38 Burst results for "Diseases"

Fresh update on "diseases" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

News, Traffic and Weather

01:09 min | 20 min ago

Fresh update on "diseases" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

"Out of the new federal covert released Bill. Democratic representative Maryland Strickland, host of the call to talk about the package, which she says has the goals of getting people vaccinated, getting kids back into school and rebuilding the economy. Lakewood Mayor Dan Anderson reminded everyone on the call that cities like his have lost tax money provides for revenue replacement to municipalities who sorely needed to make up for the actual extra expense they had during this pandemic. Anderson says his city relies on a lot of small businesses so money to help small and large businesses get back on their feet will also help cities and counties House is expected to pass the bill. The president could sign it before the end of the week. Our state's health care leaders say. Take it slow on gatherings. Once you have your covert vaccine comas, Ryan Harris tells us what they say about lifting mask mandates. Hardy is the word Washington State Hospital Association chief Cassie Sour uses for states choosing to lift their mask mandates. Now calling an exceptionally premature on new centers for disease control and prevention guidance that says people who've been fully vaccinated can gather with each other. Sour says she's a friend or two, is also fully vaccinated to spend some time. Would still don't have a party to be cautious, You know, think it through really carefully. We need to take small steps Forward..

Ryan Harris Cassie Sour Washington State Hospital Asso TWO Anderson Maryland Strickland Democratic Sour Dan Anderson Lakewood Mayor House Friend Hardy END
Airline industry pushes US to standardize health papers

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 3 hrs ago

Airline industry pushes US to standardize health papers

"Airlines in business groups are asking the White House to take a leading role in creating travel credentials to show a passenger's been vaccinated against Kobe nineteen more than two dozen airline and business groups including the U. S. chamber of commerce road to the White House asking it take part in developing standards for virus travel credentials the airlines hope such a document would lead countries to relax some travel restrictions and are concerned a piecemeal approach would be confusing but while industry is seeking proof of vaccination documentation it opposes mandating vaccines before travel meanwhile the director of the centers for disease control says every time there's a surge in travel we have a surge in cases Jackie Quinn Washington

U. S. Chamber Of Commerce White House Centers For Disease Control Jackie Quinn Washington
Fresh update on "diseases" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:31 sec | 21 min ago

Fresh update on "diseases" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

"Dave. Joseph. If you've recently recovered from covert 19 you have something powerful inside you. They're called antibodies and their founding a plasma plasma is the liquid part of your blood. It's mostly water that also contains antibodies, which keep your body working well and fighting off deadly diseases. Plasma from people who've had covert 19 could be crucial to helping others fight off the virus. Huh? Going directly into patients suffering from the virus and going to the scientists working nonstop to create potential treatments and medicines recovering from covert 19 makes you unique. Donating your plasma makes you a hero. If you know someone who has recently recovered from covert 19 and think they could be a hero to let them know about us. To donate your plasma. Please go to the fight is in a stork. And thank you can if I am 6 40..

Dave Joseph 6 40 Covert 19
Fully vaccinated people can gather without masks, CDC says

Steve Trevelise

00:25 sec | 7 hrs ago

Fully vaccinated people can gather without masks, CDC says

"In case you missed it fully vaccinated Americans. Hand gather with other vaccinated people indoors without wearing a mask or social distance scene, according to guidance from the CDC. The recommendations also say the vaccinated people can come together in the same way with people considered it low risk for severe disease, such as in the case of vaccinated grandparent's visiting healthy Children and

CDC Severe Disease
Fresh update on "diseases" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:41 sec | 55 min ago

Fresh update on "diseases" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

"After Dr Rochelle Walensky says the recommendations are just a first step as more people get vaccinated and the science and evidence expands and as the disease dynamics of this country changed. We will continue to update this guidance. Let's get added. CDC recommends that fully vaccinated people can visit With unvaccinated people from one other household indoors without wearing master physical distancing as long as the unvaccinated people and any unvaccinated members of their households are not At high risk for severe covert 19 disease. The guidance has designed to address a growing demand has more adults have been getting back stated and wondering if it gives them greater freedom to visit family members.

CDC Rochelle Walensky First Step ONE 19 Disease
CDC says people who are fully vaccinated against Covid can meet safely indoors without masks

Michael Berry

00:52 sec | 10 hrs ago

CDC says people who are fully vaccinated against Covid can meet safely indoors without masks

"At least one dose of a covert vaccine. We're doing pretty good across the country were yes, yes, President Biden visiting a Veterans Medical Center earlier today, as the city See releases new guidance, CDC director Dr Rochelle Walensky says those who are vaccinated can meet other vaccinated folks without masks or physical distancing. And those relaxed restrictions also apply to vaccinate people meeting up with unvaccinated people from just one other household as long as the unvaccinated people and any unvaccinated members of their households are not at high risk for severe covert 19 disease like those over the age of 65 for those with diabetes or cancer. She says, if people are meeting up with those from more than one household than everyone should mask up and distance, regardless of vaccination status. Jessica Rosenthal Fox

President Biden Veterans Medical Center Dr Rochelle Walensky CDC Diabetes Cancer Jessica Rosenthal Fox
Here's what the CDC says fully vaccinated people can do

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:54 sec | 14 hrs ago

Here's what the CDC says fully vaccinated people can do

"Fully vaccinated people can visit with other fully vaccinated people indoors without wearing a mask or physical distances. CDC director Dr Rochelle Wolinsky says fully vaccinated people can also ease up in some other situations with unvaccinated people from a single household who are low risk of severe You're covered 19 disease indoors without wearing masks or physical distancing means a lot for families and friends that have stayed apart during the pandemic. So what does this name If you and a friend or you and a family member are both vaccinated, you can have dinner together wearing masks without distancing. You can visit your grand parents if you have been vaccinated, and they have been, too But as of now, only about 9% of the U. S population is fully vaccinated against Cove in 19. About 30 Million people. CBS NEWS Special

Dr Rochelle Wolinsky CDC U. CBS
A Look at Postpartum in the Bible

Your Grandparents Did What?

04:33 min | 16 hrs ago

A Look at Postpartum in the Bible

"Oldest record of postpartum instructions can be found in the old testament. Of course okay. So on leviticus. Twelve five which rate twelve five discussion already as a biblical scholar cracked rachel a biblical biblical assessment name. You do She must not touch anything sacred or go into a sanctuary until the days of her purification or complete because women are unclean after giving birth. Okay to mention children. The lord's children. I mean it's a good thing that women are pushed into doing right and then also then are also coming on. Babies were born like not consensually many and then once they are born now. You're like some dirty unclean. He them so offer. Rest if you had a son you would get thirty three to forty days. Okay and a daughter would give you sixty six to eighty days because the manar leslie yes. Inherently the original sin like from the bible. Yes from eve the whole yes. Women are just inherently cling from birth. There's nothing you could do get it like you're just born a woman you're born as a biblical scholar of us are born sinners right. Yes that's part of it. I i did take a world history. Colonised that i showed up to bolt right western religion. Yes we are. All born centers So back to my biblical scholar nece the postpartum depicted in the bible. Had new more bleeding at than did with resting. Okay back to the sin so it didn't really matter that you were healing. You just gave per day jim. Fuck like when you're done being dirty. He them disgusting anger women harm. You can come back okay. Carrie good moving to any ancient egypt. K new mothers were advised to have their backs rubbed. Great with oil sounds great in which a nile perch had been sued. You want they wanted to increase increase airflow milk. It's not how you do at bam smelly fish. You just get dirty old dead fish dirty old oil studio s can you imagine so Eating a mouse was thought to cure a number of ills and it was not the extent mother. Eight the mouse. She could pass along those cures through her milk. No passing the hantavirus through your milk or other Diseases of Yeah the roads are disgusting. Disease carriers yes so okay. Menstrual blood was another potent medicine and it was rebuilding infant to drive away any demons that might wish to hundred child. I mean so you just put your one station blood. I'm but like okay. So but yeah. Like i don't know if there's a distinction between measure blood in postpartum bleeding right like who different actions yet not that they would necessarily understanding. No i guess they just thought Baby on your period. Just blow up coming for coming out. Yeah you're not talking disagree about like shedding your lining with ovulation alerts as being a you being a Open wound inside of your body. Yes yep so. Ancient greece and the birth was followed by a period of rest lasting roughly forty days from other child which the forty day thing comes up over and over and over and over again. It's crazy to me i'm attempts. I read the theory days. And i don't know why i don't know if it's just like a nice number i'm guessing it hasn't been new six week postpartum thing which we also subscribe to now like when you go get your first offers visit. Yeah postpartum is it must. I guess there's an again. I was actually going to ask you that too because i was like when is how many visits like win is the first time now d- touchdown with a doctor after you give birth and i was released weeks weeks. It's horrifying come your every two seconds then buy post-partum dangerous tyner or person like a recovering because there's just so many things that can go wrong because you go to your pediatrician. A lot. they're like surf. Doctor is like laying is not fair. to your pediatrician. Auto be keeping an eye out. I don't think that. I think people care enough about birth parents. No

Rachel Carrie Egypt JIM Greece
Anthony Fauci On How COVID-19 Has Humbled Us

Big Brains

02:25 min | 19 hrs ago

Anthony Fauci On How COVID-19 Has Humbled Us

"The her school university of chicago particularly dedicated to evidence based policy analytical approaches. It's been a challenging year for evidence based policy. And i want to start by asking you a little bit about what we've learned over the last. What is the evidence to say. First of all the fact that this virus is spectacularly capable in transmitting from human to human number one number two unlike any virus that i've had any experience with about thirty to forty forty five percent of people. Never get any symptoms at all. So whenever had you seen a virus in which almost half the people get no symptoms and yet it can kill a half million americans thus far and a couple of million plus globally but the real show stopper for us that slapped us into a recognition in what we were really dealing with. Is that anywhere. Between fifty to sixty percent of all transmissions occur from someone who will lead the never get any symptoms or is pre-symptomatic which means they are transmitting it. Before they have manifestations of disease and that's just not the way respiratory viruses worked historically so we have knowledge that evolves as the weeks and the months go by and sometimes you need to make policy changes or policy decisions when you have not all the information that you need and one of the things that this outbreak has taught us that scientific investigation and the collection of data and evidence will almost naturally. Have you evolve your own. Stance opinion guideline. Or what have you because when you're dealing with virgin territory you have to make adjustments be flexible enough and humble enough to know that you may need to essentially modify what you said before the very sobering part and the humiliating part. The things that have made us very humble about this is what this virus has taught us. It's been a very painful learning experience.

