39 Burst results for "Disease"

Fresh update on "disease" discussed on Mark Blazor

Mark Blazor

00:57 min | 24 min ago

Fresh update on "disease" discussed on Mark Blazor

"And that would say that we approach Thanksgiving. The reality is that it is changed. And we are stressed over 1000 ICU beds in Ohio are filled with covert patients and case numbers keep climbing around the state. Doctors in a call with the governor again today, say hospitals air seeing a continued increase in the number of patients, and that means that there will be ah, less amount of available staff nursing. And if you ask any hospital representative in this state, they're going to tell you that they've always had a problem with getting nurses. I mean, this is a national problem, so given that Stress and strain of losing any staff right now is impactful and we were really are feeling that so as we lose staff from the virus, and as activity picks up people, you know how we moved together in the cold and viruses accelerate. This is the nature of the business, and we're used to it in hospital systems like open is different. It's a nasty virus. We've always known that from having treated before. We just never treated in this kind of body before. So, yes, now's the time we are feeling it differently. One out of every four patients in the hospital has Cove in 19 and central Lahore, Ohio, according to doctors with always use Wexner Medical Center, and one out of every three patients in an ICU has the virus. That means less resource is available to care for those who are suffering other ailments, and it appears the coronavirus cases are spiking in Children. The American Academy of Pediatrics says they were more than 144,000 new cases of the respiratory illness in American Children just last week. Columbus Blue Jackets reported today. Several of their players have recently tested positive in a statement, they say they those players immediately went into quarantine. The club also closed. It's off ice facilities that nationwide arena they did not provide any more information on which players or how many were affected. Meanwhile, the recommended quarantine period for covert 19 could possibly be shortened. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are considering shortening the recommended isolation period from two weeks down to seven or 10 days. The Wall Street Journal reports. The move is being considered to encourage quarantine compliance. Health and human services Secretary Alex Cesar says the FDA will meet with its independent Vaccine Review board on December 10th. To consider emergency approval of covert 19 vaccines. The American people can be confident that hope Help. Are on the way. He says Distribution of the vaccine could begin shortly after that meeting. The front runner at the moment is Pfizer's vaccine, which has already submitted its application for approval. The U. S developed Madonna vaccine is expected to submit its application by the end of the month. Mark Roma lard, ABC News and Black Friday. Sales have already started mostly online this year due to the pandemic, There's no need to worry about overall deal quality this year. Deals a little bit better because they realized that people don't have a lot of money to spend. So they try to entice shoppers and get those hold a dollars. And if you prefer spending those holiday dollars locally, just know it might cost you people should support the local businesses. But don't expect the same discounts that you're gonna find at Target and Wal Mart. Websites. We'll have Thanksgiving sales. That could be, uh, Posse's much as 50% online this year, just because people will be home shopping, More sales are expected to top $1 trillion They see her radio 16. W TV END SPORES. BUCKEYE Update A service of Anthony Thomas Chocolate BUCKEYES. Ohio State coach Ryan Day says he talked with a big 10 yesterday about the officiating during Saturday's Indiana Game Day. Most concerned about a mist helmet to helmet hit on Justin Fields that he believes was targeting our guys playing Illinois on set. Saturday tonight. The first college football playoff poll is due out from the NFL. Former Buckeye JK Dobbins to Miss Baltimore's Thanksgiving night showdown with Pittsburgh after he tested positive for Kobe. The Brown's deal I will have to step up without miles. Carrot again. Karen battling Covert will miss the second straight game Sunday. The Browns play on the road at Jacksonville from the central Ohio $100 Sports Desk. Maverick would use Radio 16 w. T. V and Alison Wyatt stay connected to Columbus on the hour at the half, and as news breaks overcast tonight, we'll see a low of 39 over.

Ohio Alex Cesar Centers For Disease Control An Jk Dobbins American Academy Of Pediatrics Ryan Day Representative Columbus Blue Jackets Ohio State Wexner Medical Center Pfizer Justin Fields Lahore Browns Abc News Target Columbus
Anticipating the Logistics of a COVID-19 Vaccination Effort

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

05:25 min | 16 hrs ago

Anticipating the Logistics of a COVID-19 Vaccination Effort

"You have a highly efficacious vaccine and only a relatively small forty fifty percent of the people get vaccinated. You're not gonna get the herd immunity. You need what we do need is we need to get as many people as possible vaccinated so a lot of work still to be done. As we mentioned astrazeneca today joined pfizer and moderna becoming the third maker now of a highly effective vaccine candidate. Their version said to be cheaper easier to transport one of the that wants the vaccines are fda approved. The next challenge will be actually getting shots into arms across our country and around. The world complicating matters. The trump administration has so far not communicated distribution plans with the incoming biden administration. Back with us again tonight. Is mike oester home. Professor and the director for the center of infectious disease research and policy university of minnesota also happens to be a newly named member of the president-elect's covert nineteen advisory board. Michael i presume this helps that up. Twenty day wait to get your hands on. Everything is better than maybe a forty day weight. And i'm not sure our audience understands you've been forbidden from calling your public health counterparts inside this sitting government before we got actual notification that the transition is underway. So does this help. Thank you brian. It helps a lot. The transition team will immediately begin reaching out to those federal partners. Whether they be at the fda or the nih for the cdc so that we can in fact begin. Planning not just for what's happening now but well after january and so this is a very important development and one that will really help us a lot with the vaccine delivery to the united states. Is it a strange feeling that you're some total efforts are the hit the ground running january twentieth and in some cases you're inheriting wheels. That aren't moving. You're inheriting at administration without as we have this conversation a national plan. Well you know. I think it's really important to remember. We do have a number of really highly talented and skilled scientists within the federal government. I mean tony cheese. A classic example there are many outstanding individuals at the cdc in the fda that have had many many years of career service and really outstanding science development and research and so the fact says that they will still be part of this team. going forward. and i know that The biden harris administration will use that scientific expertise immediately. in addition. is you know the incoming administration is already starting to develop their own plants Whether it be around vaccination testing et cetera. So i think it it will be a good hand off that will occur and i'm excited about the fact that we now collectively all of us can really work together with science as the basic of value that. We're all using to judge what we do. So i think the next several weeks will actually be very positive in terms of what we can do to to move. This administered new administration forward. So that on january twentieth. It does hit the ground running. We have a graphic showing the air traffic currently over the united states. Every icon is an aircraft with people on board all those people leaving somewhere to go visit somewhere to then return home. Is it now predicted in your line of work because of all these people getting together. Despite all the government warnings that we're going to see a bump in hospitalizations and the death toll just in time for christmas. You know brian. This is one of the really sad commentaries about where we're at right now is helping america's understand the seriousness of the situation tonight as we said here we have over. Eight hundred thousand americans hospitals around the country with covid nineteen infections. Many of them critically. Ill are hospitals. Are breaking at the seams right now and so. It's really important that people understand. No one is asking them to sacrifice or to reduce their contact with others. Just for the sake of this is really about human life. it's about maintaining our healthcare systems. So yeah this is a real challenge for us and as you've seen as you know having been on this show a number of times with you you've seen what's happened since labor day. We've gone from twenty six thousand cases a day reported to now we're averaging over one hundred and seventy thousand cases and before long will be well over two hundred thousand cases a day that is going to break our healthcare system so please america understand you know we gotta stop swapping air in. The way we do that is we. Don't do all this. Large crowd related activity. That travel is going to be a problem and I don't wanna see where we're going to be in four or five weeks. It scares me a great deal. Dr michael oester home. Our thanks as always for joining us tonight. Greatly appreciate it. Good luck with your work upcoming

Trump Administration Mike Oester Center Of Infectious Disease R FDA Moderna Tony Cheese CDC Astrazeneca Biden Harris Administration Pfizer Biden America Brian NIH Michael Federal Government Dr Michael Oester
Fresh update on "disease" discussed on  The Frankie Boyer Show

The Frankie Boyer Show

00:36 min | 30 min ago

Fresh update on "disease" discussed on The Frankie Boyer Show

"Is really a collaboration between physicians and veterinarians or public health officials. For example, in Minnesota state public health veterinarian deals with zoonotic diseases Rabies, for example, animals or sentence for humans and humans. Air sentence for some infections. Animals. There's more valuable information at a V, a maid dot or President Trump taking partner Thanksgiving tradition of pardoning a turkey horn. I hereby grant you a full heart backing for voters on Twitter, saying corn should get the presidential pardon over his buddy Cobb. But don't worry. Both corn in Cobb will be living out the rest of their days. At Iowa State University. After today's ceremony, these birds will retire under the care of skilled veterinarians at Iowa State University of tremendous University in Ames, Secretary of state Mike Pompeo, blaming China for the Corona virus outbreak. Waiting around the world are suffering because the Chinese Communist Party failed to properly alert the world to have a public health disaster on his.

Iowa State University Of Treme Iowa State University Cobb Mike Pompeo Chinese Communist Party President Trump Rabies Twitter Minnesota Ames China Partner
Biden signals shift from Trump with national security picks

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 1 d ago

Biden signals shift from Trump with national security picks

"President elect Jill Biden is tapping Obama administration veterans for top national security positions including longtime adviser Antony Blinken to be secretary of state lawyer Alan hunter my York has to be homeland security secretary and Linda Thomas greenfield to be ambassador to the United Nations with former secretary of state John Kerry S. is climate change envoy the appointments signal a stark shift from the trump administration's America first policies that disparaged international alliances career diplomats and other veteran government officials in a statement the Biden transition team describes the group as experienced crisis tested leaders will start working immediately to rebuild U. S. institutions and renew and re imagine American leadership to keep Americans safe at home and abroad and address the defining challenges of our time from infectious disease to terrorism nuclear proliferation cyber threats and climate change Ben Thomas Washington

President Elect Jill Biden Obama Administration Antony Blinken Alan Hunter Linda Thomas Greenfield John Kerry S. Trump Administration United Nations York Biden America Infectious Disease Ben Thomas Washington
Fresh update on "disease" discussed on The Joe Rogan Experience

The Joe Rogan Experience

00:58 min | 50 min ago

Fresh update on "disease" discussed on The Joe Rogan Experience

"I don't say it in my book. When you did say it's the only diets been shown to reverse heart disease. And i really think it has but the burden of the burden of proof is to give me one study were. It's not that's not true. Well so i've i've made the clive. Prove me wrong. There's a lot of factors that led to reversing that heart disease. And i think when you look at all those factors particularly the eliminating sugar we know is a toxic substance the adding of exercise the eliminating of oils. All these different things that we know are not good for you. I think those are contributing factor. If you wanted to say it's been that a whole foods plant based diet plus eliminating all these toxic things have been shown to reverse heart disease. I'd be right there with you good. That's what i'm saying. Everybody eliminates that part including you know left that out. Well when you said it you said whole food plant based diet. You didn't say eliminating all these things that have known that have been shown to cause heart disease show. What is a whole foods diet. You go to whole foods. Whole food. Diet is actual whole foods fruits and vegetables being so it's not sugar. It's not oil. So when i say a whole foods plant based diet i mean no sugar. No refined grains no oil. None of the shit that you're talking about the whole foods exercise plus these people eliminated. They're eating before the gave them heart. Disease astle stint studies were only dietary based. He was a whole foods plant based low fat diet. And if you read my chapter on heart disease and and the whole foods diet you know what. I'd love to have this conversation with you some to other even diet based you're still eliminating all these toxic things exactly right. That's a good thing. So no one has proven that a whole foods plant based diet along with those toxic things like if you if you had all the good foods that we know whether it's you know animal foods mollusks all different things if if we could just all come to an agreement. There's things that people eat than we've been eating particularly the last few decades in this country. That are just bad for ya. We promised we get into these ideological discussions of meat versus plants. And this is where things people tend to sort of gravitate towards one side of the other ignore all the different different aspects of this conversation. Like what we're talking about here with eliminating sugar exercise if you said a whole foods plant based diet plus adding exercise and eliminating food that we know to be toxic is better for you. There's not a single person who's going to argue that the problem is everybody says it's a whole foods plant based diet that this is what's the good but it's i think was doing. The good is a lot of things so exercise. Eliminating toxic foods like sugar and all his vegetable oil novel. Bosh wholefoods diet eliminates those things. So that's redundant your whole diet. It's not going to have sugar refined grains or oil in it because those aren't a whole foods understood but the problem is that i do want to people. Were taking those those consuming those bad things before. I wanna put the challenge. I want you to just because i think call with also stands work on heart. Disease is worth looking at for you. Because he didn't do anything but diet so he didn't have exercise in it program. You didn't have stress reduction. He didn't have Meditation or anything else in there he just had diet. It was a whole foods. Plant based low. Fat diet did reverse heart disease. It's so he's clearly eliminated all those other aspects. It's all foods plant based diet so royal toxins because whole foods right so let's see let me think convenient. That's the thing that's conveniently left out. You can say whole foods plant based diet but it's not just that it's eliminating toxic food. Yes it's not just eating good food so what we need to do what you need to do or you need to come up with some evidence for somebody needs to that you can throw in. My face is a whole foods. Meat based diet has eliminates all these toxins will also reverse heart disease right. You can do that then. I'll remember we talked about the lease earlier that they're just a suit of clothes. You produce that evidence. I'll take off the suit of clothes. Because i i'm actually about being intellectually having intellectual integrity. I've come to my conclusions. Based on my own dispassionate. Study so If you produce the evidence. I'll probably change my mind. What do you think i'm gonna. What do you think people are doing wrong when they're eating a vegan diet and they have all these health problems. They're eating junk food vegan diet not eating a whole foods. They're eating junk food. That's they're eating all these toxic foods that were talking about. That's not everybody. Chris hemsworth was eating like he was having vegan. He was having plant based shakes morning and eating whole foods and he started developing all these kidney stones and lot oscillates. I have no idea if he's having a problem. Oxalate chances are he was eating a lot of a huge amount of green vegetables. Sure yeah eating too. Large quantities as oxalate sin. It could cause problems in your kidneys. So all i know is that i've been doing this. Listen chris hemsworth there was liam right. Which was thor thors. Chris yes the other one liam store. I love it. You gotta go that way. So but one we joe what we agree on. Let's go back to what we agree. What we agree on is we should be not eating all this crap. Yes we agree. We agree on that. I think we agree that we should eat lots of fruits and vegetables. Yes yes sure then. We agree on ninety percent of it. Then it's a question of how much animal foods are good for us and that's where that's where we may differ but probably not even that far apart there because i'm saying you can eat some animal foods and have a really healthy healthy diet and lifestyle. It's a question of how much and it's are certain point. I believe that the the saturated fats cholesterol from animal foods will begin to clog up your arteries and it's not that they cause cancer but they can be. I believe cancer promoters at least you know has also been proven is a big issue with eating cholesterol along with comp simple carbohydrates and things. I'm with you since we agree on the subra hydrates. We have to argue with you and i. We are sympathetic. Oh we sink on that. Cut the sugar out. Cut the cutback. What about oil. How do you feel about that one. Well i'm not a big fan of vegetable oils. Good yeah is there any other kind of well. Yeah i mean you could have animal oils me. I actually cooking beef or you may like boothby talent butter. Yeah i was thinking oils. But they're fat. Yeah well beef. Tallow renders down into oil right. It's I think that there's a lot of people consuming a lot of process. Shit i think this is where we absolutely meet in the middle. Whether it's vegetable process shit like i have a friend who's vegan who eats all kinds of wacky vegan delights. All these little treats all this. Read this fucking ingredients garbage preservatives and nonsense and but it's vegan so it's it's ideologically acceptable right now. Things fall into these they fall into these little groups like this this aligns with my religion so many eat this earth. Plenty on the on the Paleo kito there's lots of little groups on the animal food side to chore so everybody it's almost like diet. In fact this might be more interesting. Discussion unite baton. Each other on about this one..

