38 Burst results for "Disease"

Fresh update on "disease" discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

00:34 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "disease" discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Choice, as of last month, about a 109,000 workers in Illinois had saved $91 million for retirement through secure choice. Jim goddess one O 5 9. Her voice produced two of the most iconic themes of the 1980s Irene Cara hit the charts with fame. But we titled song in 1980 and then struck gold again with flashdance, one of feeling from the popular movie, Cara has died at the age of 63, according to her publicist. A cause of death has not been disclosed, Kara played Koko and fame about New York's high school for the performing arts she won an Oscar and Grammy for writing and singing flash tense. New research finds that a longtime gauge of heart health is not effective for one particular race or group more from CBS News Michael George. High density lipoprotein or so called good cholesterol may not be as strong a barometer of heart health among all racial and ethnic groups. Research in the journal of the American college of cardiology found lower levels of HDL were associated with increased risk of heart attacks among white adults, but not black adults. Higher levels were not protective for either group. The authors conclude that in addition to supporting ongoing and future research with diverse populations to explore these connections, the findings suggest that cardiovascular disease risk calculators using HDL cholesterol could lead

Jim Goddess Irene Cara Cara Koko Illinois Michael George Kara Grammy Cbs News Oscar Journal Of The American Colleg New York Heart Attacks Cardiovascular Disease
Liberal Media Sounds the Alarm on Another COVID Variant

Mark Levin

00:53 sec | 3 d ago

Liberal Media Sounds the Alarm on Another COVID Variant

"And now we're getting these warnings that with Thanksgiving coming your Thanksgiving is about to become a super spreader event So again gotta ask the question are we in a pandemic or are we not in a pandemic Because if we are in a pandemic and everybody should be masking up again well then why can't we use title 42 to keep our border safe and make sure people are not bringing in communicable diseases like perhaps I don't know the new variant of COVID they're talking about Oh yeah I heard that scary report today The new variant now completely resistant to any and all vaccines But since most people have already had COVID it's nothing to worry about since your natural immune system will be able to fight it off But of course the scary headline is new variant that nothing can stop except your own natural immunity because anyway so again we had a pandemic where we not in a pandemic

Communicable Diseases
Fresh update on "disease" discussed on Bloomberg Best

Bloomberg Best

00:38 sec | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "disease" discussed on Bloomberg Best

"Millions of Americans are doing their holiday shopping from coast to coast. I did not expect to buy this much, but it was definitely worth it getting up this early and waiting in this long line. Adobe analytics says a record $9.1 billion was spent online for Black Friday alone. That doesn't include all the shoppers who flocked to the malls. The record comes despite inflation being on the minds of many consumers. Two omicron BQ coronavirus sub variants are now dominant in the U.S.. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says BQ one and BQ one one are causing 57% of new infections in the U.S.. The Pentagon is condemning a rocket attack that targeted a U.S. base in northeast Syria. Two rockets were fired at the base Friday night, resulting in no injuries or damage. The Pentagon is expressing concern about escalating actions in the region, saying the air strikes are threatening American progress to defeat ISIS. It did not say who was behind the attack. That's the latest I'm Julie

Adobe Analytics Centers For Disease Control An U.S. Pentagon Syria Julie
Unredacted Emails Show Scientist Doubt Over Origins of COVID

Mark Levin

01:47 min | 3 d ago

Unredacted Emails Show Scientist Doubt Over Origins of COVID

"Through a freedom of information lawsuit guardian reporter Jimmy Tobias obtained newly unredacted emails detailing both the February 1st 2020 teleconference between doctor Anthony Fauci director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and virologists discussing the SARS CoV-2 virus as well as correspondence pertaining to COVID-19's possible origins After a long foia fight he tweets out I just received a bunch of new unredacted emails detailing his teleconference Emily cop a reporter with the nonprofit investigative research group U.S. right to know has incorporated these findings into an extensive and detailed timeline concerning the proximal origin of SARS CoV-2 She noted that in February 2020 when the aforementioned teleconference took place Several top virologists sought to examine the nature of the coronavirus that would go on to kill tens of millions of people worldwide Although the ultimately concluded in the journal nature medicine at the virus had not been engineered stating quote we do not believe that any type of laboratory based scenario is plausible behind the scenes it was a great deal of doubt Many of the scientists who were attempting to account for the origin of the Führer cleavage site on the virus's spike protein responsible for its relatively high infectivity were confronted with the strong possibility of human intervention U.S. rights in a reported that in January 2020 Danish evolutionary biologists and Scripps research institute immunology professor Christian G Anderson raised the matter of a gain of function study that looked like a how to manual for building the Wuhan coronavirus in a laboratory

Jimmy Tobias National Institute Of Allergy Sars Emily Cop Anthony Fauci U.S. Scripps Research Institute Christian G Anderson Wuhan
Fresh update on "disease" discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

00:57 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "disease" discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"We buy things we don't need by Elena Samuels. Searching for an explanation for a compulsive shopping. I recently ran across the story of a woman who couldn't stop buying rabbits. Her husband's told doctors that each day, she would visit the market and return home with yet another for a creature and a compulsive habit that appeared almost like an addiction. Then she would feel guilty about all the rabbits she had purchased. The reason this 70 year old woman was suddenly buying so many rabbits, she had been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, which scientists believe is caused by a lack of dopamine in some parts of the brain, and she had then been put on drugs to trick her brain into believing it was getting the dopamine it needed. But some patients who received these dopaminergic drugs started compulsively shopping, gambling, and binge eating. Their brains were getting inundated with dopamine, which made rewarding behavior feel even better than usual. I think about the woman who bought so many rabbits every time I look at the many recent Amazon orders on my account or receive a new package on my doorstep and scurried and move it inside. So my neighbors don't judge my consumption habits. I know that buying more new stuff is bad for the planet. The production and use of household goods and services was found to drive 60% of greenhouse gas emissions, but every time I buy something, I get a little jolt of happiness. That's hard to give up. Like the woman buying rabbits, I can't stop. But a new book has helped me understand that my desire to keep buying things isn't necessarily a personal flaw. It's the way our brains have evolved, and there may be a way to break the cycle. All things being equal, we are predisposed to try to acquire more and more stuff, and try and work less to get it, says Anne Christine, a Harvard neurosurgeon who explored how to rewire the human brain to stop needing more stuff, and her new book, minding the climate.

Elena Samuels Parkinson's Disease Amazon Anne Christine
Vaccinated People Now Make up a Majority of COVID Deaths

Mark Levin

01:27 min | 3 d ago

Vaccinated People Now Make up a Majority of COVID Deaths

"So yeah there's a lot we gotta ask Fauci about particularly as a new report came out today and said the majority of people who've died of COVID have been vaccinated which of course is shocking As they also buried another report that vitamin D levels may have a direct correlation with your ability to survive the virus But again Fauci worked directly with the tech companies to silence quote unquote disinformation If you remember anybody who went out of line and said anything even about the lab origins of COVID was probably shut down and silenced There's a lot to answer for My theory of course is that we can now trace the gain of function research funding from Fauci's office and Collins office He's another one that should be hauled in Directly to the Wuhan lab we know that they were experimenting with these viruses These guys admitted in these emails they were working on this fury in cleavage They were working on these weird Frankenstein mice and the cells in the lungs and everything like that They created this thing and they knew that they did and they tried to lie and cover it up by finding a way they could justify this came from nature And because the media in this country the corporate media loved Fauci and don't forget Brad Pitt played the guy in Saturday Night Live He was a hero to people The nation's leading infectious disease doctor you actually have to say that by law whatever you say his name Did you know that Well they love him so much so anything he said they just went with gospel so when he said no no no this was this came from a bat

Fauci Wuhan Collins Brad Pitt Saturday Night Live
Mike Rowe: Screens Cause Men to Be Soft and Lazy

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:50 min | 4 d ago

Mike Rowe: Screens Cause Men to Be Soft and Lazy

"Mike Rowe was recently on Tucker Carlson's show. They were at the patriot. I believe it's called the patriot awards yes it is for Fox. And micro was interviewed by Tucker Carlson. And I just want to go through some of the things that Mike rose said to kind of set the tone. And I really do think this is important. And the more that I think about this, there's always when it comes to politics, there's always micro issues. There's symptoms and there's always a greater disease at play. And I think the denigration of manhood in America has become a huge problem. And we're seeing it play out in politics if you, if you just look at it. All right? So Mike Rogan, he was on Tucker Carlson's show. And Tucker Carlson obviously was interviewing him and Mike wrote to Tucker Carlson that the man in this country they're becoming soft and lazy and he says that's in part due to how much time these men are spending on their screens. I want to get into some of the specifics of what Mike rose said, but I think we all can relate to that. Listen, I spend a lot of time on my phone screen. I spend tons of time on my computer screen. I'm not looking to be influenced, though. I'm looking to search for, you know, news stories, headlines, and to be able to do a show like this or to be able to do my own show. To be able to do my podcast, by the way, check out my podcast the Carl Jackson show dot com Salem podcast network dot com or wherever you get your podcasts. And you can follow me on social media. The Carl Jackson show. But here's what Mike Rowe had to say to Tucker Carlson. So he said, so I'm wrong about I'm quoting, obviously, so I'm wrong about as much as I am right. And it's for that reason. I hate to say, I told you so.

