12 Burst results for "Directors Guild Of America"

"directors guild america" Discussed on Tales of American History

Tales of American History

16:29 min | 1 year ago

"directors guild america" Discussed on Tales of American History

"Linked in now take a journey back through time with Kent masterson Brown and his guest and let their story telling transport you to the most compelling moments in American history today can we'll be talking with Ronald F Maxwell the writer and director of the epic civil war films Gettysburg Gods and generals and copperhead Ron has been a film director screenwriter and producer of films since nineteen seventy six. He is a member of the Writers Guild of America the directors guild America and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences welcome can an Ron what I'd like to welcome uh today my friend Ron Maxwell who has come here to Lexington from his lovely home in Flint Hill Virginia on top of the mountain in Rapahannock County and Ron Welcome. It's great to have you great to be with you as all of you know Ron Maxwell in the the writer and director of the movies Gettysburg Gods and generals and copperhead and what I'd like to do ron is start off by asking you have you always been interested in history yes I guess so I can give my father the blame or the credit for that because when before I could read my father would read my brother Night Asleep with and Merrily as memories are factories Vanity Fair and Charles Dickens at the time I thought it was now in retrospect would you called child abuse just kidding but I think you know ah the the love of stories and characters and literature got really imbued and made a very early age so that by the time I I learned to read and write which is around first grade are immediately you just segue into reading myself and before long as a reading fiction and literature and history and a great deal more than in fact I was being offered in in the classroom. Yeah a graduate of the New York University School of film and I'd like to ask you when you went to new NYU and wanted to study film Did you ever have in mind at some time you would do two films on historical subjects probably the answer is yes I had been an undergraduate theater major and from my whole Youth I was a you know a again from a very early age writing and directing plays in the garage in my living room before I had any notion of career or or that this would be commitment it was just something I always dead and I remember when I was eleven or twelve I grew up in northern New Jersey and we were in the the the broadcast area of the New York City big broadcast channels crisis long long before cable television this is all broadcast television and one of the channels broadcast A BBC production called an age of kings black and white but there were Shakespeare's histories some his daughter from ooh Richard the two yeah through Richard Three all Henry's in between and and it's just captivated and it was a a window into a world that I didn't know it previously had existed I mean I had been exposed Shakespeare to effects my father but you know reading it looking at it on the page is different than seeing it produced and with great Eliza take spearing actors and such a profound impression on me that soon thereafter because I had already been writing plays at eleven twelve thirteen at around thirteen fourteen I wrote researched and wrote a play in blank verse and Mba Pentameter Called Charles I and I had as my source of his history collection we had the old books a my my father had these great collections of elegantly around the books of the history of England history of France and so I was always reading them already and and Charles I gravitated to me and of course we remember his last party words which are also the last words in my play before he's executed Charleston I says I go from corruptible to an incorruptible crown uh-huh and then I produced it then I got money from the student council and from the the the Mustang Band Fund we had a band that was world renowned it would go to the Rose Bowl every and I actually raised a few hundred dollars and we produced it on stage and then the following year I wrote another play in blank verse Amber Tamiko Henry the third which so so I I managed to find some kings and Shakespeare hadn't touched that had and that to raise money and and you know ironically the my high school I tended to that would have been my sophomore year in high school some the first play was made Freshman Year in high school that was Charles I in my sophomore year of high school is when I wrote and produced and directed the Henry the third and ironically there was no theater program I am in my high school I mean can you believe this yeah so there I was my life was all about theater and I was doing the academics I was kind of an honor roll student but not even a class in in dramatics as I have to invent it so sometimes you know necessity is the mother of invention yes indeed so visit I share the background with you so you understand that when I applied to college and I I I I was happily accepted at the universities I applied to and I decided to go to NYU because it gave me a full tuition scholarship and my folks were working class and they made a big difference yeah and it turned out that they had a very good theater program Ram and I spent my four years as an undergraduate constantly in costumes and makeup and doing theater yeah Joshua do play on replay and and check off and it was one of wonderful undergraduate theater program and I by that time in my life I thought well I'm number one and actor also directing also writing but it was the whole thing to me and I had always done it I didn't know anything else so that by the time I finished my junior year I was cast as hamlet and I'd cells nineteen when I played hamlet and I don't think I've ever had so much fun and life I knew the whole play and I remember in those days we had the reel to reel tape recorders and I had a little reel to reel tape recorder that I kept up to learn the lines yeah and to jam him into my head and they're the character of hamlet just the character alone there are has more words than the entire Scottish play of Shakespeare this evening of the magnitude of it where and and that that so I'm finally getting around to answer your question because at one of those performances Jay Hester who was the president of New York University remember that was in uptown campus which I attended and there was a downtown campus which is the one we think about today at Washington Square I'm