness. When I mean by that is we chose to come to a planet that's evolving. and. Moving through an historical time line moving through a historical time line of separation and polarity. One where the frequency of love is not. Typically, a welcome vibration. In fact, competition polarity, hate violence. That is what we experience here on Earth. You chose to come here and. Be a transformer. Be A disruptor being up router. So the question is how can retract the wealth new you deserve. A soul level intuitively. And you WANNA create a massive impact in the world. How do you do this and serve your clients to the highest level? How do you break through and overcome your current situation and start manifesting the wealth that you know you deserve. Hello, my name's Corinna Stewart I'm so wealth coach seven figure entrepreneur running my spiritually conscious business, and I have dedicated my life to debating wealth and purpose. For spiracy conscious entrepreneurs. And on the activate your wealth, show how your guy. To show you. How? To activate your well. Step into your purpose in a powerful way and make a profound difference in the world while doing it. Thanks for joining me..

Corinna Stewart disruptor
"disruptor" Discussed on Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

04:39 min | 3 years ago

"disruptor" Discussed on Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

"Coach can offer cheerleading support and simple accountability. You know if I'm working with the client. I WanNa know what you intend to do this week and do you mean five days a week or seven days a week and demean twenty minutes or an hour demean five hundred words or thousand words. What do you mean what he's GonNa do and are you going to check in with me so the the the main offerings of a coach our support and accountability and then there are all kinds of tactics strategies to help with respect to those two things a coach should be versed the kinds of things we've been talking about about what process really looks like and maybe understand you know the writing world pretty well in even have some understanding of whether poet ever gets a literary agent or whether self publishing is a better or worse option than traditional mission publishing knows stuff? A coach ought to know stuff in his or her domain. No stuff share stuff have suggestions these supportive and all clients accountable. We'll have links to everything below. The podcast podcast for everybody in the show notes and in a minute or to Eric will be giving the U._R._l.. Where you could find him but I did have to to ask questions for you? I obviously we have very diverse group of people listening. They do different things that brains are different. They were they interface with the world is different so it's impossible to kind of pick any sort of one-size-fits-all thing but from your experience from your years of working with creatives if you want to have one takeaway for somebody who's listening today who feels a little bit lost. It feels a little bit unsure. What is the the first place to start? It's going to be super simple. Maybe sound over simple right every day because the because that is when you missed two days of writing three days of writing you typically lose six months or four years is that when people stopped writing they stopped writing for a long time. No one cares. If you lose a day here there might be living one of your other life purposes Mrs so there may be a good reason to not right today or tomorrow but it's losing some consecutive days. That's a profoundly painful and ultimately disabling because you typically don't get back to your writing for long time so as I say it's a it sounds over simple but my headline would be right every single day. Who is your favorite disruptor in history living were dead? We'll be someone that most of your listeners. Jason is probably have not heard of but it's fella named Thomas Ause who is a Hungarian psychiatrist and for the last seventy five years he died recently so he's not doing it anymore. But for the very long time he was the one pointing out what he called the myth of mental illness he he was single handedly fighting psychiatry for between fifty sixty years and we believe the when he died psychiatrists had a big a party. That's a joke but not so much of a job because he was a thorn in their side and so he's my he's in my lineage is my favorite disruptor. It's great. There's so much this could've went on for very long time so instead ah I will just simply allow you to tell folks where they can learn more because you have so many topics of interest to creatives that we have not even had the opportunity to touch upon today so let the folks know how the best way there is to get a hold of you in to learn more about which do sure come to my site which is Eric Mozelle Dot Com and that's the are I see M._A.. I- S._e._A._l.. Dot Com and I have a couple of the five day deep writing workshops coming up one in August is in Mendocino California and one on October is in Vancouver British Columbia real quickly. Tell us about those those deep writing workshops. Well people love them. We don't share or critique the work I think it's a little nutty to write something on the spot in that have critiqued as if it's your best work but so there's no sharing and no critiquing lot of writing gets done I present what I think are important lessons and then folks work on their cherished products so a lot of wonderful energy in writers writing along together and I think the headline is people really love. Those workshops will thank you so much. I know we've certainly set a spark a lot of people's minds today and hopefully they'll take it from there and become more creative and productive and happier than ever and I want to thank you for joining us on disruptor. Thanks.

Thomas Ause Eric Mozelle Vancouver Mendocino California Jason seventy five years fifty sixty years twenty minutes four years seven days six months three days five days five day two days
"disruptor" Discussed on Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