School University Of Chicago Virgin
Despair and disparities: covid-19 consumes Brazil

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:46 min | 20 hrs ago

Despair and disparities: covid-19 consumes Brazil

"Has just gone through. Its deadliest week of the pandemic daily fatalities. Hit a record level of more than nine thousand nine hundred on thursday bringing the total number of deaths to more than two hundred sixty five thousand and cases to more than eleven million. The discovery of contagious new corona virus variant in the amazon region has fueled the brutal second wave but the government's response has been slow and patchy and has failed to contain the spread. The sense that you get living here is sad and almost fatalistic. It feels like this country has given up on dealing with this pandemic in a responsible life saving way. Many months ago ceremonies. Lynn is brazil correspondent. Even though we are all seeing that the cases are higher than they've ever been. The hospitals are full in nearly every part of the country. The restrictions that have been introduced feel completely out of tune with that reality. They've been late. they've been minimal. And some cities are slightly stricter than others. But i think the feeling that most brazilians have is that covert is just going to happen. Overtake this country like a tidal wave. And there's nothing that anyone can do about it and the concern right now. Is that the. The health system is buckling under the weight. Right so the difference between this second wave compared to the first wave is that for the first several months of the pandemic. The virus was sort of ping-pong between different brazilian states whereas now most of the country's twenty six states are seeing their hospitals at or near capacity. And there's really a limited ability to sort of transfer patients or doctors or supplies between the different states recently. The health secretary of the amazonian state of honea mentioned this desperation in a video aimed at those who weren't taking the current virus seriously is typical seymour's known them was laid to swap mine. Nothing lead today but also by a sweatshirt but he says we have no icu. Beds for your mother your father for your aunt. It doesn't matter if you're rich. Poor young old. We simply have no. Icu beds available and those rising in numbers. Those strains that are coming about. Is that down two new variants of the viruses. That the big problem here. That's definitely part of the story. They found this new variant in the amazonian city of manaus late last year. It's called p. One and recent studies show that. It's one point four to two point two times more contagious than other versions of the virus. And the really scary thing is that it looks like it is much more capable of reinfecting people who have already been infected. That might be why people in manaus were hit really badly by second wave. Even though some studies suggest that as many as three quarters of the population had been infected in the first wave the other thing that seems really scary is that it looks like this. Current wave is affecting young people and much higher numbers than before so this variant is clearly causing some of the trouble. But you also say that. There's a certain sense of fatalism. That's contributing here. I mean how much does that have to do with the leadership. We talked a lot before. About how president of brush off the pandemic bolsonaro hasn't changed a bit at a recent event. He told brazilians to stop whining about the krona virus. Sugar jimmy because the club and said how long are you going to keep crying about it. But it's not just him the first wave you saw politicians trying to take a different stance and even going to the supreme court to fight for their right to shut things down even though the president disagreed this time it's different. Brazil has been seeing cases creep up for months now and it's only in the past few weeks. That mayors and governors have really started implementing serious restrictions closing businesses fulltime rather than. Just say from eleven pm to five. Am which is what we had in sao paulo for a few weeks. And what do the brazilian people think about. The the patchy measures have been put into place. I think there's a real split. You definitely see the outrage that brazilians especially the more educated and richard brazilian have had from the beginning. But there's also a real feeling among the middle class and the working class that putting in more restrictions is going to do more harm than good because the economic situation is so bad. Unemployment has barely come down from its high of around fourteen percent and the emergency cash payments. The federal government paid people for nine months last year. Have now been cut off to. Millions of people were basically plunged into poverty when the clock struck midnight on december. Thirty first congress is trying to push past a smaller version of the cash payments. But it's going to take some time but certainly one path out of all of these kinds of trade offs is vaccination. How is the country's program of of inoculation going. It's had a frustratingly slow start. Brazil has administered vaccines to only about three percent of its population that's way behind neighboring countries. Like she lay here in brazil. Most of the problem is that boston otto is anti vaccines and many months ago. When he had from different vaccine companies including some that were doing trials here in brazil he kicked the can down the road and signed with astra zeneca but that one provider hasn't been enough now here in sao paulo. The governor signed a deal with the sign of that company to produce its corona vac vaccine in the federal government. Sort of found itself forced to make a deal as well but they've also been all sorts of supply bottlenecks and problems with distribution and real kind of ineffectiveness by on the part of the national health ministry. Which is overseeing this whole effort. It sounds like a fairly bleak picture all around but it's not just a problem for brazil if these new variants in particular are allowed to run rampant. That's true and it's really scary. The longer the disease is left to fester. In in countries like brazil greater chance that new variants will start to emerge that reduced the effectiveness of covid nineteen vaccines elsewhere in the world posing a threat to nations that have already immunized their populations in a lot of these countries. That are still really struggling with the virus. You see their leaders just begging for the rest of the world to send them vaccine so that they can vaccinate people as quick as possible so far. We haven't seen that from bolsonaro he's been really against vaccines but just in the past few weeks. It looks like maybe he's starting to change his tune. He signed a deal with pfizer and he suggested in a recent interview that he himself might get vaccinated. So i guess the hope is relieved. The bolsonaro will understand that vaccinating people is essential to the economic recovery. That he's been prioritizing from the start and that that combined with attention from the rest of the world in getting vaccines to brazil will start to allow brazil to get a handle on something that feels right now like. It's totally out of control very much for your time sarah. Thank you jason

Manaus Honea Brazil Sugar Jimmy Richard Brazilian Lynn Sao Paulo Seymour Amazon Astra Zeneca Federal Government National Health Ministry Supreme Court Congress Boston Bolsonaro Pfizer
How to Supercharge Your Brain Health with Food

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

03:36 min | 20 hrs ago

How to Supercharge Your Brain Health with Food

"Talk about three of these foods. Here that people would be surprised to know that this food is a brain health food. Yeah so first. Of all i mean with the book genius foods. I really wanted to strip away to be s strip way the dogma and really pick the foods that are packed with the kinds of nutrients that we know that your brain needs not only to survive the modern world but to thrive. We want to give the the kinds of nutrients in the kinds of antioxidants. That are really gonna help. Your brain fend off against the insults. Do to toxin exposure mean the modern world where confronted with more toxins than ever before in human history. You know and i kinda use toxins as as a as a to cast a wide net. I mean this could Describe anything from the industrial grain and seed oils that we over consume today the canola oil corn oil soybean all these oils are toxic. But then all the way down to the the refined processed carbohydrates that now make up sixty percent of our of the calories that we intake so these foods that i highlight if you can go to the supermarket and buy them on loop. You're gonna be doing your brain a huge favor so three of them. I would say You know for one definitely dark leafy greens so my favorite spinach kale a ruge. What i try to do every single day is try to eat what i call a large fatty salad and i'm usually focusing on those three greens. rush university research has found that people who do this consume a large bowl of dark leafy greens everyday have brains. That look up to eleven years younger on. Scans so i mean you have more youthful brain eat dark leafy greens I'm usually Seeing those greens in extra virgin olive oil. And i'll tell you. Why allah voile. I consider to be a genius food in its own right Because it's rich in first of all it's got a very favourable fatty acid profile so in terms of the kind of oil that we wanna consume liberally. We can look too many different types of studies to confirm that extra virgin olive. Oil is really beneficial. We can look at the population level and we can see that people who tend to consume more extra. Virgin olive oil have better health. They've got better cardiovascular. Health got better Brain health they even can lose weight. We can look taking a step down To randomized control trials. You know there was the pregnant trial. The premed trial was a very Population long-term about six years is what it spanned Trial where they took Groups of people and they put them on either low fat diets or mediterranean diets for already higher in fat and they supplemented those two mediterranean groups with either morning nuts or more extra virgin olive oil and they found that when consuming up to a liter per week actually improve the health outcomes of these people. The pretty midst study was actually recently reanalysed Because there were some flaws in the random mutation the methodology but even after the reanalysis of the trial they found that the results were the same and so very good evidence. You know people were surprised because as you mentioned up to a leader a week. Yes the lots. Its large quantity. Yeah it's twenty. I mean you know we now know. Thankfully that fat doesn't make you fat even though the two unfortunately have the same word But extra virgin olive oil. You know it's the polyphenyls in the oil aside from the fatty acid Ratio of monounsaturated fat to saturated fat. It's very favourable from that standpoint but it also contains plant compounds that are profoundly anti inflammatory. So inflammation is the cornerstone of all modern disease. Pretty much and extra virgin olive oils is one of these foods that has a very strong anti inflammatory effect in the

Rush University Mediterranean
The Problem of Gestational Diabetes With Dr. Elizabeth Boham

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:58 min | 20 hrs ago

The Problem of Gestational Diabetes With Dr. Elizabeth Boham

"We're gonna be talking about conditions pretty common This one hundred percent preventable. A hundred percent reversible that is managed often in very weird ways by traditional medicine and something that's called just station diabetes which is essentially diabetes of pregnancy. So liz tell us how common is this problem. And why should we even care. Be worried about it. Yeah well thanks mark. thanks for having me. It's great to be on with you again and It's really common actually say up to ten percent of women have diabetes which means their blood. Sugar is too high during pregnancy and as a result. What happens when their blood sugar too high during pregnancy is the babies grow too big right so they will get. They will get over weight when they're born so they can grow big. Those offspring often have increased risk of insulin resistance and diabetes and waking when they're adults so when women have just diabetes during their pregnancy. It makes it harder for that baby to maintain healthy weight. When they're an adult so it's trans-generational absolutely not only. Is it dangerous for the baby. During that pregnancy they have a higher rate of of problems with birth. They've increased rate of c-section but their metabolism is damaged. So they have a harder. Time with maintaining normal weight as an adult. They have an increased risk of obesity. They have an increased risk of insulin. Resistance and For that mother to if they had just stations diabetes they have a much higher rates of diabetes post pregnancy. Both type one and type two which is interesting. So they also have a higher rate of cardiovascular disease. they say that a third will develop metabolic syndrome when the within the next five years. So you know it's it is definitely a risk so if if you were told during your pregnancy that you had just diabetes or you you're at risk for just station diabetes. It's important that you are paying attention to your blood sugar to your insulin level to that waist to hip ratio postpartum. Because because you don't want you wanna be be picking this up early. 'cause it's really much easier to reverse if you pick it up early. Imposed ten percent of women who have pregnancies have this problem which is a lot At but when you think about the fact that one and two americans has prediabetes or type two diabetes. You know that's pretty significant. And the question i am is if ten percent have actual just diabetes which means your blood sugar is over a hundred forty after a glucose tolerance test one hundred. Twenty six fasting. How many have prediabetes. Who are pregnant. Yeah because it might be the same ratio as with regular dhabi might be like ten percent and another forty percent of the population might have prediabetes pregnant and that also comes with risks.

Diabetes LIZ Insulin Resistance Obesity Cardiovascular Disease Dhabi
Thousands of Microsoft Customers May Have Been Victims of Hack Tied to China

Start Here

01:45 min | 21 hrs ago

Thousands of Microsoft Customers May Have Been Victims of Hack Tied to China

"Over the last several months tens of thousands of computers have been hit by a series of acts in the last few days. The pace is escalating microsoft. Says that chinese hackers have been targeting. It's email server software using newly discovered bug that can on january sixth. The one most americans were paying attention to the insurrection at the capitol security experts. Say that's when the attacks began they were targeting holes in microsoft's exchange servers the service used by millions and millions of customers including huge important businesses. And at first those big groups appear to be the chief targets infectious disease researchers universities defense contractors law firms once microsoft figured it out they patch the bugs but this is where it gets even scarier. We are concerned that there are large number of victims and are working with our partners to understand the scope of this so companies with huge it departments obviously the immediately installed these patches but lots of other groups have been less attentive. They still haven't will in a final flurry. The hackers have quickly begun prodding thousands and thousands of clients on one of the most widely used email server systems in the world. This includes local governments. Police departments credit unions doctors offices school districts. Basically if your company did not update its servers last week. These hackers very well could have had the keys to your email. Everyone running these servers government private sector academia needs to act now to patch them the well-known group krebs on security says. The good news is this has nothing to do with that. Big solar winds. Hack a while back. That was by russians microsoft. This is the chinese. China denies this but the bad news is this is probably even more widespread at one point. This weekend wired reported that the victimless was growing by thousands every hour.

Microsoft Krebs China
Fauci Warns Coronavirus Cases Could Spike as States Ease Restrictions

Sean Hannity

00:12 sec | 1 d ago

Fauci Warns Coronavirus Cases Could Spike as States Ease Restrictions

"Week. Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's leading expert on infectious diseases, called reopening so soon ill advised, he says restrictions should remain in place at least until new coronavirus cases fall below

Dr. Anthony Fauci
Washington, DC area marks 1 year of coronavirus

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:54 sec | 1 d ago

Washington, DC area marks 1 year of coronavirus

"Law Today marks one year since the first cases of covert were reported in Virginia and DC, Maryland marked its one year anniversary. On Friday as we continue our coverage of covert 19 1. Year later, our Mike Murillo takes a look back with America's best known infectious disease expert who talks about what surprised him the most about the coronavirus. It's a very unusual virus, the likes of something Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, says he's never seen before. Most puzzling was that despite the extraordinary destructive nature of this virus, a substantial proportion a third to maybe 40% of people Have no symptoms at all, he says. When people not outwardly sick or causing the spread, then makes it extremely difficult to do the kind of contact tracing that you traditionally do, he says. Before this, most respiratory illnesses were spread by people who were

Mike Murillo Dr. Anthony Fauci Infectious Disease Maryland DC National Institute Of Allergy Virginia America
Fauci Warns Coronavirus Cases Could Spike as States Ease Restrictions

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:57 sec | 1 d ago

Fauci Warns Coronavirus Cases Could Spike as States Ease Restrictions

"More states. Reason. Coronavirus restrictions Arizona, California and South Carolina relaxed at least some of their restrictions Friday. South Carolina no longer has a statewide mask mandate. Arizona ended restrictions on capacity and businesses, while California is letting its theme parks reopen. Still, health experts warn the risk is not over and of states go too far too soon, it could lead to another surge of covert 19 cases. Most Americans say they either have or plan on getting the covert 19 vaccine. Jim Forbes has more, a Pew research survey found. 69% of Americans have either gotten a vaccine shot or say they definitely or probably will, infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci says. Vast majority of people need to get vaccinated to stop the virus from spreading. He continued to say that combining the availability of the vaccine with the reduction in case numbers, the country could be closer to getting back to normal. Later this year.