Tucker Carlson Mike Rose Mike Rowe Mike Rogan Carl Jackson FOX America Mike
A Place of Praise to Thank the Lord

Your Daily Prayer

02:10 min | 5 d ago

A Place of Praise to Thank the Lord

"And crowns you with love and compassion. Some 103 one through four. Life is hard. Struggles are real, but the lord is still good. In our lives, in the midst of all our hard places, we can still find so much to be thankful for. And God calls us to be thankful people. True thankfulness stems from living in a place of praise where we have our eyes, our heart, and our souls completely focused on the lord. In this place of praise, thankfulness can freely flow, changing our lives and the lives of those around us. It's all one O three one four says this. Praise the lord, my soul, all my inmost being praised as holy name. Praise the lord, my soul and forget not all his benefits, who forgives all your sins and heals all your diseases, who redeems you from the pit and crowns you with love and compassion.

'Viral jambalaya': Early flu adding to woes for US hospitals

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last week

'Viral jambalaya': Early flu adding to woes for US hospitals

"An early flu season is straining hospitals in many states One doctor describes it as a viral jambalaya the CDC says more than half the states have high or very high levels of flu Hospitals are already overburdened in many areas with people sick from the coronavirus and RSV the state's impacted are mostly in the south and Southwest but include a growing number in the northeast Midwest and west The flu season usually doesn't get going until December or January The CDC says flu vaccinations are down from other years especially among adults possibly because the past two seasons have been mild An infectious disease specialist urged Americans to take precautions before gathering for Thanksgiving saying nobody wants to bring a virus to the table I'm Ed Donahue

FLU CDC Midwest Infectious Disease Ed Donahue
Elizabeth Holmes faces judgment day for her Theranos crimes

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | Last week

Elizabeth Holmes faces judgment day for her Theranos crimes

"The disgraced CEO of theranos Elizabeth Holmes is scheduled to be sentenced today for peddling a bogus blood testing technology Holmes was convicted in federal court in January of four counts of investor fraud and conspiracy her sentencing today will be in the same courtroom in San Jose California prosecutors say the 38 year old should serve 15 years in federal prison and pay $804 million in restitution for duping investors and endangering patients homeless technology was supposed to be able to scan for hundreds of diseases and other ailments with just a few drops of blood but the test produced wildly unreliable results Theranos collapsed in 2018 Her lawyer is expected to ask for a sentence of no more than 18 months preferably served in home confinement Holmes now has a one year old child and is pregnant with her second I'm Donna water

Theranos Elizabeth Holmes Holmes San Jose California Donna
US home births increased in pandemic but are still uncommon

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last week

US home births increased in pandemic but are still uncommon

"A government report says home births increase slightly during the pandemic The report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that in the pandemic's second year 2021 home births increased slightly among almost 4 million total births nearly 52,000 of them occurred at home That took about 12% from 2020 following a 22% rise from 2019 to 2020 The lead author of the report Elizabeth Gregory says she doesn't know the reasons for the increases but they occurred when COVID-19 rates were high and vaccinations were either unavailable or not widely used Previous research suggests that about one in four home births are unplanned I'm Donna water

Centers For Disease Control An Elizabeth Gregory Donna
Pelosi to announce 'future plans' after GOP wins House

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last week

Pelosi to announce 'future plans' after GOP wins House

"A government report says home births increase slightly during the pandemic The report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that in the pandemic's second year 2021 home births increased slightly among almost 4 million total births nearly 52,000 of them occurred at home That took about 12% from 2020 following a 22% rise from 2019 to 2020 The lead author of the report Elizabeth Gregory says she doesn't know the reasons for the increases but they occurred when COVID-19 rates were high and vaccinations were either unavailable or not widely used Previous research suggests that about one in four home births are unplanned I'm Donna water

Centers For Disease Control An Elizabeth Gregory Donna
Rising food costs take a bite out of Thanksgiving dinner

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | Last week

Rising food costs take a bite out of Thanksgiving dinner

"Americans embracing for a costly Thanksgiving this year with double digit percent increases in the price of turkey potato stuffing and other Staples of the holiday Lower production and higher costs are only part of the reason that Thanksgiving meal is going up disease rough weather and even the war in Ukraine are also contributors Turkey supplies are at their lowest point since 1986 after a deadly avian flu and prices are up about 28% but not everywhere says Walmart's CEO Doug McMillan The Walmart U.S. team has set the retail prices for a typical Thanksgiving meal the same as last year We're removing inflation on a basket of traditional Thanksgiving food items including whole turkeys for under a dollar per pound Stores like lidl and Aldi also offering deals and target as advertising 99 cents per pound on select frozen turkeys Julie Walker New York

Doug Mcmillan Walmart Ukraine Turkey FLU U.S. Lidl Aldi Julie Walker New York
 Roberta Flack has ALS, now 'impossible to sing,' rep says

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last week

Roberta Flack has ALS, now 'impossible to sing,' rep says

"Musician Roberta Flack has revealed she is unable to sing because of a medical condition I'm Archie's are a letter with the latest Roberta Flack has been diagnosed with ALS also known as Lou Gehrig's disease Flax management says it makes it impossible for her to sing and not easy to speak Flank who's 85 is best known for songs like killing me softly with his song the closer I get to you and feel like making love the announcement comes just as a documentary about flack called Roberta will premiere Thursday at the DOC NYC film

Roberta Flack Archie Lou Gehrig ALS Flack Roberta
In a first, doctors treat fatal genetic disease before birth

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 2 weeks ago

In a first, doctors treat fatal genetic disease before birth

"In a first doctors are treating a fatal genetic disease before birth So be a Qureshi 16 month old daughter a la Bashir has Pompeii disease Which is a genetic disorder Glycogen storage disorder which affects the muscles in basically every muscle in your body The body fails to make some or all of a crucial protein to avail his sisters have died from Pompeii disease Doctor panis chalk report he is at children's hospital of eastern Ontario The disease starts in utero disease starts in the fetus There's evidence at the heart is involved even before the baby's born So they started treating ala well before she was born The innovation here was treating earlier and treating while still in utero ALS parents say the treatment appears to be working Without their help without without their help you wouldn't hear all this noise The outlook for aella is promising but uncertain I'm Ed Donahue

Fatal Genetic Disease La Bashir Genetic Disorder Glycogen Stor Panis Chalk Utero Disease Utero Als Ontario Aella Ed Donahue
Hurricane Nicole forms; Florida awaits rare November storm

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

Hurricane Nicole forms; Florida awaits rare November storm

"A rare November hurricane will make landfall overnight along Florida's east coast The last November hurricane to make landfall in the U.S. was Kate 37 years ago Hurricane Nicole has top sustained winds of 75 mph as it rolls towards floor disease coast Storm surge beat erosion has already wrecked dozens of homes and buildings Brad Reinhart with the national hurricane center says the surge runs some 370 miles along the coast into southeast Georgia From north Palm Beach to altamaha sound Georgia We're calling for peak storm surge values of three to 5 feet Disney World and universal Orlando closed early Wednesday Airports including Orlando international have closed as much as a half foot of rain from the system could fall along the blue ridge I'm Tim McGuire