back in the sixties When I was in undergraduate it was a beautiful uptown campus where they had the hall of fame for Great Americans a traditional quad with the with the the romanesque buildings and and the Georgian buildings that since since the decades since has been sold I think the two Bronx Community College but anyway the present swath performance he came backstage afterwards and he said you belong and the new school the arts they were just forming a founding a graduate program called the School of the arts so I said fine and so with his recommendation I went down to see the new dean of the theater program which is what I expected to apply to and when I was sitting there waiting for that interview there was a poster on the wall in the room was down on Washington square announcing the new graduate school in the film and Television Yeah and I thought with the arrogance of Youth I know everything there is Oh about acting I'd been acting my whole life I was nineteen but my whole life I'd been acting Shakespeare and everything else and I thought what I really WANNA learn how to do is make movies and so I did the interview but I immediately applied for the film school instead of the acting program and I got the letter from the president of the versity and I was accepted with scholarship into graduate school film and so I didn't realize in the moment can't that I was making back into a major life decision I didn't think I was leaving acting behind and goings emotion but in but in effect that's what I did unknowingly I've hardly he ever acted since it's been my whole life from that moment from nineteen seventy has been about learning how to make movies it was a two year program at the time graduate yeah now now I it's a three year program then it was a two year program and my life took a turn and ever since I've been making movies and sometimes with sadness I remember the wonderful how wonderful it is to be the actor but what it did give me and what has continued to provide me is a an understand ending appreciation and sympathy for what the actor does Yeah Yeah having been trained in the method of Stanislavsky method practicing being done it myself I understand what an actor does and so it's given me a a a tool a very useful I think essential tool to work in the of movies that I make wow you know it's interesting We just completed a film on Abraham Lincoln Illinois and in that film you watch Lincoln try to educate himself and he has a friend named Jack Kelso who lives in new Salem Illinois who lends him books by The Shakespeare plays Robert Burns among others and the these are the books that he reads and notice in in that film and his life Lincoln becomes interested in history and so did you and you your window into it from what you're saying is reading Shakespeare you said that last night by the way folks he ron delivered a stunning address to the Kentucky Civil War Roundtable last night to a he you just crowd and he went over some of this last night and honestly your address last night ron was spectacular and but you mentioned Shakespeare then too and the the history plays of Shakespeare because Shakespeare does take you to the site it and he doesn't editorialize he takes you to the story and you get in this story and I can see how Shakespeare our influences people and influenced you well their influences that you I can understand better now after decades of making movies you see in the moment not I don't think I wasn't self consciously thinking of Shakespeare or or self-consciously for Richard Wagner Russia or the plays of Sophocles and the Greeks but looking back you understand how it shapes you in because in many ways for instance you there's a humility that you absorb even if you're not conscious of it now now I can look back and understand it because when you've read the place of the ancient Greeks when you've read the plays of the renaissance of of the of the enlightenment of the restoration period of of of the Western allegation of the the canonise sometimes called moliere racine in France Shakespeare Congress the other authors in the English language you realize you're in a stream you're not alone right you're you're in a long stream of thousands of years of fellow humans who are grappling with the big mysteries of life grappling with the human condition right and and and Shakespeare in particular of course no one talks like that no one talk that way then when he wrote in ruin talks that way now but this is part of power because he puts the English language into poetry all of those plays are set in blank verse in IAMBIC pentameter their their their poems their epic poems that then become enlivened on a stage by a -CCOMPLISH trained actors who make it sound conversational right but in fact it's poetry so it's elevated language and I think that's an immense part of the our Ju- just think of any any verse of any of the plays of this Scottish play Julius Caesar Hamlet Romeo and Juliet and take the out of it and the poetry out of it the power is diffused goes away so so it's actually the language of Shakespeare that whole olds the power like a uranium atom and that that that then it gets translated by by great acting in great directing for an audience and so having imbued that having understood that I I made a decision conscious decision and the and the AH in particular in Gettysburg and Gods and generals to work in the epic form Arabic form which is as old as the Greeks so some critics I and I'm not being churlish if you're making movies you should be open criticism and I am some six people didn't talk that way civil war and people don't talk that way now and they missed the point they missed the point we're working in epic style everything is real it's emotionally real just like it's absolutely emotionally real in Shakespeare play where gripped with emotion we understand that the the scene between lady Macbeth in Macbeth when she's encouraging him to murder Duncan that is a powerful thing we get it we understand those impulses those deep primordial human instincts to do that kind of human destruction because of vanity because of ambition of what we want whatever the driving Ursus so it's it's it's based it's derived it's moving and emotion but it's rendered through this more formal thing so the same thing in Gods and generals and Gettysburg because of this you're you're training yourself training to have been interested in history a longtime when did you first consider hitter doing a film like Gettysburg which is your first civil war film well the going back to the early days.