South Carolina Arizona California Jim Forbes Dr Anthony Fauci
Coronavirus Cases Could Spike as States Ease Restrictions

Bloomberg Businessweek

01:04 min | 1 d ago

Coronavirus Cases Could Spike as States Ease Restrictions

"Or easing coronavirus restrictions. Arizona, California and South Carolina relaxed at least some of the restrictions on Friday. South Carolina no longer has a statewide mask mandate. Arizona ended restrictions on capacity and businesses, while California is letting its theme parks reopened. Still, health experts warn the risk is not over and if states go too far too soon. It could lead to another surge of covert 19 cases, and most Americans say they either have or plan on getting the cove in 19 vaccine, a Pew research survey found. 69% of Americans have either gotten the vaccine shot or say they definitely or probably will, infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci says. Vast majority of people need to get vaccinated to stop the virus from spreading, he said, By combining the availability of the vaccine, with the reduction in case numbers The country could be closer to getting back to normal later this year. I'm

South Carolina Arizona California Dr Anthony Fauci
More than half of nurses who died of COVID-19 are people of color

Sean Hannity

00:24 sec | 2 d ago

More than half of nurses who died of COVID-19 are people of color

"The nation's largest nurses union says black nurses are at an increased risk of dying from coded national nurses, United says while black nurses make up 12% of the workforce, they account for 18% of nurses who die from the disease. Pittsburgh registered nurse Geri Allen. We are usually in a staff nurse position, which means we are at the bedside more than other races of

Geri Allen United Pittsburgh
'Weight isn't always within your control': Why some states are prioritizing obesity patients for the COVID-19 vaccine

WGN Programming

03:18 min | 2 d ago

'Weight isn't always within your control': Why some states are prioritizing obesity patients for the COVID-19 vaccine

"State leaders make their own decisions on wind groups or eligible, but many people are not happy about obesity being considered a risk factor that should get early dibs at the vaccine joins us now to talk about this Dr Fatima Cody Stanford, She's an assistant professor of medicine in Massachusetts General Hospital. She's also in obesity, medicine, physician and adults, Adolescence and Children and MGH Wait center. Thanks for joining us tonight, Doctor. Thank you for having me. I guess the first question becomes one of the risk factors for those who are overweight when we're talking about Cove it so it's important for us to recognize that obesity is an actual disease, and I think one of the things that people don't realize is that it's the disease is not just how you look. It's actual, a disease process characterized by a high degree of inflammation. And so when we have that high degree of chronic inflammation associated with obesity, the disease it doesn't play well with the acute inflammation of covert 19. As such patients that have the disease of obesity do have a risk of dying. That's much higher, sometimes 3 to 4 times the likelihood of those that are leaner and wait. So it's important for us to recognize that this is important. We need persons with obesity to be vaccinated. We want them to live. We want them not to need ICU care and be on the ventilator. And that's why I think that this really is a prudent and a really important step for those that have the disease of obesity. Doctor. I want to read a quote from the chairwoman of the Obesity Action Co Elite coalition, who was featured in the USA Today article, she said, Wait isn't always within your control. With that in mind, and what we know about the risk of obesity and Kobe complications is the right move to get obese Americans in this next phase of the vaccine. One thing I'm gonna change I don't want to call people will be so this is a label. Obesity is a disease. And so that language can be highly stigmatizing for my patients that actually have this disease of obesity, but hands down. It's the right move to get patients with obesity vaccinated when we're looking at the vaccines, the fires of modern of particularly we saw that patients with obesity had a similar level of immunity with regards to the vaccines as persons that were leaner and wait status. So if we know that they're dying quicker. We know they're getting sicker and having much more Colton disease processes associated with covert. We need to make sure that they're getting vaccinated. Have you had a chance to talk to any of your patients? What was their response when the news broke that the possibility of them being moved to the next group? They're up to get the vaccine. What was that thought process. What was their feelings about that? There were some that felt you know a little bit guilty that their weight status would cause them a higher likelihood of getting the vaccine sooner than others. But many of my patients were actually very pleased, actually finally be able to get this vaccine so that we can return to some sense of normalcy here in the United States and around the world as we try to navigate these issues with social distancing physical, do, insisting and getting back to work, So I think that it's important to see that there's different camps in terms of what people think. But overall for my patients that have a B C that Aaron care they were very relieved to see that they were moving up in the ranks of the consideration for the vaccine. Alright,

Obesity Dr Fatima Cody Stanford Obesity Action Co Elite Coalit Massachusetts General Hospital Chronic Inflammation Usa Today Colton United States Aaron
Separating facts from fiction on major COVID-19 vaccine misconceptions

Part Time Genius

05:49 min | 2 d ago

Separating facts from fiction on major COVID-19 vaccine misconceptions

"Of coded. The news does seem to get a little better every day, particularly when it comes to vaccines. We now have three covert vaccines in circulation. Advisor Madonna and Johnson and Johnson. More and more vaccination sites are taking appointments in the U. S. Almost 77 million doses have been administered. Even his inoculations rise. So do the questions. What does that mean for our daily lives after we get both shots? Can we take off our masks and we go on vacation? To get some answers. We talked to Dr Sandra Cash, deputy medical director and infectious disease specialist at West Bed Medical Group, located in Westchester, New York. Is what she had to say. Thanks so much for joining us. You're welcome My pleasure. So with the vaccine on everyone's mind these days, what are some of the common misconceptions about the vaccine? You know, just that this is ah, very good question, and I've seen and heard all sorts of mythology out there about the vaccines. Some of the more common myths that I've seen are that the vaccine can close Cove. It Um, the vaccine. The genetic material in the M R in a vaccines can actually affect your gardener your genetic material on but it can cause problems with fertility. Um You know, and the first two are flat out wrong. Um, you know, the genetic material in the in the vaccines really does not interact with your DNA's A. It's degraded very rapidly in the side of possum. The area outside the nucleus of the cell by yourselves. Enzymes on that happens really, Very quiet. Very quickly. Um, you know, the question about fertility and impact on fertility is one that I think we have not seen evidence of that to be the case. I don't anticipate that being The case. But you know these air new vaccines, So we simply haven't had the time on Ben. The question about whether the vaccines can cause Kobe that that one is flat out wrong. There's no mechanistic way for that to happen with the vaccines that we use these air, not live vaccines. Well, that's great to hear, and it's good to be clear about the facts. After you had two shots of the vaccine, and the correct time period has passed. Do you still need to wear a mask and other other precautions you should be taking you do And the reason it seems a little counterintuitive, But the reason we we continue to make that recommendation is several fold. Probably the most important reason behind that is that we still don't know. And I'm anticipating will have the answer to that in the next few months. Whether vaccination prevents transmission, meaning that a vaccine individual will not get infected if they're exposed to someone with Cove it But they may still get enough of the virus to carry it in their nose in their fair or unfair, inks the back of their throat and be able to spread it toe unvaccinated individuals. And that's where masters becomes a mechanism. Tol interrupt that that transmission I suspect what we'll see with covert vaccine is what we've seen with vaccines for other infectious diseases. Primarily that vaccination not only prevents infection, which we know the M Marny vaccines, the backs and the Johnson Johnson vaccine, they're highly effective in preventing infection. They'll also be very effective in preventing preventing transmission. This asymptomatic carrier status. We just don't have that information now. So we continue to make that recommendation recommendation on mask use until we have that additional information. So given that is it safe to expand your social bubble? Once you have the vaccine, and if so, who can you include? That's a trickier question, and I'll give you like a scenario. So if you're with other vaccinated individuals what you can Probably pretty. Realistically assume, is that those individuals? If they're carrying the virus, they won't infect you. And you won't infect them. What you can't assume And what we're not sure of yet is whether if you're carrying the virus again and your nose, you won't get the infection because you've been vaccinated. Can you expose another person in your gathering and they again Because they've been vaccinated won't get infected. But will they get enough of the virus in their nasal mucosa and then take it to their home where they may have unvaccinated individuals? Now? The likelihood of that happening? You know, there are lots of steps involved. Becomes increasingly remote. And so I've seen, you know, groups of people who have been vaccinating getting together and you know and not wearing masks. I don't think we're at that point yet I would feel much more comfortable with that once we kind of reach more a level of herd immunity. But what vaccination does do is it obviously prevents you from getting infected and dying from this, You know disease, which can be horrible, But it also allows you to do things that you may have been very frightened to do with a lot more comfort, and I think one of the things that we talked about a lot with Cove. It is this underlying kind of second pandemic of tremendous anxiety and fear that it's created in people. You know, fear of going to the store fear of interacting with people fear of even going Outside an exercise in which we know was probably one of the safer things you could do right now. And I think vaccination gives you you know, Ah, lot of relief that if you do go to the store and someone buy, you sneezes or coughs that you know you don't have to have that panic attack, you know, And I think that is a huge weight off of a lot of people's shoulders, and that's why you know Healthcare people in epidemiologist and all the people are talking about. This is really the first major step back to a sense of normalcy and why vaccination is going to be so important for us to get back Tol we were the society. So

Dr Sandra Cash West Bed Medical Group Johnson Infectious Disease Westchester Madonna U. Johnson Johnson New York BEN
Detroit mayor rejects initial J&J vaccine shipment, saying Pfizer and Moderna are 'the best'

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:45 sec | 2 d ago

Detroit mayor rejects initial J&J vaccine shipment, saying Pfizer and Moderna are 'the best'

"The mayor of detroit is changed his mind about whether one cavities covid. Nineteen vaccine will be distributed in the city. Fox's lisa brady after turning down and initial supply. The johnson and johnson vaccine detroit. Mayor mike dugan appeared to suggest it wasn't as good as the pfizer moderna. Vaccines they all are safe are effective. They prevent severe disease and death. White house spokeswoman. Jen psaki says everyone should take whichever vaccine they have access to. The white house team had been in touch with the mayor who released a statement. Declaring confidence in the johnson and johnson vaccine insane. They look forward to receiving it. Health officials say in trials. All three vaccines prevented one hundred percent of hospitalizations that a difference in the efficacy percentage is misleading. Because it's one shot. Instead of

Lisa Brady Johnson Mayor Mike Dugan Detroit Jen Psaki Pfizer FOX White House
"diseases" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