Hurricane Nicole Brad Reinhart Georgia From North Palm Beach East Coast National Hurricane Center Kate Florida U.S. Orlando Georgia Disney World Tim Mcguire
Jeff Cook, Alabama Co-Founder and Guitarist, Dead at 73

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 weeks ago

Jeff Cook, Alabama Co-Founder and Guitarist, Dead at 73

"Guitarist Jeff cook of the country band Alabama has died after a battle with Parkinson's disease at his home in Destin Florida according to a band representative He was 73 I'm Archie's are a letter with a look at his career Jeff cook joined his cousin's Randy Owen and teddy gentry to form a band when they were still in high school in the state of Alabama with drummer Mark herndon they became the top country band ever Alabama's hits included feel so right love in the first degree mountain music and dozens of others They won piles of awards toured the world and in spite of all that success cook said in a 1996 AP interview there was one aspect of the business he hated I hate the video Well

Jeff Cook Parkinson's Disease Alabama Randy Owen Teddy Gentry Mark Herndon Destin Archie Florida Cook AP
Alcohol death toll is growing, US government reports say

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 3 weeks ago

Alcohol death toll is growing, US government reports say

"A newly released study says deaths from alcohol have been going up since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the number of deaths that can be directly attributed to alcohol went up nearly 30% in the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic a CDC report focuses on more than a dozen kinds of alcohol induced deaths including alcohol caused liver or pancreas failure alcohol poisoning and withdrawal in the 20 years before the pandemic the rate of such deaths had been increasing by 7% or less each year The CDC says there were more than 52,000 such deaths last year up from 39,000 in 2019 the report also says the death rate was the highest for people ages 55 to 64 with deaths more common in men than in women I'm Donna water

Covid Centers For Disease Control An Pancreas Failure Alcohol Poiso Donna
US agency softens opioid prescribing guidelines for doctors

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 3 weeks ago

US agency softens opioid prescribing guidelines for doctors

"Government health regulators are easing some of the guidelines that had doctors reluctant to prescribe opioid painkillers in some cases where they were needed Medical professionals say previous guidelines issued in 2016 did a good job reducing opioid addiction But in some cases denied patients proper pain treatment I've seen the profound impacts pain can have on someone's life And I've also seen how that light can be transformed when a patient is able to access safe and effective care Doctor Christopher Jones heads the U.S. Centers for Disease Control's national center for injury prevention A pharmacist he says there had to be a better balance Flexible tailored patient centered care rather than a one size fits all approach Doctor Jones says the new guidelines also work to address racial disparities in pain treatment saying patients who are black tend to be undertreated with medication However safeguards on opioid prescribing are disproportionately applied to black patients I'm Jackie Quinn

U.S. Centers For Disease Contr Christopher Jones Jones Jackie Quinn
Charlie Pierce on the Tin Hat Reaction to the Paul Pelosi Assault

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

00:50 sec | 3 weeks ago

Charlie Pierce on the Tin Hat Reaction to the Paul Pelosi Assault

"I was even being a happy clappy liberal. I felt you, you said over the weekend, watching the reaction to the assault on Paul Pelosi, I just gave up. We're on the very brink of handing the country over to the lost and the mad. And I didn't think this midterm can feel more important in a week, but this is just, it's just everything. You said I've watched the steady descent of American conservatism and its primary public vehicle, the Republican Party into the terminal depths of the prion disease. And it just, as we were saying today, after everything was debunked that they said over the weekend, they've just doubled and tripled down, right? Well, apparently they've moved along now to this being some sort of deep state flight. Yes. Yes. You know, which is contradicted, I would point out by the guy who committed the crime. Right, yeah. Yeah.

Paul Pelosi Republican Party
CDC director tests positive for COVID again

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 3 weeks ago

CDC director tests positive for COVID again

"The head of the CDC has tested positive for the coronavirus again The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says their 53 year old director doctor Rochelle Walensky is isolating at home in Massachusetts Willensky tested positive for COVID-19 on October 21st took a regimen of the antiviral pill packs lovid and later tested negative but her mild symptoms returned on Sunday She is one of several high profile government officials who have come down with the virus and one of those people whose symptoms returned after completing the 5 day antiviral course the agency says she continues to work and hold virtual meetings I'm Jennifer King

CDC Rochelle Walensky Covid Massachusetts Jennifer King
"disease" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

05:06 min | 3 weeks ago

"disease" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"<Speech_Female> The research <Speech_Female> found there's no <Speech_Female> beneficial effects <Speech_Female> on <Speech_Female> reducing saturated <Speech_Female> fat on cardiovascular <Speech_Female> disease and <Speech_Female> death. <Speech_Female> In fact, the research <Speech_Female> instead found <Speech_Female> protective effects <Speech_Female> against stroke <Speech_Female> when study <Speech_Female> participants ate <Speech_Female> foods that had <Speech_Female> saturated fat. <Speech_Female> And I just <Speech_Female> want to share a <Speech_Female> client story. <Speech_Female> I have a client. <Speech_Female> I've been seeing <Speech_Female> probably <Speech_Female> for a little less <Speech_Female> than a year. <Speech_Female> He had a heart <Speech_Female> attack at age <Speech_Female> 43. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Strong <Speech_Female> family history of <Speech_Female> heart disease. He <Speech_Female> wanted to meet with me though <Speech_Female> in <Speech_Female> terms of just <Speech_Female> revamping his diet <Speech_Female> in <Speech_Female> order to prevent any <Speech_Female> further cardiovascular <Speech_Female> disease. <Speech_Female> He doesn't want obviously want <Speech_Female> to have another heart attack. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Very, <Speech_Female> very reluctant <Speech_Female> to add saturated <Speech_Female> fats into <Speech_Female> his diet. <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> could tell, you know, just <Speech_Female> he was <Speech_Female> kind of fighting me tooth <Speech_Female> and nail. He's like, ah, <Speech_Female> he's like, I just think I'm going to <Speech_Female> contribute to more heart <Speech_Female> disease if I eat these <Speech_Female> saturated fats. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Where do you think <Speech_Female> he got that <Speech_Female> message <Speech_Female> or information? <Speech_Female> Who knows? I mean, <Speech_Female> that's just kind of <Speech_Female> been a long-standing, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> a lot of people <Speech_Female> just think that, <Speech_Female> but right. <Speech_Female> Maybe they don't even <Speech_Female> know where they first heard that. <Speech_Female> No, exactly. <Speech_Female> Or <Speech_Female> maybe cardiologists <Speech_Female> are still saying it. <Speech_Female> It's updated <Speech_Female> information. Right, <Speech_Female> exactly. <Speech_Female> Anyway, <Speech_Female> I talked to <Speech_Female> him. I tried to <Speech_Female> explain to him <Speech_Female> that it's more <Speech_Female> the blood sugar <Speech_Female> piece and <Speech_Female> the jelly beans he was eating <Speech_Female> every day. They'll <Speech_Female> say ultra <Speech_Female> processed sugary foods <Speech_Female> that were irritating <Speech_Female> his vessel linings, <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> it wasn't the saturated <Speech_Female> fat. So <Speech_Female> he <Speech_Female> actually put <Speech_Female> his faith in me <Speech_Female> and he <Speech_Female> started eating the saturated <Speech_Female> fats. <Speech_Female> He started <Speech_Female> doing coconut oil, <Speech_Female> real <Speech_Female> butter, heavy <Speech_Female> whipping cream, <Speech_Female> and I <Speech_Female> said, let's test your <Speech_Female> cholesterol again <Speech_Female> in about three to <Speech_Female> 6 months. Let's <Speech_Female> see where we're sitting. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And <Silence> <Speech_Female> it was great news. <Speech_Female> His cholesterol <Speech_Female> had gone down <Speech_Female> and his bad cholesterol <Speech_Female> are his LDL <Speech_Female> had gone <Speech_Female> down. <Speech_Female> With eating the <Speech_Female> saturated fats. <Speech_Female> That's phenomenal. <Speech_Female> But you <Speech_Female> were confident that <Speech_Female> that would be the outcome. <Speech_Female> Right. He had <Speech_Female> faith in you. Right. <Speech_Female> So kudos. <Speech_Female> To him, I know it <Speech_Female> can be hard to have <Speech_Female> a new way <Speech_Female> of thinking. Right. <Speech_Female> Exactly. <Speech_Female> But that's a <Speech_Female> great story. I thank you so much <Speech_Female> for sharing. <Speech_Female> That brings back <Speech_Female> a memory of, <Silence> <Speech_Female> I think it was in 2014 <Speech_Female> when <Speech_Female> Time Magazine, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> listeners may remember <Speech_Female> this. But Time Magazine <Speech_Female> came out, <Speech_Female> there was a picture <Speech_Female> of butter <Speech_Female> on the cover of <Speech_Female> this magazine. <Speech_Female> And the <Speech_Female> tagline read, <Speech_Female> eat butter, <Speech_Female> scientists <Speech_Female> labeled fat <Speech_Female> the enemy, <Speech_Female> why they <Speech_Female> were wrong. <Speech_Female> And I don't know if you remember <Speech_Female> that Christie, but that <Speech_Female> was <Speech_Female> a real eye opener <Speech_Female> for a lot of people. <Speech_Female> And of course, at <Speech_Female> nutritional weight and wellness, <Speech_Female> I was working here <Speech_Female> in 2014. <Speech_Female> And we were <Speech_Female> already <Silence> <Speech_Female> disseminating that message. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Exactly before it <Speech_Female> even came out in the <Speech_Female> magazine. <SpeakerChange> Yeah. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Yeah, so <Speech_Female> it just kind of brought <Speech_Female> back that memory.

