18 Burst results for "Director Of International"

"director international" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

Blank Check with Griffin & David

07:00 min | Last month

"director international" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

"One. let's jessica death does a film. I love. I feel like it's a film people who see it love it. You know one of the hungry titles a great title also got that great tag now. I've right something's after. Jessica someone something very cold very wet very heinous and literally fell purchase. Kind of my again. There are gaps in my research. But that is kind of the i like. It's a big studio movie. It's a paramount moving. But it's just like this. It could also have just been a halloween. An embassy pictures it was but it was like a rounding error for paramount. Basically cheap lament nineteen seventy. One is a great movie. That fox makes called them a fiscal walls. Which is ellen. Alda playing a pianist. It is seen for seeing the same as rosemary's baby. It sounds like it's really halt kind of movie again. He watches a couple years ago. And it's like oh this is three years after rosemary's baby and they were like so enrolling. Baby john kassovitz an actor in this movie. We should make alan alda pianist. It's an mefissa waltz phil and he sells his older the devil to become a better pianist. It's actually really good as really fun. Alan alda pretty good in a horror movie contact coming for my soul. Paul wind coasts. That's his name. I don't wanna mention the next big one nineteen seventy-three movie actress big one of the most successful films ever i hit. We're gonna come back to it. But i just wanna say at this point worldwide. Five hundred ninety seven million adjusted warner brothers. Ten oscar nominations ray. It's one of the five precision also. The book was one of those books. I was not alive at the time. But i feel like it's one of those books that was on every coffee table. It was like a blockbuster book to again league. The book often helps here right if you're adapting from a bestselling novel. Have you know the cover. The famous every gary young children. Exactly you stay at. It'd be just decided this halloween. I'm going to reread the exorcist and read legion religion. You're gonna watch extra three or actresses through. I know i'm saying. Are you gonna do a rewatch marathon. Sometimes i haven't watched the exorcist. Every july fourth you text me about whatever like political thriller made the cut this year through. Yeah here's here's package not yet gonna. We can't get into it but there's a great movie on. Hbo called the maybe. It's on amazon now. Package with gene. Hackman tommy lee jones. Good cold war thriller. It's david movie anyway exorcist. Nineteen seventy-three huge weirdly. This i was actually surprised by nineteen seventy-three. Don't look now not a studio film art film. It is but i thought. Mgm made it. But i think that's just because i'm picturing the old. Dvd they had the home video rights for whatever. It's a british ally. Bears mentioning exist outside now weirdly by this time so classy also based on are quite classy star star search. Also he's fucking this genre some fucking this genre now in my chronology only five years away from halloween is very a-list. You're bringing tony but then there's just a few more but even at this point i i found it interesting that the palme has not really gone horror. No he's doing. Nineteen seventy two right. Yes yeah carries. Nineteen seventy six but then those are the only horror movies. He's made random of the paradise doesn't really counts. I mean obviously it's sort of har- nodding to it but he is not yet a horror film. carries united artists. So that's a studio movie. And then based on as you mentioned star driven out the but these ones some of these aren't quite horror hearth and somebody's going to come up again in a minute but just the the the rest of this list. Now from seventy four to seventy eight studio har- where it's starting to ramp up. Okay it's alive nineteen seventy-four warner brothers. Larry cohen's movie evil baby Stepford wives nineteen seventy five columbia. Rosemary's baby connection Ira levin levin or lewin eleven so again stepwise kind of horror kind of satire. Yeah but. That's a columbia movie kind of a hit. Nineteen seventy six. The omen fox huge. Hit coming back coming back to that night on it. Yeah nineteen seventy six burnt offerings. United artists distributed great movie. Amityville horror before amityville horror. David's avoiding eye contact via someone to face the wrath. People moving into a house that has evil totally good movie but amityville horror so burnt offerings. The seventy-six amityville har- book comes out. Seventy seven the true story is the move the tree of course the the true story book that that that definitely happened. The movie is when seven nine coming. I know that that's just after halloween. But i have to mention it in a minute. The rest of these seventy-seven audrey rose don't have you ever seen that creepy girl movie. I think there's a ghost. I think it has. It goes down then shift though even these. That's robert wise. I feel like these these eight years. You've covered right. We starting out with like oh. It's proven directors international arthouse. Oh tours this and that and often based on a bestselling we were breaking. Classy films can as you said be sold as a single feature right demon seed nineteen seventy seven. Usa christie evil technology. Moving ben demon seed never seen that evil technology. What if what if the computer. But if you gave your house. Computerized computer tried to make you make you pregnant. And what if a witch hacked that computer seventy-seven is also the sentinel which is universal Which i think is a movie that people have come back around you but these are the kinds of movies that started just have tons of stars from like the forty the sentinel is michael winner movie and if you grew up in britain which no one here did did relevant once. You know michael winner. Obviously he directed death wishes well and he is the new shock that i grew up your big. I am very big boy. Michael winner became a guy. Who would like you know. When he was like a pitch man. It was weird. Rector became this column called. Don't look it up. I don't know what it was called. Okay michael winner. Look it up winner. Takes it all know. Michael winner wrote a column for thousand columns winner's circle about restaurant reviews yes was this column called griffin does. Where does your brain does. Dinner winners dinners. He became this guy who had like wear cravat and say britain used to bring us to be better before and he would tail off. And you're supposed to learn shocking about and you really. Aren't you the guy who made these like trash. She has movies in the seventy. He's an odd figure. Anyway the sentinel. I think is is that set in brooklyn a brooklyn heights. Moving sentinel is indeed set in brooklyn moving nine hundred seventy eight serandon martin walsum the.

Alan alda john kassovitz rosemary warner brothers Hackman tommy lee jones Alda gary young levin levin paramount jessica Jessica ellen fox phil oscar audrey rose columbia Hbo Mgm Larry cohen
"director international" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

09:45 min | 2 months ago

"director international" Discussed on The World Next Week

"And when we recall how the taliban regime protected qena members in afghanistan soil will do same thing is happening in venezuela model and they regime has Andoni let's leader of has monica. A dissident revived. Biza isn't learn fire. They have also. Joan mentions was visited. Provide who plotted the car bomb equal. That fortunately didn't become into a major tragedy and it was aimed not only kill colombians to kill us citizens so if you evaluate the essence of resolution thirteen seventy three that came out of the un security council twenty years ago well. It is evident that was taking grazing. It's a violation of denver's huge. That's why i consider. They should be declare. Now is that degration is sober notice. Not because i think we have to concentrate in how we build the path could democracy and the pathway economic and social reconstruction and that also has to do with what venezuelans can do. And that's why the democratic Resistance is is approaching their regime trying to bill a erode map so that there can be a recovery of democracy. Is that going to work. We don't know because while we have seen over the years. Is that every single time. There is negotiation. Wants to become stronger. They wanna win time. They want more pressure. And maybe what we have seen is not a substantial result. Can this time be different. Maybe yes how. Can it be different. Maybe with international pressure and that's why columbia has expressed united states that we want to be part of the solution not part of the problem that we want to work hand in hand with the united states as we have done it over the last five years because the lima group was created with a division of united states colombian other countries. We acted multi-laterally. We acted delivery of the oas reacted with the lower lead. Lima the id. So can we do something. The lateral yes and we will be working hand in hand with the united states of there has to be strong pressure so there. There are free elections with all full guarantees so that people can really experienced that whatever they decide is going to be respected by by the regime that there can be a new tomorrow and sada. Thank you for for your question. And i'm very happy because i remember that twenty nine thousand nine. We had a visit to silicon valley. We were able to To have dial ups with the big tech companies in the united states we had a great conversation with people from the world economic forum in san francisco in the industrial revolution center. We also had a great conversation with anti-gatt superman amazon with with session. Adela for microsoft. And what happened since that. This is that most of the big tech companies of united states have increased investment. People as something that was the was asked them. We want to be there. We know that you have the interest of making gloria a silicon valley in latin america. We need to have more programmers and we launched in the midst of the pandemic a program to train one hundred thousand for ranch as of today. We have do thousand verses that are being trained as programmers and we will have fifty thousand more in the next semester. We have done this with universities. We have done this for virtual education and this is going to be a revolution because most of the skills are going to be used to to make a place for app development and to have been tag golf ethnic your name it and using for example the ford industrial region especially in iot s instruments. That are going to be connected with the greasing of coverage of four g networks and then transition to five g networks to start by the end of this year and last but not least and you mentioned center last year. We decided to putting blazed non-conditional cash transfers. The families were more affected by that means that we have to to to send a resource store almost four media families and we did that through fintech so we made the largest expansion of financial inclusion in a latin american country twenty twenty we ranked number one in twenty nine hundred by the i d be and i believe now seeing new bank ludovic and new in opportunities in in virtual banking columbia is going to be disruptive market and we will have new generations of romanian using this kind of services through virtual technologies so we are now a congress working on dynamic transformation of the financial markets in order to connect to the new technologies. And i think this is going to make the number one mic for fintech math in america. Already in that position. Are we want to consolidate this for years to come so it has happened because we have approached a regulation but also because we have promoted interpreter. Sheep and i think we have created an environment so that companies can be founded can grow and grow at three digit levels becoming it unicorns as is called in the world of german. Let me just in my role as vice chairman global affairs at the carlisle group. Simply underline. what. The president has said and the potential in colombia. Something we're well aware of are invested in columbia as well as the president knows. Well i think mr president we have time for perhaps two more questions so Why don't we see how they laura. Let's let's t- up to questions for the president place. The first question will come. From mark rosen as a reminder please stage affiliation for asking your question. Good morning mr president. A good morning admiral I was the recent till recently. The united states executive director international monoprix funds. And before that. I spent thirty years as an investment banker bringing capital to latin america particularly to the andean region and Today i think investors look at the indian region which has beaten seen for. Many decades is a very attractive place to invest with some concern. As you know yesterday. President castillo was inaugurated as president of peru representing a marxist leninist party even though he said he is not a marxist leninist hopefully will govern from the center in chile. Leading candidate is mr barak. The communist candidates communist party candidate was defeated in the primary. Recently as you know but he certainly the To the to not necessarily pro business. I would say and in your country The leading candidate next year is Senator petro mr petro again there is some concern about his about his positions from the perspective of foreign investors and investors generally. So i wanted to ask you. Where does the end in region go with this time. Next year we have present. Castillo president. Boric president petro in the andean region. What what do you say to investors is. Are they going to govern from the center. Have they looked at columbia. They looked at venezuela colombia and recognized what went wrong and that they will not follow those kinds of policies and keep rb concerns. Thank you mark. Okay and i think we have time to very quickly laura. Whoever the next question is please be concise rate. We'll take the last question from sara lee whitson off President my name is sara lee whitson from democracy for their world. Now i know typically you in your position. President received lots of advice from united states. But i wondered if you could offer some advice. Offer some advice to the biden administration and it really ties into your remarks about sanctions on venezuela for terrorism of course there are sanctions on cuba There's been a new condemnation by the state department on cuba for attacks on protesters and these policies are quite in contrast to america's role in the middle east. Where for cease-fire resolutions were blocked As the war by israel against gaza continued military. Support for. Israel continues. I know you've seen some of the consequences of israeli abuses given your role investigating the attack on the flotilla. I believe in two thousand ten gay. Thank you very much. We'll go ahead and let the president answer. We only have four minutes left. Thank you for your question. Okay thank you amaral mark on your question. I'm not good at breeding future am good..