06:30 min | Last month

"diseases" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

"So to summarize leaving. George are really questioning. The constructs of self reported measures and their ability to be measure for participation given this question anna likelihood that at least with some individuals. We are probably not measuring participation when we administer self reported outcome measures. We asked georgia me from our specifics on their studies. We have a study. That's ongoing now. A pilot study will were trying to collect some of these data so that we have a combination of activity data in gps data with self report winds clinic based outcome measures. The start to look at cannery. Had we do somebody think so. How do we quantify information accommodate times. They leave the house. What's the distance. How much time do they spend out of the house forces in the house. What were their behaviors. In terms of mobility behaviors in the is out of the house in china. Look at You know how much time was sitting in the house versus out of the house and things like that so just starting to collect that data and also fortunate to work with some smart mathematicians that have good ways to look at analyze data but then also keeping trying to keep were figuring this out to keep the provide information anonymous way to. We don't know specifically where they went but we know that type of location where they went from. Gps so that's kind of what will work in on now so so. What clinic measurements are you using in conjunction with the fada. We're just kind of casting a wide net at this point right because we want to see what might be useful. What's not so we're doing everything from walking measures gates speed. Six minute walk test. A balanced measures functional gate assessment berg balance scale. So you know. Some lower level functioning higher level functioning motor function so Just fuel meyer. So some impairment based measures in himself. Report mike stroke impact scale The abc to again look at how those three or four different aspects of measurement. Can we combine those got help us. Better understand that bigger picture again going back to talk about the very beginning. I don't think there's going to be anyone measure that's going to be some holy grail is going to be a combination of these things and probably as pt's at least me. I'm a little bit bias towards measuring the mobility and activity aspect of things. But i think it's important to step back and try to look at more than just that and hopefully we can do that with all these different measures while. I think that's another big point is like how much can clinicians really taken and integrate and what kind of interfaith the you then need with a clinician. Like you know to georgia's point like part of it as an anon- beano being anonymous about where you are but part of also like. I can't even handle that information for all my patients. I just wanna know like you know they were. They were out in the community for x. Number of minutes the last week and or you know sitting at home for the majority of the time or whatever it is like it has to be fairly growth. I would think permission to be really useful and integrated in clinical manner. So we've along. I think there's a long way to go before we get there but Yeah like what's important out of all that information is pulling. I think that's even true when we look at the stepping data right so is really the number of steps today is that what's most important or is it about so you take or You're walking when you're taking steps right. So i think even those. We're not sure what is the most important information or maybe berries person to person. I don't if you guys have garmon so with this garmin does is. It gives you a daily goal of depth count. It decides your daily goal based on what you've been doing actually think that there's something good about this the fact that it's moving my target because what i learned is that holy cow in the last you know five days or whatever i haven't been doing and that like now i need to go for a long run where i need to walk to and from work. You know whatever it is to get my step stack up. Though it's interesting and sort of there's a psychological piece to it. I was just gonna say that. Could lead to your next podcast that we need to partner with psychologists really to better understand behavior change totally. I mean that's the big thing right in so highly. We actually support people to change their behaviors and not be sectarian. So i think you know. Look at some literature. Was smoking cessation weight loss in. How can we apply some of those principles to improve activity in additionally george suggested we talked to dr lori. King professor researcher at oregon health science university in co director of the balance disorders lab hanging lorries. So even talking to lead dibble. George full um in order to try to answer. The question of bts can measure participation in the clinic and they had some very unique ideas but they also said that you were doing a lot of work in this area. So we'd love to hear from you. About what are the types of things that you're looking into or tools that you're using you. We are yes. Our lab has been interested in as an activity at home for a number of years. And it's kind of interesting because we started doing this like a decade ago on some level but the recent covert restrictions have really ramped up what we're trying to do with monitoring because our lives have been closed so it's kind.

George Six minute china oregon health science universi georgia today three five days last week george four dr a decade ago lori. King beano anon
"diseases" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

04:37 min | Last month

"diseases" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

"Therapist. Tune improve quality participation. Click badgers snap shot in the person's behavior. What we really would like is a is a movie. Welcome to four dean deep dive into degenerative diseases gaining insights through casual and amusing clinical conversations. Katie mcgrath former chair of the bbc and member of the four podcast podcasting. We're doing something a little different with this podcast. The team wanted to be true to our name into a deep dive on one topic but talk to a few different experts. In order to do this we reached out to dr george. Full professor at suny upstate. Medical university and editor in chief of the journal of neurologic physical therapy george suggested we look at the topic of participation in how we can really evaluate quantify in impact participation with our patients. We were psyched. And so here. Coz i'm here farm paget secretary the d. said in our podcast hosts to start our discussion of participation great katie. I think this is a great topic. you know. We know that participation is important. It's hard of the ice off. And so i was excited to hear that george brought to our attention and you know. I think it's something that we should think about and care about but the reality is in a busy clinical environment where you're collecting certain outcome measures and really addressing people's problems impairments. It's kind of easy to lose sight of participation. At least for me. I totally agree. I think it's really hard to know how to measure participation and to remember to measure participation in particularly when and if it's not part of your regular valuation or workflow as you're trying to address other issues and reasons that the patients are coming in for therapy so katie what are you doing to measure participation. Now it's a good question. I don't think i'm doing very well if i do. Measure it salardu. More of a quality of life measure specific within parkinson's i use the pd q. Thirty nine lot. It does kind of draw out functional participation level limitations that may not come out with something standardized that we're using like a six minute lock test or the time go right. They may not necessarily make the link. That oh i do feel slower out in the community or i have a hard time keeping up a so. I think trying to define what we're talking about when we're talking about. Participation is a great idea to tackle the definition of participation we have storage full for his expertise and understanding. I don't know there actually isn't like holy grail of participation rates. I think that it's going to be multiple avenues. That are helping us. Get a picture of the participation. There's going to be is not gonna be anyone measured but it's gonna be a combination of multiple measures that would give us some idea. What the participation is great so is can be self report along with activity monitors including gps including Clinic based measures rates. I think it's going to be some combination of all those things using. Gps to measure participation was a new idea for us and so we were curious about how george started going down. The path of using gps track participation in patients initially got some of these ideas actually from reading papers about endangered species. So they actually have you know you know. For example you can go online and watch where some sharks are swimming in the ocean rain so they actually have these. Gps in activity monitors paired together on for I started radiant with snow. Leopards actually And looking at their habitat in so then they can infer as a eating location feeding hunting versus a travel location based.

katie Katie mcgrath six minute bbc four podcast parkinson one topic lot george dr Thirty physical nine
"diseases" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

07:04 min | Last month

"diseases" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

"That we can share with our listeners. Last year was kind of just at the. I think it was almost the last day of. Csm when we're kind of tired and at the finish line and we were just talking to the speakers up front kind of talking about a game plan and getting ready to introduce them and as we're standing at the podium not speaking into the podium all the sudden we hear this voice coming over the sound system over our heads of very official person. Doing a very nice introduction really didn't know where the voice was coming from as it turns out Next door the other section had gotten a few minutes headstart on us and we are getting their audio and our audio is getting patched into there's So we thought maybe we should just have the audiences switch rooms and listened to the speaker in the opposite room. Maybe that would have prepared us for this. Virtual environment where But after a few minutes than audiovisual guys were able to fix it up but that was pretty comical at the end of the a weekend that's degree story and i'm not sure if that was the same room that will hours in but that was kind of the worst story. Irish digging of to where the rooms had gotten crossed there so that's funny And another thing. That had happened to me ways. When i felt like i was managing to really well. We had a lot of people in the room at the time. It was the front of the room the person who is introducing the speakers and I had one of our whole group of just complete rockstars from the field of physical therapy there and I was interacting with them. They go to introduce them and introduced the lead speaker. And i say and here is adele field slit who we all know in love and it turns out. Her name is not pronounced that way at all. I was really embarrassed after that. I sat down my face. Must've been rod Because that's not how you savor name and say that. I really put my foot my mouth. I guess you could say. I think it's your photon your mouth. Yes i was scared to even say it now. I thought it was going to stay at wrong again. I have a war story to tell about you. The the first time i met you in person But we can say that for later date. But i think csm. I'm obviously biased. But i think it's absolutely the best conference That you can possibly attend as a therapist and maybe across in other healthcare professions And the gift that our committee has given is amazing programming from amazingly smart intelligent articulate researchers clinicians and educators and so our job is simply pick from this bevy of great programming and help put it together So he couldn't do it. Without all these presenters all the individual six years included So we're excited for csm every year. This year's obviously the look a little bit different But i think at the core of it. We're going to have some phenomenal educational programming. And yeah we won't be able to sit in the chairs next to each other or actually search for a chair with each other and try to separate But we'll all be intended this year. And i think one benefit this year's the cost of attending. Csm is quite a bit lower. The tuition is almost half the price. I believe there's no air travel. there's no lodging. there's no sixteen dollar drinks and the coffee line in the morning is just gonna be me. And my wife said there's some benefits to the virtual formatting so make sure you do sign up even in this awkward year to attend encourage your co workers that have never come before i know. I have a ton of co workers. That never come because they can't get the time off. That's not an excuse this year so we're hoping for a really good numbers because again we're gonna offer that very very good high quality education experience and so how do we have to sign up yet. Is there a deadline or is it right up to the middle of march. That's a great question. there's no reliever deadline so there's no incentive to register early but it does help us with the planning on expecting how many people are going to call them up. Joined kind of like what. Heather mentioned with the bandwidth on the virtual rooms So you can register at any moment. And i believe he can register up until the very last day of march. So if you've talked it up really good. Some of your colleagues might be attending the last day to kind of plug in and get twenty. See us at the last last minute. So yet you can register at any moment Up until the conferences over at the march some great so at the end of every year every attendee is probably tired. I don't think anyone is as tired as the two of you and yet the amount of support that you give physical therapist whole profession and each one on the programming committee is a may is. And i'll tell you when i get home and i know bart's tired and then in the mail comes a handwritten. Thank you note from. Bart is just an amazing feeling. And and i'm just so excited to be part of it heather and barr. Thank you both so much for joining us today. Gave us a wealth of information and this is really helpful for anybody planning on going to see them this year. So thank you so much. We hope that you'll be back again next year to do this with us. Thank you so much for having ashley really appreciate it. Records great to talk to you and all of your sick friends and looking forward to seeing you at virtual. Csm this year were saying you to. We hope to see you at our csm mixer on tuesday february fourth at eight pm eastern time. This podcast was produced headed by the a n. P. t. degenerative diseases. Special interest for podcast. Team our team included farm paget sarah crandall katie mcgraw adriana carey and mirror pierce and i am rebecca martin subscribed to or newsletter on the an. Pt website neuropathy dot org or check us out on facebook and twitter. If you enjoyed today's episode please share it with a colleague today and thanks to jimmy mackay for providing music and thank you for listening. What a brilliant idea. So so much fun. Let's try it again. And then i'll give you a better answer question. I'm so sorry we. Of course the internet just suen gone. I have no idea said dr. And he'll just maybe as factual and maybe it's not a bunker him bunker bar we love the bunker or as we say in boston the bunka you're in the bunka..

jimmy mackay Last year six years Heather today twitter next year facebook sixteen dollar two boston rebecca martin this year bart This year twenty Bart both tuesday february fourth at middle of march
"diseases" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