heart disease heart attack Time Magazine Christie
"disease" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

04:56 min | 3 weeks ago

"disease" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"Even packaged breads, granola bars, and sweetened yogurt, fall into this category of being ultra processed. I know, I mean, I feel like most foods these days is falling into that category. Exactly. And these are the foods heavily marketed, well, to both kids and adults. Did you know that 60% of the calories that Americans are eating come from foods that are in this ultra processed category? That's crazy. 60%. 60%. I am more than half of the foods that most people are eating. Fall into this category. So we need to think about the future health not only of our aging population, but our kids. I mean, if we can steer our kids away from these highly processed foods, we're setting them up for a future to have low risk of heart disease. Not to mention many other chronic diseases that can occur from poor nutrition and lifestyle. Right, exactly. So I can't believe that it's already time for our second break here. It's going the hours going fast. But you are listening to dishing up nutrition. We are talking about heart disease today, which is the number one cause of death in our country. As nutritionists and dietitians, we focus on food first. But additional supplements can be helpful to fill in. I like to call it nutritional gaps. Most Americans are deficient in omega three fatty acids. So taking a high quality omega three fish oil supplement can reduce inflammation and can be supportive for heart health. And so omega three fatty acids, they can be difficult to obtain from food sources. That is one reason that most Americans are deficient. So we will talk more about

heart disease
"disease" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

04:42 min | 5 months ago

"disease" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"I'm happy to talk to you today. Yeah, I'm happy to talk to you too. Prions have been a kind of a hobby for a long time. It's a topic that I really am interested in because there are very unusual type of pathology or infectious agent. So if you catch a virus, you're catching a virus from the environment or from somebody else. A prion is a molecule or a protein within our cells. And we already make this protein as part of our central nervous system. And the problem is, is that it changes to become pathological. And I'll let you take it from there. But let's start out with this idea of, what exactly is a prion? Okay, like a prion is an infectious agent of prion disease. It is a misfolded version of cellular protein. We all have called the prion protein. So the term prion goes back to staying a prisoner. And refers to a protein being the solely infectious agent. Okay, so this is an infectious agent that causes a number of devastating diseases in humans and other animals. But it's something that comes from within, right? I mean, this is a cellular protein that's normally present in a number of different cells in the body. And when it converts because of either some sort of environmental or other type of genetic situation, becomes a basis of pathology, is that correct? Like.

prion disease
"disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

05:14 min | 5 months ago

"disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"The positive side comes from with the best of real gloves we have and things evolve seem to be that there is antioxidant anti inflammatory components with whole fruit and vegetables, extra virgin olive oil, nuts and seeds, you want to be getting obviously enough protein. You want to get all your nutritional requirements as well. So you think about, okay, how am I going to get all my nutrition requirements? So I minimize the need for supplements. I mean, I know supplements have a role, but minimize the need for supplements, right? And also reduce the chances of me developing insulin resistance from the diet. And if you focus on that, so I do with my patients. Then as long as you get the base of the diet right, other things here or there, it doesn't matter so much. So get the basic right, cut out the crappy stuff on my language. And then it's about preference of different cultures, different types of foods in your food, Chinese food, whatever. There's going to be obviously some big differences in a lot of the food that people eat. Yeah, I think that's right. And I think the lifestyle stuff is so huge and you talked about the pia P diet I talked about the pegan diet. This is essentially focusing on quality. So whatever you're eating, the key concept is it should be high quality, meaning nutrient dense, processed, whole real food, and you can kind of go up the chain. You know, eating a feedlot steak is better than eating, for example, you know, a bunch of bread, right? But it's not as good as eating wild Elk or eating a grass fed steak. So you can keep going deeper in the quality chain. The second is to really understand that food is medicine. And then everything you're eating is regulating your biology in real time. And three, it's personal. Everybody's biologically different. And some people may be more carbohydrate tolerant than others. Some people have made me more fat intolerant than others. And there are ways to figure that out, which is really important. Absolutely. So that really covers a lot of the diet side of stuff. And then obviously from a hotness perspective, exercise, I think, with somehow over ended, the most important message is keep moving, do what you enjoy. Be careful of overdoing it. A lot of people get injuries. They overdo it. Especially if you're stressed out and you're doing more than say 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise a day more vigorous side, that can actually worsen your stress level. So the data really says that 30 minutes of moderate activity a day. And you can do different things. You do Pilates, you do yoga, you do recycling, you know, I'm not a particularly big I used to be a runner. I've kind of shifted more cycling now because running on the road generally is not particularly good for your knees. I mean, I do sprints once a week. I do hips. So all these things are there, but do enough, but don't overdo it, right? With the exercise. And then the big thing Mark, something I've discovered in the last few years, which certainly has a big impact in my patients, is stress. Psychological stress. Psychological stress, which, in its own right, and I write about in this book, is the equivalent of another risk factor like high blood pressure type two diabetes in terms of its cardiovascular risk. But a lot of people are managing that, not realizing how important is and of course it links to inflammation. There's a lot of emerging data. There's stuff related to clotting problems, increase in fibrin and the blood, which is involved in as a colleague factor. And what I do with all my heart patients is I asked them, you know, I do a very simple questionnaire kind of on them. And I asked them in nought to ten in the last few years, these are people coming have already got diagnosed hard to do. Some people have had scans done. They've got some fearing of the arteries. And I say to them, you know, where is your stress levels over the last two or three years? I know it's obviously been pandemic time, so it's a bit skewed. But in general, most of them say that they are stress levels are kind of 8, 9 out of ten, right? For the last few years, and they've not done anything about it. And then I write about in the book, you know, we need better quality data and more data, but what's fascinating, the largest study on heart disease reversal. Which was done in India. By a cardio interventional cardiologist strategical Abu healthy heart trial. Basically, it took patients with a significant coronary disease. So well over a hundred patients, moderate to severe, so at least 50 to 70% blockage in their arteries. These are people that didn't want to have a bypass operation. They want to have stents. And he put them through his healthy lifestyle plan. Now in India, there's a lot of vegetarians. So it was a very high fiber vegetarian diet. There wasn't starting there, but it was very high fiber vegetarian diet. It was moderate exercise two, 30 minute brisk walks a day, okay? And then it was somebody called raw geogra meditation. Which also wasn't just about meditating. It was like, there was a bit of counseling because reconnecting with your family and your friends and the social aspect. Only reduced stress levels. Long story short, the end of, you know, after two years of the trial then for 5 years, they found that in the people that it did to the lifestyle program, there was a 20% reduction on average in the stenosis of the arteries, which is unheard of, right? Yes. Yeah. They got better. They reduced from, say, 70%, 50%, 50%, 30%. I mean, extraordinary, right? This is no statin. This is pretty standard. No statins. And then, when they try to look into what was the most important factor by far, of all the lifestyle factors that contributed to the reversal, it was 40 minutes of meditation a day..