12:40 min | 3 years ago

"disruptor" Discussed on Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

"It's really a pleasure to have joanna pen with us this morning joanna welcome to disruptor thanks for having me on the shea john it's great to be here awesome so we always begin with a simple question we hear a disruptor celebrate the rebels the mavericks and the weirdos those of the publishing world which one of those were his best fits u n y yeah like i definitely found that a very difficult question against the i i dated gang ten i guess they go with any they was not acceptable answer oh well but then i so i would look up the definition of fees was being you could wordsmith and decided that would maverick at does mean independent minded and say my favorite which is independent and so i guess i'm gonna get mad because it's basically independent excellent that leaves us directly into what i would love to talk to you about today we're trying to encourage people to disrupt in their own way and not everyone has that or at least cannot easily identify that disruptive gene inside them i look at what you've done in terms of building a career as an entrepreneur an how you have acted i pro quite properly as if there are no limitations is if you design your own wife as a writer is a writing instructor and you've got a hidden done that i assume that came fairly naturally to you is that just something that reflection who you are i again it's so funny hearing a view of me from the outside 'cause i again i see myself as particularly disruptive i a great book back in two thousand six and it's a it was a non fiction but about career change i was in a consulting joel i wasn't enjoying and i read the book and then i said oh i i guess i need to publish it howdy publish a book and a bit of research and discovered how long it would take take she goes to the agent and traditional publishing praise that and kind of went well there's gotta be a better way of doing this and say i self published back in the days before a before the can know before even before you know before the icing call before audiobooks when digital and so i self published by in the i guess the early early days the print on demand and ever since then i've i've just carried on doing the thing as they have been busted tools a say i think probably the thing that comes naturally to me is to be independent and try and find a better way i'm not very patient tests and so if anything takes too long i figured out that must be a better way to do it or click away the chiefs and mike gold's be the key i think to to destruction and i do think you're you're disruptive in the sense you're laying down a a a a role model attempt played for how other authors thurs can take control of their own of their own careers there's a feeling always i think with a lot of writers they're they're not in control that they need someone else's permission they need the editor to say yes in agency has publisher whatever an and here you've gone and just simply created your own career so is that something that is inherit in you or is it a is something you've learned over time yeah saying i think this this is pretty interesting question and i do think that the little today with demographics of in this because a when i started getting interesting in writing and publishing it was we at a point in history when the internet on digital trouble disruption starting to happen in a little sip different industries say you know i i used to listen to load of a self help american audiobooks people like tony robbins a and he we're always learning learning and one was listening to some of these shows i listen to you podcast before they were cool poke cost you need the early days of of audio on a streaming audio and i just i learned about how you could do things online intensive making money so i found people to emulate he would know oh says but they were using that writing to make money on the internet so this is a you know two thousand six to two thousand eight the when bloke is starting to make really good money on because i was unhappy in my job i was like i'm gonna i'm gonna get into a winter rights of all my my book kano say logan i started poke costs when you cheap back then and old before i ever write fiction and say i think for me the shia book cooled growing up digital by down at dawn scored and i remember meeting on a penny dropped around the way internet business with getting to reshape the world and again this is the early days of of amazon and online shopping 'em i think i think i just realized early on how things begin to change so i believe i've written region a wave of will has been industry disruption but that's why i guess i don't consider myself a disruptor i just saw this coming in the same way though i now see voice focused on aol in these really interesting thing shifts the coming on maybe we will talk about but i think that's probably the biggest thing for me is the i i ratio city confuse other people's information on the island and a jet then just trying extra energy say i think wait to punish in the kids the people the muslim myself on i've never asked for permission right at i would i would argue the in looking at a lot of these digital innovators even looking at people like tony robbins you model yourself after some pretty disrupted folks so it's it's natural but it's going to rub rub off even if you don't necessarily see yeah and i think it's it's just being at the last ten years i mean it'd be an incredible time of change in the in the publishing industry but say which team parliament of creative say the music industry obviously went bust a and a lot of creatives found the eight the big contracts contracts with big music company music labels wouldn't working out very well for them and say indie music became a saying way before indie office became a thing on indie film the same way it's kind of a natural progression a to me the indy or says which would a rice in the same way and maybe it is a demographic thing because you know we've we've been in his thirty years at a lot of folks who have been with us since near the beginning or obviously a certain demographic as they had be image implanted in their head of what an author is in their minds and author is somebody who sits in a lovely location maybe a cabin somewhere and writes out now they you know these these typewriters players but they okay but now these computers and sends off their manuscripts to a magical place somewhere new york city and then you know wait for the book real discovered while they work on their next project at whether or not that ever actually was truly a reality for tickly large number of authors it's a reality for almost no authors now so there is this sort of baggage from the pass i think that maybe you didn't experience where you just didn't absorb that holds people ball back how do you talk somebody out of that i saw somebody look you gotta be her own savior when it comes to writing career well i think you have to be honest with yourself about what you want like every also has to decide what they want and and also who is most emotionally once that say validation on by a certain community that puff may still work for you or someone who wants to win literary price you know he wants to spend fifteen years whiting one book that may or may not win a prize that there's no reason why you call and sits in your guy and write that book and send off you can still be that if that's your definition national success but if you will definition of success is let's say making a six figure income then you have to do things differently and when i decided that i wanted to leave my job i was making multi six figures and i always and i liked making good money i i never intended to be a poll also never gonna give up a great career to be poll say because i i enjoy my lifestyle unfunny create you know some of the most famous creative in history being multimillionaires i mean look the say for example and say i mean look at stephen king and i love stephen king's the click contains passes and these are traditionally published authors you also have a very good business model say you know there are ways of doing this in the industry but you'll also see people like normal but king practice and danielle steele people who are in the best seller list of all the time the oh say the best earning less bail old putting out several books today yeah i'm not see other thing if you want to make money as the right so you have to be biting and regularly and prolifically and generally in the initial read that people want to buy say a or you if you have multiple streams of income like ideas like you do and say that would be my overarching question what is your definition of success i will see you going to do to get to that level of success so if one of the most popular things talked about in indy off the community if you idea of twenty books to fifty k say if you might twenty but he could probably make around fifty thousand u s donors pretty much holds true pioneer a as a as an independent off self publish not necessarily traditional and i'm pretty much how she says there is a number for you on on it took me forty eight years to like twenty bucks a and i have other streams of income so basically the question is what is your destination you think i know what a lot of folks listening to this and they might have just had a big gulp at twenty bucks a an also looking at other things that and author preneurs such as yourself does as a course of business in terms of getting yourself out there being a podcast and a doing webinars and building products or what have you and the question is how in the world do do it so what's what's what's time management for a couple of minutes here how once you're by someone who already feels pressed for time what who wants to follow in your footsteps how do you make that work permit time perspective well again comes by definition of success and tony robbins again i'll come back to him because he he talks about what do you want and then what are you going to give in order to get that a and say when you decided to become a un all says the first five years i did my day joep hope and that's why would get up at five in rights before my old because my joke was pretty taxing say a big dosage when i go hang but when i go hey i would be learning the business i would be making poke costs with building my blog i was networking i i was a giving away things every weekend i was doing that i gave up tv in a social life for about five years and then i went to four days a week in my day job by to doubt the career toss a see all of these things are examples of giving up something in order to find time to be the thing you want to date and a so i went fulltime in twenty eleven and say oversee that gave me more time but amazingly doesn't give you necessarily any more time actually writing because as i say you have to then run the business you have to be the marketing say now as as per then i still have assuming a routine but it's just a bit longer in the morning idee creative stuff say on whether that's creating another book or a of course or on i'm i've studied oj but nomination now a so i might new eight some forty eight but the thing in the.

joanna mavericks five years forty eight years fifteen years thirty years four days ten years fifty k
"disruptor" Discussed on Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