Heart Disease Chris Hemsworth Liam Thor Thors Cancer
Oxford's Vaccine

Kottke Ride Home

05:02 min | 1 d ago

Oxford's Vaccine

"Good vaccine news just keeps on coming on the backs of really promising news. From the pfizer. Biontech and madonna now oxford astrazeneca have announced the preliminary results from their phase three trials which showed overall seventy percent efficacy as reminder madonna and visor biotechs. Vaccines both currently show around ninety. Five percent efficacy but seventy percent is still very solid. That's about where dr fauci had been saying. He'd be very pleased to see. But i overall seventy percent. Because there's a weird quirk of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine. That i as someone who is not an immunologist. Don't quite understand but hopefully we'll get more information on it in the coming days. Here's what i can tell you for now. The vaccine like the pfizer biontech one would need to be distributed in two doses however the first dose just needs to be half a dose for some reason. Doing a half dose on the first injection makes the whole vaccine overall more effective than if you got to hold doses quoting stat news. The preliminary results on the astrazeneca vaccine were based on a total one hundred. Thirty one covid nineteen cases in a study involving eleven thousand three hundred sixty three participants. The findings were perplexing to full doses of the vaccine appeared to be only sixty two percent effective at preventing disease while a half dose followed by a full dose was about ninety percent effective. That ladder analysis was conducted on a small subset of the study participants. Only two thousand seven hundred forty one a us based trial being supported by operation. Warp speed is testing the two full dose regimen. That may soon change. Astrazeneca plans to explore adding the half dose full dose regimen to its ongoing clinical trials in discussions with regulatory agencies spokesman told stat in an email and quotes and quoting from the new york times. The oxford scientists said they were still trying to understand why the vaccine was more effective at a smaller first dose. The first is supposed to prime the immune system while the second is supposed to boost its response while it seemed counter intuitive for a smaller i dose to be more effective. They said that strategy. More closely mimic. What happens with a real infection. End quotes peter openshaw professor of experimental medicine at imperial college. London explained to the associated. Press that vaccines. don't work. Like normal drugs where a higher dose produces more effects. The immune system is more complicated. Openshaw also notes that if indeed people do only need half a dose for one of the injections that's great news because it will be even cheaper to produce for more people. This was the vaccine candidate. That i was most excited about early on because it seemed like they kind of had a head start quoting the new york. Times astrazeneca's macos vaccine is designed to genetically altered in a dinner virus found in chimps. So that it harmlessly mimics the corona virus and provoke an immune response vaccine deploying. That technology has never won approval but the approach has been studied before notably in a small two thousand eighteen study of an experimental vaccine against the virus that causes middle east respiratory syndrome or mergers that viruses related to sars cov two the novel corona virus that causes covid nineteen so when covid nineteen emerged the team of scientists at oxford's jenner institute that had been leading the work on similar corona viruses. Had a head start once. The genetic code of sars cov two was published in early january. The oxford team sped to adapt their platform to the new corona virus and begin animal testing and quotes the other win in oxford. Astrazeneca's corner is unlike the pfizer. Biontech vaccine this latest one does not require any special refrigeration just standard storage and transportation temperatures of two eight degrees celsius or thirty six to forty six degrees fahrenheit and it can be stored for up to six months. The moderna vaccine requires cooler temperatures of negative four degrees fahrenheit but then can be stored at normal refrigeration temperatures after thawing in can be stored as such for a month. The pfizer biontech vaccine. Meanwhile requires dry. Ice to store at negative seventy degrees celsius or negative ninety four degrees fahrenheit s- that makes the oxford astrazeneca vaccine much more appealing for areas without the infrastructure or funding to sustain the pfizer. Biotech cold chain. And with that in mind. Astrazeneca is applying for early approval wherever it can as well as an emergency useless stained from the world health organization so that it can be made available in low income countries they plan to produce three billion doses next year and are committed to providing it at cost around the world through july. Twenty twenty one. The vaccine costs around three or four. Us dollars significantly less than the others late stage. Trials are continuing in the us. Japan russia south africa kenya and latin america and further trials are planned for other european and asian countries. So definitely more good news but watch this space for more

Astrazeneca Oxford Pfizer Biontech Dr Fauci Madonna Peter Openshaw Openshaw The New York Respiratory Syndrome Jenner Institute Imperial College The New York Times
Fresh update on "disease" discussed on Keepin' It Real with Rev. Al Sharpton

Keepin' It Real with Rev. Al Sharpton

00:35 sec | 56 min ago

Fresh update on "disease" discussed on Keepin' It Real with Rev. Al Sharpton

"She shaped me as an actor, a musician as a human being. So when she was diagnosed with colon cancer, it was like our whole family got cancer and she died when she was only 56. So this is personal. Hopefully, my heartbreak is your wake up call. Colorectal cancer is the second leading cancer killer, but you can prevent this disease screening finds pre cancerous polyps so that they can be removed before they turn into cancer. I've been screen If you think that you're at an increased risk, like I am ask your doctor went to start screening. And if you're 50 or older get screen. I don't have my mother anymore. So please Do everything that you can to stay around for yourself and for your family screening saves lives. A message from the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, raise both arms and wait goodbye to anything that holds you.

Colon Cancer Cancer U. S. Department Of Health And
AstraZeneca-Oxford COVID-19 vaccine up to 90% effective, late stage trials show

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:28 sec | 1 d ago

AstraZeneca-Oxford COVID-19 vaccine up to 90% effective, late stage trials show

"AstraZeneca says late stage trials of its covert 19 vaccine developed with Oxford University were highly effective and preventing the disease results are based on interim analysis of trials in the U. K in Brazil of the vaccine, the lead researcher, Dr Andrew Pollard says this vaccine doesn't require high end freezers to store in transported to stole the French temperatures and we can get it to every corner in the world. It's already been manufactured in 10 different sites around the world to make sure that that can

Astrazeneca Dr Andrew Pollard Oxford University U. Brazil
Wisconsin congressman says he tested positive for COVID-19

WBBM Late Morning News

00:37 sec | 1 d ago

Wisconsin congressman says he tested positive for COVID-19

"Remember of Wisconsin's Congressional delegation being treated for coronavirus Brian Style says he's tested positive for covert 19 The statement by the Republican lawmaker from Janesville Says he began experiencing mild symptoms over the weekend contacted his doctor while at home. The congressman says he learned Sunday that he has the virus. Steele says he spent all of last week working in Washington, D C, adding that he is immediately began quarantining following centers for disease control guidelines and plans to continue working from home. Bob Conway. NEWSRADIO 105.9 FM.

Brian Style Janesville Wisconsin Steele Washington Bob Conway
AstraZeneca-Oxford COVID-19 vaccine up to 90% effective, late stage trials show

Charlie Parker

00:21 sec | 1 d ago

AstraZeneca-Oxford COVID-19 vaccine up to 90% effective, late stage trials show

"AstraZeneca says It's covert 19 vaccine is highly effective in preventing the disease. The drug company and the University of Oxford are in late stage trials of developing a Corona virus vaccine today, the head researcher said. Those who were given a half dose followed by a full dose were about 90% protected, He said The tests show that it's an effective vaccine that will save many

Astrazeneca University Of Oxford
Pat Quinn, co-founder of viral Ice Bucket Challenge, dies from ALS at age 37

Charlie Parker

00:30 sec | 1 d ago

Pat Quinn, co-founder of viral Ice Bucket Challenge, dies from ALS at age 37

"The A L S Ice Bucket Challenge. Has died. Pat Quinn died at the age of 37 yesterday after seven years with the disease. Quinn and the late Pete Frates started the challenge after being diagnosed with a L S, which is known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The ice bucket challenge raised over $250 million Since it took social media by storm in 2014. Those of you do not know

Pete Frates Pat Quinn Quinn Lou Gehrig
Pat Quinn, Ice Bucket Challenge co-founder, has died at age 37

News and Information with Dave Williams and Amy Chodroff

00:47 sec | 1 d ago

Pat Quinn, Ice Bucket Challenge co-founder, has died at age 37

"J. Powers, Fox News Another co founder of the Ice Bucket Challenge, has died. Pat Quinn, motivational speaker and co founder of the Ice Bucket Video Challenge for a less died Sunday morning at age 37. He battled Amy a traffic lateral sclerosis, often called Lou Gehrig's disease since diagnosis in 2013 the video challenge taking social media by storm in summer, 2014. Quinn talking to Fox News radio in 2015 disease that has no hope at the moment, but The ice bucket challenge is revamped that outlook the challenge so far raising more than $250 million worldwide. Currently, there is no cure for a less a fatal progressive nervous system disease, which impacts nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord, causing loss of muscle control.

J. Powers Ice Bucket Challenge Traffic Lateral Sclerosis Fox News Lou Gehrig's Disease Pat Quinn AMY Quinn
The rise in Americans' food insecurity

KYW 24 Hour News

01:02 min | 1 d ago

The rise in Americans' food insecurity

"For so many Americans who are having trouble putting food on the table. Food insecurity has been on the rise during the pandemic. Kay what abuse? Lynn Atkins tells US researchers have found another more another reason that we need to tackle this crisis. Food insecurity is one of the nation's leading health and nutrition issues, and it's killing us, according to doctors to meet Kitana. Instructor of cardiovascular medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in the U. S for non elderly adults, So that's the 22 64 year old population with increases in food and security levels. There was an increase in death from cardiovascular disease, and this was after accounting for changes in several other factors like unemployment rates in an area poverty levels. Changes in the racial and ethnic demographic and profiles etcetera, he says. One reason for this deadly association could be that those who can't afford to put healthy food on the table. Also, like the money to buy the heart medications prescribed by their doctors. Lynn Egg Kids, K Y.

Lynn Atkins Kitana KAY University Of Pennsylvania Sch U. Cardiovascular Disease United States Lynn Egg
AstraZeneca: COVID-19 vaccine 'highly effective' prevention

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 1 d ago

AstraZeneca: COVID-19 vaccine 'highly effective' prevention

"The university of Oxford and AstraZeneca say later stage trials of the Kubic nineteen vaccine were highly effective in preventing disease preventing seventy percent of people from developing the coronavirus Oxford and AstraZeneca say the trial so far indicate if people are given a Hoff those followed by a full does robin to full doses protection then rises to about ninety percent at the WHL special envoy David Nabarro welcomed the news it's a vaccine that can be stored at fridge temperature for longer periods it's a vaccine that has high effectiveness in one of the drives each regimes that have been tried out the vaccine used follows last week's announcement from FISA and will dent saying was all showed that because with nineteen vaccines well almost ninety five percent effective Charles Taylor this month London

Astrazeneca University Of Oxford David Nabarro WHL Oxford Charles Taylor London
AstraZeneca says late-stage trials of its COVID-19 vaccine were “highly effective’’ in preventing disease

John Williams

00:32 sec | 1 d ago

AstraZeneca says late-stage trials of its COVID-19 vaccine were “highly effective’’ in preventing disease

"Well drug giant AstraZeneca today saying that leech stage trials of its covert 19 vaccine developed with Oxford University were highly effective in preventing disease. Chief investigator for the trial, says one of the dozing regiments and the trial was around 90% effective. If I remember the two other drugmakers. Fizer and Moderna last week reported preliminary results from late states trials, indicating that their covert 19 vaccines were about 95%

Astrazeneca Leech Oxford University Fizer Moderna
Pat Quinn, Ice Bucket Challenge co-founder, has died at age 37

John Batchelor

00:46 sec | 1 d ago

Pat Quinn, Ice Bucket Challenge co-founder, has died at age 37

"And another co founder of the Ice Bucket Challenge has died. Pat Quinn, motivational speaker and co founder of the Ice Bucket Video Challenge for a less died Sunday morning at age 37 He better of India Tropic lateral sclerosis, often called Lou Gehrig's disease since diagnosis in 2013 the video challenge taking social media by storm in summer, 2014. Quinn talking to Fox News radio in 20. 15 disease that has no hope at the moment. But the Ice bucket challenge revamped that outlook, the challenge so far raising more than $250 million worldwide. Currently, there is no cure for a less a fatal progressive nervous system disease, which impacts nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord, causing loss of muscle control boxes.

Ice Bucket Challenge Lateral Sclerosis Pat Quinn Lou Gehrig Quinn Fox News India
Bill Gates, the Virus and the Quest to Vaccinate the World

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

10:14 min | 1 d ago

Bill Gates, the Virus and the Quest to Vaccinate the World

"Who gates welcome back to the daily social distancing. Show good to see you you lost. Join us on the show. I would say it was about seven months ago and seven months ago. Just like dr fauci. You said you will worried because you felt like the worst was yet to come a lot of people accused you of peddling fear and terror and now it appears that unfortunately you were correct. Here's my question to you. Why does it seem like we've become worse at handling the pandemic you know in europe in the us then we were seven months ago when seven months ago. It was so bad. Well there's a couple of things working against us. I is that with the winter when we're colder we. The virus multiplies more and more indoors. More so that is not a good thing and then there's a certain fatigue. Some of the things people have had to do in terms of staying away from friends. That's tougher i've to say this round. It looks like europe is getting better compliance with the restrictions than the. Us is so they're starting to see a downturn. When you talk about that compliance and when you talk about the downturn is part of the downturn like should we should we be looking at the virus cases or should we be looking at the deaths because i never know which one is more important than usual. Be like a million more people to me. Five million seven million and then you'll see some doctors saying yes but fewer people are dying from because we know how to treat it. How should we be looking at this virus and the fight that we have against. It's well the case is our leading indicator it is true that cases are translating into less doubts for two reasons. One is that the cases are more in the young people Who are less likely to be very sick. And the other is that the quality of treatment including some new drugs like decks method have been proven out so when you do get hospitalized you have a higher chance of survival but were predicted to go back to over two thousand deaths a day in the months ahead so for the next six to eight months news is mostly bad after that the volume of the vaccine will have kicked in and then we'll have a light at the end of the tunnel. Wow i mean the the question is then i think for a lot of people is like. How long tunnel. How bad does that tunnel get. And how do we stop it from being the worst possible tunnel one of the big things. A lot of people are worried about is going to be the transition between joe biden. donald trump. You know you've worked with governments all over the world working on their vaccine distribution working on healthcare around the planet. You know how important it is for one administration to talk to the next when it comes to Handing off on their plans. How much do you think this will actually affect america's response if if there isn't a transition well it's unfortunate that the current administration got tied into a positive narrative that you know we're turning the corner And that you now have this transition will make. The message is a little less clear. You know this is when you'd love to see the best. Cdc people on tv reminding us about social distancing and masks. You know particularly when there is that fatigue out there so leaders at all level. This is a chance to step up even on politicians. You know encouraging friends that hey we. We don't want this additional several hundred thousand deaths you know it'd be adjective. A person who dies know when the vaccine is absolutely on the way and so i think the good news should drive compliance not lacks laxity as somebody who's done work globally around healthcare for so long especially around infectious diseases. What have you found is the key to encouraging or convincing community members to buy into the measures that keep them safe where we had vaccine resistance with polio and they're getting the religious leaders to speak out have them a visibly vaccinating their own children for would like we'd never stopped polio in africa and yet now it's just been certified that we've gone three years without wild polio so activating the trust hierarchy and getting rid of the conspiracy political element to it and just reminding people you know in this case. It's about saving lives in that case it's about kids not being paralyzed people back to that. Very human impact. If we don't behave well. I think it will often come through. It's interesting that you bring up conspiracies because the conspiracy theories about you online have are insane on social media and social media has propagates them in a way where it's like bill gates is trying to create vaccines so that he can cook troll your minds and he wants to vaccinate. Everybody can implant change. People's dna is what they said. You're going to change our dna. So that i don't know we turn into something and then we work for you somewhere. I don't know the full story. I'm still learning it when you see these things first of all. Have you been able to track down where it comes from. And secondly have you. Even i know you think about these things you want to like the biggest thing because i hadn't even thought about like the motivation behind it because i'm always trying to figure out who benefits from a conspiracy theory and i'd love to know if you've put any thought to this at all because of how many people won't get a vaccine because they truly believe conspiracy theories yeah usually when you work on infectious disease like dr fauci and high do your your kind of obscure in a nobody talks about t be or or malaria so here we have this complete turnaround where vaccines and are they. Good for people are now front and center. And there's always been a small group of anti vaccination people and we see this with you know measles vaccine. They've now got a platform and they've sort of joined forces with some political and spiracy abuse and it's so easy to click on particularly when a simple explanation for this pandemic that there is somebody evil behind it. You know as somehow easier than you know the true biology which is actually kind of complicated so we have to make the truth more interesting. And you know we've got a label things with the truth and sadly the naievety about how to make social media work. Well is pretty strong. And that's coincided with the election and the epidemic. I wish i had the answer. But you know it's it's it's out there in big big numbers and hasn't it just keeps growing so when we look at the vaccine. Now i mean that's now the story you know. Now the world is waiting for the vaccine because the vaccine becomes the key that unlocks the doors. You say the lights at the end of the tunnel. The question then is how do people get the vaccine. How effective will the distribution method be and how difficult is will the vaccine short supply. The good news is that there's four other vaccines that are likely to get approved fairly quickly as well. The fact that pfizer worked so well makes us optimistic. That astrazeneca johnson and johnson vacs which those are much cheaper easier to scale and don't require that cold chain so we'll have a lot of scenes and we need to prioritize people. At risk elder people people working nursing homes and each country Will have to decide okay. Who goes first. That's still a little bit confused in the us but hopefully we'll get that straightened out very very soon because the vaccine is likely to be shipped a lot in the month of december as you said anti vaccine community has only grown over time. I think the us is now the biggest hub of anti vexes in the world it started as a fringe thing with measles now with corona it is fully fledged and because of politics it's been amplified so now you'll have some people who on the liberal side saying i don't trust that vaccine it was made under trump and then you'll have other people saying like i don't trust that vaccine that came from joe biden and the and the democrats trying to brainwash. It's a lot of people may not want to take the vaccine which may now go against everything we've worked toward. So how do you begin convincing people that the vaccine is safe like in the midst of this political crisis. Well it's clear that the fda through the professional staff. They're all the things that are supposed to do likewise pfizer. There's even an external committee that will weigh in just to make absolutely sure that the the political desire to get this quickly did not in fact the efficacy and safety review and i feel very confident because the people involved are are really doing their job. Well we don't need everyone to take the vaccine. Society will have to decide if there's some jobs like going to a nursing home in taking care of somebody's grandparents whether that person you know how strongly you encourage them to have a vaccine so they're not spreading seeing but with this level of efficacy if we can get to seventy five percent dosed then you'll block the spread of the disease with measles you'd have to get to like ninety five percent because it's even more infectious but the good news here is that we just need that maturity and i think as people see people taking the vaccine and they see that The side effects of any are very very rare. That confidence will build and that will be good for society because when you take the vaccine you're helping to protect other people.

Dr Fauci Polio United States Europe Joe Biden Donald Trump Gates Fatigue Measles CDC Astrazeneca Johnson Bill Gates Infectious Disease Africa Malaria Pfizer Johnson FDA
Pat Quinn, co-founder of viral Ice Bucket Challenge, dies from ALS at age 37

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:26 sec | 1 d ago

Pat Quinn, co-founder of viral Ice Bucket Challenge, dies from ALS at age 37

"Pat quinn. The co founder of the viral ice bucket challenge died on sunday at the age of thirty seven quinn and the late pete. Freights were both diagnosed with a rare and fatal disease and started the ice bucket challenge to raise money and awareness about the condition. The disease has no hope at the moment but the ice bucket challenge revamped that outlook the ice bucket challenge helped raise more than two hundred million dollars to fund research and treatments for the disease.

Pat Quinn Quinn
Pat Quinn, Ice Bucket Challenge co-founder, has died at age 37

News Radio 920 AM Programming

00:27 sec | 1 d ago

Pat Quinn, Ice Bucket Challenge co-founder, has died at age 37

"Founder of the viral Ice Bucket Challenge, died on Sunday at the age of 37. Quinn and the late Pete Frates were both diagnosed with a L s a rare and fatal disease and started the ice. Could challenge to raise money and awareness about the condition disease that has no hope at the moment. But the ice bucket challenge revamped that outlook. The Ice bucket Challenge helped raise more than $200 million to fund research and treatments for the disease. Meanwhile, one of the NFL's rookie

Pete Frates Quinn NFL
Pat Quinn, Ice Bucket Challenge co-founder, has died at age 37

Always in Fashion with Mark Weber

00:28 sec | 1 d ago

Pat Quinn, Ice Bucket Challenge co-founder, has died at age 37

"Co founder of the ice bucket Challenge for a less died this morning at age 37 he better Amy O Tropic lateral sclerosis, often called Lou Gehrig's disease since diagnosis in 2013, the ice bucket video challenge taking social media by storm in summer. 2014. Quinn, talking with Fox News radio in 2015 is great for the A L s community. We really needed a new sense of fight new sense of hope. So far, the challenge raising more than $250 million Worldwide.