high blood pressure diabetes Mark coronary disease India heart disease Abu
"disease" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

04:55 min | 6 months ago

"disease" Discussed on The Bio Report

"Bright future. Your developing a new class of therapies you call and we'll go biotics. So any good biotics are definitely the first in class modular protein class gene editing modality. And they enable us actually to bring this required precision we're talking about two to the microbiome modulation. So our aerobatics achieved that through the precise targeting and the specific gene editing of the resident bacterial genes. So the genes of the commensal microbiome that are engrafted that evolves in biotically with the host. And the genes that have validated causal link to significant disease. And so thanks to a tree, thanks to the big and powerful synthetic biology platform and capabilities that we have that's enabled us to create therapeutic delivery particles that are both specific to the target bacteria. As well as to your target gene within the bacterial species of the strain. And so once we've delivered with this particle, a DNA payload, these DNA payload can express and gene editing enzyme of choice and therefore can either remove inactivate or add genes to the targeted bacteria in order to add its genetic makeup and as a consequence, positively modulate the host response. And so very importantly, we're not we don't have any concert in terms of target because human cells are not transduced as opposed to all the other gene editing approach. The particles only target bacterial cells. And so these electromagnets and the area unique abilities really enable us to deploy the whole suite of gene editing capabilities to a unique set of targets and address unique diabetic opportunities that are currently not addressable by any other technologies. And at first we have with these illegal bikes, we have decided to focus on high value indications in three fields in autoimmunity dermatology and oncology. And we have specifically choosing targets for which the causal relationship is well established. So beyond correlations and for which the clinical path are actually de risked by the ability to stratify patients who are the most likely to respond to the treatment. I know you're looking well beyond infectious disease, but from a point of view of antibiotics, it would seem there's a big opportunity to go after targets that have traditionally been treated with those. What are some of the advantages of might have over antibiotics? So when we started young ago, we had indeed just published two nature BioTech papers where we made the first demonstration that the delivery of a CRISPR system on a DNA payload to a bacteria could be used to destroy bacterial genes and at the same time kill the bacteria carrying the genes. Both in vitro, but also in vivo, and numerous animal models, with their really their own microbiome. And so at the time we had invented what we called sequence specific and tamako bio. So basically the most precise antimicrobial today. And with these, we can indeed kill specifically strange that harbor pathogenic genes that there are genes and leave the rest of the microbiome completely in depth. So these technology, indeed, that is like the super precise thematic, really led to the grain of the landmark patent in the field of microbiome gene editing. Really earlier statins in the field..

infectious disease
"disease" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

03:37 min | 6 months ago

"disease" Discussed on The Bio Report

"The emerging understanding of the role the microbiome plays in wellness and disease is opening up a large number of potential therapeutic targets in the millions of genes that drive the microorganisms that live within the body. Is developing a new class of precision medicines that use gene editing to address the expression of pathogenic genes in the microbiome to treat not only infectious disease, but other conditions such as inflammatory diseases and cancer as well. We spoke to Xavier de Porte, CEO of elago bioscience, about the company's use of synthetic DNA to target bacterial genes. Its platform technology, and the wide range of conditions that can be addressed through this approach. Xaviera,.

inflammatory diseases Xavier de Porte elago bioscience infectious disease cancer Xaviera
"disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:11 min | 6 months ago

"disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Good if your cholesterol, if your LDL C is a little bit high, we want to ask your physician, let's do some more testing. Let's look at the particle sizes of those LDL cholesterol. I want to see, do I have the small dense or do I have the big fluffy? If you have the big fluffy particles, they're less concerning. And if you have the small dense ones, you know it's time to say, I've got to make a change in my lifestyle. I've got to make some changes in my diet, my exercise program and my sleep. I've got to work to make these LDL particles bigger in size. Because many times we can. Sometimes when somebody's LDL cholesterol comes back very elevated, then it triggers us to look a little bit deeper. There is a subset of our population. It's about one in every 250 people who have something that's called familial hypercholesterolemia. And they have a genetic variation that prevents their body from getting rid of their LDL cholesterol as easily. So for that subset of patients, we might see their total cholesterol be almost 300 or higher. We'll see their LDL cholesterol be greater than a 190. That's very high. That's not very common, but if you have those numbers that are higher like that, you want to ask that question, okay, what's going on? Do I have familial hypercholesterolemia? Because we know that people who have this genetic variation have a much higher risk of heart disease. They have a 20 times increased risk of heart disease and it happens at a much younger age. So they might start to develop heart disease in their 30s or 40s as opposed to in their 60s or 70s or 80s. So if you have a family history of early heart disease, which means less than 55 for a man or less than 65 for a woman, so if you have aunts or uncles or parents or brothers who've had a heart attack at a young age, or if you have any signs of really high cholesterol. So your LDL being greater than a 190, maybe you've got some cholesterol deposits around your eye called xanthi asthmas, you can often see those just by looking in the mirror. You'll see some bumps under the skin around your eye..

heart disease heart attack
"disease" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

07:56 min | 7 months ago

"disease" Discussed on The Bio Report

"Who have Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease from a temporal dementia. Those are much more common. Huntington's disease is monogenic. It's caused by a mutation in a single gene. It strikes basically at the prime of life. The average age of onset is 35 years of age, so that's sort of when your career is taking off and you're having kids and it's really just as all of these neurodegenerative diseases are. It's very devastating. But what's also devastating is you know that your parent had it. You have a chance to get it. Your kids have a chance to get it. If you're a child of an HD patient, then in a way, you're watching what might be your future. So it's just, it's very, very devastating. It's so hundy dense disease is characterized by three major symptom areas. One is motoric lack of torque control, Huntington's disease used to be called Huntington's chorea so that lack of movement control is what Korea is. But also equally perhaps more important are the cognitive or thought processes disruptions as well as behavior behavioral issues, problems with controlling behavior. Those sorts of things. And so oftentimes that's even more devastating than the movement disorder. What treatment options exist today and what's the prognosis for patients with the condition? So there are a cluster of three drugs that basically work by the same mechanism. And they partially treat the motor problems. But there isn't anything that really is affecting the disease progression at this time. Over the past ten years, there has been a tremendous amount of energy put into both research and development of additional treatments. And so we have a number of treatments that are in the clinic now primarily targeting prevention of synthesis of the target protein Huntington. So I think honestly, I was just at a meeting in February, and I think it's really a hopeful time. I think there's a lot of attention. There are a lot, I think the best thing I've seen is really a diversity of approaches, so there are many people trying to go after this disease in different ways and to modify the progression. So I think this is there's a lot of optimism. And I think that's well deserved. At the moment, there really isn't a lot to help ease the progression. And so much of it is symptomatic and then just supportive care. What makes this a compelling indication is your lead indication. Great question. People often ask that because they want to know why wouldn't you go after the huge Alzheimer's disease market. And so when you have a startup or when you start on something, you want to make sure you're going after that, which will give you the best likelihood of success. And so in Huntington's disease, because we know what causes the disease and we know what to fix on the preclinical side and what do we need a drug to be able to do and because we can identify the patients based on their genetics and we know what to measure and we basically know when to measure it, we have, I think, a winning formula, which is we know what we need the drug to do, and we can actually test it in the clinic. And those two pieces are critically important that we often make lots of drugs and put them into the clinic and they don't always work. For a variety of reasons, oftentimes, because in neurodegeneration, there's trouble knowing who has the disease or when to treat or exactly what outcomes to measure. And I think that due to an awful lot of hard work from a huge number of people in the HD field, both in academia and in an industry, I think we are in a position where Huntington's disease can be can be treated. And so that's really why we chose Huntington's disease as a start. It sounds kind of funny to say, but in my mind, Huntington's disease is really the low hanging fruit in neurodegeneration. Is that because it's mechanism is well understood? Well, we know what causes the disease and so we know that the that we need to get rid of the toxic protein or prevent the protein from becoming toxic. So yes, there's that part, but also because we know how to run the clinical trials. And we know who to recruit and there's a wonderful registry of unbelievable people who have volunteered to be part of the registry. Patients and their unaffected family members. And so we can execute on the clinical trials as well. Your experimental therapy is Ori one 13. What is it and how does it work? So one one three is it's a small molecule protein degrader and we've done some delving into how we think it looks like it works in the cell in a lot in detail. And it looks like it is basically enhancing recruitment of the mutant Huntington to one of the degradation pathways in the cell called autophagy. And so we think we have a pretty good understanding there of how the drug is working. The upshot is that when we treat human Huntington's disease neurons, we can actually prevent some of the pathologies that you can see in these cells in a dish. So we kind of do a clinical trial in a dish. What is the clinical development path forward? So we're actually still fairly early. So one one three is not yet a drug candidate, meaning we still need to optimize some properties of the molecule and we do that medicinal chemists help us make lots more compounds that look like one one three. And we figure out which ones are the best, meaning they have good efficacy, but they're also safe and they can be given orally and synthesized easily. And so all of those good properties, we still need to build in. I will say things are looking good and it definitely gets in the brain. And so we're doing some in vivo characterization as we speak..