15:03 min | 3 years ago

"disruptor" Discussed on Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

"You're talking to writers, who may be aren't in the in the what pet cut a cord demographic. How do you describe social storytelling to somebody who's always thought of writing as being a very PR? Private individual one to one kind of communication form why I think I would use examples like I said of, you know, the difference between telling a story around a campfire and watching how your audiences responding to your pacing. I think even looking at things outside of writing, like you know, in theater in when people shows on seen how Bill pull a story together on watch, how audiences are reacting to, to craft a tighter narrative. I think that four so many people think it's also about understanding that what young people's expectations are about how they consume culture is changing when you look at how much time people are spending with YouTubers and social influencers, and even how they interact with news. They don't just want to be told, what is happening. They want to be able to ask questions to participate. And I think looking at fiction the same way as what we do, Pat. Looks religious. Get your ear input on, on this subject, because we in my other world would would writing blueprint, central book insider, most of the writers that we talked to our people in their forties, and fifties and sixties. So they have a very considering they're trying to write for teenagers one of the hardest things for them to understand. I think is the world that millennials have grown up in is so wildly different than the world, that baby boomers and genetic Sers grew up in the sense that if you were born in, let's say nineteen ninety five and nineteen Ninety-six, especially if you lived in America, that it, it's the entire world, you basically lived up. You've basically grow up in just crazy world, right? You have. No, I I'm old enough to have some perspective. And so, you know, the world wasn't wants so completely insane. And maybe it won't go out you'll get back with way again. But if you're growing up in this day and age the world just makes no sense. Do you think that this idea of? Storytelling in a social way is a Wade for for young writers to make sense of the world in a different way than we had to make sense of it. That's a really interesting question. I think that a lot of our users like to yes, bounce things off of, of other people and see how they are reacting. I don't think that they see it as one narrative. I think they want to understand how other people feel about it in a corporate, some of those perspectives into their work, but I also think that they also want to understand the world before I don't think that, that means that writers from, you know, the that are in their forties. Fifties sixties need to write stories from the point of view of teenagers today. I think that those storytelling is happening in that's of interest to them. But if that's not, what comes naturally to them. I think there's also a lot that they can benefit from social storytelling, but through telling the stories that they understand that are familiar to them. So social storytelling, though, helps them help you. Young people. Make sense that have other people sort of come together and share their ideas about the way the world is that somehow as a comfort to, to alone individual as opposed to earlier generation, where it was sort of, like on my own. Here's how I view the world. And it's just it seems to me that need for social connection is kind of a life raft to how to get through the very turbulent waters of, of the world right now. Is that a fair assessment? Do you think I think that I wouldn't want to say it's blanket in all cases? But I think yes, we absolutely. See a lot of that on what pad. And we also see a lot of people that are writing in a very individual way on what had where community of over seventy million people. So there's a lot of interest communities in different things that are driving them onsite. How do you help writers become better writers? If he's obviously, you know, it's great to say right, right, right. We've always used that with our own folks, but just writing and making the same mistakes over and over isn't. To help you. So do they become better writers by specific feedback? How do they actually develop their craft? Yeah. I think I'm a lot of our writers on what had create their own writing circles, we have clubs and other areas for education. They think oh to we're also not very judgmental, though, on what is good. That's a judgment term that different people have different perspectives on have different requirements and different communities. Expect different things from stories. I think that by default, while peds very welcoming community. I think as a writer, unless you're specifically, encouraging it, you won't receive a lot of critical feedback on your story or the craft of writing, you'll receive more emotional reactions to the things that are happening to the characters, but there are clouds on what had that writers can join but to your point, I think that the strongest thing is that practice for so many writers on what pad, what they're posting on what had his very first thing they've ever written one of my favorite things to see his to read the last chapter of a book in the first one when I'm looking at a new story on what Pat in, you just see how. They found their voice through writing. They have some gotten a lot of confidence through the audience and knowing that the audiences waiting for them. And I think writers discovering their own style in their own rhythms is one of the things that improves writing the most the other things of grammar, that's easy to teach. In fact, there's never been more options to learn more about that or even just to have constant corrections through programs like grammar Lee, which I think is antastic as well, but I think having not style in rhythm in storytelling. I think that's one of the things that's hardest to teach. What ped- has developed or is developing its own style of writing since it is kind of community based very real time response. I mean, the writing process as it goes through what bad is quite different than traditional writing. Obviously, do you think that a new way of writing is being developed somehow? Now I think we're developing new genres. But I also don't think that, that means that we're abandoning traditional writing at the same time when you look at the volume of content on watt, Pat, again half a billion stories. There are millions of those that are quite traditional narratives that are attritional eighty thousand words structure to a novel with the same casing. We also have a type of almost like I described him as like soap opera novels where every chapter ends on a cliffhanger, and they're, you know, hundreds of chapters in the story shows no signs of slowing down with new problems in things in the characters. Encounter in new characters introduced. So I think that because we're not. Found by a book that needs to fit on shelves that needs to be a certain number of pages because or else will be too expensive to ship. I think that opens up near opportunities for writers lose funny. You talk about thinking about the more Twain's books were all generally published as the cereals in magazines. It's what is back to the future sort of idea that a lot of great novels that we've you, as being singular entities actually started that way. Exact exactly this way with being published piece by piece chapter by chapter often with cliff angered the NC by the magazine next week. So I find that's an interesting sort of closing of a circle. Absolutely. Yeah. What one of the things that we all deal with, is this. Lack of monoculture talk periodically something happens game of thrones comes on, and everybody watches everybody could talk about it. But for the most part, we all kind of now live in silos. How do you get people who are in one silo, in want pad to pay attention to the other silence? Or is that an interest to you at all? You say, hey, you if you're happy in this particular area. Cool stay there or you trying to create you know, kind of broader interest among readers. Well, we try to create different paths for users to be able to do what they want at that point in time. You know, sometimes you want more of the same, you know, the episode of law and order finishes you want another one exactly the same like some we all have our own habits. But we also sometimes want Seaney wants the novel on what had you can see your recommendations you can see stories that are new on the rise. You can explore trending tax. We try to create spaces that elevate different types of content for different types of writers an from a data for. Effective were always curious at what our readers are doing to one of my favorite data points to look at sometimes is something that we have called genre loyalty report. But you can look at top stories in a certain category in see, like okay, but for the story like using science fiction as an example, we can look at our most popular science fiction stories, but I can also look at one of the most popular science fiction stories, mom readers that don't usually read side, high because that's sometimes a different list. And as a publisher that's really interesting to see what has potential as crossover appeal, or what things could maybe hit a bigger audience, even though they're in this genre. She would walk her books. Is that in the tempt to create meal of? Not the word monoculture, but, but a, but something for everyone who's watt paid user to look at and go here, a guys here are some books that came from what pet that you all might be interested is, is that a little bit more of an attempt to break out of a silo and, and rep and have things that represent the entire community that the entire community can then look at. Yeah. You know, I think for what had book, specifically being that it's our first year. Launch we are really focused on North America, which isn't to say as a company were not looking internationally in fact just last month. We announced our own imprint in Philippians with our partner there and all books national book chain. So we are we aren't looking for a one size fits all solution for our entire community. We're looking at what makes sense in different parts of the world based on what our users plot. What had one way of elevating the certain type storytelling, but we're also bringing more stories out into film, and TV through a partnership with Sony. We just partnered with I flex in Indonesia, where allowing users to pay by the chapter, and that's that's doing really well for a lot of our writers, too. So. So we're not really looking for, for one thing, that's going to represent all pod. I think we're always looking for what do our users love. And how can you bring these two prints were also wanting to make sure that we're doing what are writers want in the more opportunities that they're looking for that we can help service them? So looking. When I see. And I'm not a Dettori demographic. So let's say I was when I see what pad at the beginning of a movie. I see maybe on an audio book. I see it on a physical book. I've seen on various piece of content. What am I to think about that? What, what, what let me, let me backtrack in certain music. There are certain record labels that when, when they came out, you knew what to expect in the in the early sixties of Atlantic records came out with a soul record. You news can be amazing is Ray..