united states qena Andoni Biza industrial revolution center columbia venezuela un security council sada oas taliban Adela latin america monica Joan carlisle group afghanistan lima Lima
"director international" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

09:10 min | 3 months ago

"director international" Discussed on Slate's Working

"Surveyed in twenty twenty. Potential savings will vary discount vary and are not available in all states and situations. Marcus watson thank you for joining us today on working. Thank you for having me absolutely so. Let's just start with the very basics. Your in intimacy coordinator and choreographer. What is that. It's a multifaceted position in that. We work with actors and productions to advocate for the actors as well as choreograph so act as a liaison between the talent and the production so that talent is fully aware of what the production the producers director is wanting from them and so that the production is fully aware of what the actors are fully consenting to i gauge their consent level outside of the many power dynamics that exist in tv film and theater because directors producers. They all have so much power in the room in terms of hiring and firing power future. Gigs you know. Kind of the success of actors in some ways in some position. So it's about getting that consent for scenes that are that have been written that the actors will be performing and making sure that they fully understand and are fully consenting to everything that we're doing and then starting conversations around that and making sure that the production is getting what they want within the boundaries that the actors have set when needed. I do groggy. I come from a background of stage. Combat acting gymnastics dance very physical storyteller. I love to utilize movement and specificity of movement breath work to make sure that we're telling a very clear and specific story True to the tone and what storytelling and this this job where you know you're choreographing and coordinating and mediating as scenes of intimacy are being staged. That's that's a relatively new profession right. I feel like. I didn't hear about twenty years ago but i feel like i hear about it all the time. Now yes exactly. I mean there have been people who have been doing this work. Not so much as a profession per se Especially not recognized by any industry. I know they're people like tony sina. Who started idei with So with some other intimacy korangi directors. She wrote a thesis about this in the early two thousands and kind of coined the phrase intimacy direction So there's there have been people who've been working at this and doing this for a long time but it wasn't until about two thousand fifteen that idea. I created the first company for intimacy courier. Coordinators directors and what is idei intimacy directors. International was a nonprofit organization meant to spread the work of intimacy coordinators directors and. They have no folded having accomplished their mission. And so now. There are other companies that are also working with coordinators to help productions find and connect with intimacy directors and intimacy coordinators directors are for theatre coordinators. Ever for film. And oh interesting interesting. you know. Two thousand fifteen. Seems like a very fortuitous moment to found an organization like that because of course we have the trump election the women's march in the metoo a movement or moment that immediately come after that do you feel like essentially this. Profession has become more widely accepted adopted as a response to those political and cultural currents definitely. I think they were so lucky to have started this company before me too. I think because the metoo movement like rocket launched their their mission and the mission of idei. And i think it it wasn't that these stories had not been told or that People didn't know that this was happening in the industry. It was just after these movements. It was no longer able to ignore it. So you mentioned earlier that you have experienced and training and mime and stage combat and things like that. How did you get from there to do wing intimacy work it was. I mean a long road. I was choreographing in new york city for stage. Productions doing Stage combat choreographing violence as well as the odd stunt job here and there in theaters will bring in would bring me in for sometimes scenes of sexual violence to to deal with The violent aspect of the scene and win working on that if there were kisses or groups or anything like that i would approach those in the same way that i would approach choreographing a fight where we were talking about it. We would discuss the safeties. We discuss where hands were would be going where the actors were comfortable being touched and kind of defined boundaries defined safeties and moved from there and then just because a kiss or touch might be within that moment i would discuss breath. And who's initiating this kiss in the same way that i would say who's initiating this punch or this grab and directors would see. That was a really great way that you handle that. There was another kiss in the show. And would you mind looking at that as well and it has nothing to do with violence but like come in and take a look at so it kind of was. That was happening. Where there were there was not someone specifically for these scenes of can hyper exposure for the actors of these intimate moments and we had multiple fight choreographer who kind of noticing this and that's kind of what helped to start idei and i happen to be working with alicia rhodus who is another co founding member of idei. We were teaching university out on long island doing stage combat whenever she was starting the company and so we had many hour long drive trips out to long island to discuss the whole movement and the company and just kind of what is needed in these situations and so from then. I started doing all of the the workshops and practice workshops and things that she was doing in the city and Just really continued to grow might techniques and skills for intimacy coordination using my background in very physical storytelling and is there. A certification process. Like if i'm a producer looking for an intimacy coordinator. Is there like a guild. That i go to. They're like who's who's checked out to do this. A yeah so there is. There are things in the works that will probably coming out in the next year or two that that will help productions Even more so right now. There are several companies. Who do certification. I originally certified with idei and i am now certified with Idc which is intimacy directors and coordinators. And you can see a list of the certifications and what. We have to do to become certified. The number of hours. We have to train the kinds of trainings. The mental health first aid training bystander intervention training trauma training. So there's lots of things that go into the certification process. And how do you get your work. Is it word of mouth. Do you have an agent. Their specific actors. Who like to work with you again and again like how do you actually get a job. I would say once you've been through all this training all of above it comes. There are some times where actors have heard about intimacy coordinators. And they say. I don't know how to get one. But hey production we need one and i am asking for this and sometimes it's an internet search which brings people to idc page where you can find different. Certified intimacy directors or coordinators depending on region and area of the united states or even areas of the world. And then there some times where it's word of mouth through productions like i've worked with this i eighty on this set and now this i eighty is working on this totally different set. Nah hey bring this person in. It was really great to work with them. So there's word of mouth that way there's also we're a very close community so ever we're being reached out to if we're already on a show already doing something we are also giving these productions colleagues names and information so that they can to us and when you start working on a project what are the early parts of the creative process they are you or your first conversations with the director about sort of what they want staging wise.

Marcus watson alicia rhodus new york next year today tony sina idei Idc Two thousand fifteen long island first company twenty years ago first conversations trump united states korangi twenty twenty women's march about two thousand fifteen two thousands
"director international" Discussed on The One You Feed

The One You Feed

03:34 min | 3 months ago

"director international" Discussed on The One You Feed

"Thanks for joining us. Our guest on this episode is reverend safe food on neil sing. Morales the executive director of spiritual directors international and an ordained zen buddhist priest. He's a practicing spiritual director in companion and motivational speaker. In a previous life he was also an executive and microsoft where he successfully grew international groups and divisions and provided leadership to multicultural teams around the world high food. Welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. It's a pleasure to have you on. You are the executive director of spiritual directors international and have a wide background in a lot of areas. And we're going to get into really what spiritual direction is in general in a moment. We're going to start like we always do with the parable. There is a grandfather who's talking with his granddaughter and he says in life there are two wolves inside of us that are always battle. One is a good wolf. Which represents kindness and bravery in love and the is a bad wolf which represents things like greed and hatred and fear and the granddaughter stops. She thinks about it for a second and she looks up at grandfather. She says will grandfather which one wins and the grandfather says the one you feed. So i'd like to start off by asking you. What parallel means to you in your life in the work that you do thank you for that wonderful bearable response to it is. We have choices. We become our intentions right. If our intention is tomato kindness compassion so that we can become kindness and compassion incarnate. The become it then we have to work at it and we have to practice it and we have to build on it and if we choose for a variety of reasons to go in the other direction seasonally childhood trauma are actually sometimes choices in in a negative direction than we become those negative intentions as well so for me basically speaks to you. We have choices in life. Not as many as we think we have some choices in life and the choice to be a good person. Ethical personnel responsible. Person is something that we choose something that we need to practice wonderful. I think that's a great starting place for us. I'd like to to start with just the basics for people who are not familiar. What is spiritual direction. Or i know another term. That is used a lot of spiritual companionship. So pick whichever those terms you like and tell us for people who have no idea what that is. What spiritual direction is so. They're both great terms. I rueda's priest use the term spiritual companion which derives from one of the oldest recorded. Sutras hit the trigger taco. Which is the body con on the secret texts buddhism where the buddha says that To a nanda who is his chief disciple. That spiritual friendship companionship. Camaraderie is the highest form of the spiritual life is basically the entirety of the of the spiritual life. And so that comes from the buddhist tradition. But it comes also in christianity. It comes in his long and he comes in all of the world's major religions and it has certain haul logs distinguish. It is not just. Let's go have a beer and talk about god. It's actually something far. More involved than that is based on deep..