Ron Welcome Ronald F Maxwell director New York University School of Writers Guild of America writer Academy of Motion Picture Arts Kent masterson Brown Lexington Charles Dickens Rapahannock County NYU guild America Flint Hill Virginia Vanity Fair producer two year hundred dollars four years
"directors guild america" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"directors guild america" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"We had a nice fat. Yeah my production designer had a great time making that model and and he at the end of this conversation he starts telling me about how the earth is flat and i just was like my brain was. I couldn't even register what he was saying. Obviously was joking right and then he wasn't choking what is happening and i really. I'd never heard of it because i didn't know it was a thing yet you know so he turns around and he says to me is park the car from my apartment. He looks at me and he says exactly what nathaniel says which is basically look. Listen i get it. You're exactly where i was a year ago. All you have to do is google it google it. Just is keep googling. It's all there. It's undeniable if you just google deep enough and i was like thank you sir out in a movie yeah so i knew i wanted one of the characters to be aflutter that was sort of the beginning of the conspiracy theory thing and then once we were trying to figure out the con what would a story be that would make some artifact more valuable that came in you know it just kind of organically manically emerged from there yeah but it has this great humanity to it in the way you treat everybody the way the actors perform the parts just the way the characters interact with each other and i think it's really a it's a it speaks to your sensibility in your the humanity of your your body of of work is expressed here the same way it's the same thing i remember loving about hump day and all that stuff in between like you've brought it to the t._v. Work you do as well how it expands into this bigger kind of you know meditation on the moment we're in but in a way that's really loving of all the people involved. I thought it was just a lovely kinda. It's a lovely treatment and way of thinking about these things well. Thanks yeah. I definitely as a northerner coming to the south. I didn't want to condescend to southerners. I also didn't want to represent you know the south in authentically so that was something i was very concerned about and even the folks who i consider the wrong minded okay individuals in this movie i i wanted to humanize them. I wanted everybody to feel like real humans and not just nope. Nobody was to be a cardboard cutout out or or a cartoon or you know sort of two dimensional. I wanted everybody to feel real. Is that great moment. When you know the kids pop up at the they've been taken and <hes> you know and mal says oh you're those your those guys marks ideas. I remember he was marks idea and i just i i. I love it so much. I think it's so smart to me. It felt like it immediately just yeah it humanizes them it just makes them and so and and they're they're trying so hard to be toughened bullies but just like everything just goes to his sort of you know philosophical approach on on his show that i've always loved which is he's basically talking to everyone with the the fundamental unspoken thing is everyone is just a person and i'm going to get to know the person exactly and your movie does the same thing in a way that in probably ugly part of where you guys link up and the this part aware what you're illustrating in the stop and your shared journey. It's cold court thing. It looks like we're winding down but totally great to talk to you about this. Thanks thanks for doing this. Shelton ladies ladies and gentlemen. Thanks guys. Thanks for listening to another q._n._a. If you'd like to hear more you can find passed up sales of the director's cut. Wherever you listen to podcasts stay tuned in the coming weeks as we look more great q._n._a.'s directors andrea birla and quentin tarantino be sure to subscribe and please take a moment to rate and review us. We'd love to hear your feedback and you can help fellow santa claus on the show. Thanks again for listening and we'll see you next time. This podcast is produced by the directors guild. America music is by dan wally <music>.

google directors guild nathaniel quentin tarantino mal dan wally America andrea birla Shelton director q._n._a.
"directors guild america" Discussed on The Valleycast

The Valleycast

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"directors guild america" Discussed on The Valleycast