writer Pat Bill Sers America Indonesia North America Lee Twain Sony Seaney cliff NC publisher partner
"disruptor" Discussed on Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

10:50 min | 3 years ago

"disruptor" Discussed on Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

"This is how you write a book having empowered more than sixty five million writers to share their work with the world. What pad is as disruptive. Affor- says there is in the world of publishing now. They're taking it to the next level with the creation of what pad books. The company's first book publishing division, the woman in charge is Ashley Gardner. And she's here right now on disruptor. When we talk about disruption in publishing these days, you have to talk about what pad. And so as the show's called disruptor, it couldn't be more appropriate to have Ashley Gardner with us from what oak Inc. Thanks so much fattening. Let's begin with the question that we always asked to start with every guest, you know, we do. Celebrate the rebels Mavericks and weirdos of the publishing world, which one of those words, best fits, you and why. Oh. Support for my options against. Il, weirdo, or, or if you'd like you can go for none of the. I think I like Mavericks, the best out of those are I think that I, I consider myself less of a rebel in that I always feel like I've been working to find common ground with different groups. Yeah. I think I'm a little bit too basic to be a weirdo, sometimes. But I feel like I've always been doing interesting things on the edge of technology in literature, that's always been the intersection. That's most interested me. I've gotten to do a lot of new things and change the way we do business at pod in the way that we get other publishers to work. I think I've been good at, you know, speaking tech to business to lead people through a lot of change group. Let's sort begin I folks who may be completely familiar with wok Pat, or maybe just don't have their brains around would want pet is, how would you. How would you explain the general concept of watt peds, someone who is new to it? Yeah. So while pad. We're a global entertainment company with over seventy million monthly users are poor business is at called wop had that. Let's people read and write stories and, and connect through those stories. I'm it's all user generated content. So it's similar to something like what instruments for photos or YouTube is for videos. That's what, what had is for writing in tech storytelling so users can start posting stories other users can find those stories begin following them. See the stories on full chapter by chapter in we build a massive community over the years. What pad is thirteen years old now. And we've seen our users right over half a billion stories on our platform. And today, we work to take a lot of those top stories in transform them into new mediums like bringing them to print books, which I know we're going to talk more about today, but also partnering with film studios around the world on other digital programs or creating new opportunities for writers on what Pat platform itself, we really want to help writer to be able to build a career on head. Judicially writers their first effort is, how do I get the attention of editors or agents, here, you're sort of bypassing that and saying, how do I get these tension of other folks on the platform to create a groundswell for my book, is that a fair assessment? I'd even go back further than that, you know, before you get an editor or an agent you have to write the story and on. I think the New York Times article few years ago saying that ninety percent of the population says they wanna write a book one day, and most of them, don't. And I think just getting that story out can be a really lonely alienated experience. And on what Pat the fact that you can post chapter by chapter. It really helps so many people express themselves. I also think that while guests at a large percentage of our most successful writers are curious about how they can monetize their work, but they can do for career. So many writers on what had our Jeanne for different reasons it is for self expression. To be heard to connect with other people in the same way that, you know, not all of us that host photos on Facebook, wannabe photographers. Some of us just want to be acknowledged to be able to share our work. Now, you have both. I would imagine as writer through the writers, on the platform, and also the people who were there, re a younger demographic than publishing at large as at a fair assessment. Yeah. Absolutely. I think because we are something that is very social driven. And it is something that is a technology product by you know being on apps for very mobile focus at does attract definitely more millennial audience, but millennials are getting pretty old now. I think our core audience is under the age of thirty for sure. So how do in the age of texting just massive amounts of context coming into our lives every day. How do these younger readers prefer to access fiction? Yeah. Sorry, go ahead and finish. You'd obviously the traditional way which what bed boats which will get to sort of heads toward, is, you know, put a book in front of somebody, and they read the book, but, but there are so many different ways to access content. Now, what are you seeing in terms of how young people prefer to get their fiction? Why have I absolutely want it? Mobile ninety percent of our traffic is coming through mobile devices on phones, tablets are users, they want to be able to interact. They don't just wanna be broadcast to. They want to participate in the heard able to talk to the creators, and talk to other readers like the social experience is really exciting. The young people one thing that I've in I get to speak to a lot of interesting folks, a lot of different perspectives on publishing. And one of the things that just keeps coming up in the conversations there, another bring it up here is this idea that we talk a lot about their being which content out there. But there's also this huge amount of narrative out there, no matter where you are. Someone is trying to tell you a story every time you watch an. Add every time, you, you log onto to Twitter or Instagram or Netflix or whatever there's somebody there with a story to tell you at what point do people get narrative fatigue? Do they simply say, you know there's also the real world to deal with? Is that a concern? I don't even the real world where always making our narratives in a nonfiction way in how we even have our sense of self and a self in the world. I think that humans are storytelling animal, and we're always looking to find ways to make sense of our own experiences than relationships, so that you think that they'll just continue to grow this need