microsoft two wolves One both neil sing christianity one Morales buddhism a second buddhist zen buddhist
"director international" Discussed on The Darren Smith Show

The Darren Smith Show

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"director international" Discussed on The Darren Smith Show

"Or Jim Russell, what are we looking at today? We have some salmon asparagus and some mashed potatoes. Now finds grumbled on in they're. Like I don't. Know why? I did. It All Go since I didn't have time to stop and pick up food and I was a bit on clear was that I might be offered over here today and ground point. At least I know seasons fifty two delivers Tuesdays and I was pretty sure that they were still doing that Jim. Would you have shared? You've got your own. There's plenty Oh. Yeah a really yeah. Interesting. Very interesting. Well then. Perhaps I had an Aaron judge. Rethinking your decision. A little bit. There's a story that was sent to me by about thirty different people today. COMES FROM USA Today. and. If, it's one thing that I don't feel confident. In is knowing what really will be a big story, and what won't and I'll give you a couple of examples. The saints the bountygate. That's not going to be a big deal more. What are you talking about every team? Does this every team? Does something like this? What do you mean? The Astros. Now again they took it to a different level. But that's not going to be a big deal. Everybody's doing something like this. You kidding me I've known for a decade that there are teams that have cameras installed that peak right into the dugout peak right into third base coaches box I mean this has been going on forever. People even started to admit it like you. We've been doing this stuff using. For as long as we've been playing ball. There's a story in USA Today in Latin. America, big-league clubs are exploiting prospects as young as twelve years old. A whistle blower told the feds now it should be pointed out because I'm not going to read the whole story that the whistle blower has died. Nobody's accusing anybody mentioned in the story of killing the whistle blower. Clear. However maybe. Info wars would go to that length. But the padres are referenced. The padres Scouting Director International Scouting Director. Whose name is Chris Camp? Maybe some of you know maybe some of you don't. But he is mentioned in this story, and it is alleged that his voice appears on tape of Ham, not only agreeing financially with underage prospects, but also then attempting to cut the money that is spent or will be spent on some of these prospects and again I'm not the world's greatest judge and already today I've been told that this is going to be a really really big deal or that. It's not gonNA be a big deal and I would. Remind everybody of something that came out about thirteen months ago. It was may of two thousand nineteen. There was a story where the Department of Justice sorted. Pena's different Major League baseball teams, because it wanted some of their travel records because it was investigating human smuggling, which is sort of what you have to do. If you're going to try to get players from certain countries like Cuba And the padres were amongst those teams mentioned and I said. This feels like it's a really big deal. Well guess what thirteen months later. I haven't heard of people about it. Padres were mentioned. Dodgers were mentioned. Other teams were mentioned. I haven't heard anything about that nothing, have you? It seems like that story now..

padres padres Scouting Director Inter Jim Russell Chris Camp Astros Dodgers USA Aaron America Pena Major League Department of Justice Cuba
"director international" Discussed on 1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"director international" Discussed on 1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

"Involved in. I guess. You could give it to be only been a month world for for this space bit. But I've read in some in some other interviews you give them the you've actually seen. Each around. Agency is more of a it's more fifty fifty. So how have you found that big? Business. Spread. The word about women to these temples. I talk about this a lot with colleagues from family and my friends and everything because yes, it is to destroy is still now they're all males in the stem industry and in the space industry and Easter and everything else however for me where I was based in Cologne in Germany was the center and I think it was about fifty fifty of female many instructors. And the Crucible Office Medical Crew Support Office was their spouse. There was a lot of females there. My boss was female. Immediate line manager was female in the UK Space Agency. The exact figures but again, it's about fifty fifty and safe for me. I've never seen it as a barrier or like I am conscious of it. And I can go into meetings now and think it's Ben. But it's never been a barrier to me and I think I've always had very good role models as well as I said. My previous boss I think we'll been and female now why managers May Open Director International Director is an amazing they d. Say, she's a pretty good role model as well. Say never be a barrier to so it's the roofing. Could try use this almost the want to because I've worked in loads of different engine i. think he is one of these things that the reason which the balance anyway But when you work in with different engineering organizations that still predominately male. And for me, there's two things. One is HFS dealer rebound. About how to get the equality during themselves roles? So. A Lot..

Crucible Office Medical Crew S UK Space Agency Director International Directo Cologne Germany
"director international" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"director international" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Parasite making history with it somewhere and first foreign language film to win Best Picture an extremely strong night for the movie winning director international feature film Best Picture the twisted south Korean thriller taking the victory here tonight the members of the film a motional making their way up to the stage here's ABC's Alex stone Renee Zellweger won Best Actress for Judy Best Actor Oscar went to walking Phoenix for joker you're listening to ABC news can we use time is two oh two Colorado senator and presidential candidate Michael Bennett is campaigning in New Hampshire two days ahead of the primary he stopped just short of saying a loss on Tuesday would signal his farewell to the race my strategy is to do to do everything I can do between now and Tuesday to metal here in New Hampshire and that's what I'm going to try to do and if that doesn't happen what to see what happened Bennett speaking at a campaign form in Concord New Hampshire on Saturday don't put away the shovel just yet after this past weekend snowstorm fox thirty one meteorologists jeskell bell lets us know how much we can expect early Tuesday morning only about one to three inches expected across metro Denver we could see two to five across the Palmer divide and into some of the foot hills that does include Jefferson and Douglas county we're also expecting about one to three up in fort Collins in Loveland Jessica says temps will be in the thirties all week which is below average it'll be warmer by this weekend the avalanche danger in the high country has dropped a bit from high to considerable warning of the crop meaning that we don't expect large natural avalanches right now but the danger for people to trigger like Atlanta still remains a considerable avalanche danger which means dangers avalanche conditions do using condoms work with the Colorado Avalanche information center he says the danger was a four out of a possible five that dropped on Sunday to a three out of five and a statewide alert for carjacking suspect out of Elbert county sheriff's office says a man pulled a gun on two women who had stopped to help him after a rollover crash near agate he in two female passengers then stole their vehicle and took off the stolen vehicle is a twenty sixteen silver Toyota Rav four for more news listen to the daily dive the big news stories explain not shouted listen to the daily dive each day on the I heart radio app or wherever you get your favorite podcasts I'm Danko shelling came away the voice of Colorado you make your way around the mentoring if he wins the fines could be fairly easy you've got no major incidents of delays there were some overnight road were taking place not causing any major problems you will encounter some slick and icy spots on bridges and overpasses and some of the side street other than that to be too good to be normal to the Texan rowing twenty five in nothing slowing it down right now once.

"director international" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"director international" Discussed on 710 WOR

"And I heart radio stations its forty two degrees of one o'clock good morning I'm Liz Warner great relief that two police officer shot in New York City this weekend are expected to survive governor Cuomo was left horrified over the shootings ABC Stephanie Ramose details yesterday shooting in the police precinct in the Bronx a gunman calmly walking into the forty first precinct in the Bronx and officer seen ducking for cover after hearing gunshots the government then running into another room his weapon drawn another officer response to the scene in the exchange one lieutenant is shot in the arm police say the suspect unloading his entire clip eventually dropping to the ground his gun is seen thrown across the precinct four officers then movin swarming the suspect one officer punching him repeatedly while more than a dozen race in the MTA is revealing the cost of damage done by protesters on January the thirty first a show Paula has detailed dozens of subway stations were covered in graffiti video screens smashed metrocard machines soaked in glue police are still searching for suspects caught on surveillance video doing the damage and ABC seven is reporting the price tag for repairs is over a hundred thousand dollars activists protest in Grand Central Terminal on the thirty first demanding free M. T. A. service and no police in the subway the MTA said on Thursday that they respect freedom of speech but the damage done by vandals is costly and takes their attention away from numerous scheduled repairs a show Bala W. O. R. news it was an Oscar stoner for best picture at last night's Academy Awards ABC's Alex stone was backstage at the Oscars in Hollywood here is site making history with its win and first foreign language film to win Best Picture an extremely strong night for the movie winning director international feature film Best Picture the twisted south Korean thriller taking the victory here tonight the members of the film a motional making their way up to the stage here Joaquin Phoenix took the Best Actor prize for joker Renee Zellweger won Best Actress for her role in Judy Brad Pitt.