"Every now. And then you need your jets Jovan. I understand that. No one can have a hill jets track. See mid-nineties? Did you see I didn't see it? But he just looked so cool now, he just became cool. He's so listen to interview every photo, and it was really good because the G Q or the was video. I don't know where it goes. I listened to him Bill Simmons podcast was a really good interview. It was really DJ directors guild America's hot cast. And he was talking about how he's made the transition how when he first started out. Everybody was calling him. Like, oh, he's just the comedy silly boy, and he never wanted to be that and he's had to like slowly transit. And I think he's done that you don't really see him as just funny anymore. Yeah. Whole transition. He was like actor was always a path to director. He was always in. My mind was always a path to director Google. That's the difference. I've talked about how different groups of people will take the comedy mantle for a while. So it's like it was will Ferrell's group for a bit Nadan McKay. And then the set appetite grew and Seth Rogan and all of them. But this throw gin Jona hill James Franco group, they're different from everybody else. Because there they took this frigging town by storm on every level. They're writing their directing they're doing so much getting nominated for Oscar. Rip. And I'm not saying this as an absolute. But I would say will Ferrell's group is a bunch of comedians and actors, which is fine. And for the most part that's kind of the path that they stayed on. There was director Adam McKay that they stayed with. And maybe they would write their stuff here and there, but most of them Chris Parnell stuff like that stuck to the acting while Franco's group, just DEA everything. And they're they're the next level. They're about to take over. I think a new realm of comedy as apoptosis group. Expands more. Yeah. I still haven't seen disaster artists. Billy plan. Yeah. Have you seen the room though? Like have you seen the I know I've never watched the whole thing. And I did like a secession. We did a back to back actually was like, I think it might be the way to do it in my honest opinion because. We'll see we'll also it is it is so bad. But it's not one of those horrible. Like, you see the madness within you see all that in. So it's kind of fascinating to see all the madness within. So when you see it again, I I don't know. I really liked it that way because you were just like oh that is. Oh my God. That's exactly how that happened. Oh, that makes perfect sense. As to why it was such a weird read that he did have you gone back to Bander snatch at all as up. I did. I went back and tried to watch it. But you can't watch TV for my TV. Oh, wow. Mom, we'll help you figure that out. Well, have you figured it? Do you want to watch the old Mary Poppins, Steve before you watch him new Mary Poppins because we'll help you figure that out you put them on at the same time. They shouldn't do that. At the same time, really hard to focus on one of the storylines after the second lion. Dr. Affection.

director Nadan McKay Ferrell James Franco Billy plan Mary Poppins Bill Simmons Seth Rogan Chris Parnell Google America Oscar Dr. Affection DEA Steve Bander
"directors guild america" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:43 min | 2 years ago