07:56 min | Last month

"diseases" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

"Be aware out. no well. i think personally since. I'm so integrated with the neuro programming when i'm on the ground at csm it's twenty seven sessions three days three times a week. You know it's busy. And i only get to see. Even maybe fifty percent of the neuro programming. I think one of the biggest benefits of virtual sim is. I'm gonna be able to ten a lot of different. I first of all. I'm going to be able to attend all of the programming from neuro which i'm ecstatic for. But i'm also i work in acute care I work with geriatrics. i work. I send patients home healthcare. I dabble with research so i'm really excited to be able to look at all the different programming from the different sections and academies and. I'm going to be able to take all that in over the course of a two month. Time period So i think that's exceedingly exciting. I think since it's a new platform this year. There's a few things that we all of us will get smarter over the course of the two months but i think one of the most important things is Make sure you listen to the lecture before you go to a and a. So if you don't listen to the lecture then the qna's not going to be very valuable to you so make sure you listen to that ahead of time and i'll also highly encourage you to attend the q. And a. because these these lectures are great. But i think that dialogue with the presenters. It's so valuable even if you don't ask a question you just learn so much more by kind of understanding and how chew on the content and the information so Just make sure attend the classes ahead of the and make some time to carve out so you can actually attend the. But i think that's the most important factors awesome. Thanks for that advice. I think that makes a lot of sense because sometimes you don't even realize what you don't know what you didn't quite understand until somebody else asks the question and you realize that's a really great question. So thanks part. Sorry sir now that. We have kind of the way of the land of starting to feel like i i understand what. Csm is gonna look like a little bit this year. Let's get one step further and sees the as from the perspective of a single attendee. And so for the sake of this podcast. Let's pretend we see primarily patients which diseases so heather. Would you be able to kind of walk us through where someone like me. Should even start so if you go to. Ta dot org slash fm. You can find the entire schedule that is available and you can search by section so you would choose neurology and you could see our entire schedule that we are offering. But if i was really interested in german disease i would be looking specifically at thursday. The twenty third february where we have a lineup of several live. Qa in a row that might specifically starting at seven pm. There is expanding dual task training and parkinson's disease the intersection of treatment and technology. There is hitting the mark exercise prescription and high intensity training for persons with m s. Then at seven thirty there is promoting high quality evidence based practice in rare neurodegenerative disease huntington's disease as a model and eight thirty that evening. There is global neurological physical therapy. Be a part of the community awesome so this is really four great topics that would be very applicable for anybody in her special interest group. That was february. Twenty third right correct from seven to ten eastern time. So if i was really interested in that would be the night had focused on but that is not all of the offerings that were having under jenner disease. This year are great. Awesome and are there certain networking events that are really specific descrip- so yeah indeed there are so if you're interested in you wanted to participate in the degenerative disease meeting you would be looking at february fourth at eight pm eastern time and you would want to tune in that on zoom all right and i don't know if you know off hand these things that you can just show up to all of the courses really. Do i have to register ahead of time. Do i just log in. How does that work is a good question so when you register for cfm you can pre select courses. That is not a binding commitment. You can change your mind at any time But actually is pretty relevant because it helps ata decide how much bandwith they need. Because even though it's virtual there is theoretically unlimited capacity for a number of attendees at any one time so in your preselect data at helps them gauge. How much bandwidth. They're going to need so that everyone who would like to attend can attend the live q. And a. and. I do believe that you have the option to rsvp to be safe meeting as well okay. Great and that's really good information. It really behooves us to actually be as honest as we can about what we're going to attend ahead time or air on this is gonna carson. It would be helpful but certainly people can change their minds at anytime. Ra great Is there anything else that you feel like individuals in in this perspective this category should really prepare for heading into csm. Or that about covers. I think that about covers it. I would echo bart thank. You would get more out of the live q. And if you have already watch the recorded lectures but as well. We also have a platform in Dedicated to dvd issues as well. We have fifty three jenner disease posters. That you might want to watch awesome. That's great and now. I have a question too so there's probably a couple hundred different education sessions i could wash. Does that mean that c- cruiser just unlimited almost for this two month event. Or how does that work. It does not So there is a cap to c. E. is i believe. It is two point zero ceos and in order to achieve those see us. You will need to take a ten question posts ouster each course that you have attended and you need to pass this test but you have unlimited opportunities to pass this test. In order to claim your seat us all right awesome and obviously. We're not just going to see us. Sanford as the years. There's so much so many more benefits of csm that but it's good to know how that process works now that we've kind of concluded the business part of the call. I have to ask heather. What do you do in your spare time. Well i have upheld hon bike and i am completely obsessed with my peleton bike so i spend a lot of time doing that Now that there's a pandemic a lot of walking outside and the pond in my neighborhood alright. So we heard from heather and what you to do in your spare time but bark. Can you tell us a little bit about what you like to doing your free time. I was born and raised in montana where the snow was on the side of mountains So i grew up skiing. But i moved to minnesota. Twenty years ago and boycotted the concept of ice skating With the pandemic our family has had a lot more downtime and we bought our kids ice skates about a month ago. And i watched them on snow-boots so this morning i actually went and bought ice skates to join my kids so there was a lot more motor learning a lot lot of balance and falls but And and it's really a joy to be coached by your six eight and eleven year old on how to do a skill that they're better at So that's what we're doing this winter. That's great a very humbling experience right. Yes lastly i know that everyone in the program committee has some more stories to tell some maybe not appropriate for broadcasting but far. Do you have any program stories.

minnesota fifty percent february Twenty years ago seven pm two months three days six two month twenty seven sessions thursday twenty third february eight pm eastern time montana each course ten question a month ago This year ten this year
"diseases" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

08:00 min | Last month

"diseases" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

"Work in our hospitals hundred these clinic and in our pediatric nurse. Muscular clinic As well as with our residency program. We're excited have you both here. So i just rolled off my three year position as part of a mvp program committee and every year. Heather barton. i've talked about making some kind of primer for. Csm to help those newcomers. Get a grasp on the setup of sia sam where to even start but we just never found the time but barton heather if attendance rates stay consistent you guys are going to have maybe eighteen thousand newcomers grappling to understand the very first. Csm that's a virtual layout and probably the two of you are still trying to grasp the new layout so our hope is that podcast could just shed some light on how to approach. Csm twenty twenty one so bartlett's just start with the education sessions. I know that. Csm education sessions have typically been three two hour sessions for three days to maximize the number of sessions. That participants are able to attend. But what does it look like this year. Thank you and it's been in a volume process of understanding how virtual platform would look and we're still constantly learning about it but Every day this year we've gotten a little smarter so csm will be Available from february first till the end of march and the entire month of february there will be live content And then in the month of march all that content will still be available for on demand To watch at a later date as well as to take a post test to completely complete your c. E. us all of our neuro content will be available on demand. Starting on february. I saw l. to watch any lecture at anytime. All the lectures are intended to be between sixty and ninety minutes in length and And then on top of that. Some of the courses will feature in a live format. Some of them will actually play in the evening hours between seven to ten at night on tuesday nights. We're gonna feature five keynote addresses. One of them is kind of a follow up from last year's George hornby talk on having difficulty. Removing the kid gloves. We're also going to have one on. Did major research in the last decade change. Practice locomotor training gadgets intensity everything works. And then we're gonna have the an someway cook lectureship we're gonna have a special Topic on the neuro practice and covid nineteen across the continue continuum and then we're also gonna highlight a global neurophysical. Therapy be part of the community. So those five classes will be shown in a live viewing. But they're not actually going to be live but we're going to show them so the group can watch them simultaneously but then We probably have about a dozen courses that will have a live. qna with the audience. That was gonna be. My question is what's the benefit of going to live. Course if they're all recorded anyways yeah and so part of that is just to have everybody to watch at the same time. And maybe that means you text back and forth with your colleagues across the nation. Just like you'd be sitting in the classroom onsite but following that live presentation will be alive q. And a. with the speakers and so we'll be able to talk and dialogue with the speakers after those five sessions but also i think there's about a dozen that were featuring with the live q. And a. so. Those will all be occurring on tuesday evenings between seven and ten eastern during the month of february If you're not available for those lifetimes to dial in qna those live cuny's also will be recorded and be available to watch on demand later and there's also going to be an a synchronous chat associated with every single course so You know just like a comment dialogue on a in a chat room. You can pose a question. You can answer questions. You can further the dialogue long so that'll be associated with each individual course right awesome and another great part about. Csm is just being able to interact directly with researchers during poster presentations platform presentations. But how is that going to work. Virtually yeah and so. I think we've been forced to transition to some new techniques this year just because of covid but because of that we've kind of stumbled on along a lot of really neat Techniques to deliver content in a different way so we will be featuring platform Presentations again like a typical year But they're all going to be delivered. Virtually I believe instead of having our typical three or four platforms. I think we're going to have six. And the reason for that is that we have their shorter because we feel that People screen time is hard to keep their attention so most of the content that we're going be delivering is going to be focused at a sixty minute time window. So if you're at work and you're eating lunch You know pop on demand session from csm. You can watch it in that our timeframe so we'll have six platforms and then we do have a posters as well They're going to be available. Digitally and i think over ninety percent of all posters for all of ap a also have a a audio file associated from the presenters as well. So there's some dialogue to listen to you as well as presenting the poster. I said is there any kind of interaction with the researchers or is it just something we're able to watch this year I can't speak specifically on the poster presentations but the platforms will have that asynchronous. Qna so you'll be able to dialogue with them as well. Great and the other thing that i really wanted to make sure you have to ask about is just the networking that happens at. Csm so important. And it's actually how. I ended up by the csm program committee so are we just don't missing out on that this year. Has that way. Well everything in this past year look different. The mylan melter. We didn't feel like we can really pull off so that won't you planned on. We won't execute that this year The business meeting and award ceremony will be held. It's going to be held outside of the timeframe of typical. Csm so it's gonna be january twenty sixth Right before the week of csm starting and then every thursday night during the month of february we're gonna have Events or meetings. A lot of those nights will be cygnets were. Each sick is devoted about a forty five minute to an hour time period. How they can fill whichever way they like so the will have an evening And those are all going to be on zoom. So they're very flexible and how they perform and then we'll also have a mentor mixer. That has usually been a highly attended event at csm so there will be opportunities to dialogue with professionals in your fans and meet them virtually at csm. Thursday nights between seven to ten pm awesome and last year. He cement mentor mixture. I thought that was a great event. And i'm trying to remember some of the the mentor. Things that go on there. I don't know if if you have details on all of that or not. I think if you attended that event you could expect to get a little bit of information about the opportunities within a npt Particularly if you are looking to engage in volunteering either as a student or as someone who is early in your career unfamiliar with the opportunities across all of our committees and our six you may also season representation from the various things including the residency and fellowship sick As well as probably an informal opportunities to engage with other people in our profession. That sounds like a great opportunity and so is there anything else. Big picture that i'm missing. Are there any other big events that we need to.

february six platforms last year five sessions barton three march ninety percent Thursday nights six three days Heather barton end of march three year sixty minute bartlett George hornby both two five classes
"diseases" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

03:12 min | 2 months ago

"diseases" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

"Out tng and started having this conversation. 'cause andreas really a clinical expert. In parkinson's disease was aware of the parkinson's disease edge documents and was really always kind of searching to kind of improve practice. So angie like thinking back to kind of those original conversations. What we're kind of some of your thoughts as i approached you about this project yet. Thanks amy i was excited about the project being a therapist for over twenty years and really knowing a lot about parkinson's i had been doing a lot of the outcome measures myself but knew that a lot of my coworkers were not doing commercials. I was doing so. I was excited because it was a good way to really. I think approached them and get their input. We're kind of approach it as a team. How can we do more. Parkinson's specific outcome measures In provide more research based gill to to people with parkinson's. I was super excited about it. Angie give us a little bit of background on your clinic like how many clinicians do have there. What kind of populations do you see. It's a relatively small clinic. It's outpatient neuro clinic so there are currently. Actually we have three physical therapists at this point. I'm part time physical therapists in two full-time. Pt's we have two fulltime. Ot's three speech therapist and to physical therapy assistants. So that's pretty much our team right now in the front office staff. Jim itself is actually small which came into play when we were deciding which outcome measures. We're going to choose so as far as the physical barriers That was something we had to talk about amongst the team as ours. What outcome measures were going gonna work for us so that was helpful. When emmy came in 'cause we could all together for us as a team. What are the outcome measures that we feel we can implement and continue to. Do you know a forever and were there. Other clinics involved in this effort yes. We're the main neuro clinic. But there are several other outpatient clinics associated with essential genesis. And so i guess how many there was about there were four clinics that were involved in the project in particular because so the grand blinked. Clinic is probably i would say. India said the central clinic that sees primarily neuro patients but there's other clinics and other remote parts in the flint area. Down a patient with parkinson's might not wanna travel a half hour so these clinics were closer to their home in these clinics were commonly smaller clinics. Two of the clinics only had one physical therapists. That was at that clinic but that would still see somebody with parkinson's disease. The project included four clinics that included seven physical therapist to occupational therapists..

parkinson's andreas angie parkinson amy Parkinson gill Angie emmy Jim flint area India
"diseases" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

04:04 min | 2 months ago

"diseases" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

"Hi this is george folk. The new editor in chief of the journal of neurologic physical therapy. I am excited to welcome you to the first episode of the journal of illogic physical therapy and special interest groups of the academy of neurologic physical therapy author interviews in these podcasts p. T. sick podcast. Teams talk with jane authors about the research unique expected findings in how to translate these findings to practice in our first podcast. We are partnering with the degenerative diseases. Seek to interview dr. Amy york was on faculty in the physical therapy department at the university of michigan flint. In angie lead wa. Who is a physical therapist at ascension genesis fiscal therapy in grand blanc michigan. They will be discussing their article. Standardizing outcome assessment in parkinson disease analyst translation project which is published in the january issue of jane. Not take it away arm. Welcome to four deep dive into degenerative diseases gaining insights through casual and amusing clinical conversations. Welcome to forty a podcast brought to you by the p. t. degenerative diseases.

george folk journal of neurologic physical Amy york university of michigan flint jane grand blanc angie parkinson disease michigan degenerative diseases
"diseases" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