Joaquin Phoenix director Academy Awards Oscar Bala W. O. R. Stephanie Ramose governor Cuomo Liz Warner Judy Brad Pitt Renee Zellweger officer Hollywood Alex stone Grand Central Terminal ABC Paula MTA Bronx New York City
"director international" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

08:31 min | 1 year ago

"director international" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"By great tasting California well not today's partly cloudy twenty two partly cloudy seven tonight mostly sunny twenty nine tomorrow right now nineteen and fair skies at the my talk studios hills and not show it was easy we've talked in the past on the calling them Bradley show about how awkward it probably is too sexy right it said something most people do day to day in their jobs we have like questions about like how does that go yeah hi this is the calling the Bradley show my top one of seven one streaming live at my talk one of seven one dot com everything entertainment Cleveland Sir Bradley trainer hello well so the news is that about a year and a half after SAG AFTRA talked about the need to have some standardized policies in place around those sex scenes they have come forward with new sort of rules regulations and protocol for what they call intimacy coaches and this is something that a production can decide whether or not they want this is to you know they don't they're not required to have intimacy coaches yeah but more and more as a way of protecting the actors they are hiring intimacy coaches seems like a good idea post need to you know that particular experience could be open to some abusive behaviors well it's not only that I mean I even just think about you know when we need to think about the stories that have come out about how the White Sea that how many potential victims there were of just him alone among actor says that there might be moments where those intimate scenes might trigger a person and a little bit and so part of what these intimacy coaches do is recognize when a person is not comfortable with what's being choreographed so to speak yeah and then they can intervene and help the production the I also learned this help the production and pay attention to what is an actor and actress is nudity writer so if they're going to do nudity of any sort or eat or any kind of simulated sex they have a kind of contracted rider that says like here's what I'm willing to do here's what I'm not willing to DO and so the intimacy coaches the into the intimacy coordinator's job is to sort of be the liaison for the actors in that experience so the question then is who these people work for thank you for asking I little known I did not know this there actually is over seeing kind of there's a company that provides intimacy coordinators to any production that once an intimacy coordinator so far by the way HBO is the only one that staff all sex scenes with these intimacy coordinators but there is there's like a separate group it's called the there's if there's intimacy directors international and intimacy professionals association for they work within those a paid contract yes they're technically working for like whatever studios presumably putting on right movie they're not working for the actors they're not working for the directors right actually like working on behalf of the student part of the studio and production staff yeah so they but now they have to go through a certain type of training they have to be able to provide different types of support including but not limited to you know maintaining the closed that when there's an intimate scene being filmed so making sure that that everybody the only the people that are going supposed to be there that need to be there are there they make sure that the garments that are being worn by the people who are in the intimate scene or especially where sex stimulation is taking place that those have adequate coverage and that the actors are comfortable with them that's so weird I just don't get it I don't get how you can do that in the first place I could I don't know that I could go to work like Hey honey I'll be home tonight I'm gonna go bleep somebody on the TV it's weird because you're simulating sack right I don't I don't know I mean stuff I'm sure happens yeah and that's part of what they're there to do is help kind of neutralize that and talk through that and be there you know to make sure that everybody's comfortable but again I don't know what would be comfortable about that no I don't think that would be comfortable at all and in fact if I I just that wouldn't be something I'd probably be comfortable with unless it's something I've always done right so like if it's just what you've always done and that's all you know than sure it makes total sense that you would do that but like if tomorrow they were like Hey you're going to be in this movie and you know I'm gonna need you to take your pants off and like yeah okay so I don't I can only imagine we keep you up all night long like that would be the day you would want want to call in sick to work right I also don't want cameras at my age you know who the lady who Toledo right right or a lease yes it was like really low lighting and then like why do we need you know but at the same time outs are off to them celebrities for doing it for right so I don't have to I but I do think it I what I appreciate is that they obviously saw it needed to standardize the protocol and so among other things they are all required to do background checks so now take a million ounces missing coordinator hang onto ninety minute needs is take your clothes Hollywood right like color creepers so they do have to go through they have to go through background checks and the sec after it developed this with the help of some of the intimacy coordinators in those two different organizations so that they could really look straight face for the idea public who goes into that job right who goes to be an intimacy coordinator presumably if somebody who's already been in the industry who understands what that experience was like I was just gonna say I'd rather be the coordinator for the person you're in the scene yeah but that's a lot to coordinate their probably actors who have done it before yeah that's what I'm saying it's kind of like a consultant role yeah it's very interesting I just the eight I don't know it sounds a very Hollywood right in with the court my name is Beverly shower and I'm an intimacy coordinator but it is but it's necessary because this is these guidelines are meant to really address the problem of sexual harassment head on hi Lee yes yes although see this is almost like what do you call this when it I wonder if studios have this to cover their bases like it's a veneer because the I don't like when it comes down to it and you're dealing with lots of money powerful directors powerful actors how much power does it you know Beverly shar intimacy coordinator really half in the moment I'm not saying this is a bad idea I'm just saying I have lots of questions and I'd love to watch a six part documentary on Netflix about yeah like just because the actors are comfortable while they're filming a scene does not mean the people higher above them our diets well and again you know you could see a director talk getting in the ear of an intimacy coordinator like you know like because again they're probably not paid super well right that I don't know I don't know I want to see the show watch this I would what I would I would watch that reality show all right when we come back on the Colleen and Bradley show what one thing would you spend the money on it to make your life just that much easier each month six five one six four one a one oh seven one what is one thing that you would definitely spend money on if you can afford it just to make your life easier every month after that one of seven one everything we have to give up entertainment.

California Bradley
SAG-AFTRA announces plans to standardize on-set intimacy coordinators

Behind Closed Doors

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

SAG-AFTRA announces plans to standardize on-set intimacy coordinators

"And the union representing movie and TV actors plans to develop a set of standards for onscreen love scenes sag after president Gabrielle card terrorists says the goal of her union is to normalize and promote the use of intimacy coordinators within the industry the union will work with Alicia rotors of intimacy directors international and other training providers who will standardize codify and implement

President Trump Gabrielle Alicia
"director international" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

08:23 min | 2 years ago

"director international" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Seven hundred and seventy artists from fifty two countries your dash minutes here the executive director as well as Judith aspen are one of the founders of the international folk art market right and it's happening with our phone doesn't stop ringing on an issue just has used to it is it too late for people who want to volunteer my family not I've never too late right yet we need a few more artists assistance and cashiers although it is the artist as system do the artist assist that helps the in the sales of the booth writes up sales right right maybe help with language or language sometime right if sign language of the whole now much I'm not yeah and and cashiers okay you know we do have a nineteen hundred and seven the plus volunteers but we have to fill forty six hundred shifts okay you know you can volunteer you can volunteer for four hours right that's right whatever you want to do you know the market you can stay for the entire eight hours work for hours shop for four hours right yeah right you get a bad season there and all that is there a minimum age for volunteer I don't think so I mean obviously if here be literate yeah all right I mean we have steam possibly two yeah we have lots of teenagers they know maximum they used to drive the golf carts Riga so if you have any friends story them you know look for and something to do this we can make a we have a concierge program which basically involves runners and all of that and most of those are young people sounds like a good get I'll spread the word there you go if you if the if you want to get involved and you know to thought yeah I mentioned before the break that you know this is an opportunity for maybe people who can't travel to fifty two countries all want to experience different cultures different languages I mean it's it's it's museum held that is the sights and sounds and smells and goods unlike just about any experience that we can now it's extraordinary and to do it make you before that the folk art museum and the museum of international are museum of Indian arts and culture right are both on museum hill okay idea Lyell is a Spanish colonial had the wheel right and the botanical garden and go guard yeah so it's a marvelous place Asian and and be with other people from all over the world during folk art week right and folk art market especially on the weekend Friday night all day Saturday from the early bird on and then all day Sunday Friday night is the big gala dinner right sold out not yet but close very thankful to be sold out by today or tomorrow okay now just kind of extra help people Judith what this is added to your life I know it's kind of a impossible thing and you know thirty words or less you know but kind of tell us you know well what is your life when I was a young person I was a member of a very interesting group of of students in in Pittsburgh Pennsylvania that were in a program with the Carnegie Foundation and so I went all summer long during the summers and on Saturdays during the time we were in school and when I went of course we met at the museum and I saw all of these amazing works of art and I came home and of course I told my mother when I grow up I'm going to have all these things in my house they're going to be so beautiful and of course my mother smiled and shook her head and of course once I studied art history in college I understood the me in certain trillions of dollars that are involved in owning these things so when I first discovered folk art as I spoke about a few minutes ago I realize that here's something hand made beautiful totally culturally relevant you can learn about what's important in a culture you can learn about their design you can learn about things that they use and spiritual peace DD's yes absolutely and you can afford it so I thought this is for me I'm going to have a beautiful house with beautiful things and I do what is card today was a scar from it is absolutely incredible it is credible it's from Malaysia and it's one of my favorite artists in the market her name is Sonya Judy and she's from Malaysia and I want to tell you just a bit about this this is so extraordinary as you can see the pattern on it is not doesn't have clean edges and that's because the print itself is put on the war before the cross strings the weft goes across and so you get this remarkable the fact that you cannot get in any other way and it's called the economic and it's very very difficult and technical to do this because it not only involves making a pattern body involves putting a resist materiel on all of the places that you don't want to be a matter for you lost me on on the war but I court is definitely beautiful gold different shades I mean and and and some kind of Grays and blacks in there as well and these are all natural colors most of them come from plants in the region Sharon booth number and she is earth number forty three hi forty three and fifty four what about this gorgeous planner with that part of your lunch today well I wish it were easier to tell precious I don't use them except out for special occasions but this is from France and it will be this work will be at the market in the birth of France law phrase name who runs what friend's name friend's name in the booth number number twenty five when my lucky number forty five as you're looking at yes and this is actually made in a very interesting way the colors are put on with some of the play enough so that they have more thick the like some slip along with it all let the colors and put into the slip and so they scored the color onto the plate and then they move it around in till they get a pattern that they think is beautiful and then it goes into the kiln and it comes out the different anyway because the killing has its own magic so this is a beautiful like square serving plate maybe thirteen inches square are these days he has other functional where yes and he is a proficient master both in throwing and in casting right and so this is the cast please and he also is a mold maker so you that's why many many partners don't make cast pieces anymore because they don't know how to make the molds so this takes a lot of craftsmanship in training to be able to do the work that you will see in France was the but in most of the E. you you have to be an apprentice for several decades before you you know so you'll learn how to make the absolutely an entire product or standing the clay and glaze is really almost a lifelong process all right thirty two minutes at three o'clock store can you stick around yeah I'm here aren't stories of Ashman the executive director international folk art market along with one of the founders Judith aspen are he knew he wanted to have all the beautiful art in her house if Fokker we write back thirty two minutes after three o'clock we'll be coming right back to the Rangers each show voice of Santa Fe here on JT RC Santa fe's news talk later.