"directors guild america" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Marvel studios. Black Panther showed Hollywood changing, it was always much more than just another superhero film. We don't know if it will be nominated at the Academy Awards voting for Oscar nominations opens this week. That was Vincent Dowd. Well, nowadays, it's getting harder to distinguish between the two formats that will be covered by the Golden Globes, TV and film as the best acting, directing and screenwriting talent seems to make no distinction between the big screen and the smaller screen when it comes to taking on work. Well to discuss some of the favorites for tonight's Golden Globes. And why you might be hearing a lot more about them as award season continues right up to next month's Oscars ceremony. We're joined in our London studio by the British entertainment writer, Emma, Bullimore, Emma. Welcome. So let's discuss I how film and TV are beginning to overlap. What's driving that? Well, it's interesting look at the nominees list. Hugh Grant, Julia Roberts, Amy Adams. These are film stars there will nominated for TV categories. It's really starting to change. Netflix started this. I think it's made TV cool again and actually at a time where it's very expensive to go to the cinema and your option seemed to be big blockbusters which. Are in front of a green screen or little nashvillehomes that no one is actually going to see is very tempting for these great actors to think if I do something on TV, a it's cool again be there's some cachet, and I actually get to get into some really interesting material. So we're seeing a real shift and as a critic, how do you respond to this change? I think it's really exciting, and it's also really exciting for awards ceremonies because it tends to be the films are films that were released. I mean, some of them haven't even been released here yet and some of them were only released a week ago or something so people don't feel as engage whereas the things up for TV awards bodyguard killing eve, very scandal off things we've been talking about for ages. Let's get to some of the recommendations that you have in that our panel might have let's start with TV. Let's talk about a BBC film last year about a disgraced politician in the nineteen seventies, Jeremy Thorpe, the film is called a very English scandal or the TV program. Let's hear a bit more of the trailer for that before you tell us more about it. Liberal. Norman. Youngest man to lead the party. More than a century. Sure. Very dramatic. This is such an exciting coming together of British talents. You got Russell t Davis is such a fantastic writer and Hugh Grant who versus audience is a fall in love with his Iran Qatar actually getting to show that he can properly act, and this is fantastic performance from him with Ben Wishaw who was so celebrated as well. And I really hope it does. Well, tonight, he Hugh Grant is really doing some of the best stuff of his career. Isn't it? I've got I have to admit I loved him in Paddington to. He was fantastic. He was so willing to take care of himself. It's it's really great. Because he you know, he is a good actor, but he got causing this or four-page card type role. And now, it's really nice to see him blossom. Okay. Well, let's bring our guests in here. We have to bring Candace Allen in particular. You're still a member of the directors guild America. You get the tapes for all the nominated films. What's what's really impressed? You this season? Well, the the diversity not just the diversity in in the films like the big films like black Black Panther and so forth. But the. The the the smaller diversities in you know, the favorite. I mean who would have thought I mean, it's just unbelievable. I don't think it's going to win the Golden Globes because it's a bit too edgy widows, Cold War. I mean, there is just it's it's an interesting time. It's an interesting time when MS talking about in terms of the net the net flicks influence on what's going on in the industry. It's just blasted it open now. And there is there is still a place for going to spend all of that money to go and see certain things on the big screen. I mean, I think Rama for example. It's a net flix film. But to see the beauty of it, you need to be on a big screen, but other things like spider verse you really need to be immersed in it. And so that is a. I think the big screen is like books. There's a point where they think that it's not there. It's you're not going to need them anymore. But they come back because people want that particular experience in getting back to the Golden Globes in terms of film. I suspect that a stars born is going to to it's it's the fourth incarnation of this story people like love it in Hollywood, Bradley Cooper, did a wonderful job. I I was really impressed particularly with a backstage stuff really visceral. But it's fairly conservative. I'm upset that widows didn't get any love whatsoever from people because it's so edgy the favorite. I don't think is going to win. They green book, which again is a very conservative take on on interracial relations that gets a lot of love, you know, the the Golden Globes it's a big party and it's important for. The impetus. But in terms of really critical of evaluation of of what cinema is that's not what you go to the Golden Globes. It's less stuff. Isn't it? It's more of an industry party, and you get Emily blunt nominated for Mary Poppins bohemian rhapsody is there. It's it's allows you if you're not into really criticizing films, and almost pretentious about it. You can have a good time at the Golden Globes people that you recognize will be there. It's film and telly says very accessible in a way that some of the other all ceremonies aren't just just briefly. I wonder are you seeing a net. Flicks. Productions are they getting the same number of awards has the industry has the awards industry really pivoted to to to hand out Oscars and things at the to the same at the same rate to those kinds of productions. Yeah, it took a while. And it was really the crown that saw that that shift. They really wanted. They were very popular. But they wanted that cash. They wanted that gold standard of proper awards Baptist Globes. And now they're starting to get it. But what is interesting is that bodyguard will be there as a Netflix original, even though we know as as a BBC show they into all these car production. So they're taking credit for certain shows. We would not classes Netflix show. So interesting times. Okay, Paul assist and briefly with you. What would what would be your quick pick film? What what's piqued your interest? The one that I would really like to see just at least get noticed is is vice I think, it's such a brilliant idea because Cheney was such a key figure sort of half in the shadows in the Bush presidency. It would really be good to see. See him portrayed up there in this slightly comedy way. Okay. Fantastic. Well, thank you to all of my guests. Emma, Bullimore Kansas Allen and Paul Melly were just coming up to the end of the hour on weekends on the BBC World Service..