for people to hear other people's stories, will always, always be. There will always be kind of an expanding area. Now, I think, you know, stories are at the core of most entertainment, even when things that, you know, a traditional book, would compete with a lot of also narratives on even if it's social narratives or nonfiction narratives, I think that at. Tau. We make sense of our place in the world. Let's talk a little bit about a diversity, which is such a hot area in publishing right now and is on the minds of so many folks, I had an interesting chat with joy outta cortina's from Latin next in publishing for previous episode, one of the things that Joanna was talking about was that publishing traditional publishing. It is very well meaning but because of the kinds of pay that you get and the location where it takes place. And all that, that most people in publishing tend not to be particularly a diverse audience, even as well, meaning as they might wish to be in that is sort of this structural institutional problem for publishing does what pad by having. I would assume a fairly diverse user base managed to avoid that problem. Or do you still have that issue a little bit of lack of diversity in terms of what you're seeing coming out of your own authors? I think we have a tremendous meta jersey on the platform, because we are so global we do see a lot of marginalized groups, come to walk how to tell their stories that are. Are being ignored by the traditional publishing industry. I think when you compare the amount of Latin next content LGBTQ contents, even things like Muslim fiction, how much of it, we see on what had compared to the traditional industry. That's something I find really exciting as someone coming from the traditional publishing world to see that these aren't the same stories that we're seeing. And I completely agree with the opinions that you've voiced. I think that because publishing is an industry that no in most cases, the centers of it are in some of the most expensive cities in the world London, New York, even Toronto here in Canada, and most people that are looking to enter into the industry have to work for free for six months to be able to get an entry level job. And that's a level of privilege that isn't open to most people, I think I'm really proud that it wa- pad. We do take diversity and inclusion very seriously. I'm as a company we measure ourselves against our own diversity stats. We post those publicly I can share the link for you. But our leadership team is over fifty percent people of color. Over fifty percent female, on tech has some of its own unique diversity issues that can be a little bit different publishing, but our company looks like our user base does our leadership team also represents our company stats, and that's something that we're really proud to track in continually try to improve on, let's move on to what books, which is your area. Now is the leader of what pet books which was we have a lot to talk about that because it's absolutely fascinating. But I describe one want pet books is in and will be. Yeah. So what had books isn't evolution of what we've been doing it while Pat for the past five years, we've been representing some of our top stories in bringing them to publishers to be published. We've seen numerous New York Times, bestsellers, international bestseller's come from stories off of what pad and we've reached a point where we decided that we are going to invest in publishing those titles ourselves so that we can bring more stories out in the world. Rely more on our data and understanding what our users want. To bring stories that, aren't what traditional publishers are necessarily picking up and to be able to respond more quickly to the trends that were seen on what had of what readers are looking for where launching this fall with six titles. Then were doing twenty next year. So the, the thing that obviously will pop out to people when they when they look at what ped- books is this idea this, the story DNA the use of artificial intelligence to help select these books describe how that works? Yeah. So I mentioned some of our numbers that on what had, we have over five hundred million stories on, it would be impossible for any of us to read all of them, but story, DNA, let says, look at both on machine learning of Texas, as well as our audience data to help us understand some of the top stories are on wop had were able to see what stories are on the rise..

Pat writer Ashley Gardner New York Times wop Mavericks Affor YouTube Facebook oak Inc Il Texas cortina Jeanne editor Twitter Canada wa
"disruptor" Discussed on Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"disruptor" Discussed on Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

"What's your advice someone wants to disrupt? Ignore status. And focused instead on. On what, what drives you in nightly to, to be in this business of writing and publishing? I find that this is an industry that because there's not a whole lot of profit margin on the books themselves at tends to draw people who are less focused on Monday and more focused on accomplishing something fairly ambitious and so focus on, what that is rather than on trying to impress a particular agent, or a particular publisher particular group of people groove us one last question for you. Who's your favorite disrupt during history could be dead or alive anywhere any area of the world. I think I'm gonna go with a contemporary choice, Allen. Baton is a UK author who? Has this very classical education in philosophy? And for anyone who knows anything about academic academic people in in philosophy departments. They do not kind of look on the business world with anything but disdain, so Ellenbogen wrote a novel and then he wrote a range of books that are basically self help books, like how proved can change your life for the constellations of philosophy. He's like a pop philosopher to me. That's such a daring move for someone who knew he would lose respect for writing for a general audience. And then beating that, even he launched something called the school of life, which is based in the UK, but now has little outcroppings, and it's a business, it's a business that helps people improve their lives through the application of philosophy. And to me that is incredibly daring and is not what you would expect. From someone with his background, he it reminds me of one of my favorite disruptors crawl Sagan who took a lot of heat for taking cosmology to the people. But that's a that's incredibly noble thing to do so. Choice. Well, this has been great. Thank you so much. We'll regroup in five years, and see how you did. Thank you. And and again, everybody, if you are interested at all what's happening in the future publishing and the president of publishing..