executive director Judith aspen thirty two minutes four hours thirteen inches eight hours
"director international" Discussed on Datebook

Datebook

14:55 min | 2 years ago

"director international" Discussed on Datebook

"So welcome Maya thank you. Thank you so much for having me. So we're here today to talk about intimacy choreography, and why don't we just start out. If you don't mind saying what that is yet. So intimacy direction. See choreography intimacy coordination is all those entertainment. Excellent question. Intimacy coordination is for film and television, and intimacy direction or choreography are used in theater. Well, there you go. So there you go. Now, you know that is a field that is essentially a counter part to fight direction. It is saying that instead of what has traditionally been done in the past when it comes to scenes of an intimate nature, which is kind of go do it, and good luck that actually, we need to create a graph that. And so it's taking scenes of intimacy which could include a simulated sex scene. A. Kiss a hug between family members nudity. A first touch between Romeo and Juliet, whatever that might be whatever feels vulnerable, an intimate and making that specific technical repeatable and highly choreographed, so that just as in how fight crag Raphy you'd be making sure that no one gets physically injured ride that you would never hand someone a sword and hope they don't kill each other hope for the best. If you open the best exactly that this is saying, we're not only protecting actors physically, but we're protecting them emotionally, and so it's sort of covering all of those bases, a physical safety emotional safety, psychological, safety and trying to. I mean, had its most basic it's, it's treating actors like human beings, which sounds it sounds so basic. But in our industry actors are so often asked to do things that are unsafe unfair or downright abusive. And so it saying you are human being and you have agency over your own body, and we're here to help you make sure that stays the case so free, intimacy choreography, really would just be like, hey guys, we've got a sex scene here. Can you go off and figure that out by yourselves snakes pretty much? Yeah. I mean, you know, of course, there's a range, I mean, I think the most typical thing that would happen was exactly what you just said, is essentially good luck go. Do it go make out in a corner, and come back and tell me how it went. And then there's the other option, which is, you know. Actors in vulnerable positions maybe wearing not a ton of clothing with some. Figure of thority telling them to make dirtier I'll make sexier stick your hand there. Right. And so, yeah, trigger warnings about in the subject. And so this is putting the actors I and making sure that it all choreography comes out of place that is safe for them and not just go. Have fun good luck. So one of my questions was going to be wide. Do we need choreography by you kinda just? Yeah. I. Yeah. I think I may be did. I mean, I think, you know, people ask me this a lot. Why do we need it? Why is it important hasn't the industry existed for hundreds of years before this? And the answer is yet it has, and with the metoo movement. And with the time's up movement were seeing all of the damage that's been caused with the way that the industry's been run so far. You know, Tonia sina, who's one of the founders of this field and of intimacy directors international, which is where you train, which is where I am training still time in apprentice with intimacy directors international that was founded by Tonia sina, Alicia Rodas, and Chevron Richardson. They are sort of the head honchos of the field right now. So I'm very, very privileged to train, and learn from them, and to still be training and learning from them. But the way she talks about it. Is that, you know, people walk onset would walk into a rehearsal, hall, and a director might behave in a certain way and an actors would kind of have to say okay, guess I'm getting sexually harass today and of no recourse. You have no HR department often. No recourse in an every young actor knows that there are hundreds of other people waiting outside the door who will take your job. If you throw fuss if you're a diva if you say, no, right. And so it's this field of intimacy direction and intimacy coordination is fighting to change that industry and change that paradigm saying, this is no k-. It's not. Okay. Just abuser actors, it's not okay, what are some of like I don't want to spend too much time on those because it's like the what are some of the worst stories you know about from like. An intimacy choreographer director not being there. Yeah, I mean, you know, this is this is the heart for me. And I, I imagine that this is the case for many of my colleagues as well. This is one of the hardest parts of the job for me is that I. I hear about the stories that happen. People wanna tell you specifically. Yes. And so you have to hold that. Yeah. Absolutely. Oh, gosh. Well, and that's part of the director's work. Right. Is is holding holding space for people and holding everybody up in a rehearsal room. And when I'm in a rehearsal room. I'm thinking about everybody. Right. So I'm not just thinking about, okay the actors seem. Okay. I'm thinking about the director. I'm thinking that the designer I'm thinking about the PA who's looking a little pale in the corner. Right. So it's part of the work to huge part of the work to hold space for everybody into sort of make sure to always be aware of all of the trauma, and the complexities of the vulnerabilities of this work, but yeah, it doesn't mean that I end up being a sort of a container. Let's say, yeah. A container for. Horror stories. And I think I've been working as an intimacy doctor in the bay area for who I don't know year and a half, two years now, as that time, you can imagine. I've heard quite a few stories from places within the area from places outside of the bay area. And I think the worst stories I hear are often from older actors from people who have been in the industry longer. It's those actors that, you know, everybody's excited about this work, right? Actress particularly, I've never had an actor have yet to have an actor be like this is terrible this shouldn't exist. Right. Missy. Yeah. People in general are really grateful for the work, but I find that when I work with actors over the age of forty. It sort of takes on this whole new meaning because they realize all that they've been putting up with for their whole career. Oh, god. And so, in that moment, they realize the things that they, they didn't know how to say, no to, they didn't know they could say no to didn't know they were allowed, I think of intimacy direction as, like a, like a tree, like I like to think that for every actor director designer technician. I work with and of course, this extends greater right to my, my colleagues, and those who pave the way for this path that each actor each person we work with is like a branch that they get to sort of sprout off on their own knowing that they have these tools, and they have these options and they have recourse. So hopefully they're branch will spouse sprout other ranches and other leaves that they can bring to their next processes. So that's sort of what, what keeps. Me grounded, when there happens to be a time, where it's, it's feels like a barrage of hearing horror stories is thinking about the impact of the work and also as an apprentice with intimacy directors international. I have the privilege of learning from the best of from learning from the people who fought tooth and nail the three founders I mentioned before and, and Claire warden, who is the first intimacy director, on Broadway right now, but I get to have them and so whenever I start to feel overwhelmed. You know, I can reach out to my colleagues who are also printed, I can reach out to those who have done so much work to further this field. And we'll have each other's backs which I think, is a really powerful thing because this community of intimacy directors is still so small, there's, there's not many of us. How much farther do you have to go in your training? This training takes place over a couple of years, it's sort of. Of the key distinctions between fight choreography. Is that fight corio you could maybe take a day, long class and get a certification in unarmed combat or whatever? As you can imagine intimacy direction is not like that. And that is largely because of the complexity of human beings. We're not simple creatures, and you sort of never know when trauma will bubble up or when something will turn away that you don't anticipate whereas in a fight. I'm not a fight director. So I can't speak eloquently about fights, but in a fight, you know, as long as you know, how to keep people safe you're good. And when we're talking about the human psyche, it's much more complicated to know how to keep people safe. Alternately were not mental health professionals. We, we are all required to get a mental health for states or certificate as part of our training. And so that helps but it's, you know, we're not psychologists before you mentioned that you've never had an actor be all skeptical. Reluctant work with you have other types of. People. It's an astute question. Yes. Yeah. Of course, I mean, I you know, I think for the most part what I've experienced in the bay area is largely open arms. And again, that's a huge tribute to all those who who paved the path before me who sort of fought those fights to make sure that I was able to do this work. But yeah, I mean, I think I face sometimes hesitation from directors face hesitation from artistic directors or from arts administrators on what grounds. Well, I think part of it is a fear. Part of it is a fear of, I think for directors of meaty stepping on toes of taking their jobs, right? Especially for older directors who've been doing this. You know, some of them longer than I've been alive, that there's this idea that, you know, I'm just gonna come in and kind of take over their job because they've been doing this forever. So that's part of it. Right. Is I think fear of. Of letting person take control. I think part of it is, is a lack of understanding people not being clear about what this field is or why they need it. Some people just don't believe that we should have it. There are folks who I've come across in the bay area, who just believe that ultimately the field is unnecessary, and that was sort of making things too complicated. And that maybe this is just a, a training director should have for a few hours and then that's good enough. We've had people naked on our stages for years. Why do we all of a sudden care? Now. How do you deal with that? Yeah. I mean with directors for me. It's easiest because I'm also director and I'm trained as a director, so you can speak there. So I. Yeah, exactly. And so, for me, that's the easiest of being able to say I am not here to take your job. I am not here to misdirect your vision. I'm here to further your vision. I think the fear is often that intimacy direction will sanitize the work that it will make it less Grady or less sexy or hate that word. But whatever I do you hate that were. I I'm trying to I'm trying to get directors to instead of using the word sexy use the word charged because I think telling an actor to be sexier is incredibly demeaning. So I'm trying to that's, that's a large part of what we do is a Missy directors is about changing the language that makes a lot of sense like lily bed, rehearsing for, you know, five hours. But, like how about you be sexier now? Yeah, exactly. Yeah. These sexier be dirtier those words, just I mean you hear the way I'm inflicting those words. Right. And it's because they're such. There's such a connotation with them. And especially I think for young actors, it's just I think it's damaging and its diminutive. And so if you're saying, you want to see more chemistry, fine, right? If it's this moment needs to be more, charged it needs more heat needs more tension. Those are great words, but I'm trying to move. I'm trying to help as we all are trying to move away from words that sort of place, this connotation on, I think, especially young actresses, as objects for lack of better word. You're also making me. See how vague the word sexy. Right. What does that mean? It's like be better. Yeah. Exactly. Exactly. I go around screaming, beauty is in the eye of the beholder because that's what that's what sexy is to me is like, I don't know what sexiest to you. I have no idea. Absolutely none. It's going to be different for. Every person. So when I work with actors and directors, I try and get them to give me adjectives. That's pretty much how Ariel and I cry Laurent, this is aerial craft and this is a previous cutting ball production with how many.