Golden Globes Netflix Bullimore Kansas Allen Hugh Grant Emma Hollywood BBC writer Academy Awards Marvel studios Baptist Globes Vincent Dowd London Jeremy Thorpe Paul Melly eve Paddington Norman BBC World Service directors guild America
"directors guild america" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"directors guild america" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"So there's a lot. I mean, that's a big. I mean, forty days is a good schedule for this movie. But it was still a lot of things to do. So as much as I prepared, you know, like as much as as you ready to go and have things prepared as much as possible is always these one simple seeings surprise you. Like, I got this figured out. We worry about this. We'll just keep moving. And it's always this one little scene in it is one of those things with with film. No matter what no matter what how much you prepared is always the smaller thing. So I think it was mostly the schedule in some of the scenes within the schedule that probably surprised me most of. All right. I think we have time for one more question yester. Yeah. I feel like is is a really good place right now, I feel like you know, like one of the films. I love love Cooley high seventies right now at that time Michael shelters actually from my hometown directed that movie. Gordon parks in the seventies. There was a lot of there was specific filmmakers, but then there was a lot of after non African Americans direct in a lot of films of with African American starring in some of that was the case in the nineties as well. And there's always these pockets where you see these films, and then those films go away, but now is a little different. Now, think reason why I think television has a lot to do with personally in terms of there's more African American women more women, directing there's more African American men, directing there's more African American Latino and white non white show runners. So now, the vision is not actually white individuals controlling those visions, they are actually visionaries who are women. In African American so within that you have these authentic voices and different voices. And I think the audience really need that in some many of these shows are very successful Mideast films are so which will continue to make other projects and contained to make other films. So I think that's the difference between the seventies in some of the films have made in the nineties. So that's the difference in. I'm just glad to have this film at at the same time. Right. Well, thank you more time. Thank you made a beautiful beautiful movie. And and I think he made a movie that does so much for all of us as people and as directors it really challenged all of us. So it's a wonderful film. Thank you very much. Thanks for listening to another TGI QNA if you'd like to hear more you can find past episodes of directors cut wherever you listen to podcasts. We'll have a lot more for you in the coming weeks as a word season approaches, including QNA's from Joel Edgerton, Matthew Heineman and I'll follow borrowing. So be sure to subscribe. So you don't miss naps during join the podcast, please take a moment to rate and review us, and I tunes. We'd love to hear your feedback and you can help fellow Cinna files. Find this show. Thanks again for listening, and we'll see you next time. This podcast is produced by directors guild, America music is by Dan, Wally.

QNA directors guild Gordon parks Cooley Joel Edgerton Michael America Matthew Heineman Dan Wally forty days
"directors guild america" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"directors guild america" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"The. Alot, and thanks for tuning into another episode of the director's cut a podcast by the directors guild America featuring today's top director sharing behind the scene stories at their latest films and insights into the craft of directing. Please take a second to subscribe to our show on itunes or wherever you get your podcasts and check out the DJ website at gauge e. a. dot ORG to watch or listen to ours upon tent, such as past episodes of the director's cut videos of the guild, seventy fifth anniversary celebration and long-form interviews from our visual history program, you can access it all for free. I go into the website and hovering over the craft tap. This episode takes us behind the scenes of director, Lauren Greenfield's, new documentary generation wealth. The film continues MS Greenfield's examination of wealth culture, and the pathologies that have created the richest society. The world has ever seen by examining materialism, celebrity culture and social status. In addition, her investigation reflects on the desire to be wealthy at any cost, the global boom bust economy the corrupted American dream and the human costs of capitalism. Narcissism and greed. Generation wealth was screened as part of the DJ's documentary series, which aims to spotlight groundbreaking nonfiction films for DJ members and guests by presenting screenings of documentaries as well as conversations with their directors. In addition to generation wealth, MS Greenfield's from graffiti includes the documentary feature, thin and the documentary shorts. Magic city best night ever, beauty, culture, fashion show, and kids plus money..

director Lauren Greenfield America seventy fifth
"directors guild america" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"directors guild america" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Really special when we filmed with norman brian like you gave the letters like here's your correspondence with your best friend and it was so motion for him to see there and it was letters back and forth we had all of norman's letters to hal to so he can go back and it was really emotional for everybody especially for him to see has a family any of the family seen this will will lee has daughter yeah she went with us to sundance so she's a you know it was hard with lee because she was so vulnerable in the film you know they never met really after she was born so it was a hard interview and it was a hard edit and i was never sure what she would think about the film or if she would wanna see it or so she's now she's very much you know in support of it brother jack but jack passed away while we were making the film yeah i think that we're about out of question so let's anybody else has anything else one more question go ahead okay i think we have to stop i'm sorry unless was a really great question but thank you very much okay and tell your friends that'll be out in september and to go see it and thanks so much this is actually a very good crowd not just good in quality but in quantity too so that's might be interested in this thank you everyone very much thank you everybody thanks for coming thanks for listening to another dj qna if you'd like to hear more you can find pets episodes of the director's cut wherever you listen to podcasts in the coming weeks we'll hear from directors sean feszty lauren greenfield so be sure to click subscribe so you won't miss nep assode thanks again for listening and we'll see you next time this podcast is produced by the directors guild america music is by dan wally