Huntington Alzheimer's disease Parkinson's disease temporal dementia Korea academia
"disease" Discussed on DNA Today

DNA Today

03:59 min | 10 months ago

"disease" Discussed on DNA Today

"Well, there are no disease specific treatments available yet, meaning that they're really targeted to solve this problem specifically with the enzyme, not working well enough. Or not having enough of a enzyme that works adequately. So we're developing a working on developing an investigational enzyme replacement therapy, which is where we take the recombinant human enzyme, meaning that it's a match to the human enzyme, but that we give back through an infusion to patients, this has been done in many, many different lysosomal storage diseases. And has been thankfully approved in many different diseases. All around the world. And we're working on towards the initiation of a clinical trial. With this enzyme replacement therapy, which of course is still still investigational, but we have done all of the required animal work that would go into it to demonstrate that the enzyme can work in this disease and can reduce the build up of the material. In the animals that are models of farber disease. And then it's also it has been quite safe in the studies that we've conducted so far that are part of what the FDA and other agencies require. So we're looking forward to being able to offer patients enrollment in a clinical trial as soon as it can start. I can give you a specific date, but that is our that is our goal. For the just for the completeness of the information, there have been patients who have been undergone bone marrow transplant or he might have stem cell transplant for far more disease, of course, that isn't the specific therapy that's done for many different diseases where other therapies are not available. But that is a part of the literature that's related to the potential treatment of fiber disease. What we're working on is a very specific, very targeted treatment that we hope will be able to benefit patients..

farber disease FDA
"disease" Discussed on The Health Quest Podcast

The Health Quest Podcast

11:18 min | 10 months ago

"disease" Discussed on The Health Quest Podcast

"Enhancing molecules that activate the immune system. So the innate immune system can eat up anything foreign, whether it's the infectious or food remnant, so you're innate immune system can repair you, so your innate immune system can identify abnormal self this polyphenolic combination of coercing and dihydrate is the plasma noise, but then soluble OPC soluble orthogonal cyanogen see I really am a biochemist. Soluble OTC is the preferred slava null. What do we mean by preferred? Over the last 30 years, thousands of articles have been written about 7 or 8 in the scientific literature and consistently the station, more beneficial by the noid, of course, into hydrate. And consistently, the more effective safer and effective salmonella is soluble OPC. So we put them together in a small town school that's easy to crush and swallow or a larger time fuel that has two and a half times billion for those who need more polyphenols. And that's perfect. So there's for pain guide, which was launched in 1987, studied in 1992 95, 97, 99, consistently the better performing safer form. And then about 1995, we brought out repair barn. And that too has been in multiple research outcome studies and this is only a bit strong, but I can assure you that many, many people would not let you take the bottle out of their hands. If it works, you bet they're going to be committed to it. And that's the proof of the pudding. Let me jump in though and offer three very quick vignettes of how these work. A patient has been on pain medicine for 27 years. Two weeks, and gardens several other profiles. And they were at half the pain medicine within 6 weeks they were off with prescription pain medicine. And then their constipation went away, their depression went away. Their sedentary lifestyle reduced because they felt like getting up and doing things. Their relationship improved because their family said they weren't so good. So there's a lot of indirect and direct benefits to getting the better forms in the right amounts for the right individual to overcome repair deafness have known as inflammation and really renew and repair. Now, if we look at the medical conditions associated today with inflammation, it ranges from cardiovascular disease to diabetes from cancer to autoimmunity, basically anything that is a chronic ill, anything that's a degenerative disease anything that we knew as an autoimmune disease. Anything that we knew is a quote inflammatory condition. They all have a common source that most doctors don't know about I've devoted my career to crafting a path to and then bringing back the opportunity to engage. In other words, it's one thing to know that coercion and dihydrate is the preferred slap noise or the soluble OPC is the preferred flavanol. It's another to note that here's an easy to swallow tabs. You'll that's a 100% active all the time by design. There's nothing in any per formula that isn't beneficial in active. And this sets a new standard, but it also helps us improve uptake. Let's go buy availability. And we always enhance the delivery is needed. We shop around the nutrients to where it's needed. That sets a better standard, the body appreciates it and this testimonials are of any value and they are of some value. Look at our website pert dot com or the perky guard repair dot com. Or call the toll free number, which if it's okay, I would like to offer to you lessons. So that we can extend the discussion. Please do. Thank you. The 800 number for per if you have a pencil is 800, 5 two 5, 73 72. That's 800, 5 two 5, 73 72. Okay. And our customer service team is just waiting for your call. We can help refer you to a professional if that's what you would like. We can help you get to the information you want on the website. If that's what you'd like. And we really are grateful for the opportunity to serve both specifically with products like Perkin card and for prepared guard polling for knowledge. But also with the philosophy that says, better really is better and it's about value, not really about cost. Well, it's very interesting. You said a lot there that I'd like to touch upon. First, I want to commend you for having that kind of customer service. Because your company as a practitioner oriented supplier is ultimately interested in linking up consumers with practitioners and letting the practitioners decide what products might be appropriate for that consumer. That's a great service to the consumer community, something that many people wish we had more up. So the fact that you've brought that out, that you commit to offering that kind of service is something that I really appreciate. Now, you mentioned something that was kind of a new concept for me and I wanted to explore it with you just a little bit. You talked about inflammation being a repair deficit. And I thought that was a very intriguing description because what it says to me is that these diverse problems that we have and sometimes we wonder what's the connection. But if your body is not able to repair properly, it may have trouble repairing any or all of the tissues throughout the body, the repair process is somehow inhibited, inflammation becomes a part of that deficit that inability to repair and therefore, if we are calming down this inflammatory process, does that suggest that we are then probably enhancing the repair process that we're doing both of those really at the same time through a product like this. That's exactly right, Steve. We develop these products because of my insight from decades ago that we were looking through the wrong end of the microscope in essence that we were looking at the results of pathology. We weren't looking at the causes. The cause of inflammation is repair deficit. And the repair deficit occurs because the first line innate immune system, which should both defend and repair us and eliminate abnormal cells. Runs out of energy, more quickly than any other cell in the body. And if that cell, the innate immune system, polymorphic nuclear cell DMN cell, poly cell. If that cell lacks vitamin C if that cell lacks polyphenolics, that's less minerals. The cell just shuts down. The absence of that point is that whatever is least available with the body needs in a complex system like a cell, will control the whole cell. So we want to make sure you don't have too much, but you don't have too little of anything that you need. And yes, it's a new insight even to researchers that inflammation really at its cause is repaired deficit, and therefore it's an opportunity to enhance repair through the essential nutrients and activate repair rather than through the pain medications that if your listeners have been reading the headlines lately, we take far too much of opioid or pain medicines in America, far too much of NSAIDs that now have black box warnings on them, far too much of Tylenol, and by the way, I hope your listeners know that if you take any class of either aspirin or Tylenol or an NSAID, you should never take another class of NSAIDs in the same week because if you medicines across pharmacy or pharmaceutical categories, you multiply the risk and divide the benefit. So you get less pain relief and more side effects. I only learned that a few years ago, so I'm sharing it with your listeners. That most doctors don't even know that yet, let alone concerns. We are so casual in our approach to these pain medications. As if they're actually helping us be better. The commercials would lead you to think that if you take this, you can go out and dance and garden and you're better. You're not getting better, you're masking the pain and perhaps even making your situation worse, consumers need to get that message as well. If you take an end center and aspirin or a Tylenol. Between four, 6, 8, ten, maybe 12 hours, you will, as you correctly send Steve mask the pain, you feel better, you can function, that's good. However, you basically exceed the need for that medicine, twice a day, or four times a day. Whereas if you invest in yourself through eating foods you can digest assimilate and eliminate without immune and then you supplement because you're living in the 21st century where we're marinating in toxins and distress and various other things that use up the nutrients. If you do that, if you eat wisely and if you supplement wisely. You can like me be healthy or in the 21st century. Now, for full disclosure, I used to weigh 65 pounds more, and while I've lost that weight, I don't plan to find it again. I now have better restorative sleep. My relationships are better. My mood is better. My resilience when I exercise is better. So I want people to get up and move at least an hour a day. So sitting is the new smoking. But I also want them to know the better is better that better supplements with all active ingredients even the novel delivery systems that we pioneered at perk. Are all in the service of 21st century survival. Now, you had mentioned numerous clinical studies along the way. Could you give us an example perhaps of one of your studies that really stands out in your mind? Give us just an overview of what you saw in one of your impressive studies. Be happy to and I'm going to take the most common condition and that is diabetes both type two and type one at two acquired type one is insulin dependent, and what we did was the following. We put this approach into practice, we recruited a group of people we divided them in half. Everyone had been well taken care of every one of them was on best standard of care in conventional medicine for at least a year before the study. We divided them.