director Romeo Tonia sina Missy Juliet Chevron Richardson Claire warden Grady Ariel Alicia Rodas Laurent technician five hours two years
"director international" Discussed on How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"director international" Discussed on How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

"We set that way to get full goal. Will we get over with hope we do jingly? Will we set them? We talk to each other. And so, yeah, it's a great deal begun tastic pro teams while if we will would would be delighted I have to say see you guys win it because I think be better if his shot by Michael young as well. Much not I think the the true definition of somebody who should be a British nominee should be a real. I'm BUSTER doing ambassadorial stuff spreading the word flying. Like the bridge. Headdress leather dots traveling around the UK of the globe. And just spreading the messages of how great we all you care what we do. And that's what we will continue to do if if because of that people keep coming at us for brief headdresses year that we will always be grateful for that. And we always accepted wholeheartedly dominate you. Anyway, you'd be dominated. So. So one bit of advice. I was going to to really about you is, you know, working as a Jew. I would in truth we have, but we've gone off into such a lovely root of conversation that I didn't really want to pull it too much back to that. But if there is a couple who work out there is a in a in a business relationship working relationship as well as a relationship of as a couple was the best tip that you could give to them working together for success. I think you've got to respect each other's opinions. Listen to each other's opinions in the compromise of the miser. And then stole was think that I'm right. Another thing that we always try to swell. His overseas were together unlimited together, we try to have it cut off until it's not always possible, but send maybe eight o'clock in the agent we relied right? Can we stop talking about work now and just give ourselves some time out and talk about other things, you know, live like otherness actually perfect absolutely perfect to perfect interview really house paying, but we're not done yet. We're going to just share some links after these questions I'm going to put to you an old link spot away listeners, as you know, by now, we'll have them on the show knows. And maybe we can share some of your images of work as well guys. And maybe a photo of your dog Garryowen mollycoddle, an image of your photographic work would be good. But we'll be in touch about that nearer. The time of the interview and these questions are put out there to our listeners through free to answer. I'm gonna just awesome as I see them. All right. So we're gonna kinda guy fruitless as quickly as we can. So we had a question from the EZ director international director fatigue, and he's a former guest of ours. Allen, Alex, Byron hell, and he just said you'll be a two thousand eight collection two thousand eighteen collection was incredible. What was your thoughts on this collection? We use three behind. I think we decided a couple of years ago just to you know, somebody's been take stock and take setback and think about who we are out brand days what we should really be kind of putting out that it intended imagery. And it was a celebration of of real women. You know, the story story was to is no story. You know, we didn't have in color half of it black and white. So present it in a very editorial fashion way. Multi-cultural in abuse beautiful girls wearable have with an edge. But every picture told the story, you know on the day. We were really estimate goes to model we've gotten to be relaxed for the commerce had girl. So I said so the kind of thing that given around, and we just created copter to really, really grit more. I think we wanted when people look at those pictures of what we want them to smile women in the gallery, we stood watching people come job Patiala smiling near the emotion that we want to put through the pictures. We take love those pictures, but of C wasn't to be and thing. Not this case. Because it was just about, you know, kind of celebrating empowered women strong, strong beautiful women, and I'll do think dots. That's exactly what we achieved..

director Patiala Michael young Byron hell UK Garryowen mollycoddle EZ Allen Alex one bit
"director international" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

11:32 min | 2 years ago

"director international" Discussed on KCRW

"We're going to talk about the show smell. It's about a hard. Luck. Single mom in Boston it received critical acclaim and was up for two Golden Globes last year. It was renewed for a second season. And Frankie Shaw is the crater star in Showrunner. I have my AA meeting today at four o'clock. I'm making coffee even sober for over a year came as one meeting, take your doctor. You want me to bail on my coffee commitment branch? I can't do that. So I'm in a rush through my job, which houses closed and feeds our kids. So you can make coffee. So that's the toughening however late last week ABC signature studios announced is cancelling the show and suspending Shah's pay while it investigates allegations against her. Those allegations include people not getting credited for their work writers being separated by race and the mishandling of sex scenes can masters is editor at large of the Hollywood reporter and host of case or at least the business. She broke the story last year, and she's been reporting on it since then. Hi, hi, okay. So tell us about the alleged misconduct that you discovered, and what did you find out what's going on on the set of smells, you know? I have covered movies and sometimes TV shows where the cast and crew turn on somebody and lose faith in the show runner. But this was really extrordinary. I started to get I got one tip and made like one and a half phone calls. And I was just overwhelmed with people that then started to call me with stories from the set particularly of the second season. But also the first on this show this show time show Smith and Frankie Shaw is the show. I mean, it's based on a version of her life, and she is star. So there isn't it's not like they can get rid of her and still carry on with the show. She plays this mom. Rosie o'donald played her mother should really good cast. And what happened is she just seems to have been an abuser. I mean there were allegations. I over more than twenty people calling the tip line at Disney, which is the parent of the ABC studios that produced the show there were complaints to particularly the writers guild about the credit issues. Shockingly complaints that the writer's room was as you mentioned segregated by race and not by accident. This these are the allegations, and they were mishandled sex scenes. One of the stars of the show this actress Samara weaving she had in the I m second season incidents. Ultimately, it was seen as the breach of her contract. When which it seems that nude scenes that she was playing love scenes were handled with great insensitivity in the first season. She was allegedly bullied. She had a, you know reluctance to do a certain kind of thing in this love scene and in the second season. There were monitors turned on this was supposed to be a closed set. It. Absolutely. I was told Frankie Shaw herself instructed that the monitor speed turned on even though there was a preliminary conversation that this is very sensitive with. The actors with the director and nonetheless with lots of crew and various people on the show watching monitors were turned on this as this was considered a breach in the actress actually left the show, and she was one of the stars of the show. She was just a character killer. Yeah. Okay. So what is the explanation for this has Frankie shot come out and explain any of this? She kind of said, well, eventually she said, well, you know, I just really was inexperienced. And I didn't know and there are two things wrong with that one of which is a very competitive writers guild program for show runners, and she was in it. She got a place in it. So she had training. And the other problem is there are executives have Showtime executives that ABC studios. Executive producers on the show who with relatively young new show runner. Like, Frankie Shaw are supposed to be the adults in the room. And I have to say it seems like that was a complete fail. This thing. Only got to be started to be an issue when Rosie O'Donnell who I feel bad for because she she really did a good performance. As this characters. Mom, she initially reported based on the nude scene in the second season that something was wrong on the set. And it seems that you know, the reaction was border between slow and non existent only when we published a story about these allegations. Did they I would say grudgingly say they would investigate. Okay, Kim masters editor at large the Hollywood reporter, host of case Italy's business. Thanks, kim. Thank you. So what would have happened? If smell had had an intimacy coordinator, you know, someone to make sure everyone felt comfortable and safe when shooting sex scenes in October HBO announced that an intimacy coordinator will be on set whenever a sexually intimate scene shot that person is aleisha Rodas. She's associate director and co founder of intimacy directors international and she joins us now. Hi, how are you? I'm great. Thank you. So what exactly is an intimacy coordinator and intimacy coordinator is a movement coach or a movement. Rector an advocate for actors and a liaison between actors and production. So I like to think that we are the connective tissue between what we see on the page. And what it is that happens when we are shooting. So I imagine that you've had more work since metoo happened. That is absolutely correct. We started this a number of years ago in twenty fifteen myself Antonia, CNN, Chaban Richardson, created intimacy directors international after we had seen such a need for this kind of work, and we got some attention. And you know, we we spent a while, you know, researching and a lot of this was based on Tony CENA's research that she started in two thousand four and after doing this research with legal experts with consent experts trauma, experts other directors, and we were all movement directors and actors and after going through all this. You know, we start put out workshops at our protocols and people started to take some notice and then metoo happened and. Obviously people turned around and said, what was that thing? You were talking about again because everyone's sort of realized that we are coming. You know, I don't think me too was a few people acting badly. It was the idea the realization that the way things were our power dynamics. And our systematic dynamics in the entertainment industry, and in a lot of our industries really had some problems. So this is something in there to help mitigate that. All right. So I guess I'm wondering exactly how this works out getting too graphic. But it sure did it used to be that a director would say, okay. You to get in the bed pretend to have Saxon. We'll shoot it. And that was that. I mean, there are a lot of different ways to go about an intimate scene. But in general, what we what we have seen is that there is a lot of, you know, do what you feel like go with your instincts. And I understand, you know, the the want is from a having an authentic performance. But the real story here is that what they are doing is fake. We are not asking actors to do sex work. We're not asking them to have an actual sexual experience if actors want to do sex work that is fine. You know, God bless but with our laws with our business laws with our union protocols. That is not what we're asking actors to do. So I think for a while, you know, and we're going on how many years of filmmaking and theatrical practices. Where we've had this black hole of artistic and also practical ideals in our intimate scenes. So I know my experiences an actor was a lot of hey, you to figure it out or you three figure it out whoever's in the scene I've had experiences and talked to plenty of actors who have had experiences of being on set. And then saying, you know, what this isn't working could you take your top off or you know, what just take take his pants off. And none of that is specified ahead of time all of that have to be specified. Absolutely. So so exactly is specified is it down to where you put your hand. If you kiss the neck or the older or not necessarily that much. What we go with? We have things called nudity writers or waivers or simulated sex writers or waivers, which are denims two contracts. That are are very commonplace in in the industry, and what we do is make sure they say, exactly. What it is. They're agreeing to as far as if they're agreeing to simulate a sexual act, or what type of nudity, it is that they are okay showing or not okay showing it's not a blanket statement. And if people do want to work like that and say, I'm okay with everything. All simulate anything, I'll show anything. Fabulous awesome. We can open that up and work within whatever boundaries people are working with you ever get a situation though, where someone has said that. And then when they're actually filming they say, oh, never mind. I can't do this. I don't wanna do this. Oh, sure. Even though they've paper. And is there then a negotiation with the director? And does it get a little fraught? I mean at the end of the day, if someone says, I am not going to do this. And it is something that with nudity a sexual act a violent act. What what are you going to do? I mean, do you say, okay, you're not going to are you going to physically force someone to do it? Now. The problem here, of course, is there's a lot of coercion onset what intimacy coordination does is. Allows us to get all those conversations ahead of time. And I can count on my one hand the number of times that someone has actually withdrawn consent in the moment. And that is because they didn't have all of the information ahead of time. So what we find is when actors no the information ahead of time. They know that they are going to be safe. They know that they're being advocated for they know exactly what the shot is. And what they're being asked to do. They feel then more empowered to do their best work. And that's what we really want here. You know, we we don't want to censor anyone we want everyone to do their best work and go figure when actors no they're not going to be harassed or abused. They do their best work people do actual sexual acts. There's a long history and lots of rumored and corroborated statements of people talking about actual sexual acts happening actual intercourse. Sure. Yeah. Never when I have been there. But we're also very specific about it. And here's the. Thing if we don't have specific protocols set for our intimate scenes, then we do open ourselves up two times where people can feel coerced into having actual sexual acts on set to people feeling like they have to do things that one they shouldn't can't be doing because of their union protocols, but also you as an actor are allowed to have personal boundaries. You know, I'm on the deuce for, you know. And this is our the second season we've been doing this. And I work on a lot of H B O shows, we do a lot of risque work, and I work with a lot of directors and every time we can find a way within the boundaries of what the actors are green to do. And with how directors like to work to make it safe and also exciting and about the weren't industry in the deuces, right, so. Yeah. Seventies. And eighties to imagine the sex has to be pretty explicit. Oh, surely. Yeah. We have to tell the story of very explicit sex. But when you say, oh, I've. I've heard stories of actors actually having sex. Aren't they supposed to be wearing things that prevent that from happening isn't there? Well, it's material..