Tropic Lateral Sclerosis Lou Gehrig AMY Diagnosis Quinn Fox News
Genetic Engineering in Animal Agriculture

Talking Biotech Podcast

06:08 min | 3 d ago

Genetic Engineering in Animal Agriculture

"Welcome to the talking biotech. The weekly podcast but agriculture and medicine with an emphasis on biotechnology. And the good things we can do for people and the planet. My name's kevin polka. I'm your podcast host and western plant biology coming to you from archer florida on the exotic farm and we're going to talk about animal. Agriculture and how biotechnology has or maybe hasn't been able to improve animal agriculture. And we're speaking with dr mark west susan. He's a professor at texas a and m. veterinary medicine in the area. Physiology and pharmacology. So i've been trying to get him on the podcast for about five years and here he is finally so welcome to the podcast dr west. Houston thank you so much can. Yeah this is really cool. Because you're you've been Not just involved in your research work at in your research directly with animal genetic engineering and working with different projects but you also have a very good sense of what's happening. Globally in animal agriculture. So i really wanted to get an idea you know. What is the current state of genetic engineering across livestock and livestock pertaining to the four legged. Ones you know. Maybe not chickens. But we've covered a few on the podcast. But what are the current agricultural animals that are being improved with genetic engineering techniques. Kevin so i would say that almost every livestock species that you can imagine or think of including chickens as you mentioned but if you think about sheep goats cattle pigs and even to some extent horses Our genetic modifications that scientists are looking into to benefit either the animals themselves and or the products that they produce for us. So it's it's it certainly has a lot of potential and there's a lot of work going on in in with all all the different species. Will you named a few different species there. And as a general rule. How is transformation. Don is it the same from goats sheeps pigs horses or is there. Something unique about you know. Different wants the general methodology that she used for genetic modification animals or gene. Editing is essentially the same. And i would say that with the new technologies that we have involving crisper cast meghan. Nuclear aces It can be as simple as collecting an embryo at the one cell stage injecting it with the necessary molecular tools and then Transferring that embryo back into a recipient female to produce genetically modified animal. If the if the modification that you're looking for is more complicated or say you want a very specific promoter on it you want it. The gened only expressed or the the outcome of the of the modification to only show up in a particular tissue. Say milk or something like that then sometimes the modification. The complication of it would require that you would take a cell line Genetically modified the cell line and then do some screening and genetically modified again until you got the proper cell line then use that with nuclear transplantation cloning to produce the desired genotype that looking for but essentially it's the technologies are the same across species. The differences come up a really in controlling the reproductive cycle is the old the older technologies that have been around for a long time I think that that tend to sometimes throw a monkey wrench into the projects. In i worked for instance i work quite a bit on For years on dogs and if anyone wanted to Genetically modified dog is kind of. we're not talking livestock species but the reproductive tract is quite a bit are the reproductive cycle is a lot different and so they can become a lot more challenging. Where do you get the ovaries. Where do you get the embryos how synchronized different things like that. Okay so i. I see that. It's probably kind of the same across most of our barnyard animals. But so let's start with sheep. I really don't know much about sheep i haven't heard much about it. But what approaches are current. What is the problem in sheep first of all and what's being done to solve that problem. There's really no problem with sheep. I think there's a left. Oh i would call it a leftover kind of thought that she difficult to work with because dali was one of the You know first sheep that was cloned and if you look at sheep from a standpoint of clowning they are. They do seem to be very difficult. And i don't think anyone really knows why they seem to be a species. That for some reason The efficiency of cloning doesn't work it. It just doesn't work very well if you compare that. For instance the cattle. Are you compared it to go to some of the other species is just. It's hard to clownish eat. But if you if you get out of the cloning aspect and you say i'm just wanna do genetic editing. We've we've done a lot of genetic editing and cheapen. It works very well. We we use the process. As i said earlier where we just collect embryos at the one cell stage we take them into the laboratory inject our crisper cast to do the modification. We wanted walk back over to the unit. The surgery unit transform back into the cheapen and produced a large number of genetically edited a shape. Genetics are in my lab. The we were looking at was to create a bu- a model for bone disease. And i want to say we obtain like seventy five percent

Kevin Polka Dr Mark West Susan Archer Houston Meghan Florida Texas Kevin DON Dali Bone Disease
How COVID-19 human challenge trials work -- and why Sophie Rose volunteered

TED Talks Daily

04:01 min | 4 d ago

How COVID-19 human challenge trials work -- and why Sophie Rose volunteered

"In april. Two thousand and twenty. I made what many perceive is a risky decision volunteered to be deliberately infected with covid nineteen. This infection would be part of what is cold. A human challenge show where young healthy people given a vaccine and then deliberately exposed to the virus that causes covid. Nineteen these trials help. Researchers figure out more quickly if a vaccine is working. I think this research is crucial. Because today i'm going to speak to you for six minutes in that time. Roughly twelve hundred and fifty people will be confirmed infected with covid nineteen twenty. One people will die and then this pot repeat hour after hour and day by day until we're able to vaccinate most of the eight billion people affected but squabble crisis. Scientists have been working around the clock to make those vaccine's reality. But what should we do when the human cost of waiting for vaccines is rising by the day. This is a human challenge shells. Come in the different from the traditional phase. Three bucks trials taking place now where people are given a vaccine or placebo. An oss to go about their everyday lives. Researchers have to wait to see how many people in each group become infected until enough of them get sick. We don't have enough data to know whether a vaccine is working. Finding effective vaccine with this method can take months sometimes years and it requires thousands of volunteers. A challenge tall works foster because research control exposure instead of waiting for people to get sick so instead of a year we could know in as little as a month whether a vaccine seems effective instead of thousands of volunteers a challenge shawl relies on just fifty to one hundred because we know if a sudden when people are exposed and develop disease. These trials also allow us together data about the early stages of infection and our response. This data is impossible together in any other way especially for people who become infected but never showed symptoms. This knowledge is important for designing policies. That limit covid nineteen transmission. The time saved translates into precious month's headstart on manufacturing getting a small working covid. Nineteen vaccines scenes foster. These trials are useful even their recent phase through results on encouraging. The arrival of the fuss vaccine is going to be a monumental breakthrough. it just isn't quite the fairy tale ending role harping full. We're going to need multiple vaccines because we just don't have the infrastructure needed to immunize eight billion people on the planet with just one kind. Each type of back seen requires its own special process and equipment to make store and deliver it if we had multiple working covid nineteen vaccines. We could make use of all of our equipment at the same time. Some of the leading candidates need to be kept extremely colds before they live limit to people. This can be really hard especially in countries where there isn't reliable electricity or a secure method to store them. Scientists have been using human challenge. Charles for hundreds of years. They've sped up the development vaccines against typhoid and cholera. And i've helped us better understand how immunity develops to things like the flu. Malaria and dengue gay with use them for other types of coronavirus. Before there's been a lot of debate about whether challenge charles a too risky. I happen to think that those risks of taking a challenge trial would recruit young and healthy participants think between the ages of twenty and twenty nine fewer than one percent of people in that age group need to be taken to hospital after becoming infected with covid nineteen likely even lower in a challenge trial because researchers check to make sure that participants have no pre existing conditions. The risk of a young healthy person dying of covid nineteen is around five thousandth of a percent

Colds Typhoid Cholera Dengue Malaria Charles FLU
"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

13:06 min | 6 months ago

"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Number Five Oak Park Illinois number four Ashburn Virginia Number Three Toronto Canada number to Paris France and still at number one Santiago Chile. Thank you twelve hour Chilean listeners. The other down under yes so I forgot to ask before but in the comments. Tell us where you're from. We'd love to know. See who are friends are this evening? And if you know somebody else who would like to know about lyme disease and the Carnivore Diet? Invite him to come join us. It's going to be a great conversation. Orion need to say this at the beginning of your countdown. Time to type in. Get the comments up there. Make a note for next time. I don't have anything else to say. All right. Well I can tell everybody a little bit about Jen. Yes let's do that. In the meantime the comments listener where you're from so two thousand nine. John's been Keith. Fell off a horse which sparked a neck pain that lingered and surprisingly traveled to other parts of his body. In Two Thousand and eleven. He received a lime diagnosis which sparked a years long quest for proper treatment and lasting alleviation of symptoms and despite finding a line literate doctor who was willing to prescribe term antibiotics. It wasn't until John Found Cannabis for lime disease and healing line by Dr Brunner. That keeps symptoms finally turned around then discovering the Kito Diet and then the Carnivore. Diet has finally turned Keith to full health. After finding what worked for her husband John was inspired to help others with chronic lyme disease today she works as an herbalist and a certified health coach excellent. Hello Kathy thanks for joining US Kathy from New Jersey and anybody else tuning in. Let us know where you're from we'd love to say hello all right. Thank you so much for using JEN. And we'll say goodbye to you for a second and we'll bring up all right all right. Piper. Now Jen welcome now. Thanks for having me. You're very very welcome. We the introduction. Okay so is lovely. I appreciate that you mentioned three main. Themes there for your husband's health and cannabis Stephen Brunner's protocols in his insights into Lyman co-infections and then the carnivore diet. Yes I think. Those are the top three things that we did. That helped Keith Remission We were got to a point where we were. Just desperate everything. We tried over eight years Just didn't work He was on antibiotics through the lime litter doctor but he wasn't getting better And he was still getting worse And I just kept researching and researching researching and found this book by Shelley. White about using cannabis for lime disease and then she mentioned the Buehner Protocol and so then I got Brunner's book and Designed a protocol based on these books based on what I learned and you know. That's a really scary moment. When you're you're your love line is you know. We didn't think he was gonNA live. It was that points like House Bounds. you just unable to be with the family And out of desperation you know not knowing anything just designing this protocol and giving it to him and then in a few weeks to maybe like a month noticing the difference and noticing that we were on the right track and It was like a Miracle That so interesting. A one of the things we're tempted to do. Is We get attached to our protocol or attached even to to a health practitioner right. We'd like them. We think they have good ideas. They're caring for us and we keep we wanna stick with something right and give it a fair chance and my question is like how. How long do you give a protocol before you designated as thank you for sharing? But this isn't working right right and so. How long did you give antibiotics a chance? He was on antibiotics for a year. Okay Yeah Eh the IB is well. We're all just we talked about during the IV but all oil and then it just wasn't working you know and that after our experience and now you know working with other clients. I really think you should know relatively soon if something is working or not and I just say key everyone's different and keep trying until you find the thing that's going to work for you that's really A big part of this and it's hard it's work and it's it's frustrating but You know after seeing these things work Keith. You know after so many years of nothing working. It was pretty amazing to watch and to tell us. A little bit about the cannabis is was it. Inhaled was eating so before we found Keith was using cannabis but more as a masking of symptoms sort of idea. We didn't really realize you know the the power of cannabis as medicine because you know we. It's it's been nearly legal and people. Just use it recreationally He was kind of hiding it for me. Like didn't really want to admit that he was using it. And then I read this book and it just talks all about the medicinal properties and it just made it legitimized it in our minds like. Oh this could be medicine. And how do we best take cannabis as medicine And then we. We made a cannabis oil so infused olive oil and he would just take that As needed since his experiences. And I've done more research and training and cannabis I lean more towards microdosing and and finding your own Therapeutic dose out through a program. There's a website healer dot com. I did their training. They also have a lot of free information And it's just all about. Finding your own therapeutic does and it's usually a really small amount. So you're getting all the benefits of cannabis without any of the negative side effects And then I also prefer tinctures over infused olive oil so That's how I would recommend using it now but it's definitely medicine and it's The other thing that's important is finding strains that work for your goals so You know some people try cannabis and say oh. That doesn't work for me but you really have to kind of trial and error until you find that thing. That's going to work for you just to give an idea. How many different strains did you try? Well ally at the time when we were using cannabis for Keith. We were in New York. It's still medicinal cannabis is legal. It's really hard to get so we were not getting it that way So it wasn't like now we're in California where you can go the dispensary and there's all these lovely different you know different strains and you can pick and choose so back in New York. It was more about you know unfortunately because it's medicine and we should have access to it. Okay so you begin to see as you start experimenting with this. Obviously you begin to see some results from changes right. His his brain fog clear pain get better mood. What changed with cannabis so through the canvas and the beauty protocol together? Things got better He you know he was gradually getting worse all the time. And then once we hit upon those two things he stabilized and then just started getting better. So you know pain was better. Knock on but better Brain fog better but you know slur not gone anxiety better but not gone. So I feel that the cannabis and the Buehner protocol help stop the disease like help kill. The bacteria stop the progression of the disease but didn't necessarily restore his health. Who why and this is kind of drum roll section? So why do you think eating only meat and assuming is totally? Meet no plant and all just hundred out Lance France. How `Bout like animal fat? Is that part of it or is it really just protein mostly so so just to give context? We did the buehner protocol and the cannabis for a year. He stopped one. Yeah he stopped the well he also had surgery in the midst of all this so I think that was part of you. Know it's a little gets a little complicated but Once I was all done he stopped. Abuna herbs kept the cannabis but Then he was stable enough for us to leave New York and we started traveling but again his health was in better. He was better enough And we just kept searching and for the answer and I you know was fatigues end. Had gained a lot of weight from emotional eating. And you know I didn't consider myself unhealthy but I definitely wasn't where I want to be a and I felt like I'm forty six and I was feeling very fatigued and Just old and I thought that was my new normal based on ten years of stress and trying to run a business and raise kids and caretake for my husband so I was also searching for a way back to health and we found the Kito Diet and sounded super crazy. All the news will say it will kill. You don't do Kito but we were desperate. Once you've been through lime you're willing. There's a certain point where you're willing to try anything to get better. So I said how much worse going to get. Exactly what do you have to lose at that point so we did? Kito for a month and I follow this woman and I cannot remember. I should plug her but I can't remember instagram name. But she her husband had brain cancer and use Kito for brain cancer and she kept mentioning Carnivore Carnivore and I was like. Oh Okay Carnivore. What is that because of course? I'm want to know everything so I started researching carnivore and found In the Carter World Charlene Anderson is one of the Most known she her and her husband been on it for twenty years. But she says she cured her lime disease twenty years ago through the Carnivore Diet so after and then at the same time as all this is going on. Kito Diet is working wonderfully for us. We're both feeling better. Keeps pain better losing weight like eight weeks week? It was amazing so at the end of that month. I said okay. This sounds totally insane. But let's try carnivore and Keith. Was a little resistant. Doesn't love red. Didn't now he does didn't love red meat. Didn't love eating steak But I said let's just try it. Look at these people. Look at this these success stories And so we tried the carnivore diet and again. Both of our health transformations his was incredible. His color came back which may be those of us that have been in the lime world. Understand how important that is. He was so gray for years and just his color. Coming back was amazing and again like a miracle where his pain resolved. Anxiety resolves You know just we both lost weight. We're both at our high school weights now Feel Great. My fatigue went away. His fatigue went away And I feel like that's what really brought his health back..

cannabis Keith lyme disease Stephen Brunner Cannabis Kito Jen New York neck pain Paris Virginia Five Oak Park Illinois Santiago Chile John France brain cancer New Jersey Kathy
"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

01:42 min | 6 months ago

"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Get a little echo there. I can hear you. Okay okay good. It sounded like things. Were really weird there for a second certain now. I think we're good. Okay excellent welcome. We are live here on facebook lime. Ninja radio show and I am super pumped to be talking to Jennifer this evening Jennifer Gladys and we're GonNa talk about the Carnivore Diet and it's something I've always kind of wanted may be dry. So maybe this'll inspire me to do it for a little while. I do have some questions. Some concerns so it's good. We've got an expert to sort that all out for us. I'm really excited to talk to her. And we'll bring her up in a couple of minutes Aurora. Do you have the top ten list top ten list. Excellent as you all know mom diseases an international problem and each week we have listeners tune into our show here or podcast which you can get soundcloud or itunes or wherever find podcast given away for free we have people tune in from all over the world as you know. Lime is an international problem. And this week's top ten tune in cities are starting at number ten. Chicago Illinois number. Nine aliso Viejo California Valencia California number seven Hamden Connecticut Number six Denver Colorado Number Five Oak Park Illinois number four Ashburn Virginia Number Three Toronto Canada number to Paris France.