05:54 min | 8 months ago

"diseases" Discussed on The Bio Report

"All you have to do is look in a mirror and watch the changes over time fountain. Therapeutics is training. It's artificial intelligence platform to look at individual cells to detect changes that occur as cells get older and discover therapeutics that target underlying mechanisms of agent. The company believes this will provide new ways to targeted therapies to treat a range of diseases associated with ageing. We spoke to John Demos Co Fountain about the company's Ai Platform. It's approach to understanding aging cellular level, and how it provides new ways discovering developing therapeutics for diseases of aging. John Thanks for joining us. Thanks to any. Thank you for having me. We're GonNa Talk About Aging Fountain Therapeutics and its efforts to us. It's a platform to address the consequences of aging. You're looking at aging at a cellular level. What is aging in that context? That's a great question Danny <hes>. We all understand what happens to us. I guess intuitively as we get older. I the superficial things we develop wrinkles, and then the more significant things we start getting a little bit trail, a little bit slower prophecy start gaining weight. We get older. We also become prone to developing more and more diseases. Any of the so-called Age Associated Diseases, which is about eighty, maybe ninety percent of all diseases that humans are afflicted with our diseases that are associated with getting older. What happens is that ourselves start slowly breaking down. They start slowly developing dysfunctions, and this is likely the very root cause of all of these ageing processes and consequences and fountain. We're looking very specifically defined drugs to prevent or even reverse that kind of age associated damage. How does sailor aging different than say chronological aging? The two things are of course linked, but they're separate on illogical agent is determined very much by the date on which you were born, we can look at the calendar and know exactly how old we are. Biologic aging is a little bit different. It integrates not only that time, but also our health, our activity, our environment, our jeans, and it's something that it is very much at least in part, but still very much under control. We can influence our biological age based on our diet based on our exercise based on other lifestyle factors as well as by the drugs that we take or or perhaps don't take. And is what you're doing in any way. Change our conception of aging our conception of disease. I certainly hope so. We have long thought that aging is something that's that's immutable. Where we're born. We aged certain rate. We succumb to old age if we're lucky. It's not in any way linear, and it's not something that preordained has to happen following that sort of calendar clock. We do have control over how we age, and as as fountain and many other companies working in the space, continued to discover and develop new products targeting age. I think we'll have even more control over those processes and will stop thinking about aging. This the unchangeable march towards the inevitable. We tend to think about diseases as Driven by proteins either proteins better. Expressed to quantity or or not enough. Is. Looking at the cell itself, the aging cell does that suggests something different about the way we can approach disease or or. How. We think about what diseases. Yes standing absolutely at least I think so so there are a lot of hypotheses out there about what drives aging so for example. Maybe it's your telomeres getting shorter. There's a lot of activity in that space. Maybe it's the buildup of Senescence or so called. Zombie sells again a lot of work in that area. Maybe it's the mitral country are the energy powerhouse of the cell starting to to not work as well again, also a lot of work in that area I can go on and on and on their all these different molecular protein. Processes that are linked to ageing at Fountain, taking a slightly different approach and were saying that we don't know what the right hypothesis. We don't know what the right way is to target agent, so instead were more integrating it a little bit at instead of looking at the molecular the protein level. We're looking at the wholesale level, and simply watching how the cells behave how the cells age and looking for ways to intervene in those processes. Should aging itself be thought of as a disease. That's a little bit more right now of a philosophical question than it is a scientific one. We have the freedom to philosophize. We certainly do, and there is no shortage of that you know around the fountain. Water Cooler so to speak and unsure at many many other places, and I think as we start to understand aging better over time, and perhaps have therapeutics that target aging will be a little bit more <hes> comfortable thinking of aging as a disease that can be treated rather than than inevitable. I think one any of US list experienced

US Fountain Therapeutics John Demos Co Fountain Danny John Zombie
"diseases" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

02:08 min | 8 months ago

"diseases" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"The lead. <Speech_Music_Male> If you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> like this show and you want to help <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> us out. Please <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> do it. <Speech_Music_Male> You can leave us <Speech_Music_Male> a review wherever you listen <Speech_Music_Male> that helps <Speech_Music_Male> us know what you <Speech_Male> like about the show and <Speech_Music_Male> also helps other <Speech_Music_Male> people when <Speech_Music_Male> they're deciding I don't know. <Speech_Music_Male> Should I listen to this new <Speech_Music_Male> podcast or not <Speech_Music_Male> a second? You can tweet <Speech_Music_Male> out your favorite moment from <Speech_Music_Male> the episode, so we can <Speech_Music_Male> chuckled along <Speech_Music_Male> with you and <Speech_Music_Male> finally if you want to show <Speech_Music_Male> your love. Love for sideshow tangents. <Speech_Music_Male> Just <Speech_Music_Male> tell people about <Speech_Music_Male> us. Thank you <Speech_Music_Male> for joining. US <SpeakerChange> I've been <Speech_Music_Male> Hank. Green I've <Speech_Music_Male> been sairy. Riley I've <Speech_Music_Male> Been Stephan <SpeakerChange> Chin <Speech_Music_Male> and I've been Sam Schultz <Speech_Music_Male> I should tangents is a <Speech_Music_Male> co production of complexity <Speech_Music_Male> in the wonderful team at WNYC <Speech_Music_Male> studios. It's <Speech_Music_Male> created by all of us and <Speech_Music_Male> produced by Caitlin <Speech_Music_Male> Hofmeister and Sam <Speech_Music_Male> Schultz who also edits <Speech_Music_Male> a Lotta? These episodes along <Speech_Music_Male> with her recommend Sushi. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Our editorial. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Assistant is to bookie <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> trucker Vardi. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> By Joseph Tuna. <Speech_Music_Male> Fish and we couldn't make <Speech_Music_Male> any of this without our patrons <Speech_Music_Male> on Patriot. Thank <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you and remember. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The mind <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is not a vessel to be <Speech_Music_Male> filled, but <Music> a fire to <Music> light. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> But one <Speech_Male> more thing. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> In two thousand, <Speech_Male> fourteen, a Peruvian. <Speech_Male> Incan mummy <Speech_Male> has like five <Speech_Male> hundred ish <Speech_Male> years old <Speech_Male> was diagnosed <Speech_Male> with chronic <Speech_Male> shots <Speech_Male> disease. <Speech_Male> Thanks to DNA <Speech_Male> studies of a parasite <Speech_Male> found <Silence> in but <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> What is Chicago's <Speech_Male> disease? <Speech_Male> It's an infectious disease <Speech_Male> caused by <Speech_Male> a parasite, <Speech_Male> found and more <Speech_Male> butts, the feces <Speech_Male> of the <Silence> triatomine bug. <Speech_Male> It <Speech_Male> can cause swelling <Speech_Male> fever. If <Speech_Male> long if long <Speech_Male> lasting, it can cause congestive <Speech_Male> heart failure, <Speech_Music_Male> and like to see <Speech_Male> mummies, <SpeakerChange> but I <Speech_Female> suppose. <Speech_Female> It's just like a normal <Speech_Male> talk, but Brinkley. <Speech_Male> I'll <Speech_Music_Male> google mummy <Speech_Music_Male> butts. <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Male> not what I <Speech_Male> was hoping for. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Just <Speech_Male> a bunch of mom <Speech_Music_Male> is a bunch of malls, <Speech_Music_Male> but <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> On <Speech_Male> spots <Speech_Male> and also the money <Speech_Male> from hotel. Transylvania <Speech_Male> who apparently <Speech_Male> has a giant but to. Pretty funny but.

Sam Schultz Riley Joseph Tuna. Chicago Brinkley.
"diseases" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

03:26 min | 8 months ago

"diseases" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"Syria I like. <Speech_Male> That was just too good. <Speech_Male> Saving lives with <Speech_Male> with with <Speech_Male> the like inventive <Speech_Male> science. <SpeakerChange> In the past. <Speech_Female> It was <Speech_Female> so cool. Yeah, and <Speech_Female> I'm like mad at Nazis <Speech_Female> every day now, <Speech_Female> so it <Speech_Music_Female> was really hard. <Speech_Music_Male> Another <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> Also matters. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> I suffer myself <Speech_Male> from not on immune diseases, <Speech_Male> and so if <Speech_Male> if Stephan and I ended up kindred <Speech_Male> spirits in this. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> feel you know <Speech_Male> I feel bad for not picking <Speech_Male> your fact, but there we <Speech_Male> are. <Speech_Male> As okay <Speech_Male> I'M GONNA. Get some bionic <Speech_Male> eyeballs one day. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> That's my <Speech_Music_Male> land. <Speech_Male> And now it's time <Speech_Male> to ask the science <Speech_Music_Male> couch. We've got <Speech_Music_Male> a listener question for <Speech_Music_Male> couch. A finely finely-honed <Speech_Male> scientific vines it's from. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> A happily. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Why is it <Speech_Male> possible to make <Speech_Male> a few super <Speech_Male> vaccines <Speech_Male> so that people <Speech_Male> have to get less <Speech_Music_Male> shots? <Speech_Male> Will we <Speech_Male> do have some super <Speech_Male> vaccine's right? Sorry, <Speech_Male> the Mr <Speech_Male> Vaccines kind of <Speech_Male> a a all <Speech_Male> at once <Speech_Male> the three things. <Speech_Male> Clean. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Grass <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> encountered on one <Speech_Music_Male> hand. <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> my for my understanding <Speech_Male> there that there <Speech_Male> are several reasons <Speech_Male> for this one is <Speech_Music_Male> that <Speech_Music_Male> they're different <Speech_Male> suspensions <Speech_Male> so like they <Speech_Male> have to be treated differently, <Speech_Male> and there they like <Speech_Male> are kept <Speech_Male> together by different <Speech_Male> compounds, and <Speech_Male> you can't use the same competence <Speech_Male> for vaccine, <Speech_Male> and then certain <Speech_Male> vaccines have different <Speech_Male> schedules, <Speech_Male> so they have to be <Speech_Male> given at different <Speech_Male> times like <Speech_Male> the Mr is good, because they <Speech_Male> all use the same suspension <Speech_Male> and you can do them <Speech_Male> on. On the same schedule, those <Speech_Male> who <SpeakerChange> reasons I <Speech_Female> know of. That's like <Speech_Female> pretty much <Speech_Female> some of it and <Speech_Female> like particularly if <Speech_Female> the schedule <Speech_Female> is different between <Silence> the different <Speech_Female> compounds <Speech_Female> that you're vaccinating against <Speech_Female> Ben, you <Speech_Female> could give <Speech_Female> like bonus <Speech_Female> doses of certain <Speech_Female> antigens which could <Speech_Music_Female> lead to adverse <Speech_Music_Female> effects or <Speech_Female> not enough <Speech_Female> of the things that you're vaccinating <Silence> against. <Speech_Female> It's also <Speech_Female> really hard to <Speech_Female> separate. <Speech_Female> If you have a combination <Speech_Female> vaccine, <Speech_Female> there's a negative reaction <Speech_Female> to it like <Speech_Female> which. Is <Speech_Female> causing the issue and <Speech_Female> the more you ask <Speech_Female> that, then the <Speech_Female> more I don't <Speech_Female> know variables. There <Speech_Female> are so <Speech_Female> far we've been <Speech_Female> talking about <Speech_Female> is try. Vaillant <Speech_Female> vaccine, <Speech_Female> which measles mumps <Speech_Female> and rubella, <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> there is an FDA <Speech_Female> approved <Speech_Female> heck, surveillance <Speech_Music_Female> vaccine <Speech_Female> excel <Speech_Female> us, and so it targets <Speech_Female> diphtheria tetanus. <Speech_Female> Her <Speech_Female> sauces <Speech_Female> hepatitis, <Speech_Female> B. Poliomyelitis <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> invasive, <Speech_Female> Nima fearless influenza <Speech_Female> type B <Speech_Female> invasive hayme <Speech_Female> affiliates. I <Speech_Female> think and then <Speech_Female> influenza type B. <Speech_Female> Disease Maybe <Speech_Female> Ooh, <Silence> so I think six <Speech_Female> pronged <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> vaccines <Silence> are the biggest <Speech_Male> now. He <Speech_Male> made Bernau <Speech_Male> four <SpeakerChange> now. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You know when you go. <Speech_Male> When you're <Speech_Male> at the at the <Speech_Male> fast food restaurant, <Speech_Male> and you just fill Your Cup <Speech_Male> with every single <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> soda. <Speech_Music_Male> It's like VAT <Speech_Male> DR pepper. <Speech_Male> Or <Speech_Male> that's what I always <Speech_Male> do so very good, <Speech_Male> and you know what I <Speech_Male> like is ice tea <Speech_Music_Male> and coke. That <Speech_Music_Male> sounds great <Speech_Male> is really good <Speech_Male> all <SpeakerChange> like southern <Speech_Male> tree. If <Speech_Male> you wanna ask the science <Speech_Male> couch, your, you can <Speech_Male> follow us on twitter <Speech_Male> at sideshow tangents. <Speech_Male> We'll tweet out topics <Speech_Male> for upcoming episodes <Speech_Male> week. Thank you to <Speech_Male> at crab <Speech_Male> shouting at little <Speech_Male> Chris and everybody <Speech_Male> else who tweeted us your questions <Speech_Male> for this Episode <Speech_Male> Final Sam <Speech_Male> Bucks Scores <Speech_Male> Sarah <Speech_Male> and Stephanie tied <Speech_Male> with two <Speech_Male> and Sam coming in <Speech_Male> behind with <Speech_Male> one which leads <Speech_Male> me. <Speech_Male> Still <Speech_Male> in the behind <Speech_Male> a salmon, <Speech_Male> Stephan tied for second <Speech_Male> and Ceri <Speech_Music_Male> in