Frankie Shaw director ABC studios coordinator editor reporter Hollywood kim Boston Shah ABC Rosie O'Donnell Golden Globes Showrunner Rosie o'donald Disney Samara writer writers guild Tony CENA
"director international" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

13:33 min | 2 years ago

"director international" Discussed on KCRW

"We're going to talk about the show smell. It's about a hard. Luck. Single mom in Boston it received critical acclaim and was up for two Golden Globes last year. It was renewed for a second season. And Frankie Shaw is the creator star in Showrunner. I have my AA meeting today at four o'clock, I'm making the coffee even sober for over a year came as one meeting take your kids to the doctor. You want me to build on my coffee commitment bridge. I can't do that. So I'm in a rush through my job, which houses closed and feeds our kids. So you can make coffee. However late last week ABC's signature studios announced it is cancelling the show and suspending Shah's pay while it investigates allegations against her. Those allegations include people not getting credited for their work riders being separated by race and the mishandling of sex scenes can masters is editor at large of the Hollywood reporter and host of case or at least the business. She broke the story last year, and she's been reporting on it since then. Hi, hi, okay. So tell us about the alleged misconduct that you discovered and what did you find out? What's going on the set of smells, you know? I have covered movies and sometimes TV shows where the cast and crew turn on somebody and lose faith in the show runner. But this was really extraordinary. I started to get I got one tip and made like one and a half phone calls. And I was just overwhelmed with people that then started the call me with stories from the set particularly of the second season. But also the firm. I on this show Showtime show Smith and Frankie Shaw is the show. I mean, it's based on a version of her life, and she is star. So there isn't it's not as they can get rid of her and still carry on with the show. She plays this mom. Rosie O'Donnell played her mother should really good cast. And what happened is she just seems to have been an abuser. I mean there were allegations. I over more than twenty people calling the anonymous tip line at Disney, which is the parent of the ABC studios that produced the show there were complaints to particularly the writers guild about the credit issues. Shockingly complaints that the writer's room was as you mentioned segregated by race and not by accident. This these are the allegations, and they were mishandled sex scenes at one of the stars of the show, this actress Samara weaving she had in the first and second season incidents. Ultimately, it was seen as the breach of her contract when which it seems that Newt scene. That she was playing love scenes were handled with great insensitivity in the first season. She was allegedly bullied. She had a, you know reluctance to do a certain kind of thing in this love scene and in the second season. There were monitors turned on this was supposed to be a closed set. It. Absolutely. I was told Frankie Shaw herself instructed that the monitor speed turned on even though there was a preliminary conversation that this is very sensitive with the actors with the director and nonetheless with lots of crew and various people on the show watching monitors turned on this as this was considered a breach. The actress actually left the show, and she was one of the stars of the show. She was just a character killer. Yeah. Okay. So what is the explanation for this has Frankie shot come out and explain any of this? She kind of said, well, eventually she said, well, you know, I just really was inexperienced. And I didn't know and there are two things wrong with that one of which is a very competitive writers guild program for show runners, and she was in it. She got a place in it. So she had training. And the other problem is there are executive says Showtime executives that ABC studios executive producers on the show who with relatively young new show runner. Like, Frankie Shaw are supposed to be the adults in the room. And I have to say it seems like that was a complete fail. This thing. Only got to be started to be an issue when Rosie O'Donnell who I feel bad for because she she really did a good performance as this characters. Mom. She initially reported based on the nude scene in the second season that something was wrong on the set. And I it seems that you know, the reaction was border between slow and non existent only when we published a story about these. Allegations. Did they I would say grudgingly say they would investigate. Okay, Kim masters editor at large at the Hollywood reporter, host of case Italy's the business. Thanks, kim. Thank you. So what would have happened? If smell had had an intimacy coordinator, someone to make sure everyone felt comfortable and safe when shooting sex scenes in October HBO announced that an intimacy coordinator will be onset whenever a sexually intimate scene is shot. That person is aleisha Rhodus. She's associate director and co founder of intimacy directors international and she joins us now. Hi, hey, how are you? I'm great. Thank you. So what exactly is an intimacy coordinator and intimacy coordinator is a movement coach or a movement director an advocate for actors and a liaison between actors and production. So I like to think that we are the connective tissue between what we see on the page. And what it is that happens when we are shooting. So I imagine that you've had more work. Since me metoo happened. That is absolutely correct. We started this a number of years ago in twenty fifteen myself and Tonia CNN, Chaban Richardson, created intimacy directors international after we had seen such a need for this kind of work. And we we got some attention. And you know, we we spent a while, you know, researching and a lot of this was based on Tony CENA's research that she started in two thousand four and after doing this research with legal experts with consent experts trauma, experts other directors, and we were all movement directors and actors and after going through all this. You know, we started put out workshops at our protocols and people started to take some notice and then metoo happened. And obviously people turned around and said, what was that thing? You were talking about again because everyone sort of realized that we are coming. You know, I don't think me too was a few people acting badly. It was the idea the realization that. The way things were our power dynamics. And our systematic dynamics in the entertainment industry, and in a lot of our industries really had some problems. So this is something in there to help mitigate that. All right. So I guess I'm wondering exactly how this works without getting too graphic. But sure did it used to be that a director would say, okay, you to get in the bed hat pretend to have Saxon. We'll shoot it. And that was that. I mean, there are a lot of different ways to go about an intimate scene. But in general, what we what we have seen is that there's a lot of, you know, do what you feel like go with your instincts. And I understand, you know, the the want is from a having an authentic performance. But the real story here is that what they are doing is fake. We are not asking actors to do sex work. We're not asking them to have an actual sexual experience if actors want to do sex work that is fine. You know, God bless but with our law. Ause with our business laws with our union protocols. That is not what we're asking actors to do. So I think for a while, you know, and we're going on how many years of filmmaking and theatrical practices where we've had this black hole of artistic and also practical ideals in our intimate scenes. So I know my experiences an actor was a lot of hey, you to figure it out or you three figure it out whoever's in the scene had experiences and talked to plenty of actors who had experiences of being on set. And then saying, you know, what this isn't working could you take your top off or you know, what just take take his pants off. And none of that is specified ahead of time all of that have to be specified. Absolutely. So so exactly is specified is it down to where you put your hand. If you kiss the neck or the older or not necessarily that much. What we go with we have things. Call. Nudity writers or waivers or simulated? Sex writers are waivers, which are attendance to contracts that are are very commonplace in in the industry, and what we do is make sure they say exactly what it is. They're agreeing to as far as agreeing to simulate a sexual act, or what type of nudity it is that they are okay showing or not okay showing it's not a blanket statement. And if people do want to work like that and say, I'm okay with everything. All simulate anything, I'll show anything. Fabulous awesome. We can open that up and work within whatever boundaries people are working with do you ever get a situation though, where someone has said that. And then when they're actually filming they say, oh, never mind. I can't do this. I don't wanna do this. Oh, sure. Even though they've paper. And is there then a negotiation with the director and does a get a little fraught? I mean at the end of the day, if someone says, I am not going to do this. And it is something that with nudity sexual act a violent act. What what are you going? Do. I mean, do you say, okay, you're not going to are you going to physically force someone to do it? Now. The problem here, of course, is there's a lot of coercion onset, what intimacy coordination does is allows us to get all those conversations ahead of time. And I can count on my one hand the number of times that someone is actually withdrawn consent in the moment. And that is because they didn't have all of the information ahead of time. So what we find is when actors no the information ahead of time. They know that they are going to be safe. They know that they're being advocated for they know exactly what the shot is. And what they're being asked to do. They feel then more empowered to do their best work. And that's what we really want here. You know, we we don't want to censor anyone we want everyone to do their best work and go figure when actors no they're not going to be harassed or abused. They do their best work people do actual sexual acts. There's a long history and lots of rumored and. Corroborated statements of people talking about actual sexual acts happening actual intercourse. Sure. Yeah. Never when I have been there. But we're also very specific about it. And here's the thing if we don't have specific protocols set for our intimate scenes, then we do open ourselves up two times where people can feel coerced into having actual sexual acts on set to people feeling like they have to do things that one they shouldn't can't be doing because of their union protocols. But also you as an actor are allowed to have personal boundaries. You know, I'm on the deuce for, you know. And this is our the second season we've been doing this. And I work on a lot of H B O shows, we do a lot of risque work, and I work with a lot of directors and every time we can find a way within the boundaries of what the actors are grain to do. And with how the directors liked to work to make it safe and also, exciting and. Industry in the deuces, right, so. Yeah. Seventies. And eighties to imagine the sex has to be pretty explicit. Oh, surely. Yeah. We have to tell the story of very explicit sex. But when you say, oh, I've heard stories of actors actually having sex. Aren't they supposed to be wearing things that prevent that from happening isn't there? Well, it's material and this. This is part. Right. Right. See, and this is part of it is, you know, even just even just that question. You can hear being like, so isn't there a thing that they wear underneath? It's it's really difficult to talk about these things and really put it out there explicitly what it is that we want people to where and what to have between them, and God bless all of the costumers of our industry because it has been then that have been forced into some really uncomfortable situations for many years of having to talk with actors and clear, what's okay with them. When it's it's not necessarily their jobs to do that. So when we're working with this, I work with costumes, and we make sure that we have. So there's modesty garments which has been, you know, the old half that we've used there's a a sort of sock situation that they have for people who have a penis. But that's for modesty. That's for. I don't want you to see anything. And if we're telling a story of simulated sex or telling a story of sex. And we have genitals up against each other. We want something else there. So some sort of padding some sort of barriers that we make sure they're so that one there is sexual health that is cared for because you know, God forbid someone has a a sexual health issue going on. But also making sure that we have a little bit less feeling happening there. So that if someone has a vascular reaction, the partner doesn't have to feel that we normalize it. We know that just because you put your body in a certain position, you know, your body is going to want to replicate the pre moments of that actually happening, but it's not actually happening. We're we're actors working together in a professional circumstance, and are you in the room if you will or onset when it's happening just to make sure that things don't get out of hand. Absolutely. I speak with the actors and directors beforehand, I'm collaborating with costumes I'm collaborating with makeup. Sometimes if there are prosthetics involved, and you know, the department..