Jennifer Gladys Nine aliso Viejo California Va Five Oak Park Illinois facebook Hamden Connecticut Illinois Aurora Chicago Paris France California Denver Virginia Canada Toronto Colorado
"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

05:47 min | 8 months ago

"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Diagnosed my own lime disease when I know so it was really. I think a beautiful thing because I learned about it and then I was able to take care of myself and Feel a lot better. And then I brought all of this knowledge and experience back to Syracuse area and opened up my own practice and so I take care of a lot of patients with cancer. They're looking for. Integrative oncology consultations but also lime disease and also just disease processes or illnesses where patients aren't getting answers and they're really not getting the help that they need so and that's how the universe is Kinda guided me even though it's not exactly what I had planned right. It's it's Kismet. Something like that. Yeah it's it's funny. It's funny how the universe will do that. It'll either either. Gives you a nudge? And if you ignore the nudge it'll hit you upside the head right like getting. We both have had lyme disease. It's a major wack upside the head for sure it now. You've been doing this for awhile. What's your current thoughts on treatment? In what do you bring together in your clinic because one size never fits all especially with Lime Disease? And so what? What is the toolbox that you're drawing from so drawing from my experience and training but You know lime disease is unfortunately you have these two opposing guidelines or guidelines that are very difficult to merge in the struggle that I have been patients have many times as finding that happy medium. Okay and so My approach is to hear the patient story. You don't hear what's going on. Let them talk you. Give them adequate time to talk because they feel would. That's the major complaint. They feel that patients have is a not being hurt. I'm suffering and are not being heard so I'll review their records any testing that they had done before but will review it in their words do some tests and I again. I explain bill limitations of our testing which is a big problem. Lime disease primarily is at most clinical diagnosis and we have to follow you. Know what the clinical symptoms are. Even if testing is not helping all the Tom and I use herbals and I use conventional therapies such as pharmaceuticals if needed. But it's really catered towards the individual's situation and also as how how severe their situation is. So I use something kind of a level of functioning scale to tell me you know where on that spectrum. How sick they are. And whether we can maybe start with herbals or maybe. It's quite serious. What we need to start with both herbals antibiotics now. When I visited your clinic a month ago whenever that was you were preparing to introduce something. I'm absolutely fascinated by so first of all it took the tour may solve the the IV room and the end of the normal medical stuff. And then you told me about neuro feedback and I don't know if you remember my is getting about this wide because we've interviewed several people over the years about neuro feedback here on the show and it's a fascinating topic and specially given the level of stress that lyme patients and other chronically ill patients go under. It's it's the post traumatic stress right. It's the cell danger response however you want to frame it. It's their brains. Get stuck and something like neural feedback. Kind of it back to normal functioning to tell us why you're bringing you the way you're bringing this to the re practice until I think you're bringing in but why are you bringing the practice and what you're hoping to see and and have you started with patients yet to tell me more about that. Yeah so I. I've had my eye on neuro feedback for awhile but A lot of times at conferences they will bring vendors that. Have these complementary therapies that can help patients with their hair and at the last islets meeting which is in a was in November. I kept coming back to the system that was called clear minds and a clear mind system. I just kept coming back to it because it just I might instinct kept telling me this is a really important part because one of the hardest struggles we have in. Lyme disease is on getting the brain better getting patients emotions better getting them calm on because the stress is is tremendous. But you know this system fascinated me because it's not just limited to line patients but it's limited. It's it's expansive actually to a lot of different brain disorders and different diseases that can affect the brain so traumatic brain injury autism anxiety. Depression Chronic Fatigue Syndrome FIBROMYALGIA MIGRAINES so Income and then also line. So you know. The true test was sitting there on. Having you thought so I had my brain mapped. And then I actually had a few sessions while I was there. At the conference where we try to retrain the brain the rain waves and make them more in alignment with which what is considered normal function. There's different levels of functioning of the brain waves and I found it fascinating because even in a very short period of time I noticed a difference in how one perceives things even things like colors.

lyme disease Syracuse lyme Depression Tom
"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

04:53 min | 9 months ago

"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Having me. This was great. Great Shoe saying some amazing things about treating lime disease at the end. But I'm actually going to more towards the beginning of the episode when she was talking about mass L. Activation Syndrome. And it reminded me of our old friend that. Weird Goose Syndrome. Royal thing Chinese medicine. Yes you know. The whole point of Goose Syndrome is to convey to the practitioner and the patient that it's very difficult to treat syndrome right that it's this is not something that you're GonNa cure sweated out and then feel better the next day. This is a battle that you're in and the image for Goose Syndrome is that oil has seeped into flour and mix together and then that the practitioners job and the patient job is to re separate out the oil in the flower as you can imagine. That's a very difficult task. So these chronic diseases inflammations get set. Up can be tough. It can be done. There is hope that it's not a life sentence but it's not the type of thing it's not. Excuse me an instant fix right. There's not a pill for it there. You have to do many different strategies over time and change and adjust you know. That's a whole flight Ninja and think outside the tick. You gotta you gotTa do this like in India just a full frontal attack just GonNa Cause more inflammation and make you sicker so. He had to chip away at the edge. You have to be smart and sneaky like an inch and that's why we call this lime into radio as opposed to lime warriors so I understand the idea of being alive word. You know. You've got to be tough and strong and you're going out to fight this thing but really we want to refine that you have to be really smart and strategic about it so if you were you may Ninja. Were right on board. Oh and speaking of that so I've started. I'm on instagram well. No It's speaking about things that bugs me a little bit. There's there's a feed. There's a Hashtag on instagram for lime disease and of course. I'm clicking a lot of things with lime disease what says Joe Subscribe to this Hashtag rates and getting all these hashtags and to be honest with you. Most of these pictures are like a beauty pageant. They're all these you know PAM for. It's it's but it's ridiculous all these people. I don't read the exact. What's going on with everybody? Maybe everybody's recovered. But they're all young young women who look fabulous fabulous places and and talking about lyme disease and in all about it for those of you out there who are really struggling. That must just be depressing so when that don't just don't do it it's just it's not fake news. I'm not accusing anybody being fake news. But the you know a little bit goes a long way if you have a friend to inspire you something like that but to be hammered every day by people you know theoretically talking about lyme disease but really. They're talking about their fashions. That's just you know were there. You know upside down yoga poses and stuff like that. That's just when you can't get out of bed when you're up enough energy to brush your teeth. I mean it's just the distance between the two is too great. We one of the things we talked about a wild is a media diet. You know this might be something to consider if you find yourself looking at those things you know if they're your friends that's fine. I get it so maybe one or two of those friends in your feet but don't subscribe on Instagram to the Lime Disease Hashtag. It's unless you want to check up on what the latest fashions are all right. That's my rant for today. We usually don't get on soap book grants but it's Today I did. Do you have feedback suggestions for gets really anything? Send an email to feedback and London to radio DOT COM and if you're still listening you're either a glutton for punishment or you like what we're doing here at Lime Ninja radio either way. Hit the subscribe button. That way. You won't miss an episode if you really like what we're doing do us a favor school down to the bottom of your podcast. App and leave us a review it. Yes we thank you and love reviews and last if you really really like what we're doing and want to help keep us keep an eye on consider sponsoring laminated. Your radio for as little as one dollars a month just head. On over to lyman injure radio DOT COM and clink clink. Click on the support US link and last this really is last and last as you longtime lyman inches. No this podcast would not be complete unless we left you with the Lime Ninja fact of the day. Did you know a Ninja? Once gave a box of old watches to a group of kids they.

Activation Syndrome instagram Lime Ninja lyme disease Great Shoe India US Joe London
"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

13:03 min | 9 months ago

"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"And it can lose the line in a blocked it includes the line. Pcr The ticknor relapsing fever Immuno Blot. The relapsing fever. Pcr THE BBC on. Can I be my crotty? Fish would be CR. Bartonella western blot at Bartonella Fish. Npcr So I'M GONNA I'M GONNA find it if I'm gonNA find number and find it right so if there's a PCR there's a fish is active. If I don't have that I can't say it's not active. We just not be showing but if I have enough indicators and I have somebody who has an underlying auto immune markers okay and this and this particular example we have somebody she has sealy act disease. She has a positive AMA low tighter. A she's in the middle of this acute psychosis Zaidi depression thing and her A. Who's to like a triples off the charts k? She doesn't have an autoimmune disease. But the immune system is acting inappropriately could be uncast. I always go. It could be on CAST. It can always be cast but that to me raises. We all red flag if there is still infection and that's again so this is this is clinical judgment. This is a stall to this is spurious. I don't think that there's something that I can say. This is how I'm going to determine you know and I it my practice. It's almost like front burner backburner select don't dismiss the Anka's the mast cell activation. And you say oh. We're done with that. It can't be that we're moving on or just move it to the back burner and if we need to put front again we just pulled from again no well. I wouldn't even do that to be honest with you. I never will. I never put it on the back burner because I can't because their symptomology is being driven by it and I often can't help them if they're already really reactive and again what we're seeing is a lotta line patients. Who didn't have 'EM CASS early on in their disease. Now have it so and there's a whole process why that happened so I have to address that I have to get their master's stabilized. Otherwise I'm not going to be able to treat underlying stuff so it's actually not that burner. It's really trying to stabilize one thing so that I can go in with something else on top of it. I said like a foundation. Yes I think. We're talking about something similar but slightly different concepts. That's great. Thank you for clarifying that now. You do a lot of. Ib Treatments and there's excitement about they're about IB treatments. People go back and forth. There's a lot of confusion. Tell me well actually tell me a little bit about IV treatments. And then I have another question for you okay so you wouldn't have treatments that I'm doing and why I'm doing them. Yeah okay. We're like the top three because I'm sure there's a whole menu bite exactly like why. Iv to begin with so we're talking really IV nutritional support mainly. But I I do. I want to mention three main things I have. Id Nutritional support these patients either. They've been on antibiotics and their gut is not good shape. They're not absorbing nutrients or they already have a gun issue before their treatment I see a tremendous amount of B twelve deficiency because efficiency causing a lot of neurologic symptoms Vitamin C. issues like low vitamin C. Low Magnesium low so I have to get better and I have to think about it. Again is the foundation of their of their care so so using traditional supplements like that or nutritional supplements. Iv ravina sleet. Where I bypassed. The Gut can be tremendously useful for these patients. I had I had a patient wants and she ended up having. What is it Dan loss? What's the first ammos down syndrome and lime and probably eight other different things? She controlled her symptomology with Diet. She just couldn't find a doctor really to do everything she had once she liked. But the insurance companies stepped on her and she had to back off so she was really struggling but she found some relief with restricting her diet and primarily she'd ended up doing an elemental diet so just straight amino acids for awhile and for a while that worked and then she went back and got a little trigger here. They're a little trigger there and then she found work was fasting and it got to the point where anytime she ate was enough irritation to activate her mass cells. It was just horrific and she's since moved on and begin to find some help but it can get so bad and I was begging her as like go find somebody who'll give you a high vis and I wish I knew about you because she needed nutrition she just couldn't eat. Yeah it was awful. Yeah unfortunately I I do see patients like that quite often at its. It's heart breaking up and I think there's a lot of hope and I try to use as many tools as I have to help and and if I could just give them a little boost so that they could heal the problem. Is that the very things that we're going to help. Heal the things that you have to get from food and so if you can't then we have the ID. And and so. I think it's IT'S IMPORTANT. I mean I know. A lot of people are doing these. Iv's from a wellness perspective. And they're doing it for hangovers. I've heard all of it. I really believe that. They haven't played a role in medicine. And so you know I do a lot of a lot of that And in that mix in that with that glucose ione which can be helpful for the immune system and and it's a natural antioxidant so I do a lot of that Secondly I have found that ivy fossil titled Choline I the TC Patricia Kane Protocol to be extremely helpful for many of these patients They I do find that. Fossil title choline can help stabilize mast cells. I've also found. I can make it worse in. These patients are no. There's no one-size-fits-all everybody's different and so I can't. I'm going to say across the board. That's what I use but in the right patient who who need some Detox I know that they're fatty. Acid profile is off. I know that their diet is off. I know that there's membranes of breaking down and if they're so membranes or making breaking down there might a contrary are breaking down and they're in a bad they're bad shape so if I can use ivy fossil title choline if I can get stuff and or early great and then I supplement with IV. If I can't do it early we do it. I think Along with some other nutrients glutathione and be twelve and other things that can be in a really really remarkable. We've seen some remarkable with soap as a tool that I have for the right patient mentioned that this is not nutritional and I never thought I'd be doing this but sore my iv for my for my mast cell patients. Sometimes they're in the middle of a flare and they really need. We need to get them out of the flare in. I know sending them to the ER is not a great solution. The are often does get what's going on. They often don't know how to treat it And although they sometimes need it mean if you need to go you go but but there are times when I have patients who are not that bad yet. They don't need to go to the ER but they're in a flare and we're trying a lot of things but we just not knocking it out. I'll give them was called. The I the M CASS protocol. And it's a protocol that involves medications are know to be either antihistamines or Masol stabilisers. And we do. We give them a lot of fluid. These patients are often need more. Fluid often dehydrated natural even though they drink a lot of water. They're just not you know they don't have a lot of intracellular water and so we we give them lots of fluids. We give the Benadryl. We'd give them For modine which is an h two blocker. We give them so Fran for nausea. We give them a bunch of things and and we do it over of course of three to four hours and I have patients who come once a week for a few weeks and and that. Iv could last them almost the four week day. They do better so I had a patient came every week for a couple of months then. She came every other week then. She came once a month and now she hasn't come in months months. She's doing amazing now. Perfect she still has a take stuff but I got her out of the flare. The crisis rate major stressors that she could deal with major mold. Major lots of stuff I can get out so it's a tool that I started using that that several other colleagues of mine around the country are using his well. That has really changed things. Dramatically the immune system does want to come back to homies stasis but it does get stuck you know. Sometimes it's on the teach one side such to it seems to be the teach to is more of a sticky spot than the other one is but when it stuck there it needs to be wedged back and you just gotTa pull all the stops. You ought to try different things. Look I would prefer not to pump my patients for medication but I also would prefer that they can live their life right and and get on with their day. And if I have to do it. We're going to do it. So that's my approach. Now you treat alive for a long time and let's in line with the rela term. Here what are your go to treatments these days? How has that changed over time? And and what do you think is more effective? Yeah it's changed. Oh God I think it changes every month I I I don't know so I am very open. Hey that's that's part of like the way my brain works. I like to keep an open mind and I liked to and my experiences. There were a lot of things that can work. It just depends on the patient so depending on where they are in the course of their illness. I Sti- I sometimes use homeopathy. An I've had some great cases using homeopathy and and these are patients who already had been on antibiotics and it wasn't working right so so that could be a tool for for so patients. I use a number of different herbal protocols and I've sort of created my own combination enough. Stop right so it's my own the Dempsey protocol and in some patients I can use herbs alone in the again. It depends on where they are illness. It depends on their reactivity. Depends on church while they're a lot lot of comp- you know things that I that I consider but I have some herbal protocols that I've used that are You know pretty consistently good for some patients and then I have antibiotics that you know. Sometimes you just have to. You know if you have a case. I have a case of a of a gentleman who has has a questionable diagnosis of a LS with genetics tests. That's lighting up like a Christmas tree with positives everywhere every tick-borne disease he has And I'm not gonNA use homeopathy herbals. You know he's sick. He's deteriorating rapidly. I am going to pull out all the stops and I'm going to do whatever I can to get a better and that's in a -biotics and I sometimes will use the antibiotics. It's I use it much less now than I did two three years ago five years ago because I have some other tools that I can use. I've I have different combination of of anti honestly use and I have. I think the two protocols that I've had the greatest success with well the one I should say that I have the greatest success with the other. One is still I duNno. Debate is on But the DACHSHUND protocol created by. Dr Richard Horowitz has really really been ob- transformative for a good number of my patients..

relapsing fever Bartonella Fish autoimmune disease crotty sealy Zaidi A. Who Dr Richard Horowitz tick-borne disease Anka Patricia Kane Fran nausea
"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