Stephan Syria twitter Vaillant rubella diphtheria Ceri Sam DR pepper Chris Stephanie
"diseases" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

07:31 min | 8 months ago

"diseases" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"Be proud. Never asked me the date and time of anything so Siri. You do get to choose. Who Goes I I'M GONNA. Go first because I'm really excited about. What a treat during world. War Two to Polish doctors figured out a way to save people in Roswell Holand from being deported to German Labor prisoner of war or concentration camps by making a bunch of patients test positive for typhus, which is a highly contagious infectious disease, typhus, which is also typhus fever has symptoms like purple rash, headaches, fever, and historically has led to pretty high death rates so Nazi authorities in Poland made. Made Doctors report any suspected cases and send blood samples to German controlled labs, so they could conduct tests and find infected people before carting them away to labor camps, if not executing them doing evil, Nazi things and the test they used is called a well Felix task, which is a kind of a gluten nation test invented in Nineteen, sixteen, so the well. Felix test called an agglutinate test because it's positive, if the. The sample gets all clumpy in test tube or on a slide, because antibodies, which your body makes and defense are reacting with antigens, which is anything that causes an immune response, so if you're sick with typhus, for example, your blood has typhus related antibodies floating around and in the labs they would add some of an antigen called protease, O x Nineteen, which is known to look like a typist like Antigen and is close. Close enough to activate those antibodies, so the toughest related antibodies would react the proteas. Oh, X nineteen sample would get clumpy and they'd be like. Please keep your typhus infected person out of our labor camps, and then ignore them the so, is it a call well? Felix test because one of the doctors is named Felix in the end of the test. The other doctor goes well. Felix looks like this guy's got typhus. No. One. Scientists so how do they use that to that to save people from the Labor camps? WHO'D DOCTORS? Dr Eugene Lazinski and Dr Stanislaw Metulla wicks I'm glad they didn't develop the tests. Advocates than avail Lozanovski. Matuszewicz tests much more complicated. They discovered that injecting a patient with a suspension of the protease, O x nineteen sort of like a vaccine with 'cause patient's immune systems to make antibodies and therefore clump up the well Felix test, which resulted in A. Positive so they injected lots of people with any vague titus like symptoms under the guise of protein stimulation therapy. This generalized sure just just a fake thing and the Nazis had no reason to believe. The tests were being tricked, because there are all sent being sent off to German labs, so they eventually declared epidemic area, an estimated eight thousand people were saved over three years from being imprisoned or killed. It was like a vaccine against labor camps. The yeah, because they knew that the Nazis were afraid of getting sick and yeah, just like tricked a bunch of people and protected these small. Small villages, which isn't a lot in the grand scheme of things, but was like a clever at the time it did. They ever get found out like I mean just doing this I. I assume put them in substantial danger. Did this all sort of come out after the fact? Yeah, so in April nineteen eighty issue of US Navy medicine. They published about it like they wrote about was like back in the day. This is how he trick the Nazis and it seems like. The end of those three years, they were receiving threats like some Nazis were suspicious of like the epidemic area and the tests, and so I think either one or both of the doctors fled because they didn't want to be found out, but yeah it. They just like wrote a detailed article about it that I can read in US Navy Medicine Volume, seventy one number four. I love this fact Jerry, Steffen. What do you got for us? so today we're talking about diseases and Anna as I mentioned earlier I have some diseases and one of the diseases, but I have is Glaucoma, and my today is about Glaucoma so I guess it's actually a group of diseases and the common factors that they cause vision loss over a long period of time by damaging different parts of the and usually people with Glaucoma have a higher than normal pressure of the fluid in the eyeball, but there are people who ended up being vision loss while still having normal pressures. But in general, we don't know a lot about what causes it. And so these researchers at MIT in Massachusetts, eye and ear were studying glaucoma in mice, and found that the mice zone t cells, so that's part of their immune systems were actually the thing that was responsible for the damage to the retina and causing visit vision loss, and that's very strange because. Because up until now I think the general idea is that it's the high itself. That's directly causing damage by squeezing the different parts of your I. I guess I don't like that, but it gets kind of weird or because they think that these t cells are causing that damage because they had previously encountered bacteria that you find in like your body normally. Sort of like the bacteria would be making your t cells kind of angry, and then your t cells, which aren't normally able to get into the retina. are able to get in because of the high pressure. Although they don't know how that works, exactly then the angry cells can start punching your your eyeball parts on and causing damage. And so they tried to do a few different things tried inducing glaucoma in mice with not cells. And found that the high pressure on its own was causing some damage, but once pressures returned to normal. The disease didn't progress any further, and they tested it in germ, free mice, so mice that don't have any bacteria, and they were not able to induce glaucoma those mice. And, so then they looked at humans with Glaucoma and found that they had five times the normal level of that kind of t cell. So, this together suggests that Glaucoma might actually be an autoimmune disease, which is very very weird and was the headline that made me go, and so this like opens the door. Maybe there's some new treatments where we could treat coma by blocking the immune response. Does the pressure in the eye a separate thing that just happens to help you get Glaucoma I think. The most common form of Glaucoma happens partially because like your eye has liked drainage ducts in it and so it's like draining little bits of fluids that maintains the pressure, but in in like my version of Glaucoma. They're still draining, but there may be not draining enough and so the pressure builds up. So this inside the eyeballs draining out of your eye all the time. Like the outside you can't have old stinky water in your eye forever. It was just a swamp in their. ogres living in it. Slows what you can. You can see him. If you look up at the sky, sometimes all right well I am very in favor of finding new ways to treat glaucoma especially because Monterey friends has glaucoma. Family at that personal touch, didn't it all right Sammy Herati? Three to one seri. Wow, yeah,.

Glaucoma typhus Felix German Labor fever Roswell Holand vision loss Poland US headaches Sammy Herati Dr Eugene Lazinski autoimmune disease MIT Massachusetts Jerry coma
"diseases" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

01:58 min | 8 months ago

"diseases" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"Own. Okay well, anyway. The one is fake, but in two thousand, seven, a steady found that Bosa Minella and the disease that dude on Apollo Thirteen had potentially can become two to three times more infectious and variant virulent I. Don't know how to say that word insurance so non space-bound Salmonella spends most of its life slot, sloshing around in different fluids like they just a fluid, but it has the ability to tell when it's in a flowing liquid, or when it's not, and it's like nestled into the lining of your intestines, and that's when it. It blooms and starts to spread, so it just happens to detect zero gravity as the same as being nestled into apart of your intestines where it can spread, so that's like always blooming when it's floating around in space, and that's the same with a bunch of different diseases, so people are kind of worried that diseases will be worse than easier to catch in space, and then the last one, the deep muscle thing, deep pictorial myopathy that is a disease that commercial poultry gets when they are in their cages and they can't fly. And all pools on their chest, and the turns, green and rotten. And in their meets green when they cut it out of him so God. That's. The worst thing I've ever heard and also I should have. No. That wasn't a thing. Why was I? Why was so reckless? If, it had been true. Everybody would have been so impressed. Yeah, yeah, that's like twelve shots of water or less than that is not a lot of water. That'd be rough. Like I always have to piece. I would have been a disaster on that. You know in general I. Think none of us here. Artist supercup out for a space. Who Do, you think is the best the best space candidate on the PODCAST. Because I've got I've got a vote and you to. Vote to say on three okay yeah. One two three. Me.

Bosa Minella Apollo Thirteen Salmonella myopathy
"diseases" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

02:12 min | 8 months ago

"diseases" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"Yeah! It'd be not ideal if really Liz neither here nor there. The good news is that I I right now. I'm winning this episode because I have one point. Two million on says any, but that is about to end, because it's time for trump. One of our panelists has prepared three science facts for education and enjoyment, but only one of those facts is, and we have to decide which is the true fact you can play along at home at twitter dot com slash Sasha tangents. Please don't fill out the Paul before the episode comes out because we in that situation will be aware that you're cheating. Yeah, all right. It's so play along with us at twitter dot com slash sideshow tangents and. I believe you are the one who's going to supply us with these facts. That's true. I am according to an article that I found in the MIT technology review. There's only been one example of an American astronaut suffering from a severe illness or infection while. With. Was it number one. In astronaut on the ISS had to be evacuated back to Earth in one, thousand, nine, hundred, six, after eating some Manella contaminated package of beef tips in gravy number. One of the astronauts on Apollo Thirteen suffered from a urinary tract infection, due to a combination of dehydration and holding in his P too long as they were on their perilous journey back to earth and number three. National on Apollo fifteen upon returning to earth, complained of chest soreness, and was found to be suffering from deep pectoral myopathy or green muscle disease, which is where lack of exercise in the pictorial muscle causes him to turn green and swollen. Wow, okay, so you have three potential serious diseases of astronauts in space number, one at astronaut had to be evacuated back to Earth after eating Salmonella contaminated package of beef tips and gravy to an astronaut on Apollo thirteen had a urinary tract infection because of dehydration and holding the P or three Apollo fifteen astronaut got deep pectoral, myopathy or green muscle disease, which sounds like absolutely the worst. So. Let's start at the top here..

urinary tract infection myopathy Liz Manella Salmonella Sasha MIT Paul
"diseases" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

02:31 min | 8 months ago

"diseases" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"Disease? Well! Alert. That's all the etymology. We took this and ease like. I'm not in ease right now and then I. In the sixteenth century, people were like let's let's call that sick also. It is a very vague definition. It is any sort of mission in a living animal or plant, more one of the parts of that living in war plant organism that impairs. Functions and usually has some sort of signs or symptoms or other characteristics that we would consider bad, but are just annoying in some way like extra mucus. What what if I? If I dislike Stub, my toe is that a disease not signing an injury? What about a hangnail about the disease either so disease to be? Gorey's you can be deficiency diseases. Diseases infectious diseases which are the ones caused by microorganisms like viruses, bacteria and physiological diseases like gas that would be stops hangnail territory I think a hangnail is a physiological disease. I feel like diseases to me. Link to more systemic function like those are one off events like like a mosquito bite as like one off, malaria is a disease or something that is transmitted by that. We're like food. Poisoning is is a one off events that we haven't names. Kito, by the like A. Small infection caused by the saliva of the mosquito. I learned an animal crossing it is. Is a allergic reaction to the saliva of the mosquito. Allergies disease definitely because I because all sorts of Colitis is basically an allergy to my own body, and that's definitely a disease. I was also looking upwards like disorder and syndrome and condition, and how those relate to disease. It all seems very whibley to me. I'm sure there's knocked out there who has very clear lines in their own head, but there's like Ben Diagram. Of these terms I have a suggestion, and this is really neither here, nor there because I don't think that we're going to get to a definitive definition of disease, but I'd like to remove the part of the word and have just be called. Z's. Why Sounds Way Cooler? It's like it's like I got. A chronic disease is catch somebody's? That's. that. I. Don't want to catch some. Z's anymore,.

deficiency diseases malaria Gorey Allergies Ben Diagram
"diseases" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

01:41 min | 8 months ago

"diseases" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"Infringement! Fourteen second such fine! Hell. Yeah Definitely fair use Siri Riley is also with us today. Hellos sairy. Hello, and what's your tagline? Sorry, a large group of ropes and I agree my tagline is this screw is too many? To work. Every week show tangents we get together and try to one up. Amaze and delight each other with science facts for playing for glory, but we're also keeping score and awarding Sam Bucks from week to week. We do everything we can to stay on topic, but judging by previous conversations with this group will bad at that, so if the rest of the team deems your tangent unworthy, they will force you to go one of your Sam Bucks so tangent with care now as always. We introduced this week's topic with traditional science poem this week from me. A virus wants nothing. It cares not at all. It's not trying or wanting or moving. It's a fluke nothing more. A devastating board ends up in your cells without choosing then your body's own parts grab a hold, and they start to copy it over and over. It's just what they do. They can't tell it's not you. Then it plows through. You like a bulldozer. Our bodies are hacked by these particles that are no more alive than a bell. So when you cough or sneeze. Just remember this, please your body does this to itself? That poem was about viruses, but this episode is about Disease Virus is just one kind of the many many kinds of disease. And Sarah. Can you tell us what a disease is besides just.