UK Ellenbogen school of life publisher Sagan Allen president five years
"disruptor" Discussed on Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

14:21 min | 3 years ago

"disruptor" Discussed on Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

"Because you can control more of the engagement, you decide when how and where you're showing up for how much time you know, I agreed to this interview with you. You didn't put me on the spot at a conference. I'm doing it within the comfort of my office. So like there's so many variables that introverts can now control, and you can also decide how to market in a way that befits your strength. So social media, even though it I think, I don't think it's an extroverts tool, it's just that it's often misused in a way that's the Societa d- with extroverted behavior. So when you look at. At what social media, how it actually works. You see that the more you demonstrate curiosity and interest in people, and in the world, the more successful, you are with it introverts excel at demonstrating curiosity, and other people because they're trying to deflect attention away from them. So when we look at how businesses get built over the long term, I think introverts perfectly situated to make that happen. Because I they're going to be controlling the terms of engagement and second, because they are focusing outward if they're doing it. Well, what are the skills that Burgess author entrepreneur should be developing? And we talked by that mist so you can focus on so many things you could focus on emerging technology could focus on marketing, of course, you have to focus on your craft and, and so on. But what are some of the core things that anyone who wants to move forward and publishing right now needs to have, I think early on. You need to figure out. What team is going to be helping you because self publishing as a misnomer in some regard. You can't do a well without the help of some professionals. Most people are not expert editors designers production, people copywriters sales marketing folk, so you need others. And I think there's a process you have to go through to identify who you're going to work well with so and, and also figuring out what help you actually need. So there's that piece. Then there's laying the groundwork for your online presence, and I think there are generally three pieces to that, that are not negotiable. There is the website, your author website. There's some sort of Email marketing components and then probably one social media site that you show up consistently. And so there's a digital literacy that goes that surrounds that. And the more you've already been active online for a number of years using social media in some regard. I think the more you can kind of ramp up and be a little bit more strategic in your choices and how you're showing up over time, if you've totally avoided social media been living in a cave. If you've if you've somehow stayed off Email and never received a marketing message, it's gonna take some time. But usually once you start paying attention to how those people you admire the ones who have like kind of. Already made it. They're already. Often away on on, you know, in the depths of their author entrepreneur career, if you, you can start stealing some of their best practices and figuring out your own methods of engaging, leadership and growing. There's two speaking very broadly from what I've seen there's two ways that authors use social media one is to promote a book. The other is to build a following and create connection among potential readers and I always tell people the latter is one that it's going to work people. Don't responsibly. When you throw up copy of your book on Facebook and say by now ninety nine cents is that still the mall was it still about building a, a following building a community. Connecting with people who are on your wavelength. I think build a following his sometimes even though that's what is happening. I think that's an an intimidating prospect for people who either don't like social media or just don't understand why people would follow them. Especially like so let's back up for a moment. Why might people follow you, well, probably because they've read your worker experienced something that you shared or did like maybe they met you at a conference. So all of the engagement that you have. Typically has to grow out of somebody of work, you're producing in order to be valuable to you on a career level. But if we just if we, if we strip away that strategic part, I think social media, basic basic is just about making impressions over a series of time, so that people don't forget you exist. And they start to associate you with a certain voice, or with certain. Issues. So I think sometimes this gets broken down into a formula like you're going to talk about these three things all the time. It's going to be. Bourbon cats and books. You're never going to deviate, like, sometimes people want that sort of tactical advice with at so that they know exactly what they're going to do. But I think if you're showing up as yourself rather than, as a marketer, you're naturally going to gravitate towards certain things again. And again, so I think that's really all social media is becoming associated with certain things over time, and people remembering you, when or recognizing you as the case may be when there's an opportunity to see a lot of book deals, come out of Twitter, particularly the political room, people that have been out there and talking about things that are going on building that following being kind of sage wisdom, in little two hundred eighty character bites and ice starting to see book deals come out of that. Because for publisher standpoint, if you have five hundred thousand followers s at you release a book into that makes a lot of sense. So I think that's absolutely true of let's, let's change. Here's a little bit and talk about the arc of publishing or get into what's happ. What's going to come in a minute? But it terms of what's happened since you've been falling into this for twenty years and following what's happening. Is there anything that surprised you about technology that either you thought would happen, but didn't or technology that surprised you? I thought we were going to see a lot more from app driven. Reading that was beyond just like a serial. So right now, if you think about how we read an app forum, it's either your traditional e book, like through the kindle app or if it's a little more exciting. It's like a wasp pad sort of app. So you're reading serialized something or other. There's some other like like more professional iterative of that, like cereal box or radish toppis, but, you know, they're kind of a lot of these presentations, are what I consider more on the fringe like there's not that many people, it's not like a mass medium as of yet, X unless you look, maybe at what pad. So I remember this has been back in twenty twelve. There was an app called the silent history that was serialized story, it got pushed out over the course of. Maybe six months, maybe longer, and it was truly felt innovative and special. And I thought there would be so much more to come out of that more stories like that. I also remember an interactive novel. It was it wasn't exactly a choose your own adventure. But it had that kind of aspect to it, and it was like a dystopia and future. It would have done really well today, I think maybe. That didn't take off. It was too soon for the tower the dystopia presentation. And that was another model will, I thought this, this could take off, this could inspire so many other things. But neither of those like when I talk about them now no one knows what in the world, they are like, the it's just the silent history. No one's heard of it, it feels like it reached a very small group of people. So I thought that I hit a hesitate to call it like enhanced e books because it they weren't e books it wasn't necessarily interactive literature. But it was it was taking the novel to another place that was fascinating. And I hope that it comes back of eventually and then during this improve of things it certainly surprised me. And here we are now, part of it is audio becoming such a significant player because it's such an old school technology. If you will mean what, what we're doing today, we could have been doing on the radio fifty years ago. Yeah. And yet there it is. And so maybe it is it is it about case of sometimes the technology. Thirty doesn't match what readers want. Yeah. I've, I mean, audio books, that's not something I could have predicted because I'm not a consumer of audio myself. I don't listen to podcasts. I was never a big radio listener. So to me, I just I missed I missed that coming. It but given the iphone and how we now like if you if you look closely. Yes, the signs were there, but yeah, does it tell you anything about the way people want to consume stories? Because what are they go back to the, the serialized things, I think about the fact that we live in binge society? Right. You want to Netflix puts on a show you could sit there. And watching tire thing all the way through maybe people don't want things. Meet it out. And, and do you think we like the binging? And when I did some research recently for my newsletter on audio one phenomenon I came across is that people who are like, really into audiobooks, who lists who are high volume listener is they're looking for series. They're looking for things that can they can really get lost in. And so that which is no different from me when I'm looking for a Netflix series. You know. So it's pretty interesting. What's let's, let's look toward the next five years. What do you think is, is going to happen? Take your come. Come back. Five years known Seattle, goodness. Let's go back to what pads. I've had so much fun watching the Evelyn of that company, which was founded before the kindle in two thousand six and last week, they announced they're going to do some premium forms of content. The first time that they've ever charged for something on the site because it's one hundred percent free. They do have some ads. So where is that gonna go, and is that going like, is that going to grow and become more interesting over time? I, I hope so I'm seeing a lot of younger writers, who like to go there and basically, learn how to right in front of an audience, you know, they're not going off into their Garrett by themselves to right. They're doing it. They're improving as they go and publishing along the way. So I, I would expect what pad to be more. Maybe more of an influence more of a place that new writers go, and maybe producing stories that are along the lines of what I want to see more of like the silent history. I hope. There's probably going to be a big four instead of a big five publisher environments, I I've consolidation has been predicted for a while now. But I it feels like the next five years that, that could happen. Amazon. I feel like everyone's waiting for the shoe to drop on the self publishing side where they somehow tighten the screws on self publishing authors, and that could take the shape of reducing royalties if you're not exclusive to them, or producing, royalties more, generally because they did that with audible and audio books, some years ago. So why not on e books? So maybe I'll limit myself to those two things, there's things I, I watch, avid latest, you know, always watching the winds blowing for the folks who want to see where the wind is blowing who wanna start really getting digging into the what's happening at staying on top of trans, obviously, I'm going to suggest the be all you, and we'll have your permission in the show, notes who are some other folks, or granted, he's that people should be paying attention to who are really good about bringing you up to speed on. What's going on? Well as side from looking at all the usual trade publications suspects, just for trends like publishers weekly, and the bookseller, and so on when Mike shat skin right something, I always, pay attention. He does a a blog at his website. He's kind of in a semi retirement. So he's not writing as often as they used to, but he talks to a lot of the, the big players in New York. And so, I feel like when he says something about what's happening in traditional publishing. I'm definitely gonna pay attention on the digital marketing, and I always follow Pete McCarthy 'cause he worked for the big five and went entrepreneurial, and now is in Ingram. And I feel like he's always been on the cusp of what's happening on discover ability issues with books both print and e book, I he doesn't blog anymore, but he will occasionally, be on a panel at a conference. And so you might see him surface and each has a good Twitter feed that you can follow. So you can kind of see what he's thinking about that. Macelroy has a blog called the future of publishing. He'll will occasionally do a deep dive on some issues and research things that no one else is looking at and. Looking at bloggers Joanna Penn has a podcast as well that she's often interviewing people in the industry, and people who are experts on very niche, topics, like Facebook advertising, so from, like a tactical nuts and boat bolt standpoint. She's excellent for the Indy author crowd..