salmonella autoimmune disease Perkin cardiovascular disease depression diabetes cancer Steve mask Steve America
"disease" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"disease" Discussed on The Book Review

"And having grown up in Connecticut, that was just sort of how I understood Lyme disease. But in fact, only about 50% of people get the bull's eye rash. And the blood tests are early on only about 50% accurate. And the presentation of Lyme disease can be it turns out incredibly complex. And then there's this argument that's been going on for decades about what you do if the initial round of treatment doesn't get you better. And most people who get Lyme disease, 80%, let's say, take four to 6 weeks of antibiotics and mostly feel better. But a lot of people don't. And to put it mildly, doctors do not agree about what you do then. All right, I want to get into the controversy in a minute, but just to go back to the symptoms for a moment because what you described sounds kind of flu like, right? It's a fever. It's joint aches, but earlier when you were talking about it, you were talking about nightmares and one hour of sleep a night. What were the symptoms actually like and did you get brain fog? So I got brain fog later on, deeper into some of the weirder things I did for treatment. What I got initially was this sort of baseline feeling of disintegration, which I think is fairly common with people who have chronic illnesses, one writer compared it to feeling like every cell of her body was somehow dissolving. And to me, it felt sort of how you feel like in the last day of a fever when your body is disassociated from yourself. So that was sort of the baseline. But then there was pain, pain like just moving around, really severe pain in my shoulder one day in my ankle the next day inside my throat my chest, hence the feeling that oh, this must be a heart attack or, you know, I would wake up in the night feeling like my throat was closing up. And the medical system is based around specialization. So you have stomach problems. You go to a gastroenterologist..

Lyme disease Connecticut fever flu heart attack
"disease" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

Acupuncture is my Life

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"disease" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

"Hello everyone and welcome back to another episode of acupunctures. My life now. A few episodes ago. I was discussing the internal causes of disease and i brushed on emotions as a cause of disease and i promised that i would expand a little further in the near future and in this episode i shall do so because many individuals globally are unaware that in no emotions can serve as a cause of disease. You see the two instances in which an acupuncturist would focus on emotions. The first is when it causes disease and the other is when it presents as a symptom see when it presents is a symptom we have to as acupunctures find out the root cause and look to treat the route so that the symptom can subside. Okay now to an acupuncturist. When emotion serve as a cause of disease you see these emotions present as mental stimuli which disturbs a mind altering the yin yang balance of the internal organs as well as disrupting the smooth flow of chicken blood throughout the body. Again i spoke about the important of harmony between in of yanyong being imbalanced. Emotions can disturb that emotions can also affect the flow of chicken blood throughout the body and these are the ways in which can cause disease you see. This is the way in which he motioned when we lose control of them. Serve as an internal cause. Disease injury. The internal organs. Now i say lose control of them. I mean if we carry these emotions. Let's say for an extended period of time before short period of time in which we carry them here extremely intense. Now this can also happen in reverse because an acupunctures understands that the body and mind are inseparable meaning. They are one. And i discussed this in the past and presenting disorder with a particular internal organ can lead to emotional disturbance thereby causing disease now. Let's say an example being anxiety and fear which your emotions that more so relate to the kidneys. Now if a patient presented with anxiety over an extended period of time this can create a deficiency pattern of the kidneys was an acupuncturist. May look to nourish the kidneys as one of his or her. Let's.

yanyong Disease injury
"disease" Discussed on Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"disease" Discussed on Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

"It's now the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the us affecting seventy million american suspect one three adults and fast food is a great way to bring it on since his associated with the intake of soft drinks and meet one can of soda. Day may braise the odds of fatty liver forty five percent and those in the equivalent of fourteen chicken nuggets worth of me today have nearly tripled. The rates of fatty liver compared to like seven nuggets or less it's been characterized tale of fat and sugar but evidently not all types of fat those with fatty hepatitis. Eight more animal fat and cholesterol less plant fat vibrant antioxidants which may explain why adherence to mediterranean-style diet characterized by high consumption of food such as fruits vegetables whole grains beans as associated with a less severe non alcoholic fatty liver disease perhaps because of the anti inflammatory and antioxidant effects Maybe because of specific fighter nutrients like the purple red blue anthocyanins pigments and berries and grapes and plums red cabbage. Red onions ridichio these anthem. Sign and rich foods may be promising for the prevention of fatty liver. But that's mostly. Based on petri dish experiments there was one. Clinical trial did find drinking a purple sweet potato. Beverage seem to successfully dampen liver inflammation a more plant-based die mouse improve our microbiome. The good bacteria in our gut the oldest dodge. We are what we eat. Maybe changing too. We are what our bacteria eat. And when we eat fat we may facilitate the growth of bad bacteria which can release inflammatory molecules that increase the leaky -ness of our gut and contribute to fatty liver. Disease fatty liver disease can also be caused by cholesterol overload. The thought is that dietary. Cholesterol found an eggs. Meat and dairy oxidises and then up regulates liver x receptor alpha which can up regulate something else called sorry. Bp which can increase the level of fat in the liver cholesterol crystals alone cost human white blood cells to spill out inflammatory compounds. Just like uric. Acid crystals in gout. That's what may be triggering. The progression of just plain fatty liver into serious hepatitis. The accumulation of sufficient concentrations of free cholesterol within fatty liver cells to cause crystallisation of the cholesterol one of several recent lines of evidence suggesting that dietary cholesterol glazed important role in the development of fatty hepatitis. Fatty liver inflammation in a study of nine thousand. American adults fall for thirteen years. They found a strong association between dietary cholesterol intake. Hospitalization and.

fatty hepatitis nuggets alcoholic fatty liver disease chronic liver disease Disease fatty liver disease mediterranean us Bp hepatitis
"disease" Discussed on Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"disease" Discussed on Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