13:02 min | 9 months ago

"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"A call setup okay and in many cases the mass cells are involved in that process. Okay I think that masks so activation syndrome for most patients for many of the patient I should say most but many of the patients I see started very early in life. They had a predisposition for their immune system to react in that manner over time they had insults to their body that that caused the mast cells to get more reactive to all use a tribute tate in a way and every time they have an assault on them. They get worse and escalates with time. So let's take somebody who has some mask sell printing early on in life. Maybe that your genetic then maybe they grew up in a moldy house that a damp basement. they remember being sick lot then they move somewhere else and they either move into another place or it's a better place in their healthier and they're healthy for a while then moved to upstate. New York and they get a tick bite than they did know about the lucky if they know about where most most of the time. They don't know they've been infected with something and the worst again and and and they're living in a in a in a little mold. It's not as bad as before but as a little bold and it's an infection and it's an immune system that was already probably primed for this. You get this sort of recipe. Four best selected Centra and then the mast cells are off to the races they are just reacting distort reacting. I reacting appropriately. Their job mast cells. Are Your First Line of Defense for the environment? They help fight off foreign things foreign bacteria in her sights and he said mold and all that so. They're doing their job. They're trying to help you. You're infected. You had some old. But at some point they become inappropriate in this disease and casts Nassau Activation Syndrome. And now they are reactive. They're reacting constantly inputting patients in state of of severe debilitation. Once those masks does go and if they hit the wrong parts of the body it's it can be very severe so I the way I see. These processes is that they're big triggers if you don't deal with triggers you're not going to get better so if there's active line and if there's mold you've got her eliminate the triggers otherwise you're not gonna get better and and so those will be taken care of but at the end of the day you might still have masks lactation syndrome. I think this is the most frustrating piece in the patients that I see who have had chronic lyme and they've been sick for a long time and they've tried these and they've tried antibiotics. They've tried every protocol out there and and they've been to Germany and they're still sick. Okay and why are they still sick? And so the question I have is is it because the immune system has already become regulated and the mast cells are cannot be controlled and until you control them. They going to act like you still have line. The symptomology must have much of the symptomology that we see with the lime. Bartonella I believe is through the mast cell. I believe that what you're seeing is the mast so manifestation of the infection. So you can still have that without the infection because the nationals have been formed in a reactive so I have. I have a question in these. Chronic patients is mass so activation that's underlying it all now at this point and really the infections the triggers. The mold is all taken care of or is it really that there's persistent infection and we. We have data coming out of Johns Hopkins and elsewhere. That's telling us that these bugs are persistent. And and it's very hard to treat mold and it's very hard through You're not in a moldy environment because mold is everywhere and so media really is that there's still sick because there's still something going on but you still have to deal with Celtics. Where do you find emotional stress and trauma and anxiety as a trigger for missiles? I'm so glad you asked that because I I should have mentioned that. Would I'm talking about in thinking about their childhood or their their lifetime. Line Yeah it's it's it's actually unfortunately very common to have some trauma and trauma could be. The dog died. Trauma could be abuse. Trauma could be need. It's how a trauma could be a fight with the with a loved. One could be data right better. Yeah yeah it's crazy every body Way of coping with TRAUMAS differet. Some of it is very genetic. They're definitely some predispositions. Some genetic markers that have been found that predispose people to having a more difficult time dealing with trauma so those are the people that I think about just genetically. The nervous system is wired a little differently and they have a trauma. Trauma definitely is a trigger for mass so activation syndrome stress is definitely a trigger. And then you have that sort of setting the stage for other events that happen overtime. You mentioned genetics. Are you familiar with Bob? Miller's work in his system of looking at UNIX a little bit to use it in your practice I don't use his. I have patients who have come to me with that information. I think it's very interesting. I know that he looks at the histamine piece that I know that there's some supplements that he's using but I couldn't give you specifics if you ever want to give into it. Give me a call. Okay we're a part of his research team can use his system regularly and it just sounds like an interest viewers. It's a good way to get into. In fact he's he had to create his own chip. Dna test because it was using twenty-three may data and they just kicked out a lot of the snips that he needs really incorporate as well have to talk more about it for sure. Awesome the other thing. I have my notes here. It sounds like you're talking about the cell dangerous spots. I'm giggling. Yeah I'm giggling because you hit the nail on the head. I think I think we're all talking about the same thing particularly in different things and I'm hoping there's going to be a time. I don't need to pull it. Casts. I don't need to call mass cells. It's my way of understanding. It is what I'm seeing but I think we alternately all have to put our heads together and really understand what this is that we're seeing and itsel danger for sure but I think it's it's even more than that and so. How do we describe that and understand that? Now that's haven't read the source material yet. I've heard Neil Nathan speak a few times. I interviewed him once. I have his book. He's trying to popularize the concept but I haven't yet gone to Peter Navio's work and really dive into it. You have to patch. You've got so much on my plate. Just fraud bad with it with an art with his. That's what I've heard that's awesome. You Begin to talk about your question is is. The mass are the mouse cells. Still activated is the immune system dysregulation from ongoing abuse over years or is it being currently triggered by something in the environment or in dodge. Nestle how do you begin to sort that out and I know that probably a week long conversation? But what do you look at? You know I think what we all. I have are markers so you know I've determined. Let's say you know. I've diagnosed the casts. And so I know it's there but I don't know if it's a you know what I'll call a primary and cast situation or whether it's a secondary so primary is starts childhood. These various triggers are important. They've made it worse. But the ultimate issue is really if you don't treat cast they're not gonNA get better versus secondary which is which it could also include pro. You can have primary and secondary you can have from childhood but then But really the the UNCAST is being driven out by this environmental dodgson endogenously like you said and now you have to. You have to deal with those so again. I have the diagnosis. Let's say for 'em cast now. I need to understand the environment a little bit better and understand if that is still a driver. So I'll look at mold exposure Mold testing if there's any red flag at all in certain markers in their blood or their if they have high micro-toxins I have a very low threshold to get to tell them to go. Get a mold inspection done on their home and And unfortunately very often we do find do we define things and in some patients They get the remediation done. They detox them. We do whatever we can to help of the mold and yet the mask so issue goes away. I have cases like that. It is mind blowing. I have a girl who was in high school. We just wish headline we couldn't we couldn't get the line. We definitely had mast cell. But guess what the the home was moldy. She moves out. She moves in with grandparents for for like a month her masks so she was gone. Her lime symptoms are gone right so that that is somebody who yes she only has underlying. Anka's I think just from childhood. I know that but it was being triggered and we got away. We got the trigger away better so so I have to look at that piece on. The infection piece is much more complicated so it's not always very easy to understand whether it's active infection or not and we know persistent infection exists in. How do we prove persistent infection in these patients? So what are alive. Call topsy unfortunately right right so so some of it is clinical judgment. Some of it is experience. Some of it is is looking at markers. I'm GonNa look and say okay. Let's let's put this together here. The symptoms symptoms could be okay. I'll give you an example. Let's say acute onset anxiety depression so we have somebody who is somebody who has headline and Bartonella has been treated but has some underlying cast has some allergies some other things. But it's doing okay. Took the antibiotics is doing. Great gets off the antibiotics or herbs whenever you're using and two weeks later two months later whatever it is accusing Zaidi psychosis right and you go. Is that m because let me tell you now. So Vicious Syndrome can cause psychosis anxiety and depression and all those things if you activate the nestles nervous system and if you have she added exposure. She has nut allergy so she ate something with a nudge yet an afflicted reaction and after the antic reaction a week later she gets anxiety. So is it M S. Is it just that the line is gone or is it m but the infection that we treated not gone persistent and I have to use my clinical judgment? No look at her lapse. I'm going to say okay we're GONNA get gen-x at that does tend to be my favorite lab so cannot pulse there because Jenex now has a whole menu of live. Which ones do you use? Do you just use your western blot to use their protein. Camaro shimmer whatever that's called where they put all the proteins together. What do you use so what I've been using because I feel like it really covers the bases but is extremely expensive. I will say though that in the last few months I've had patients who are telling me that their chooses covering a good portion of it now so that's a relief but they have this panel called tick-borne Disease Panel six.

activation syndrome New York Nassau Activation Syndrome Centra Germany lactation syndrome Chronic Johns Hopkins tick-borne Disease tate Neil Nathan assault Bartonella histamine lyme Celtics TRAUMAS Zaidi
"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

12:29 min | 9 months ago

"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Here we go. Hi thanks for having me. You're very welcome. I'm so happy to be here. We're going to have a great discussion about mass cells and lyme disease and mold than IV treatments and Juror. Kinda three hundred sixty degree way of looking at patients and treating them very interested to talk to you about that. I'm happy to tell you all about my approach and how I see these very complex complex patients that that need a lot of a lot of attention and they are not getting it from the medical establishment. As far as I can see so. Do you get referrals. Or how do people find you? A good question A little bit of a few different things. I speak a lot. I'm out there in the community and around the country even rela world speaking all over the place and You know Either patients were clinicians. Who see me? Connect with me said patients to me and I have a. I have a big referral base in my actual patients. You know the patients who have been seeing me entrust me with the care of either themselves or their family members and I'm so fortunate to have the patients who who believe in me and want me to help their other family members of their other friends or neighbors etc so it's You know it's a it's a it's a it's a big process and But I'm really fortunate to have that that's awesome. I like to say that lyme disease is diagnosed over the backyard fence. It's neighbor-to-neighbor St- still. Unfortunately now how did your practice become aware of lyme disease because not every physician is i? Don't WANNA say woke but woke to lyme disease now. I know well you know it's an interesting story of if I if I could share it. It's it's as I look back on experience. I know that things happen for reason. I know I was stern place of certain time and I needed this was meant to be. You know I I was speaking out other conference so I started. Sort OF BACKTRACK. A little bit. I was with Practicing medicine in a large multispecialty practice in Westchester County. New York and I was You know what I was seeing was that I was not helping patients the way I really thought they deserve to be helped and what I was seeing is that they had things that I couldn't always figure out with the tools that I had and so I would start digging in digging and digging and eventually realized that I needed to be on my own and I needed to do it in a way that would Would help more people and so I started. I called it an integrative medicine practice and and I'm located in Westchester County New York which is really a hotbed for lime disease right so I had patients of course I had a few that I was treating actively at that time That I started the practice. But I didn't appreciate the epidemic. That was going on right next to me right under my feet until I was speaking on a conference with. I consider him the world's expert in lyme disease which Horowitz and he was speaking on lime and I was speaking on my topic at this conference and I listened to him and hills knowles and I thought. Oh Wow this is big. But I don't know I don't know if this is what I missing and you know he came over. We talked about to hear my practice. And I said you know that Integrative I was doing that and he asked me how you know how Sean I was seeing. He was assuming that in Armonk New York Westchester County. I was seeing a lot of wine and I said no I have a few cases. I'll never forget the way. He said he doesn't forget it either. He looked at visa. No you don't I don't know you have a lot of cases you're just you're not. You're not you're not picking it up and I'm thinking but I was. I'm asking these questions that I am being. You know really open ended with everything trying to get the history and the questionnaires I'm using. And what am I missing? And you're very quickly. I mean with a two weeks. I realized what I was what was happening. And as what were you missing missing chronic tick borne diseases and at what goes ahead. A nation already had a code and I see decode something else. You weren't going back. We'll know now I was before I mean is they would come in. I'll give you an example in their little tired. They're not functioning. The way they need to their thyroid is off. The adrenals are off. The hormones are off. Okay and I look at that and as an integrative slash functional medicine doctor I know what to do. I'd have got issues right so working on the gut. I'm working on the adrenals. I'm working on the thyroid. I'm trying to put this together right but I haven't gone to the root. Why are the adrenals that why? Why is the thyroid that way right and you blame it on? You know if it's a woman in who has young kid you blame it on the kids you blame it on sweep you blame it on the Diet right so I did all that and emphasised. Sometimes you clean up the Diet. Clean up the gut their immune system gets better and better and you know and you. Maybe they are on a little thyroid and they back and they say okay. You know that that did it and you feel like you know you've been really successful with that patient but there were others you'd hope a little and then something you're missing. There's something else. They're still not better. They're still not where they need to be And that's those are the cases I would come back in and say I don't know now I'm having this weird Ringing in my ears the Tinnitus is now. We're a little dizzy. And then I and then a light bulb. The light bulb goes off. And once you see it you can't unsee it and so then. It becomes clear that that by former patients that I was treating other things probably had underlined performances as the as the trigger. Some of them where it's active and has retreated in some of the maybe. It's not the disease that has to be treated right now but you need to understand why it happened and you treat the consequences. It depends on each patient. But that's really what happened in as the new patients coming in and as they saw that I was in tune to this you know then it snowballs snowballs. Everyone knows now that that that's my specialty that I that I can identify diagnose and treat diseases so before you came the neighborhood lime doctor and you would just. I call a through the looking glass right now. You can see how much of your practice became lime. Instantly that'd before other referrals started just flooding in. So let's say I go from five or ten percent right a few cases to forty percents probably in. I don't know three months. And then seventy percents in a year. And I saw Richard Horowitz a year or two later after the conference and I went up to him and I said remember what you said and that's why I had to say. He looked at me smiled. He's an I remember. What do you think in I said Oh my goodness I think? Seventy percent of my patients have line disease or work or related to boycott infection and And he said Yup you got it going. Yeah we we like to say here on the show. That lime covers anything. That type of infection stealth infection. Because I mean we can spend hours just listing. Every time we speak from physician's point of view it's important to distinguish but when we say lime you could feel comfortable tick-borne infection and maybe a few other things to thank you. I'm glad to hear that because I think of line is an umbrella term due to be official. Of course you know Borelli has lime and for Nelson thing and there are some things to distinguish you know when I when I have to during this conversation. I'll say this Nello related. You know thing but generally speaking yeah. I think that's a good way of looking at it. It really tweaked me here at upstate. Medical they put out a press release about that two months ago. Three months ago saying that we've discovered this new infection. That's worse Than Live. And it's beryllium memo. Thai is like really guys as like what you've been missing all along and now you're covering your rear end saying oh we've discovered this new thing called news. We already know so old news. And they're like wow we're so great It's like you're late to the Party about twenty years now on one side. We have lime on the other side. We have mould kind of in the middle connecting these masol activation. So tell me how you see those three fitting together. So I think it's important to understand that there's there's the environment And that could include infections that are coming in from the environmental it could include Molden micro-toxins and other environmental chemicals. Voc's and then you have the host. You have the person right that has to deal with all that and so some of what we we need to realize that there is a genetic component and then there's something called epigenetics that's the environmental a assault on the DNA basically changing expression. So we have genetics that dictate. How our immune systems work They they give us a risk for autoimmune diseases or risk for cancer or whatever it is you may never get any of those things but if you have the right exposures in the right at the genetic effect you can develop those things. So I always think it's important to understand the the host that is coming from and I think it's important because there are lots of people out there. I believe that if I pulled I always say this if I pull fifty people off the street and bring them into my office or a hundred people are thousand people and I draw blood on them and I do know the best lab out there till detective borne diseases. I would guess that in the area that I'm practicing eighty to ninety percent of them will have a positive something lime burnell but this year looky at a plasma something some of them are not sick. These people are not sick at all. Some of them are sick or are functioning and have little things that common go so they see a regular doctor and some are very ill right. The question is why is that right? That's kind of what I'm spending my career trying to understand. Why are these? Are Some patients so sick? And how do we get them to get better right so I think about the genetics? So in many cases where I see chronic line the severe I see a predisposition early in life for either immune dysregulation of some kind of get frequent strep infections. They get allergies. Are there to the dog through to the cat. There they get a lot of rashes. They have stomach aches. They've been constipated the minute they were born there. Something about the the flavor of their presentation that I in early Asian. I could see that this already..

Richard Horowitz Westchester County New York Armonk New York Westchester Co Tinnitus Voc Sean Molden micro-toxins official assault Borelli cancer Nelson
"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

01:34 min | 9 months ago

"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Soon. Drills are working on the thyroid. I'm I'm trying to put this all together right. I haven't gotten to the root. Why are the adrenals? That Y Y is the thyroid that way right and you blame it on. You know if it's a woman in in who has young kids you blame it on the kids who blame it on not enough sleep you blame it on the Diet right so I did all that and and listen. Sometimes you clean up the died. Clean up the gut their immune system gets better and better join US almost every Thursday and this week Friday on I tunes Alexa and coming soon. Facebook live. We're going to try for Tuesday evening. Not Try for the next live sessions going to be Tuesday evening at eight PM. Yeah next Tuesday on facebook live. We did one episode as a test. Run at turn up pretty well. We're going to see if we can't move everything over depending on our guests to weekly show the live show that we can ask you questions of the guests. I think you're going to really like that format. It's IT'S GONNA be a ton of fun here at London Andrew Radio. We encourage you to fight lyme like a Ninja and think outside the tick you see lime. Disease Causes all kinds of secondary problems and focusing just on killing bugs can lead to diminishing returns for example. If you've ever had the thought that heavy metal toxicity might be blocking your recovery and making you sick. Chances are you could be right. And if that's the case head on over to Lyman. Andrew Radio DOT COM and claim a free. Coupon for the.

facebook London Andrew Radio Andrew Radio Alexa Lyman lyme Disease
"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