norman brian lee jack director lauren greenfield hal sundance sean feszty dan wally
"directors guild america" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"directors guild america" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"To include marijuana smoke and vapor to rhode island secondhand smoke laws regarding tobacco the state rep who came up with the points to scientific evidence showing secondhand cigarette smoke can be harmful to children and others who breathe it over time the fbi was investigating charges of sexual assault against usa gymnastics doctor larry nassar months before the allegations first became public and reporter jason scott as details on that a report says the agency knew about the accusations as early as summer 2015 well before rachel denhellender and others came forward to tell their stories of abuse to the indianapolis star nasser was later charged by federal authorities with possession of child pornography now the times says the fbi declined to answer detailed questions about its nasser investigation the fbi says allegations against nasser quote transcended jurisdiction vasser was sentenced last week to up to one hundred seventy five years in prison actress uma thurman is accusing hollywood producer harvey weinstein of forcing himself on her and director quentin tarantino of forcing her to do a dangerous stunt this is the first time a thurman is publicly accusing harvey weinstein of sexual assault when the scandal first broke she said she was too angry to speak now the actress tells the new york times weinstein attacked her in a london hotel room pushed her down and tried to shove himself on her and expose himself weinstein through his lawyer says he made an awkward pass at her but did not sexually assault thurman the actress also says during the weinstein produced film kill bill director quentin tarantino coerced her to drive a car that crashed leaving her permanently injured video of the crash and tarantino's reaction is on the times website julie walker new york the winner of the directors guild america top prizes.

quentin tarantino julie walker london the new york times director producer hollywood indianapolis larry nassar rhode island marijuana york state rep harvey weinstein uma thurman vasser nasser rachel denhellender jason scott
"directors guild america" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"directors guild america" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"The patriots an eagles are endless in minnesota a 40yearold patriots quarterback eight trip to the super bowl looking for his sixth ring the city of philadelphia starved for an eta fell championship leaning out a backup quarterback who got them here at halftime show performer who's gotten into some trouble before during the super bowl a national anthem singer who admits she suffering from the flu the possibility of kneeling protests on the international stage at a host city expecting bitterly cold temperatures shares abc's ryan burrow in minneapolis along with everyone else will be endorse hollywood producer army weinstein's attorneys have suggested weinstein could take legal action against actress uma thurman who has accused him of forcing himself upon her sexually years ago thurmand says weinstein threaten her career if she said anything hero del toro won the directors guild america's top honor for his film the shape of water todd ant abc news we need to the american people we're going to repeal and replace obamacare had say complicated process but actually is very simple his gold good health care and democrats conservatives and millions of americans don't like what they see it did the okay obamacare replacement plan that everyone has been asking for visas where orlando turns first to hear the latest developments in the trump white house news ninety six five wndb o changes are coming for sunday will start in the morning at fifty seven degrees with a south wind gradually building through the morning our highest seventy seven mostly cloudy just a slight chance for morning rain but in the afternoon sunday or rain chances kick way up into the early evening fifty percent some heavy rain even lightning possible ending by monday morning from channel nine eyewitness news i'm meteorologist george waldenberger now safetouch security triple team traffic seminal county we had a previous accident blocking the left lane i4 eastbound a county were fortysix that is now all clear in orange county some good news to the fourway eastbound between the greenway and rouse road is now reopened but you're still going to find some minor traffic about five to ten minutes worth between the between alafaya trail and the green way but it looks like your major central florida expressways are currently accidentfree triple team traffic i'm chris barnes 965 wdbo president trump declassified that controversial republican member who's when the most trump's curve youthful caused by the from its other the.

orlando president wdbo chris barnes florida alafaya trail del toro producer hollywood abc orange county george waldenberger patriots obamacare thurmand uma thurman army weinstein minneapolis ryan burrow eta
"directors guild america" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"directors guild america" Discussed on KOMO