"I'm your host. Dr michael gregor most diseases are known for their salubrious. Names and fatty liver. Disease is no exception. So what is fatty liver disease. And how can we not get it. Non alcoholic fatty liver. Disease is now the most frequent chronic liver disease. Thanks in part to our epidemic of obesity. Now even seen in children as many nearly seventy eight percent of obese children may have fatty liver disease. Why do we care because a fatty liver can progress into fatty hepatitis. Who's in cost scarring liver cirrhosis. Which should bad enough without also causing develop liver cancer too okay. So what's the source of the liber. Fat invalid liver disease. There are three main sources the excess sugar in our diet excess fat in our diet and the fence spilling over from your own excess body fat. How do we know excess. Dietary sugar is bad. Because it's been put to the test to randomize teens with liver disease tonight low and free sugars. Meeting added sugar and sugary beverages. They experience a significant improvement within eight weeks. Given this new data liver journal editorial read a strong argument can be made that. We are beyond any period of uncertainty about the harmful effects of excess sugar. Consumption must now act to inform the public on the health risks of eating too much sugar. How do we know excess. Dietary fat is bad. Because it's been put to the test. Randomized people to the scene low calorie die but one. that's low fat versus one. That's high fat and within just two weeks. The low fat diet decreased liver fat by twenty percent worth the same number of hours on high increased liver fed by thirty five percent on the low fat diet. Insulin levels went down about fifteen percent on the high fat died. Insulin levels went up about fifteen percent. Low-carbon ketogenic diet advocates are always talking about high. You have to eat more fat less carbs to keep your insulin levels down. But the exact opposite happens when is actually put to the test. Even a single high-fat meal not only increases liver fat but also insulin resistance within four hours your whole body. Insulin sensitivity can drop by twenty five percents body pump out that much more insulin as the accompanying mandatory put it a single fat dose pack search punch so help prevent or treat fatty liver disease..

liver disease Dr michael gregor fatty hepatitis scarring liver cirrhosis chronic liver disease liver cancer obesity treat fatty liver disease
"disease" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"disease" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

"To be given to everybody like okay. I'm consuming good food. But then there it is important that we also limit our unhealthy options Because in one of the recent studies we did. We found that those who were consuming more of these kind of unhealthy food items. They were Categorize more of the western diet had a did not have the impact of their Good food which they were eating so overall what. You're eating Does impact on like whatever bad yard. I am using the would bad but it's again like just like not not really bad but considered unhealthy will be like more fried food sugar for would end of that can affect night diet so consuming vest nights kind of diet was Attenuating the beneficial effect of all the good food. People were eating in the school. And this shows there's something happening there is there is this interaction or there is Some interaction happing definitely with between the good and the bad food in our diet so we have to. It is important that we have to limit. How much of unhealthy you can eat. So that's by mind either. Communication for example is like just limit your fried food intake to less than or equal to once a week. So let's not do it so regularly that you are diminishing the effect of all the other good foods. We have had in your breakfast lunch so in the if you wanna be needed. I'm just probably make it once league rather than just grabbing it everyday so so there is there is the study we have done ended probably the expanding more about the results in the conference upcoming conference. But that's definitely something we've found Patio boss effect. Like the bachelor had on the good ol boy all right now. That is something definitely to look forward to. And that conferences. Coming up july fifteenth through the seventeenth. And you can save your spot right now by visiting. Pcr dot org slash icy and reserve your spot today and by the way if you use promo code exam room all one word you can save fifty dollars off the cost of registration right now. So crm dot org slash icbm to reserve your seat and dr agarwal. I know you're going to be diving deeper into science. They're one of the other things that you're going to be covering And we're not going to go into this now because we have to save something for the conference you're also going to be looking at emerging research on pre and probiotics and gut health in terms of alzheimer's and parkinson's disease as well so this is all very fascinating and i just. I can't wait to sit down and watch the entire presentation and yeah. I think that's another area would just developing i said like a this nutrition unity Disease area is definitely very interesting and still developing and one of the aspects Which is People are like different groups. Autograph award looking at is the gut rain access. So did they say like the food we eat affect your gut microbiome affect your like overall diversity in microbiome and might have impact on brain health. So these are the new areas of research Where people delving in a like every every day they're like new answers on interesting Things are discovering related to this and so probably one of the mechanisms through which a healthy diet is working or helping your brain possibly can be through got. Don't you just love your job being able to study this day in and day out like isn't that just fascinating. I love what i do. And i think all of these interesting question. Just let me get up everyday and work more harder to make to look deeper and we are also trying to delve into more mcadams which is lock more exciting. And i guess i'll probably one of the few centers disease center. I think we are unique place to release. Study the effect of nutrition on brain up because we have these studies Collecting rains at the end of life. So we get all these bar savino what they aid in their lifetime. And now after post-partum. I mean we are looking at their brains than trying to link if there is an association with alzheimer's disease Or something else in their brains. We're trying to also established mechanisms link which really expand in for the Define or really like say how how might be affecting overall brain house so that's really exciting. So yes i do. Love may jail but it's it's exciting. It's fascinating but most of all it's important work. That is going to go toward improving the quality of life for so many millions of people worldwide and their family members their loved ones as well. And so that's why. I'm so grateful for everything that it is. You are doing and also for taking the time to join us here today. This has been an absolutely fascinating conversation. Thanks too much shock. It was a pleasure to be here. And i think talking more about this in the presentation and the upcoming contract so stay tuned.

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"disease" Discussed on The Recovery Show

The Recovery Show

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"disease" Discussed on The Recovery Show

"Is a disease the arguments I pull forward out there for anyone to explore and to draw their own conclusions. But as a practitioner like a professional in the industry, I'm using a bio psycho-social model of treatment up against a medical model of treatment that Embraces and support. the addiction as a disease Theory our challenge that with the fact that using a bio psycho-social working on all those components bio psycho-social elevates chances. of prolong sobriety recovering and yes I do agree that one someone would have been challenged by substance use disorder or certain addictive behavior. It can be a lifelong process to be managed in terms of recovering because but behaviors. Choice to use the behaviors and subsequent behaviors and loss of control Hallmark of any addictive behavior, whether it's process addiction or substance use disorder or chemical dependency. Look through it. You will see impulsivity compulsivity lack of delayed graphic verification. I lost control. Thank you for listening. Yeah, that's a little longer. in the usual podcast I really wanted to make that point but regards substance use disorder or addiction as they would say more chemical. Dependency Thursday. Okay. Bye for now. Anonymous class just on total of most people's knowledge of addiction treatment. And I am reading from the book healing the addicted brain by harle Versa or she'll sorry. No, it goes on prefer to say but it's dead Rubble. That's the sum total of most people's knowledge of addiction treatment. But Eric says, it's dead wrong. Before the states that and it's the main reason that the success rate for addiction frequent is currently only twenty 30% off much. I agree which writings of this book. I dunno. After almost a decade of working in the industry. The low rate affects us with regards. from recovery harm reduction and sustained abstinence when it comes to Continuum of Care. Mark recovered This means that 78% of the participants in any given addiction treatment program will not be successful dead. But I also know to be true no wonder people think that alcohol or drug addiction treatment home..

"disease" Discussed on The Recovery Show

The Recovery Show

15:19 min | 1 year ago

"disease" Discussed on The Recovery Show

"Hello. Yet another time for the recovery show. So today I want to see off after almost a decade of working in the field of addictions as we would say substance abuse. Misuse, I would like to challenge a popular saying that addiction is a disease. I will argue that what should be the phrase use wage when referring to addiction as a disease. Is that overtime because of abuse home substances substance use disorder. Can lead to the brain becoming disease? I think that distinction is vastly different. From seeing that addiction is a disease. I think in making that distinction that the brain becomes disease based on the use of substances or the abuse substances coming disease that I would challenge because an actual fact what happens is that the brain structure becomes altered? I think that is more correct. See now the support my argument in favor of wine things that prediction is a disease. I have several points, but I'm going to raise an Explorer support my case. Say the brain dead comes after. because of the use abuse and misuse of substances My first argument is this when we talk about addiction as against chemical dependency or substance use disorder Thursday. We are forgetting subset of addictions that has nothing to do with substances, but have all the Hallmarks signs. And category is of addictive behavior. You took over gambling you talk about shopping. We talk about sex or addictions even have addiction to people to a person what I'm really are we talking about when we say addiction man because if all the Hallmark signs, Of Addiction shows up for gambling shows up for sex, but we refer to that as a process addiction. Where is the disease in the brain would process addiction if an addiction light statement is a disease? That is my first argument against the blanket statement a thing that addiction is a disease now in support of the theory that addiction is a disease. I have a book that for the most part I value What is forward in the book on the position it takes on Titan is healing the addicted brain by harle home or cell? This book was published in 2009. I sourcebook pink and her is cheap of our at the time was chief of Palm Coast practicing which in turn helps. Com. MD medical doctor, so I want to respect what dr. Purcell the forward. But at the same time I want to challenge it because of the wide variety of information available that goes against wage argument. I suppose forward by those who.