15:02 min | 10 months ago

"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"That's where the success is. GonNa lie when it comes to the treatment so all of this research. This amuses is slowly making its way to the top. I would say last year. They were a record number of publications on this and again went back to look to the the primary literature and I found a whole body of this where a lot of this was laid out in other words. This line of research has started but by Nineteen ninety-four stopped and that's because at that point it was decided that this was a disease. You know. Typical bacterial infection. There was no big deal. We didn't need to have any profound measures. They were you know. Even as early as that is an outline of research just went away many of them got out of the field and so the goodness it's still there. I mean it's not like it's not there to go back to refer to and Quebec. Repeat some of those studies with using better equipment. By the way I mean we now have really powerful technology. That would allow us to look at those issues. It all comes down to funding so as usual. That's always right yes. I was falling one researcher. She had published a couple of papers on the T. H. Want teach to differentiation and kind of the timing of that and then all of a sudden her publish shink stopped and tried to find. You know I'm googling this this research peachy and she looked researched. She's in some government entity in the mid West now and and not doing it and just like you said the the whole trace went cold. The whole lime for whatever reason just in the nineties just stopped dead cold right so I want to. Let's let's come back out the rabbit holes was maybe that was not a rabbit hole. Maybe it was this little mouse hole. So what I find in my practice is some practitioner some physicians out there just going straight to the western blot. The kind of bypass the Elisa problem. But that's not a complete solution either and can you help us understand why. That's not perfect either. Because the sensitivity of the Western blot is still the same. It's the specificity. That's increased with the Western blot. So you're still gonNA have the same level false negatives but you're gonNA have a higher specificity so in other words if you get a positive it's apart you know you're more likely that that actually Islam disease but if you get if it doesn't meet the standard don't forget that test is interpreted subjectively So in other words if you get four out of five bands on an Eugene it's negative you get five out of five if positive really so that that's the problem you're not improving the rate of false negatives you will improve decrease the rate of false positives but not the rate of false is and again early. Diagnosis is key to preventing dissemination of bacteria in place is that I. I don't know that I mentioned this once. They are established in two shoes. They are antibiotic tolerant. So antibiotic will no longer treat those infections. And that's why you know that this issues with long-term out -biotics weather use them or not i. I think it's just an area of contention where there are two camps so far apart when the reality is kind of in the middle. I think that anybody should be used judiciously. In case went flares happen. People should be back on those antibiotics but really the bacteria are tolerant. So it doesn't matter the ideas. Just you know turned down the problem for a while but if it comes back then you know it. Re-treatment would be necessary. And that's all lost in the argument of you know the argument over long term. Antibiotics do work versus long term. Antibiotics don't work and unfortunately that's a fight between infectious disease medicine. And everybody else on earth because they are the keepers of antibiotics. Yes we won't. Early diagnosis is the key is this is what we should be focusing on and we need a diagnostic test that will enable that. And that's what the research is headed for. I hope I mean I to believe that it is so now. So let's just wrap up the western blot in Nice little bow. So you're saying that. The Western blot is also about a fifty percents of the sensitive sensitive. Right so if you've got fifty percent going into the Elisa that fifty percent sensitive on the western blot you could be missing a lot more if you do the math right. So that's okay. So that's their other tests out there and some of them are just other Western blots some of them were were trying to track down to the R. A. Of the bugs of the PR type tests. So what do you think is out there? And it's okay with me if you name labs or you don't have to agnostic on that. I'd love for you to be able to do that. But if you don't feel comfortable that's also give you an out there like what so where where should a person? Let's say we have unlimited funds? We just got. We just won the lottery. So money isn't an issue. What tests and where should we go? Well I'm going to start with genetics lab Not a not endorsing them. I'm just saying the reason why there. They do the western blot. They do allies that they do the standard testing but what makes their test. Different is that they use. They interpret the tasks so that the two antibody bands that the CDC has removed from the test which happened to be the two most specific You know protein. Antibodies that there are the CDC does not include those I- gen-x does and so you hear this. Oh while the trespasser for it's like no because they include those two bands and I also WANNA add McKay with that lab something that really annoys me greatly when I hear anybody say well. My doctor says that lab is a fake lab that they you know they they give bad results and all that so in New York State near State has the clinical laboratory evaluation program clap so to ought to be able for physician to order a test. That test has to be licensed through club. So there is a whole certification process that that you have to go. This is only near upstate. By the way okay. So all there there's federal agencies that are in charge of this clear right you might have Rabat. Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act and others so in other words the. Us government is honest but and your state has special standard that labs have to you know. It's a WHO that lasts. Have to jump through if they want to offer their tests nor state. So what I want to say about. Gen-x is that Western blot. There Elisa is clap licensed in near State so if anybody has issues with the rate of positive or negative test results. They need to talk to near State Department of Health about that. Because they certify. That test needs their standards. So you know I. It just really annoys me when people say well. Nobody would take my gen-x results because of they you know they say it's the lab is that that is not correct and I try to make that point to everyone Just that they can tell their physician say look it up. Here's the clip license. Here's the you know. How do you dispute now? That they won't but how do you do that? So that is the next red herring. Yes yes so that would be if you know as far as the highest standard for the two tier serology. I would say that would be. That is certainly a place to go and by the way insurance does cover that you. You're it's just not something that you know another word you have to be reimbursed for it you pay for your insurance does reimbursed for that test so that's all stuff that doesn't seem to be out there in the general medical round. Okay so let's let's positive for a second so we're just talking about agenda. Two Tier Elisa Western blot. They've added in two extra bands. So there's looking at twelve antigens instead of ten and these are more specific for line. So it's a it's a more sensitive tests because it's picking up these other two two yes insider and but when you look on their menu they have about it. Looks like a hundred different tests for lyme disease. They and not all not all passed the New York state. That is correct. So what else is past interstate? Is there a test for tick borne relapsing fever? Which is Another relapsing fever is purely my motto. Which is Were realizing that that's here. It's been here a lot of people. may more people might have it then. was previously thought. But there hasn't been a great test for that because Berlin Mamata live does not get picked up by the two serology so now identified also has a test for T. R. F. which I think is a superb. An additive that tests should be done at the same time. That lime has done for that very reason. Because the ticks are positive for brilliant mind Matola and near State Don't know about other states but New York state I do know that so therefore guess what you know what looks like lyme disease might be brilliant. Matola disease like what? The test won't pick that up and so again. That person gets not diagnosed goes down the rabbit hole of late. Diagnosis equals bacteria. Disseminating equals Chronic inflammation Without right if you don't get early treatment so that is just another aspect of that and then you'd asked about other types of tests. I really think the need is for a direct diagnostic test on the problem. Is Bacteria at the bloods. The sample of choice which would be the easiest to get is of course of blood sample right. Everybody knows that every once in a while you gotTa Roll Your Sleep. Have a needle stuck in your arm and have long taken for blood tests So but the issue is the bacteria do not so the sparky's themselves are not in the blood for very long because the temperature of our blood is actually not conducive to their growth so their goal is to get out of the blood and into tissues as quick as they can. So that's why. Pcr is effective early in the disease which is kind of interesting because as an early test PCR has similar sensitivity to Elisa. So why wouldn't you do For those for diagnosis of those early cases But not everybody's GONNA THEY'RE NOT GONNA pick it up because again you you draw. You know five milliliters of lot if the bacteria are in also middle bill leading. You're not going to pick up the reaction So there are other tests like t cell proliferation essays which I think the name of that test alley spot those tests again. Before nineteen ninety-five there are the republication. Saying this is. This is a good way to go. Because the T. cells looking at t cell activation T. cells get activated before brilliant. Tells them you know. Find the activated. Just don't tell cells what to do so that that's very interesting. 'cause that those tests are available I actually don't know which loves do that here. In the United States I know that in Europe. That's a test. That's more widely performed You know there. There's the urine capture which is to detect So urine samples us which is another by fluid. That's not that difficult to collect Which captures antigens from Barilla's and others evacuated inner blonde get all that gets processed in of course everything in your body out through your kidneys not everything but you know what I mean off. And they can detect the antigen in urine and that was You know the series lab was doing that for a time and now that they've woman into the research realm and kind of out of the clinical aspects of that and they're trying to license the test to other places that appears to be about `sensitive as PR so once again sent meaning. You know we have not really gotten above that fifty fifty mark for any of you right. The one study that was done. Where all of these things were looked at in a comprehensive way in fact the title of Oracle. Was You know two year review of of a two year study of all of the different tests? What they found was that you could get the sensitivity up to like seventy percent if you did three things at the same time so if you did they elisa with a PR and culture if you did all three of those the sensitivity eight was up to seventy percent. This is serum blood right now so but the piping. How realistic is that in a clinical setting? Which you know right. So how realistic is somebody? Who's going to or all three of those tests and more importantly how realistic is the? The insurance company is going to pay for all three of those tests. Because they will say. This is redundant. There's no need for three tests to diagnose disease so therefore we're not gonna pay for that which means the patients have to pay or not and any and then it's still seventy percent so three out of ten or still gonNA be Thirty percent will go on to develop long term illness. Oh we're still talking about this. Forty Day window correct. Yes yes that's the that's just the absolute brutal part of this. It's right it's actually amazing. Anybody test positive while you know a lot of people don't I know I know that's the problem and then make developed chronic disease symptoms and nobody thinks to talk about that because anybody's aren't produced in the first hour. You're infected. They can take. What is it for seven days or even longer to get enough quantity to be to be picked up. So what's what's the timeline on that while and that's unknown because in the studies on Animals Nanyang primates and mice. The responses in the exact worrying is slow and Herodotus slow meaning and this is something that's a noted I mean it's not like.

New York lyme disease bloods Us relapsing fever CDC Quebec State Department of Health researcher T. H. Want Chronic inflammation Eugene Rabat McKay Europe Matola Barilla Berlin Oracle
"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

02:51 min | 10 months ago

"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Or my dreaming that that's right. Yeah but we really able to talk for briefly and what I recall for last conversations is that you're very interested in the status of testing about lyme disease and the other critters that come along with it and around it and I would love for this to be an in-depth cut almost to`real for people just to get a good solid foundation. You're you're the triple threat in the line world you're a rockstar. I wish you know you really are you. There's there's no doubt about it. There are other people in individual niches. That may have more knowledge. But you're breadth of knowledge and your personal involvement with lime disease and on the policy. Side too is. There's nobody out there. There really isn't it's so you're you're a treasure and I treasure you. Well thank you. Mccaffrey shape that so every once in a while I get to the point where all right. I've done what I can and you know. The ball is rolling. So hopefully it'll roll all away the rest of the way you know. I think we're almost at the top of the hill and you know it has to come down the other side. It's really medicine at this point that needs to catch up You know I really believe. There's no science. They're just that that you know people get stuck on the issues of antibiotics of whether or not using -biotics weather not long-term Balasore Effective. And you know they are and they aren't. They worked for some. And they don't for others and what we need to do is investigate for those that. It doesn't work for instead of assuming it's a one-size-fits-all cure you know. And so hopefully that. I really feel that once people once. It's more clear who has the disease. Who doesn't you know the all this will open up a little bit broader. I hope I mean at is my sincere hope. Plus one over here. I was just listening to a podcast. Peter podcast the driver. You're familiar with that at all. No not that one now. Anyway so he was talking with basically a weight loss specialist a about weight loss and they were getting into. You know what's the Best I love of Blah and they started talking about fina types right in terms of different kind of how people react to different weight loss programs and calorie restriction and carbohydrate restriction or fat restriction in. What way to go. And they're in the same boat in that they feel there is no one size. Fits all.

lyme disease Blah Mccaffrey Peter
"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

14:45 min | 11 months ago

"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"And connect thank you down and chat for a minute. Thank you so much for being here today I am so I'm so grateful I think We met for the first time on the phone a few months back. And you absolutely wild me in those conversations spent we spent so much time talking about out what it would be important for this room to here and you know we are in New York City we are in an extraordinarily diverse beautiful city were also in with categorized as a lime endemic area. which is what you were talking about? I want to go back to the start of your your presentation. I want to talk about the invisible lime disease in the south. Can you talk to me about the the The endemic zone. I and Y Y you feel Beyond you know these these few slides why you feel that that that hasn't reached the level of awareness. That that you it feels important but we've gone to the factors. Don't really make a difference so one thing that sticks out and I could suggest best as that. The South is the home of the CDC and that is where the conversations about who's sick and who's well again do we have an example of what spirit medicine looks like coming out of the CDC. A template was ridden back in the forties with the experiment. Call to ski experiment and the Spirit Keep Disease in this instance was syphilis and in the writing of that historical historical journey with the CDC or the Department of Health and Human Services was a group of people with spiritual disease. Who We're we're at twenty five? The subjects of an experiment began like this one is there. You're a natural history that we can record by doing this experiment on spiritual patients and that decision was made. Yes we will proceed with that and already having a four hundred year documented history of untreated syphilis in the room for them to review then in a year into the study. There was a second report. This was a two thousand person case control study and that study and went on to say well whatever you do. Arsenic would probably accelerate used mildly and intimately accelerate the death of civilization and by twenty to thirty percent and there were another twenty years of using arsenic aggressively in this population. So then there was the penicillin that emerged later in the study that would have cured syphilis and in an experiment that was supposed to be associated with an option to treat. They weren't treated with Penicillin Salon after the Twentieth Year of the study. They were treated with the CBO. So this is the CDC handling in the south of syphilis a spirit feerick disease and I think that is a way of understanding why lime disease is is currently and Sal thank thank you thank you Going into the way that you practice. I'm I'm wondering if you can talk about the experience of actually going into a patient's home and going into going into their environment and making connections. We talked about this on the phone. I actually. I really loved this. The way that you're able to make connections. That wouldn't make necessarily in your office but help your diagnosis. So the Daniel Group began as mobile practice. Only and what that meant was entering space We live in the south. That is both sick and end sweaty so there are water intrusions and trouble with environmental exposures they take the form of mold and mycotoxin illness and that layered on top of line became one of the key factors that we discovered was keeping people sick and putting together a network of professionals to help them to understand the importance of that was very eye-opening part of our first years with the practice. I I think the food and the social habits came second. Nobody wants the doctor to walk in. And look the alcohol supply and to make assessments or your comments. But I think that it's tailing when the children have pink desserts and the adults are snacking on sweets At the table during the interview it was an opportunity to have a conversation and to do some work around how southeast which we know the southeast's yeah there was another thing. I think that the idea of one medicine which is zoonotic disease and the way we interface with animals. The South is a place that hunts and often in poor southerners that food is eat and the number of times that we talk about way to prepare venison. What animal is unacceptable? A six month old puppy or kitty is probably not a great animal to have in the home of an ls in stage. Line patient because we have the immune issues and those animals being factors it was. The story is always the tiger shark the catches the eye. But it's cute little kittens puppies. Please put us at risk. When we're talking about lyme disease now I want to? I want to answer. Ask One of the questions from the audience. I knew this was going to happen happen. I lost my glasses a couple of weeks ago and so I'm really having a hard time reading the confidence monitor so forgive me. So how effective are are deep products and protecting us Do you had you have experience with this. Well I can go on the the price of Eyelids that we get some coverage it's GonNa depend on how long between the intervals that we apply it. We have a lot out of new technology out there. That's not just chemicals For those of you. Who aren't aware there's rhino skin? which is a fabric where you're not exposed to chemicals that can protect you from most bites except Hornet the WAAS and they're very hot so some uh-huh difficulty implementing that in the southeast but up here probably would be a great idea? can go on the fabric and their companies companies out there that do a great job with multiple wash fabrics. That can be used so that you're not having to apply it regularly What type of infections do you see in your practice? And this is something that that you pay attention to that you're aware of so yes the co-infections co-infections and there are a broader cross section of CO infections in the southeast than what we're doing with in the the rest of the country although as for that they're all about the same so we see the Beezer we see the Bartonella re dealing more with Tula Ramia malaria and it's a rising vector. All over the country. I think it's about the same. We see early kids. The number one co-infection in southeast. That's the one that tests positive the most often but the testing in the suppression of one species expression in the testing when another one is present is all a part of this very dynamic dynamic reporting process with the tests so so earlier this the established species in south as dominant co-infection. But when you look at all of the areas there's a broader number in the southeast and can you talk to me about as as you work with these with your patients and in these rural communities do it has to do much educating about lyme disease in about these vector-borne illnesses or are people generally aware two thousand fifteen. When I was figuring out what would align practice like? I spent a time as the local physician in traveling around the state of Georgia working in community health care centers. These are gap keeps since centers that help to prevent medical desert's so this is the Horace Squadron of station and what I saw was sick sick people bowl who were sick in very classic ways with lime disease that were MIS categorized so sarcoidosis are coit Lupus muff multiple sclerosis. Lots and lots of steroids are antibiotic. Choices were amoxicillin doxycycline. Fourteen days on a good day two days on an average day and I don't believe in lines disease most days. That's a challenge. That's challenge and when your choice is Wally World Antibiotic Antibiotic List in Two Thousand Fifteen had seven options. Wally world in two thousand nineteen has one option. But we still. You'll have an opportunity to treat line with Zoloft prednisone and now hell doll. Sara Quel Zyprexa in the healthcare centers. When they can't sleep and they're sixteen or fifteen? What does that look like? A twenty one applying for a job without without your teeth in rural America. Where are you going to be thirty? Like question What what do you think uh of the the term post treatment lyme disease syndrome? I know this gets a lot of pushback around and this is coming from somebody who's naive to the space in a a lot of different ways I will freely admit but to me the idea of PT LDS and chronic lyme and They start to sound the same. And I'm wondering It's not always creamy. Why there's an importance in the distinction and please correct educate me? I don't night so Post treatment line assumes that there is a way of treating line that is time center and that timing is dictated by a group of scientists or the physicians pen on the paper and what it usually represents dances and uncoupling of your healing and the interval that you're actually going to have access to the possibility of healing with therapeutic tools that requires I a prescription post treatment. Lime is one of the hot words in research literature. That really really keeps. The South. Sick intimacy is another one of those really powerful words because what does India have when you got it from your Mama. Endemic means the areas of the country. There were people live. That are acknowledged. Sick what would that have to do if your mother gave birth to you New Jersey. You found yourself growing up sick Alabama so when research scientists put post treatment lyme disease patients acknowledged with lime disease living in areas. Where there ticks? Who made them sick? You have eliminated the south when you go on to talk about intimacy Southern tick associated rash illness in the ways that Discounting of the human experience experience when you say most of the symptoms will resolve. How many people have lime disease in the room? Think where did all of your symptoms go away where you WanNa knucklehead writing in their report that your symptoms went away. When did that happen? Was it after you stop sweating in the headache resolved resolved or was it okay after you were having the neurologic tingling and you're jerking and twitching or wasn't when the headaches finally stopped how about this one when you finally got all of the memory you had back to the point where you first described yourself as sick. When did that happen in the course because when we read the medical literature in scientists doctors are trying to meet in these? NIH publications locations every time. A researcher puts on that paper and other symptoms resolved. I think to myself oh the fragility came back. Maybe all their hair wasn't there period. They focused on because they asked for about twelve months. Eighteen months twenty four months. What about three years later? When they were told to have breast cancer or twenty years later when they were sitting in their diaper when they should have been in a boardroom? Meeting the peak of their career post treatment line is part of that process. We really need to stop it. What really struck me was when Dr Barnwell told the story of the difference between her patients in Atlanta and her patients in northern Virginia? And how how..

CDC syphilis New York City Department of Health and Human headache NIH Penicillin Salon penicillin Tula Ramia CBO researcher Daniel Group Sara Quel Zyprexa America New Jersey lyme Virginia prednisone Dr Barnwell
"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