Facebook Twitter publisher Burgess Netflix Pete McCarthy Mike shat Seattle happ Amazon Macelroy New York Joanna Penn Ingram five years one hundred percent twenty years
"disruptor" Discussed on Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"disruptor" Discussed on Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

"Dawn of digital publishing was met with a great deal of fear and apprehension by many in the publishing community. But there was one woman who took writers and publishers by the hand and lead them gently into this new world. If you want to make sense of what's happened in the digital publishing world, and perhaps, more importantly, what's going to happen. She someone you really need to listen to you'll get that chance today on disruptor. From the publishing it's this reptile celebrates the rebels Mavericks and widows of the publishing industry and encouraging each of you to this in your own away. Now, here's your host, John, Bard. Greetings, everybody..

Mavericks John
"disruptor" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"disruptor" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Is truly a disruptor to the retirement industry. You know, the everyone talks in the boomers are coming the boomers are coming well with every generation that comes to quote, unquote, retirement living, it seems each generation paints a new picture of how they envision spending their time how they define value. What's most important to them? And so we've tried to not only look at today's seventy five year old, but the seventy five year old. Old of ten to fifteen years down the road and create a you said life plan to munity that will provide the peace of mind of knowing plan for the future need, should you ever need assisted skilled or memory care? But more importantly is how do you want to spend that next fifteen to twenty years? You know, what what does the lifestyle look like to you as a you enter that next phase of of your quote, unquote retirement? So we have had crafted and continue to craft and the matter based upon feedback and thoughts from you know, that seventy five year old for down the road, not just today. So that crafting of what you want your life to look like how is it that the matter has taken it to another level when you most of the matter you like, I said have the peace of mind. No. Owing plan down the road for for unlimited future care how you're to receive and how you're going to pay for it. But what we also know is the typical person is brain to live ten to fifteen years in the next phase of a beautifully independent lifestyle. So we have like you said crafted both the physical components of the community that will enable the residents there to paint the lifestyle. That's perfect for them as well as services. So for example, we will have three and I rarely separate and unique restaurants that are just for residents of the matter. We will have a bar a tough caylao n-. Just the residents of the matter and the freedom to you know, make a reservation as the more fine dining or make a reservation at the fast casual restaurant. You'll have the flexibility dining when and how you want. You know, we're all moving into the world of Uber eats.

seventy five year fifteen years twenty years
"disruptor" Discussed on Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