"To the super bowl looking for his sixth ring the city of philadelphia starved for an eta fell jeb egypt leaning out a backup quarterback who got them here at halftime show performer who's gotten into some trouble before during the super bowl a national anthem singer who admits she suffering from the flu the possibility of kneeling protests on the international stage at a host city expecting bitterly cold temperatures abc's ryan burrow in minneapolis along with everyone else will be indoors hollywood producer weinstein's attorneys have suggested weinstein could take legal action against actress uma thurman who has accused him of forcing himself upon her sexually years ago thurmand says weinstein threaten her career if she said anything hero del toro won the directors guild america's top honor for his film the shape of water todd ant abc news stay connected stay informed this is komo news this is twenty four seven news on komo news time hall jackson new numbers than the flu outbreak you in washington from state health vigils one hundred thirty two people have perished from the flu so far this season mike in paris and we had one hundred seventy seven deaths this time last year bationwide cdc officials say the flu continues to get worse of there are many weeks left in the season so if you hadn't gotten a flu shot already the urge you to get one now uh no end in sight for the school bus strike in seattle about sixty drivers did cross aligning got behind the wheel on friday here's what happened one one of those drivers met one of their striking colleagues y'all progress have a great day back at work round got pay the teachers unions as members will walk out in solidarity on wednesday afternoon after students are dismissed bf that strike continue silver now parents should be ready to find other ways to get their kids to school on monday a flood watch remains in effect for our area through latenight monday in that's adding to the risk of new mudslides like the one that came down on the tracks between everett and seattle no one was hurt their gus melodious of burlington northern and southern frayed says free traffic's already moving along those tracks but passenger service between seattle at everett we'll be on hold until monday rats to protect.

flu cdc komo del toro producer burlington everett seattle paris mike washington thurmand uma thurman weinstein minneapolis ryan burrow egypt philadelphia
"directors guild america" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"directors guild america" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Hello and welcome back to the director's cut brought to you by the directors guild america for each episode we bring you a fresh and insightful interview with one of the film industry's top directors conducted by one of their peers remember to subscribe to our podcast on play music turns stitcher or on our sound pod page at soundcloud dot com slash the director's cut and if you're enjoying the director's skied please take a moment to like cher or comment we love hearing your feedback this episode takes us behind the scenes after actor martin mcdonough's new film three billboards outside epping misery the film stars frances mcdormand as mildred hayes a woman frustrated by the fact that months after her daughters violent murder no progress has been made in the case infuriated by the lackluster efforts at the local police she employees the unusual motivation all tackled at commissioning three billboards leading into her town with messages aimed at curbing revere chief of police setting off a battle of wills with the police force and the rest of the community in addition to three billboards outside epping necessary mr mcdonough's credits include the feature fountains seven psychopaths and emperors in two thousand sex he won the academy award for best short film live action for his found six shooter following a recent screening of the film at the dga theater in los angeles mr mcdonough spoke with director nicky cara about filming three billboards outside adding necessary during their conversation mr mcdonough discuss as how the film was inspired by a billboard he saw while riding in a bus at a south his approach to balancing humor with pain and the ways in which he tries to work against the expected.

director martin mcdonough frances mcdormand murder dga theater los angeles nicky cara mildred hayes epping mr mcdonough
"directors guild america" Discussed on Pop Shop

Pop Shop

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"directors guild america" Discussed on Pop Shop

"And i mean i was reading about it earlier apparently like he asked for permission to use the song a year in advance against some with some slowly clearly healing ahead matt this out well in advance so it would not be shocking if he he actually did take the time to kind of match up shots and lyrics and and really frame it in such a way that because he knew that people ten years later would still be going back and really kind of analysing every every splitsecond of it the fight and try to draws much meaning from it as humanly possible yeah i mean he did in interview i think with the dj the director's guild america magazine two years ago um where he like basically broke down shot for shot only talked about it like it was it was impeccably crafted like the the music starts the second carmella comes in and that just kickstarts starts like the last couple minutes it's it's really like its own shortfilm com if you like sometimes david chase he he he's like a murderer who concocted this really elaborate scheme to get away with it as but but he can't resist talking about illegal he's like he he doesn't want to get caught but he can't resist explaining hit like that the new show his own genius the if i did it both an and that's the which is kind of like he is a goal don't ask me about it lagat on a gentle don't ask interest to explain deserved is like will actually do this here to do this there like since it's kinda clever if you want to think about it but i i guess he he's he's playing a long game here like he he he can help you let's go drifts and drabs and he doesn't like again ledee released directors commentary for the scene i don't think so i don't know i'm not sure he wouldn't give it away all once like that but he he gives you a breadcrumbs that the people keep coming back and maguino a little bit more about what happened in that cnn did when you read about how he was planning to use it a year in advance were you aware that he asked like steve perry for permission and st perry basically said like.

director guild america magazine david chase cnn steve perry matt ten years two years