14:45 min | 11 months ago

"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"And connect thank you down and chat for a minute. Thank you so much for being here today I am so I'm so grateful I think We met for the first time on the phone a few months back. And you absolutely wild me in those conversations spent we spent so much time talking about out what it would be important for this room to here and you know we are in New York City we are in an extraordinarily diverse beautiful city were also in with categorized as a lime endemic area. which is what you were talking about? I want to go back to the start of your your presentation. I want to talk about the invisible lime disease in the south. Can you talk to me about the the The endemic zone. I and Y Y you feel Beyond you know these these few slides why you feel that that that hasn't reached the level of awareness. That that you it feels important but we've gone to the factors. Don't really make a difference so one thing that sticks out and I could suggest best as that. The South is the home of the CDC and that is where the conversations about who's sick and who's well again do we have an example of what spirit medicine looks like coming out of the CDC. A template was ridden back in the forties with the experiment. Call to ski experiment and the Spirit Keep Disease in this instance was syphilis and in the writing of that historical historical journey with the CDC or the Department of Health and Human Services was a group of people with spiritual disease. Who We're we're at twenty five? The subjects of an experiment began like this one is there. You're a natural history that we can record by doing this experiment on spiritual patients and that decision was made. Yes we will proceed with that and already having a four hundred year documented history of untreated syphilis in the room for them to review then in a year into the study. There was a second report. This was a two thousand person case control study and that study and went on to say well whatever you do. Arsenic would probably accelerate used mildly and intimately accelerate the death of civilization and by twenty to thirty percent and there were another twenty years of using arsenic aggressively in this population. So then there was the penicillin that emerged later in the study that would have cured syphilis and in an experiment that was supposed to be associated with an option to treat. They weren't treated with Penicillin Salon after the Twentieth Year of the study. They were treated with the CBO. So this is the CDC handling in the south of syphilis a spirit feerick disease and I think that is a way of understanding why lime disease is is currently and Sal thank thank you thank you Going into the way that you practice. I'm I'm wondering if you can talk about the experience of actually going into a patient's home and going into going into their environment and making connections. We talked about this on the phone. I actually. I really loved this. The way that you're able to make connections. That wouldn't make necessarily in your office but help your diagnosis. So the Daniel Group began as mobile practice. Only and what that meant was entering space We live in the south. That is both sick and end sweaty so there are water intrusions and trouble with environmental exposures they take the form of mold and mycotoxin illness and that layered on top of line became one of the key factors that we discovered was keeping people sick and putting together a network of professionals to help them to understand the importance of that was very eye-opening part of our first years with the practice. I I think the food and the social habits came second. Nobody wants the doctor to walk in. And look the alcohol supply and to make assessments or your comments. But I think that it's tailing when the children have pink desserts and the adults are snacking on sweets At the table during the interview it was an opportunity to have a conversation and to do some work around how southeast which we know the southeast's yeah there was another thing. I think that the idea of one medicine which is zoonotic disease and the way we interface with animals. The South is a place that hunts and often in poor southerners that food is eat and the number of times that we talk about way to prepare venison. What animal is unacceptable? A six month old puppy or kitty is probably not a great animal to have in the home of an ls in stage. Line patient because we have the immune issues and those animals being factors it was. The story is always the tiger shark the catches the eye. But it's cute little kittens puppies. Please put us at risk. When we're talking about lyme disease now I want to? I want to answer. Ask One of the questions from the audience. I knew this was going to happen happen. I lost my glasses a couple of weeks ago and so I'm really having a hard time reading the confidence monitor so forgive me. So how effective are are deep products and protecting us Do you had you have experience with this. Well I can go on the the price of Eyelids that we get some coverage it's GonNa depend on how long between the intervals that we apply it. We have a lot out of new technology out there. That's not just chemicals For those of you. Who aren't aware there's rhino skin? which is a fabric where you're not exposed to chemicals that can protect you from most bites except Hornet the WAAS and they're very hot so some uh-huh difficulty implementing that in the southeast but up here probably would be a great idea? can go on the fabric and their companies companies out there that do a great job with multiple wash fabrics. That can be used so that you're not having to apply it regularly What type of infections do you see in your practice? And this is something that that you pay attention to that you're aware of so yes the co-infections co-infections and there are a broader cross section of CO infections in the southeast than what we're doing with in the the rest of the country although as for that they're all about the same so we see the Beezer we see the Bartonella re dealing more with Tula Ramia malaria and it's a rising vector. All over the country. I think it's about the same. We see early kids. The number one co-infection in southeast. That's the one that tests positive the most often but the testing in the suppression of one species expression in the testing when another one is present is all a part of this very dynamic dynamic reporting process with the tests so so earlier this the established species in south as dominant co-infection. But when you look at all of the areas there's a broader number in the southeast and can you talk to me about as as you work with these with your patients and in these rural communities do it has to do much educating about lyme disease in about these vector-borne illnesses or are people generally aware two thousand fifteen. When I was figuring out what would align practice like? I spent a time as the local physician in traveling around the state of Georgia working in community health care centers. These are gap keeps since centers that help to prevent medical desert's so this is the Horace Squadron of station and what I saw was sick sick people bowl who were sick in very classic ways with lime disease that were MIS categorized so sarcoidosis are coit Lupus muff multiple sclerosis. Lots and lots of steroids are antibiotic. Choices were amoxicillin doxycycline. Fourteen days on a good day two days on an average day and I don't believe in lines disease most days. That's a challenge. That's challenge and when your choice is Wally World Antibiotic Antibiotic List in Two Thousand Fifteen had seven options. Wally world in two thousand nineteen has one option. But we still. You'll have an opportunity to treat line with Zoloft prednisone and now hell doll. Sara Quel Zyprexa in the healthcare centers. When they can't sleep and they're sixteen or fifteen? What does that look like? A twenty one applying for a job without without your teeth in rural America. Where are you going to be thirty? Like question What what do you think uh of the the term post treatment lyme disease syndrome? I know this gets a lot of pushback around and this is coming from somebody who's naive to the space in a a lot of different ways I will freely admit but to me the idea of PT LDS and chronic lyme and They start to sound the same. And I'm wondering It's not always creamy. Why there's an importance in the distinction and please correct educate me? I don't night so Post treatment line assumes that there is a way of treating line that is time center and that timing is dictated by a group of scientists or the physicians pen on the paper and what it usually represents dances and uncoupling of your healing and the interval that you're actually going to have access to the possibility of healing with therapeutic tools that requires I a prescription post treatment. Lime is one of the hot words in research literature. That really really keeps. The South. Sick intimacy is another one of those really powerful words because what does India have when you got it from your Mama. Endemic means the areas of the country. There were people live. That are acknowledged. Sick what would that have to do if your mother gave birth to you New Jersey. You found yourself growing up sick Alabama so when research scientists put post treatment lyme disease patients acknowledged with lime disease living in areas. Where there ticks? Who made them sick? You have eliminated the south when you go on to talk about intimacy Southern tick associated rash illness in the ways that Discounting of the human experience experience when you say most of the symptoms will resolve. How many people have lime disease in the room? Think where did all of your symptoms go away where you WanNa knucklehead writing in their report that your symptoms went away. When did that happen? Was it after you stop sweating in the headache resolved resolved or was it okay after you were having the neurologic tingling and you're jerking and twitching or wasn't when the headaches finally stopped how about this one when you finally got all of the memory you had back to the point where you first described yourself as sick. When did that happen in the course because when we read the medical literature in scientists doctors are trying to meet in these? NIH publications locations every time. A researcher puts on that paper and other symptoms resolved. I think to myself oh the fragility came back. Maybe all their hair wasn't there period. They focused on because they asked for about twelve months. Eighteen months twenty four months. What about three years later? When they were told to have breast cancer or twenty years later when they were sitting in their diaper when they should have been in a boardroom? Meeting the peak of their career post treatment line is part of that process. We really need to stop it. What really struck me was when Dr Barnwell told the story of the difference between her patients in Atlanta and her patients in northern Virginia? And how how..

CDC syphilis New York City Department of Health and Human headache NIH Penicillin Salon penicillin Tula Ramia CBO researcher Daniel Group Sara Quel Zyprexa America New Jersey lyme Virginia prednisone Dr Barnwell
"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

14:45 min | 11 months ago

"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"And connect thank you down and chat for a minute. Thank you so much for being here today I am so I'm so grateful I think We met for the first time on the phone a few months back. And you absolutely wild me in those conversations spent we spent so much time talking about out what it would be important for this room to here and you know we are in New York City we are in an extraordinarily diverse beautiful city were also in with categorized as a lime endemic area. which is what you were talking about? I want to go back to the start of your your presentation. I want to talk about the invisible lime disease in the south. Can you talk to me about the the The endemic zone. I and Y Y you feel Beyond you know these these few slides why you feel that that that hasn't reached the level of awareness. That that you it feels important but we've gone to the factors. Don't really make a difference so one thing that sticks out and I could suggest best as that. The South is the home of the CDC and that is where the conversations about who's sick and who's well again do we have an example of what spirit medicine looks like coming out of the CDC. A template was ridden back in the forties with the experiment. Call to ski experiment and the Spirit Keep Disease in this instance was syphilis and in the writing of that historical historical journey with the CDC or the Department of Health and Human Services was a group of people with spiritual disease. Who We're we're at twenty five? The subjects of an experiment began like this one is there. You're a natural history that we can record by doing this experiment on spiritual patients and that decision was made. Yes we will proceed with that and already having a four hundred year documented history of untreated syphilis in the room for them to review then in a year into the study. There was a second report. This was a two thousand person case control study and that study and went on to say well whatever you do. Arsenic would probably accelerate used mildly and intimately accelerate the death of civilization and by twenty to thirty percent and there were another twenty years of using arsenic aggressively in this population. So then there was the penicillin that emerged later in the study that would have cured syphilis and in an experiment that was supposed to be associated with an option to treat. They weren't treated with Penicillin Salon after the Twentieth Year of the study. They were treated with the CBO. So this is the CDC handling in the south of syphilis a spirit feerick disease and I think that is a way of understanding why lime disease is is currently and Sal thank thank you thank you Going into the way that you practice. I'm I'm wondering if you can talk about the experience of actually going into a patient's home and going into going into their environment and making connections. We talked about this on the phone. I actually. I really loved this. The way that you're able to make connections. That wouldn't make necessarily in your office but help your diagnosis. So the Daniel Group began as mobile practice. Only and what that meant was entering space We live in the south. That is both sick and end sweaty so there are water intrusions and trouble with environmental exposures they take the form of mold and mycotoxin illness and that layered on top of line became one of the key factors that we discovered was keeping people sick and putting together a network of professionals to help them to understand the importance of that was very eye-opening part of our first years with the practice. I I think the food and the social habits came second. Nobody wants the doctor to walk in. And look the alcohol supply and to make assessments or your comments. But I think that it's tailing when the children have pink desserts and the adults are snacking on sweets At the table during the interview it was an opportunity to have a conversation and to do some work around how southeast which we know the southeast's yeah there was another thing. I think that the idea of one medicine which is zoonotic disease and the way we interface with animals. The South is a place that hunts and often in poor southerners that food is eat and the number of times that we talk about way to prepare venison. What animal is unacceptable? A six month old puppy or kitty is probably not a great animal to have in the home of an ls in stage. Line patient because we have the immune issues and those animals being factors it was. The story is always the tiger shark the catches the eye. But it's cute little kittens puppies. Please put us at risk. When we're talking about lyme disease now I want to? I want to answer. Ask One of the questions from the audience. I knew this was going to happen happen. I lost my glasses a couple of weeks ago and so I'm really having a hard time reading the confidence monitor so forgive me. So how effective are are deep products and protecting us Do you had you have experience with this. Well I can go on the the price of Eyelids that we get some coverage it's GonNa depend on how long between the intervals that we apply it. We have a lot out of new technology out there. That's not just chemicals For those of you. Who aren't aware there's rhino skin? which is a fabric where you're not exposed to chemicals that can protect you from most bites except Hornet the WAAS and they're very hot so some uh-huh difficulty implementing that in the southeast but up here probably would be a great idea? can go on the fabric and their companies companies out there that do a great job with multiple wash fabrics. That can be used so that you're not having to apply it regularly What type of infections do you see in your practice? And this is something that that you pay attention to that you're aware of so yes the co-infections co-infections and there are a broader cross section of CO infections in the southeast than what we're doing with in the the rest of the country although as for that they're all about the same so we see the Beezer we see the Bartonella re dealing more with Tula Ramia malaria and it's a rising vector. All over the country. I think it's about the same. We see early kids. The number one co-infection in southeast. That's the one that tests positive the most often but the testing in the suppression of one species expression in the testing when another one is present is all a part of this very dynamic dynamic reporting process with the tests so so earlier this the established species in south as dominant co-infection. But when you look at all of the areas there's a broader number in the southeast and can you talk to me about as as you work with these with your patients and in these rural communities do it has to do much educating about lyme disease in about these vector-borne illnesses or are people generally aware two thousand fifteen. When I was figuring out what would align practice like? I spent a time as the local physician in traveling around the state of Georgia working in community health care centers. These are gap keeps since centers that help to prevent medical desert's so this is the Horace Squadron of station and what I saw was sick sick people bowl who were sick in very classic ways with lime disease that were MIS categorized so sarcoidosis are coit Lupus muff multiple sclerosis. Lots and lots of steroids are antibiotic. Choices were amoxicillin doxycycline. Fourteen days on a good day two days on an average day and I don't believe in lines disease most days. That's a challenge. That's challenge and when your choice is Wally World Antibiotic Antibiotic List in Two Thousand Fifteen had seven options. Wally world in two thousand nineteen has one option. But we still. You'll have an opportunity to treat line with Zoloft prednisone and now hell doll. Sara Quel Zyprexa in the healthcare centers. When they can't sleep and they're sixteen or fifteen? What does that look like? A twenty one applying for a job without without your teeth in rural America. Where are you going to be thirty? Like question What what do you think uh of the the term post treatment lyme disease syndrome? I know this gets a lot of pushback around and this is coming from somebody who's naive to the space in a a lot of different ways I will freely admit but to me the idea of PT LDS and chronic lyme and They start to sound the same. And I'm wondering It's not always creamy. Why there's an importance in the distinction and please correct educate me? I don't night so Post treatment line assumes that there is a way of treating line that is time center and that timing is dictated by a group of scientists or the physicians pen on the paper and what it usually represents dances and uncoupling of your healing and the interval that you're actually going to have access to the possibility of healing with therapeutic tools that requires I a prescription post treatment. Lime is one of the hot words in research literature. That really really keeps. The South. Sick intimacy is another one of those really powerful words because what does India have when you got it from your Mama. Endemic means the areas of the country. There were people live. That are acknowledged. Sick what would that have to do if your mother gave birth to you New Jersey. You found yourself growing up sick Alabama so when research scientists put post treatment lyme disease patients acknowledged with lime disease living in areas. Where there ticks? Who made them sick? You have eliminated the south when you go on to talk about intimacy Southern tick associated rash illness in the ways that Discounting of the human experience experience when you say most of the symptoms will resolve. How many people have lime disease in the room? Think where did all of your symptoms go away where you WanNa knucklehead writing in their report that your symptoms went away. When did that happen? Was it after you stop sweating in the headache resolved resolved or was it okay after you were having the neurologic tingling and you're jerking and twitching or wasn't when the headaches finally stopped how about this one when you finally got all of the memory you had back to the point where you first described yourself as sick. When did that happen in the course because when we read the medical literature in scientists doctors are trying to meet in these? NIH publications locations every time. A researcher puts on that paper and other symptoms resolved. I think to myself oh the fragility came back. Maybe all their hair wasn't there period. They focused on because they asked for about twelve months. Eighteen months twenty four months. What about three years later? When they were told to have breast cancer or twenty years later when they were sitting in their diaper when they should have been in a boardroom? Meeting the peak of their career post treatment line is part of that process. We really need to stop it. What really struck me was when Dr Barnwell told the story of the difference between her patients in Atlanta and her patients in northern Virginia? And how how..

CDC syphilis New York City Department of Health and Human headache NIH Penicillin Salon penicillin Tula Ramia CBO researcher Daniel Group Sara Quel Zyprexa America New Jersey lyme Virginia prednisone Dr Barnwell
"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

16:36 min | 11 months ago

"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"How low and in this episode? You'll learn three main things. The factors that keep lyme disease and other tick borne diseases under reported in the south the difficulties of treating lime disease in the south and and the holistic approach Dr Barnwell advocates to treat people with uh nor misdiagnosed lyme disease thanks Aurora or an big shoutout to all EU lime. Ninjas out there you're the region we have more than half a million downloads. That's exactly we need a woohoo button button and I really appreciate you tuning in and we'd also like to welcome all the new listeners out there. Welcome to lime Ninja Radio. You're now officially a lime injure and as you know lime disease is an international problem it grip listeners. Join you from all over the world like this past week. We've had listeners tune in from Moscow Russia to Minneapolis Minnesota and from Sydney Australia to San Antonio Texas. Thanks Roy Woah and tell us a little bit more about this week's guest not cheesy guest is. She was a speaker at the line mine. So about this week's wchs subject. What's the right word speaker? Just so just say speak. She's just a speaker but not just speaker. She was an amazing speaker. Anyway this is Dr Crystal Barnwell and she has an amazing story to tell about treating lime disease in the southern states. Dr Crystal Barnwell is an integrative physician the clinical director of the Danielle Medical Group in Atlanta Georgia and the treasurer of islands. She focuses her. Clinical expertise on the GUT microbiome autoimmune Nur genitive environmental challenges for clients with complex and chronic illnesses arrived. Here is the line conference presentation by I. Dr Crystal Barnwell Good morning my name is Stockton Crystal. Barnwell honored to be with you here today and I'd like to start off with. The question is lime disease visible in the north and invisible visible in the south greeter. Miracle Take Place then for us to look through each other size for an instant Henry David. Thoreau on this slide. We have a map of the United States from the centers of Disease Control and prevention and each of those dots represents a case of confirmed lime disease looking at this this map. All the cases of sick patients are in the northeast and in that Lake Michigan area the corridor what makes those people's sick and the rest of the country fairly well. Is it a different. It dear dear. That's known to be associated with lyme disease in this country. is the whitetail deer. The south has five species of deer and the heaviest concentration of deer in the United States. Perhaps it's the variety of hosts the small distributors species that pick up these ticks from Taxi deer population and at this time of year mice squirrels chipmunks deliver them to our front door to fight it in our cats but the southeast has the broadest group of destroyers species in the country perhaps it's the beryllium species the defy the western blot testing and. That could be a possibility because there are a large group of really pathogens that create human disease and really Oberdorf ry since ulanda group Strang. Thirty one is where the last forty years of testing testing have centered. The whole conversation about lyme disease perhaps way southern lime disease looks and maybe we lack check that characteristic. Em Rash that everyone's talked about the bulls eye but all of the literature and most of the scientific evidence in this country entry that describes line patients will immediately recapitulate to the idea that less than fifty percent of the patients are reporting Arash rash. So finally maybe it's the ticks and in the northeast the tick is exempt these. He's SCAPULA's the deer tick map on the left lore. Your screen is a description of the tick distribution in this country and this comes from the Centers for Veterinary Veterinary Medicine. In the center of the country. We have a light orange peel region. US people are struggling with one one major species of tick causing human disease. I grew up in Boulder Colorado and I remember as a child not so long ago because as you can see. I'm not very old. I remember walking my dog rex and if we found around one tick tick. We freaked out fast forward now living in this dark region of the country when I take my kids on what with Momo we have four two species that we have to be concerned about four poor Momo. Let's look at this map over here. These are from on some really smart research scientists to Columbia. Who are involved in trying to understanding the environmental factors that are involved in this emergence of tick borne disease? And then this map. We're dealing with infected ticks six where you see white. We don't have a large number of sick ticks. Let's not the south pulling over to the yellow area are the rare take occurrences where ticks are being sampled and sent. And they're testing positive for lime or co-infection illness red zones in the north again these represent where most of the ticks testing very positive. There's an abundance abundance of sick chicks looking at this map it would suggest that these chicks have made a consolidated agreement. We are not going below the Mason. Dixie and there are people who do that in this country. Mix Mason Dixon Line Right. So That's interesting getting. We have a distribution from Maine and Maryland to Michigan. They're traveling we could agree that they're probably moving having a distance but they don't move south and yet who back to our first map. What happened most? The ticks started in the northeast. Sit there distributing their clustering. There's more of them. They're more densely positioned and and we have the aggressive fertility of the south driving. All of the places where these chicks high nobody sick no satistics six primary care you laughing. It began my life in medicine as a primary care. Doctor that was a fifteen year interval of seeing patients in Atlanta Georgia. As I started out in primary care medicine let me give you line. Patients Line researchers an idea of the other side of the stethoscope sitting down in a primary care setting we have the interest of time. How much can we spend with the average patient lesson fifteen minutes money? How quickly do we have to move patients in order to keep the doors open? Then there's the concern of the patients themselves think. Aw Who's acutely ill. There are two types the ones that you hasten to the emergency department they're bleeding or they're missing limbs and then we have the ones who are going to stay in the primary care setting and we're going to do. Some of the work of the coal sneeze the Snot in Rash Nash. That's the First Section of patients we're dealing with. And then we have our chronic ill patients and these are patients present with one two or three systems. You don't get more than three complaints in office visit and it is a question of where they need to be referred assuming they're referred and the referral physician has done the workup and sent back the consultant letter before the next appointment. One two or three positives. That's all you get if none of those come back abnormal. You're now going into places Zoloft and a psychiatric referral or the land of diagnostic. Die Die off a reassurance and me too me too I'm sick. I'm tired to complete care of Georgia was at practice and I remember like the doctor who spoke before me about patients with these weird hypertension that can't tolerate a half pill of anti hypertensive medicine. My the patients were fourteen to sixteen year old males presenting for sports physicals with positive testing revolt salts positive. EKG's all suggesting acting their fight. They're fine there's nothing wrong and I remember signing off on those sports physical forms like Dr Dudley Looking back now asking. Were they mischaracterized. As well. When I had an opportunity to make a difference in a developmental trajectory the simple question and orth static vital sign paradigm complete care ended and I found myself next in a paradigm shift in Nova stands for Internal Medicine of Northern Virginia home of Doctors Samuel Shore and Ebony Cornish the people who introduced me to line this was environment of sharp elbows and deep purses it was an environment? Where for the first time in my life patients were not impressed with me listening? They were disinterested and actually paranoid about prednisone. Steroid steroid therapy. This was a subsection action of patients. Whose expectation was that? We go to their doctor. And they'll be heard and at the end of the day they they were going to step away from their diagnostic code because it was absolutely unacceptable to tell them this is. LS Your fifty. One in your atypical. This has Parkinson's and you will sit down from your corporate job and accept disability. Check first time. I'd ever seen this the expectation that in this environment at this time in this country the we had a medicine so exquisite that we could expect patients to heal. And what would that medicine look like. It would look like precision medicine and it would bring all of the tools together that had been discussed in this room today and it would require a different kind of physician that would be a physician that listens it would be the NF one uh after listening engaging Dr Leaner the possibility of the democratization of medicine allowing a patient into come in with a study that you put down your stethoscope long enough to engage in question they would you give me an opportunity to demonstrate human intelligence and access to your same medical studies and to propose a possibility of healing through access to the tools your pin rights. Here's here's another thing and this is something very very powerful environment. Had the right deer and the right tick Danny Group is our for southern lime only practice it is the opus of my life career and it is the environment that gave me an opportunity to take what I understood when I first began medicine. And all of those powerful moments of engaging aging patients who are too sick to tire to marginalized to stand for themselves and to agree at the end of the day to be the physician who would bring to them possibilities of hope in healing. What does that require to agree to never stop learning to take that process of medical investigation seriously and to enjoy it and to bring it back and to grow and to tear it down when it doesn't work and start again? It is about going to the homes of not the richest not charging the extra drive to the patient who can't afford it and to sit in their environments and figure with them what an environmental exposure would be that would keep them from healing while their children are there engaging their six children children and their questions about possibly healing them engaging them in therapy when I don't always know the answer and saying I don't know the answer. Let's do this together. What do you got? It could be about writing up in writing the charts going over. What failed already so that we're not doing that? Conversation again understanding where they healed and got somewhat better so we can bring those in sooner last ingredient which I think is about the future of line Madison. Addison.