Sam Bucks Siri Riley Sarah
"diseases" Discussed on Trivia With Budds

Trivia With Budds

11:15 min | 1 year ago

"diseases" Discussed on Trivia With Budds

"And what it be in. Welcome to another episode of the Trivia with Buds podcast. I'm your host Ryan Buds. Thanks for checking out I I show we have seven hundred episodes and counting to go. Listen to and there are topics for just about everybody from kids to adults to Ching families to boyfriends girlfriends to teachers. A lot of teachers have been emailing me saying they listen to the show on the way to and from school and some of them even play it in their classroom room for students to try to answer so thank you. If you're a teacher listening thank you for what you do. I come from a big family of teachers and was going to be a high school English teacher myself but then I turned it all the way to become a very very successful trivia. Sometimes people they go like So what do you do a What do you really do and I'll be hosting Bingo for like twelve people somewhere am i? This is it this is what I do. And they're like Oh okay. Good Good Luck. I hope Arby's calls back. That's the look they give me when I tell them I'm a professional bingo slash trivia host but. Hey it's going pretty well thanks to listeners and viewers supporters like you. My biggest supporters are over on Patriae on if you want to join the crew. PATRIAE DOT com slash trivia with buds. Click the link in the show notes on Youtube or on your podcast. Best APP listening device and you can join for just a buck. You get access to an ongoing chat room which has tons of cool stuff. I posted a pop culture crossword word puzzle. I found on Buzzfeed in there the other day get printed off you could do a crossword puzzle. I mean you could do that yourself if you just want to search crossword puzzles but I do share fun stuff like that. And they're Disney villains crossword puzzle. I'M GONNA post in there from a Disney event. I did this week so I did make that one myself. That could be fun for you to do but yeah we just chat Maher. We post different things as I might say. Hey I took the kids to Disneyland. Here's some new stuff we saw and I'll show some pictures in there and other listeners of the show will say hey. Here's how many I got right on that last quiz or hey. Hey here's a picture of my dog and playing trivia or stuff like that so if you're into interacting with other like-minded pop culture. Eleven folks go to patriots join for for just a buck you could join for more than a buck and that helps the show grow. So thank you for doing that. And thanks to all my fifty-seven patrons right now I am. It lasts named brewing in Upland California. Here's one of their cool coasters. They have for sale. If you're watching on Youtube this is a nice little ceramic tile poster with that Cork Board back. AXA doesn't fly around. This is from Stella Davina in the Upland area who makes these coasters and this is their beer called the runaway. Ip a few lake. Nick Indian Pale Ales. This is a great one to try here. Last name brewing the runway. IPA Not run away but the runway. Because you might be able to hear some airplanes into the background. There's a big airfield right next to here. Called the cable airport where I'll be hosting some fun stuff for the Rose Festival this Saturday January twenty a fifth come check it out. Tickets at Bruce and BROS. FESTIVAL DOT COM or. Just give it a google search and see what it's all about you can get a bunch of cool stuff and there's like VIP tickets where you get an early and you get the test and try certain beers that are available the rest of the day so go and see what all the fuss is about and help support Claremont California area schools. Today's Today's episode is about rare diseases topic. I've never done on the show before it is a little macabre. Some of these things Greg Hines who is a Patriot on subscriber for five dollars or more. Org gets to pick a topic every month and this was one of his topics that I never got to from two thousand nineteen so playing some ketchup for Greg. We got eleven questions for you if you like medical stuff if you like weird parts of history and you like Deformities and things. I guess this might be the episode for you. Have Fun playing along here. We go all right here. We go with some rare disease trivia. If I'm not pronouncing one of these things correctly Spare me because some of these words are crazy but here we go question number. One Co tards delusion is a condition where patients feel. They're missing. What question number one CO tards delusion is is a condition where patients feel? They're missing what question number one question number two auto brewery syndrome. which is crazy? Because I'm at a brewery. They're making beer right behind me. Auto Brewery Syndrome elicits the effects of what famous next morning regret question number. Two Auto Brewery Syndrome elicits the effects of what famous next morning. Regret number two question number. Three a bull Bihan. Dr Has Thick layers of bark like sores on his body giving him what infamous his nickname number three. What infamous nickname belongs to a bull? Bihan Dr who has thick layers of bark like sores on his body question number. Four Zero Dermot Pigmentosa is an allergy to UV rays otherwise known as what syndrome allergic to UV. Rays would give you what syndrome name number four question number five. What is the most common cause of elephant titus? How do most people end up with elephant? Titus question number five question number. Six hypertrichosis is an abnormal growth of what what hypertrichosis is an abnormal growth of. What number six question number? Seven Micro Shah makes patients feel objects are further away than they really are thus leading to the person thinking they are much bigger than normal. This syndrome is named after what literary character when you think you are a much bigger than you actually are so they named it. After what literary character character it's called micro shot number seven number. Eight progeria is otherwise known as accelerated. What progeria is otherwise known as accelerated? What question number nine Addison's disease means you have cravings for what common household Ingredient Addison's disease means you have cravings for what common household old ingredient number nine number? Ten Moebius Syndrome is another name for facial blank Lanc Moebius Syndrome is another name for facial blank fill in the blank and number eleven for two points. What young actor started the nineteen seventy six movie? The boy in the plastic bubble question number eleven for two points. What young actor starred in the nineteen seventy-six? Seventy six movie the boy in the plastic bubble. Those are all eleven questions for today's quiz on rare diseases. For Greg Hines. We'll be right back with with those rare disease answers in just a few. We are back with rare disease trivia answers. Let's see how you did on this quiz out of eleven points question number. One Co tards delusion is a condition where patients feel. They're missing body parts. Feels like you're missing your arm or your leg or your head coach tards delusion question to auto brewery syndrome elicits the effects of famous next morning. Regret that means you feel like you are hung over even if you have never had alcohol or you didn't have the night before you have the effects of a hangover. It could happen with Auto Brewery Syndrome number three Abul Bihan. Dr Is the unfortunate guy who has thick layers of bark like sores giving him the nickname of tree man. I've seen some. I think it was discovery channel specials on the tree man fascinated with the disease. But I always feel awful for that guy because they tried removing them a lot of the stores and things and they did before and after and they all grew back like even thicker thicker so crazy stuff. If you are not familiar with tree man number four zero Dermot. PIGMENTOSA is an allergy. Uv Rays otherwise known as Vampire Syndrome from watch out cullens. That'll get you number five. What is the most common cause of elephant? Titus the most common cause of saying elephantiasis is giggling thing like a fourth grade kid. When you find out what it is I remember hearing what elephantiasis was people? Were like. It's win you your testicles swell up so big you can in sit on them. I remember hearing that as a kid and be like that happens to people but it's really just the swelling of anybody part. I think somebody just said No. It's done there to make us laugh when we were kids. But it's a mosquito bite so you can get elephant titus from a simple mosquito bite and that is the most common cause I am very prone to mosquito bites. You might have heard on the show over over the summer. We had like our first batch of mosquito bites and California's since I've lived here and I get them like crazy. I hate mosquito bites and I hope they never lied to elephantiasis number. Six hypertrichosis is an abnormal growth of hair. They'll be like a wolf man or People you might see at the circus that have the like the bearded lady thing that would be the hypertrichosis number seven micro show makes patients feel. They are bigger than normal and they call it alice in Wonderland Syndrome because she drinks those vials. Els that trigger and maker. Bigger Allison Wonderland was the literary character in question number. Eight progeria is otherwise known as accelerated aging or aging in Benjamin Button and and number. Nine Addison's disease means you have cravings for the common household ingredient of salt. You want salt and you need more of it. Addison's disease number ten Moebius Syndrome. There's another name for facial paralysis facial paralysis can't feel your face and number eleven for two points. The young actor that started the nineteen seventy-six movie. The boy in the plastic bubble was Mr John. John Travolta the cover. This movie is very strange. It's an extreme close up on his face and he's just like any looks very very weird and I've seen the cover and and I posted it online as instagram story sometime in the last year. I had the VHS at them some. I store so that was it John Travolta boy in the plastic bubble and not to be confused with bubble boy from Seinfeld. But that's probably what they took that from. It is time for your question today. One more question for you and that is about Al Pacino. Al Pacino plays a blind man in what hit movie movie. Al Pacino plays a blind man in what movie. Tweet me your answer. At Ryan Buds or email Ryan Budget Jamais dot com to be eligible for a prize that questioned the day sponsored by Funky Monkey. Check them Outta. FM DESIGNS INC DOT COM. Yesterday's questioned. That answer was Robert Redford for the guy who invented Sundance Institute and your Trivia Team of the day is jump the the shark NATO jumped the shark and shark. NATO that's Fonzie on happy days. Jumping the shark on the motorcycle. A all right. Thank you guys for listening. Thanks for telling a friend about the show and we'll see tomorrow for more trivia with buds jeers.

hypertrichosis Brewery Syndrome Addison progeria Ryan Buds Greg Hines Al Pacino Youtube Dr alice in Wonderland Syndrome John Travolta Arby elephantiasis facial paralysis Patriae Ching Bruce and BROS NATO AXA Upland California
"diseases" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"diseases" Discussed on Post Reports

"So Sharon Baker is a retired administrative assistant. She worked for lawyers in a lawyer's office for many decades and right after she retired. She got hit with this pretty serious diagnosis. Her doctors told her she had. COPD which is an incurable lung disease. Aziz it was awful. What had happened was I knew I was not reading well? Traffic trouble getting downstairs and I was always short of breath and so as soon as I retired I'm went to my doctor and I guess my stats were so low. They wouldn't let me drive and so they. They called ambulance and sent me to the hospital. Well that was pretty scary. I mean because it just happened boom and then they sent me home with oxygen twenty four hours a day so at the hospital. They assigned her to this pulmonary specialist and she started seeing that doctor one day I was in there and she knew I live by myself at that point until she says for her you looked into assisted living and I thought why is that my solution is that my answering now I kind of by freak me out a a little because I had not definitely then I went home and I got on my computer and just started searching keeled. PD and it was about. The first thing that popped up was the luggage shoots and they had just opened an office in Scottsdale someone living with. COPD I know how difficult go can be every passing day. It was getting hard for me to breathe. I was becoming less active and I didn't have a lot of options. I felt like I was getting boxed in I was waiting for better care. Even ray of hope there is now an alternative turn it on. Treatment option for chronic lung disease suffers from the lung health institute. Using a patient's.

COPD lung disease chronic lung disease lung health institute Sharon Baker Aziz Scottsdale