08:23 min | 3 years ago

"disruptor" Discussed on Disruptor, Tales From the Edges of Publishing

"I think there's a little bit of both of those things happening, depending on where you look, I wanna clarify that Coppola isn't opinion readers, so it's not associated with Viking necessarily, it's, it's a it's an imprint just like biking. But, but just to sort of use that as an example, my publisher number that you're be founded, and runs this imprint to try to address this sort of three really big issues with with with respect to representation in a very thoughtful way. So the imprint is dedicated to centering stories from the margin. So that's addressing representation on the level of the, the stories that are told but also in terms of the creators and it's also she was very intentional about the team that she put together and the team has made. Up of four one color. So it's a dressing or presentation in the gatekeepers, as well in, in the people who are behind the scenes, working on the projects an big directive of the imprint is to, you know, have the competency to edit cross culturally, so that, you know, we're learning as much as we can with every project. And so, the imprint sort of addresses representation in terms of creators, in terms of stories, but also in terms of the gatekeepers, and really taking that responsibility, seriously by doing the research that's really involved in educating ourselves because we also have blind spots. We're bringing to the table, our personal experiences in our personal history is the bad has limits and we recognize that we recognize the job of a good editor is to always keep learning, and always keep pushing ourselves. So that we know the right questions to ask, and we can truly honor the stories that are that are coming from, from various communities communities, that we might be part of a middle so that we might not be paired of new this approach to editing is something at the imprint as a whole is something that was always supported by the president of leaders, which I think, is a very important thing to note general here end when win number came up with the idea tip found the imprint in when she pitched it to general, you know, there was nothing but support the entire way, and I think that that's going to be one of the really big fundamental pieces of all of this is getting support from the top and getting making sure that, that there's not only support, but also a good understanding of why we're doing this. So. Toes of let mix and let's move ahead. Let's look ahead say three years, five years down the road. What would have happened for you guys to say, okay, things are really now moving in the right direction. What are some of the benchmarks are were signals that you'd be looking for from the publishing industry to know that you're making a difference? I think we, we look to, you know, some of the studies that are starting to become a more regular of the industry, which, like that leeann, most study that found that while de instances of representation in characters in stories, you know, has increased the creators, the percentage of creators, who are writing stories and come from marginalized backgrounds, has not gone up nearly as much as the representations helping on the page. So, you know, until until there's, you know, some sort. Out of balance there. We will continue to do the work that we do. I think that something that lat next in publishing hopes to become is sort of an industry leader about leader in terms of specifically the Latin next community, we hope that publishers will one day use us as a resource, and maybe turn to us I when they have questions when they would like to understand our market a little bit better. Because we, we do have the capacity to, you know, to have that information ready for publishers when when they need it, what are some ways, the pro listeners can help support this. You mentioned a few earlier on, but just talk a little bit about the ways that just because we're going to people listening who are in the publishing world. We're gonna have authors. We're going to have readers booksellers librarians. What are some ways that they can on their own make difference? Yeah. I think I think that right now there's so much happening just in the world in general, that it's easy to feel overwhelmed and to feel like there's so much happening. Where do I even get started which I totally I can really tha that, but, but I think that something that people often forget is that change can can happen on a small scale, and a local level, that is still meaning all, so I think, you know, you don't have to tackle all of the big picture issues at once I think that finding the way that you can be helpful to your community is vital. You know, think of a grassroots efforts and how successful they are able to become because of collaboration, I dunno. Listen, listen to those or listening for those who are doing work and join them. I think that's that's a great. Way to get started and to really help make change that starts at a local level but can really grow from there. Also, if you, if you don't see a space for yourself, create one, I think that that's how lot next in publishing. Got started is we didn't see a support network for our community in this industry. So we created one and now we've been able to affect change in a few different areas of the industry. So it's something doesn't exist. Create it. And I think that, that's, that's something that should feel berry intuitive to people who work in publishing industry in this crater field, general while it was show notes, we'll have beliefs to Mexico Bush Ahah to your imprint as well supposed to learn more. The final question for you is the one I always ask the final question which is, who's your favorite disruptor in history and? And. Okay. So that's I feel like that's gotta be would obey who was the first Puerto Rican librarian in New York City, your cities, public library system, and she did a little bit of what I was just talking about where she couldn't find bilingual books or books written in, in Spanish or her patrons. And so she wrote some and she also didn't see a place for bilingual storytelling. So she created that space. She created that kind of programming took it all over New York City. She started in Harlem, but she did a lot of outrage in the Bronx and Laurie side and really, you know, she helped a whole generation of Spanish speaking bilingual kids become leaders. And you know, that's, that's Hugh. Huge. So for me, she's, she's one of the, the disruptors, I think about a lot. Thank you for fighting the good fight, and for a helping to spearhead what I think will be very important organization moving forward, and we look forward to having more folks from from your community on disruptor. And wanna thank you for taking the time for speaking to us today, it's been great. You for shining spotlight on us. Today's episode of disruptor was brought to you by writing blueprints, the breakthrough step by step

New York City Coppola publisher leeann editor president Harlem Mexico Bronx Laurie three years five years one day
"disruptor" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"disruptor" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"News ninety two three FM independent in thoughts and punk rock in life. It's the Chad Benson show to get this kind of reaction in the last forty hours from the elite from the core of the Democratic Party anytime, you threaten the system and the apparatus DNC and the RNC has set up such high levels of restrictions impediments to almost not allow independent person to run for president is unamerican. I love that that right? There is how shorts. Says shorts right there. He is. Of course, the independent running Trump's egging him on because he thinks he's going to take votes from the left. But what I love is the fact that he's a disruptor potentially disrupters are amazing in everything Trump in a lot of ways with disruptor, even though he was on the right side of the aisle. He's really been a bit of a disruptor in politics. This guy would be a much different kind of disruptor. And if you look in sports, if you look at entertainment, if you look in technology if you look at business disrupters are usually amazing for. Who for us scrape Netflix a disruptor, Amazon, a disruptor YouTube a disruptor? Not just the iphone. But the ipod a disruptor. You can go all the way back to J P Morgan. And you look at him. And what he did when he said. Yeah, everybody's doing kerosene. But this guy over here, right? He's got electricity and is other guy who left he's over there. And he also has electrolytes item. Just I'm just gonna take it all and we'll disrupt the whole market who's better for us. Absolutely. I like the fact that he's a disruptor. I do do I think he has a chance. No, not necessarily again in a lot of ways. I think it depends on how are you going to go? Are you going all in to the wall nonstop I'm doing this or is this dipping my toe in raising my profile and eventually Saint Nanawati part of this. Right. I like the fact that he's doing this. Do I agree with everything he says, no? But when he talks about the extreme, right and extreme left. I'm telling you guys right now he is spot on while. I think people are are worried, and I understand that this could and reelecting Donald Trump. I don't believe that what I see is that the majority of Americans are not being represented by the.