Dr Crystal Barnwell Georgia United States Atlanta Centers for Veterinary Veterin centers of Disease Control Moscow Roy Woah Lake Michigan Henry David Minneapolis Minnesota EU Colorado Sydney Australia Columbia Thoreau Stockton Crystal San Antonio Texas Russia
"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Of immune response so I would say in a nutshell. That's how I would characterize functional integrative rid of medicine your Doctor Chandra please my slides are so I'm an integrative creative psychiatrists in the San Francisco area. And what put me on this path to do. This model of medicine was an observation really early in my career that not enough psychiatric to patients were getting well. The outcomes were not what were they should be and so I wanted to find ways of helping these patients that offered were labeled wealth but weren't getting well and the patients that I see are in three categories and all three categories are patients who need a better way so one is patients with chronic psychiatric illnesses patients who've been depressed for maybe years or decades or inked anxiety patients who had for a long time also children with developmental delays and then also patients who've already been identified as having a tick borne illness but aren't responding to chronic convention. Sorry conventional treatments so these may seem like very we different populations but with the integrative punctual approach we use very similar mechanisms supporting them we find common underlying contributors causes. So what is integrative psychiatry. A lot of people haven't heard this term it's integrated in two ways. One we think about the brain in context of the whole body so many psychiatrist neurologist stop at the brain and they don't think about what goes beyond they don't ask and they don't think about contributors that go beyond the central nervous system. And I believe you have to and and second we integrate treatments so rather than just using one medication like Zoloft and saying that's it. We really tried to integrate treatments. Personalized them so we know what we try to figure out. What's going to work for that? Individual and the goal is not just to mitigate symptoms but we want to build long term health and ideally zillions so that differ patient has another stressor or infection. They're going to handle that much better than they did. The last one that's triple so why lime disease you can understand. Why use integrative approach but wide lime disease and this also came from an early observation that a lot of my patients more than I would have ever imagined had some type of immune issue or infection and so that's where I put a lot of my attention because that's what's helping my patients get well not something I intended to do and the patients who to come to me have the typical symptoms? You'd see in psychiatric population. They may have depression anxiety. Attention Issues But what's not typical about them. Is that we find this infection in a way that we don't think about lyme disease presenting there in California out of place that we think of epidemic. They've had chronic issues. They've you've been sick for years if not decades and most don't recall a tick bite and certainly not an rash and the other thing. That's not typical about them is that they don't just have one infection. Most of them have more than one. So treatment treatment is not just about killing the bugs. I'm really encouraged by the talks this morning because because we do need more effective ways of getting these bugs out the system but it's not just about killing the bugs. It's really about building resilience in the body and we have to look at internal factors actors and external factors so external. We think about stress in the home in the family diet environmental exposures and then internally we've pig about all the systems that affect building resilience including the microbiome which is so important especially in somebody's had chronic antibiotics for lyme disease might conjul health actual how how hormone will help so while it's really While the patients will come to US often don't have hope when we have this model it is it offers them hope in a way that I don't think I could have even imagined it might training conventional innocent. Well thank you. I think we can switch to the the. QNA slide died I have so many. have so many different avenues that I want to go down with you guys because those I personally find signed the Functional Medicine Integrative Medicine practice to be to be shouldn't be an outlier in medicine. Right should yeah exactly. I mean like doctors. Doctors are trained to be healers. They should they should be trained to be to make people better and yet. Can't you know as we get into specialized practice and we get into into more specialized work. We often our field of expertise zeroes in and we end up being labeled we end up being. You know even self dubbed I'm a rheumatologist or I'm infectious disease or I. Am this and and so. I think that looking at what everybody knows is a complex.

lyme disease Functional Medicine Integrativ US San Francisco anxiety depression California
"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Interventional studies with multiple components, including Derek, I think is much needed in this greater by medical space. So let us pause there and just go over some basics here. So what's the postage stamp version of paleo diet, the regular paleo? Yes. Oh, journalists, basically, removing grains legumes dairy rely. Yes. So the three main principles, I think about our nutrient density, its ability to stimulate the immune system end. In also foods ability to positively negatively impact the gut microbiome, which is intimately tied to, to the gut barrier. So it's trying to remove foods that have low nutrient density agreed potential to be immuno-genetic immune system, integrator potential to calls, despite our bells gut microbiome in disrupt. Coby got bearing integrity, goes other principals. I mean, the whole idea to ancestral diet is independent of those mechanisms is it's trying to emulate dietary principles that we as a species have been following. So with Aldo scientific approach for thousands of years, we've evolved generations to, to eat. So sensually. It's everything's on the table, except being's right in that all beings, it pretty much pretty much all beans, grains, sale, usually, oh, gluten free, so that's weak. But you're talking oats, retains rice as well as. Yeah. So rices grain. I mean keen wa that you kind of get into kind of the alternative grains, but that kind of covers everything, right there, pumpernickel guess, but that's what that's additive anyway, whatever. Pumpernickel. Is there a political seed? What is pumpernickel Brit anyway? Yeah. But so. Right. So any basically any type of bread pizza crust cereals that come in box that, that sort of thing, and then dairies always kind of an interesting one. But there are some people genetically don't deal. Well with the, the lactose, and then, as you said, it can have some, some reactivity can be the, the calls of some auto immunity, and then so that segues into that's paleo. And then auto immune paleo is even more restrictive in that you take out some other foods that can be reactive eggs, his one, right? What else are kinda the highly reactive foods as executive nuts with ninety? Certain fruit survey spices to certain spices of removed, the Nightshade family, so things like a plants tomatoes. It's associated spices paprika that chili powder. Those things are are removed. Those are the main things. I mean, some of the other things that people would still could argue should have been on the paleo diet to begin with, but may be included things like coffee, a couch, you're technically legumes, but sometimes they are included in router, paleo, typically, those things are removed on a P and then, also it's the Elsa try to remove a century, any sort of multiplying agent, additive agents, or anything that could have been derived from a grain. So there's a lot of products in different gums that can be derived from corn products. So in the purest sense, you start to get into the weeds with some of these additives, but in of the basic Forbes, it's yet essentially moving nuts, and seeds eggs, Nightshade. Some of those associated spices great. Now also, let's talk about auto immunity is one of the things that's interesting with lime disease and this compensation still out there is. There's some thinking on researchers and doctors from the traditional side of things. The idea say, said things that the post Lyme syndrome. What they call it is actually an autoimmune disease. And in the beginning, I thought all of these guys are just not. They're trying to dodge the bullet in terms of the infection persists. But just because you have wine doesn't make you Munich from also developing an autoimmune disease in fact, if you're chronically inflamed from something like lime you're actually more likely to develop in addition to lime in autoimmune component as well. And so you brief again, really briefly. Because we could spend weeks. Socking autumn unity is briefly talk about what an autoimmune responses, and then what are some of the common named autoimmune diseases that people come up against? Yes, I Don unity can be thought of, in a lot of different ways. But essentially, it's reactively towards self tissue and the main self L F not soft. Yeah, wreck. Yeah. Reactively to, to self and the term. That's most commonly used in immunology is concept tolerance. So essentially, your body in order to be able to recognize what's foreign needs to be able to recognize self but recognition is not the same thing as reacting to. So there's a whole cascade of things as certain lymphocytes, so B cells T cells different Munich cells, as they develop, we have a very intricate set of processes for them to be able to recognize south. Not react to in certain cells in that developing process, or reactive to self or don't recognize it. Then they are typically go through a killed off. They don't go past the checkpoint. So you're trying to basically make him Yun cells that don't react to sell. So sometimes overlooked, that we recognize. Yeah, of course, we need to be able to respond recognize things that are foreign. But in order to do that. We have to know it self looks like so one of the things that can go wrong is when there's high degree of immune stimulation or the types of installation, you can sort of inadvertently start reacting to sell either because self looks a lot like a foreign elements, which is a content cold molecular mimicry. You can also have. It's called bystander affect, or essentially, you as a result attending response to inappropriate for agent of inadvertently, damaged self tissue in. That's still kind of thought it was an auto immune phenomenon. But yeah, you can think about a lot of different ways. But essentially, it's a loss of tolerance in the body's immune system, essentially, directing resources interview towards self tissue damaging soft tissue in instead of recognizing itself, and not reacting in this. Why spectrum and you know we thought about other other ways as well, but some of the most common disease states or hushing, does that resided switches, the disease state that we studied auto thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis lupus. It's quite fascinating to see the number of diseases that fall under this category. But it's also fascinating to see that in traditional medicine, we loves a sufficiently so that don't actually recognize the overlap between different diseases. So even. Multiple sclerosis might affect Mylan in the central nervous system. We see that as complete distinct entity for return greatest, which isn't disease affecting joints, in Snowville tissue. So, but from a functional perspective, we're like, no, those aren't like completely separate things. Shouldn't be approach with radically different drugs or therapies. We recognize that, you know, for me to develop there has to be disruption of the ecosystem area. There has to be in America. It'll severe mental triggers in there has to be.

autoimmune disease Derek Coby Mylan wa Aldo executive America Snowville Lyme syndrome Forbes Munich
"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

08:58 min | 1 year ago

"disease" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Hello, Adrian, this is McCain, happy from Lyman into radio. Hi, thank you so much for having me today. I am very excited to talk to you, and I have a confession to make my twins and my youngest daughter, actually were, they're all born in Baltimore and Hopkins. My mom's from Baltimore and I read on your bio that you went to undergrad there, I did yet. And I Baltimore in, in her how special place in my heart as my I just think it's a, a unique place. And once you've lived there, he sort of either love or hate it, but. On what hope so from an atlas area, so I have long family. So it's still specialty. Yeah. My whole family went Hopkins as well. My mother father myself and my brother. So, yeah. You like super legacy. Well only one generation. For for being Hopkins fan than, you know, involved in the school sells and all that. So it's great to hear that your kid hopefully were believe, picked absolutely. There were will they were well treated, and the one to my wife at the time was working for the school of public health and had one of her friends was researchers they are encouraged to get out of the hospital. As soon as you can. After giving birth not a place for people to be very interesting later. Yes. So actually, let's, let's, you know, let's, let's just use that as so the woman who told her this was involved in putting together the flu vaccines. So she was very much in the public health, sphere of thing, right on the big pictures. Like trying to keep people healthy through conventional means now here's a little other interesting bit of trivia for all you anti vaccine out there. She didn't take your own vaccine. She never got the flu vaccine. So it's just it's isn't that weird weird in something you'd never hear kind of from the conventional channels of information. Definitely not an you've had some interesting experiences in the healthcare system, that have kind of given you some behind the scenes insight. So what's your take on how, how come you know, we're so good at like emergency medicine. You know, somebody comes in with the let us Baltimore since I've been in the news badly, a gunshot wound and we can save their life, which is miraculously. Right. But then something chronic, and even horrible in life threatening at Lyme disease can be, but, you know, most stained day-to-day just misery it GRA terrible at taking care of that. How come? I could probably talk a whole hour on the topic. But like you said, you know, I've seen from personal health experiences as well as I was working in a healthcare system. That, of course, and you have, basically our entire healthcare system and violet medicine, which is not very old thinking about it about one hundred years old, and its current form really evolved. Trico emergencies right where you're dying of cholera or influenza, or your legs blown off in war, or those things. So it has developed to treat these catastrophes and it's developed really well I mean we really have the most incredible system in the world for life saving medicine. And so you better believe exactly what I want in true emergency. But like you said, most of our health care costs, and most of our premature death in America is from and several other countries as well. It's from. Some Cleese chronic health issues, so everything from, you know, heart disease, and diabetes, two stroke and asthma, and, you know, feel PD and you know what whole range of things, and then be sort of more invisible illnesses, like why or autoimmune condition that really crippled people. But I as far as I can tell you, they don't have a deformity per se. Right. So when those illnesses are current system kind of misses the boat in that cold out symptom management or symptom outing. So you could say kind of a disease care system, rather than actual healthcare system. And so what I mean by that is for. Chronic health issue, you really want to get you the root cause of it, right? You want to understand why am I having decent them. There's something going on. Or why my body not functioning properly? You're not getting a period. You're not making enough already hormone or insulin or whatever it might be, or you're having high blood pressure. What is actually going on here that might be causing the because the body's extremely brilliant resilient? So it does take something to, to have that happen. And sure there's a genetic component. And at this point, you know, really only about five maybe ten percent of everything all the possible things that could influence your how that really genetic. Right. So these other ninety ninety five percent are environmental, toxins, who eat your lifestyle choices and, you know, whether or not you have used vice drugs out all this thing. So we have. It's really exciting because there's so much that we can do. But with regards to healthcare system, most of us have some situation where we might go to doctor with their chronic health issue. And like in my case when I was twenty years old. I was given I off my fury for. Better a year. By the time I actually started to see a bunch of doctors about it, and I started to go to a bunch of Hopkins doctors, and, you know, some sort of fancy under colleges and gynecologists in New York, and well and skip the line and felt very important, and blah, blah, blah. But as it turned out all of them had name, enter for me, which was, you know, we can't really see anything particularly wrong with you on your. And how about you just taking perk control hell because, you know, maybe could like you, we start putting visit, you know, fake we create when I take created in that you get it's a synthetic hormone, so making you have a period, but it's not your body. You know, being able to produce it on its own, which is what she wants. So I because of my lining various, which I'm happy to talk about in a few minutes, which was when I was from about eleven to thirteen I was in powered enough to know that, that's really not going to get to the root cause of it. And so I you know, Clinton declined and was considered a noncompliant, tation and ended up my father, thank God this hockey to somebody about this and found the and natural path who I started seeing in the summer between my junior and senior year college. And she looked at my blood work so differently. And she just started to really unravel this onion of different health thing. That had happened to me that would that were contributing to me, not getting period. A lot of it was, you know, diet, I because of my line experience had eaten very cleanly at home with my family until I went to college, and then eating in a dining hall, you know, two to three meals a day, which you can imagine. Aramark Adecco, whatever it is extremely unhealthy foods, even when I was not being that unhealthy or whatever. And, and probably I'd also studied in China brought in China and definitely have some different. You know, Paris, our backyard, whatever from those experiences that then I think we're compromising. All right, my God in their fight for my news is so, and then I'm sure, you know, like the legacy of minding in your system even if you've gotten it to be inactive it, definitely just puts a little bit of a damper on your sign when it might want to deal with something like, you know, crappy food or a different parasite or whatever it might be. So I, I know following her. Exactly. Protocol for this very strict diet and herbs and supplements that whatever for six months, and she said, if you do this, you know, religiously for six months, like your, your pure, doc insure nothing like six months and a day later did, and it's been been totally normal for the last over a decade and won the experience, that I had not duration to show me, how masked the symptom, I just take control fill and graded fakery for myself, I would have never gotten to the root cause of the issue, which was that there definitely thinks lingering in my, my diet.

Baltimore flu vaccine Hopkins Adecco Adrian China cholera America Lyman Paris heart disease McCain Cleese influenza New York Clinton