director Frankie Shaw Rosie O'Donnell ABC studios coordinator editor reporter Hollywood Boston Shah ABC kim Golden Globes Showrunner Disney executive Samara Newt aleisha Rhodus writer
"director international" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"director international" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Speaking of climate change, a Larry King years ago interviewed a man named Julian Morris, he's communists. He's president and founder of an international policy network. And he says look far better to not force the world to artificially move from a fossil based fuels to a renewable face based fuels because you're going to slow down economic growth. The best thing to do is to make the world more prosperous in fifty years from now poor people will live better than some of the wealthiest people living right now, that's the best way to deal with it that way, you have enough money to deal with the consequences of climate change rather than try to prevent climate change, which the professor of MS Feerick. Scientists at MIT Richard lindzen says climate change is a bogus term because the climate is always changing. Here's the exchange between Larry King and economist Julian ours in London, executive director, international policy network. Is it much ado about nothing or should we be concerned? Well, he is worth comparing the real problems which are facing the world today with the scenario is that have being predicted for the future every year at the moment about ten million children die of preventable incurable diseases. And yet we're concerned that sometime far in the future a few hundred thousand people maybe a few million people most might suffer in some unknown way as a result of climate change. But the same people he predict massive climate changes also predict that in order for these changes to occur. We will have had enormous amounts of economic growth to the poorest people in the world will no longer be poor. In fact, there will be richer than richest people in the world today. Average per capita income's in the poorest parts of the world are less than a thousand dollars a year. Per capita. In fifty years time, those are predicted to be greater than the current levels for the richest part of the world more than about thirty thousand US dollars, which is average per capita income in places like the UK and. Parts of Europe. So what is doing meaningless to them? Well, the reality is that in the future. People will be wealthy enough to adapt to pretty much all any change that is likely to happen. I mean, I see barring absolute global catastrophe. We'll be able to manage the situation. I got the question is whether we want to spend vast resources today to prevent something that might happen way downstream in the feature. Now, the sheriff of Pima county Arizona Napier was asked by a New York Times. Podcast. Michael, barbara. This is NPR. Not New York Times. But I'm sorry. It is a New York Times podcast. His name is Michael Barbaro. He's a New York Times. Reporter he hosts this podcast, and he asked the sheriff is Trump full of it when he says, it's a crisis on the border. This guy's gonna share for thirty one years. He says there's been a crisis on the border for the thirty one years I've been in the sheriff department. So you said that you appreciated the president using the word crisis on Tuesday night in his primetime speech. So you think that he's right that there is at this moment of crisis at the border, Michael. Yes. And it's not President Trump's crisis or this administration's crisis. This has been a crisis the entire thirty one years. I've been in this valley, the host is with the New York Times. I think I had a couple of hours ago that he was with NPR. He's New York Times, which makes it even better New York Times. My deputy says I told you in the past recover over one hundred bodies a year in a desert in my county and we've been doing this for decades. So it is a public safety crisis. Not only from drug trafficking human trafficking, victims Atieno of migrants, at the hands of bandits coyotes is also a public safety issue. And there is an underlying national security concern here more cocaine is coming into this country. We're having overdoses every day, and that's not the president being dramatic. That's happening in my community. I I know this is true. It used to be if you got two ounces of heroin or two ounces about then phetamine that was considered a big bust in my part of the world that was a big deal this past week. My deputies confiscated ten pounds of methamphetamine you..

Michael Barbaro Julian Morris president president and founder New York Times Larry King NPR Richard lindzen Europe Pima county Arizona Napier MS Feerick US professor cocaine heroin methamphetamine executive director London
"director international" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:49 min | 2 years ago

"director international" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Speaking of climate change, a Larry King years ago interviewed a man named Julian Morris. He's McConnell's he's president and founder of an international policy network. And he says look far better to not force the world to artificially move from a fossil based fuels to a renewable face based fuels because you're going to slow down economic growth. The best thing to do is to make the world more prosperous in fifty years from now poor people will live better than some of the wealthiest people living right now, that's the best way to deal with it that way, you have enough money to deal with the consequences of climate change rather than try to prevent climate change, which the professor of Emma. Mets feerick. Scientists at MIT. Richard lindzen says climate change is a bogus term because the climate is always changing here's exchange between Larry King and economist Julian ours in London, executive director, international policy network isn't much to do about nothing. Or should we be concerned? Well, I think it's worth comparing the real problems which facing the world today with the scenario is that have being predicted for the future every year at the moment about ten million children die of preventable incurable diseases. And yet we're concerned that sometime following the feature a few hundred thousand people maybe a few million people most might suffer in some unknown way as a result of climate change. But the same people he predict massive climate changes also predict that in order for these changes to occur. We will have had enormous amounts of economic growth. So the poorest people in the world will no longer be poor. In fact, there will be richer than the richest people in the world today. Average per capita income's in the poorest parts of the world are less than a thousand dollars a year per capita. In fifty years time these are predicted to be greater than the current levels. The richest part of the world more than about thirty thousand US dollars, which is average per capita income in places like the UK and. Parts of Europe. So what is doing meaningless to them? Well, the reality is that in the future. People will be wealthy enough to adapt to pretty much any change that is likely to happen. I mean, I see barring absolute global catastrophe. We'll be able to manage the situation. I got the question is whether we want to spend vast resources today to prevent something that might happen way downstream in the future. Now, the sheriff of Pima county Arizona Napier was asked by a New York Times. Podcast. Michael barbaro? This is NPR new your times. But I'm sorry. It isn't a New York Times podcast. If name is Michael Barbaro. He's a New York Times. Reporter he hosts this podcast, and he asked the sheriff is is Trump full of it when he says, it's a crisis on the border. This guy's gonna share for thirty one years. He says there's been a crisis on the border for the thirty one years. I've been in the sheriff's department. So you said that you appreciated the president using the word crisis on Tuesday night in his prime time speech. So you think that he's right that there is at this moment a crisis at the border, Michael. Yes, it's not President Trump's crisis or this administration's crisis. This has been a crisis the entire thirty one years. I've been in this valley, the host is with the New York Times. I think I said a couple of hours ago that he was with NPR. He's New York Times, which makes it even better New York Times. My deputy says I told you in the past recover over. Hundred bodies a year in a desert semi county. And we've been doing this for decades. So it is a public safety crisis. Not only from drug trafficking, human trafficking, victimization of of migrants at the hands of bandits and coyotes is also a public safety issue. And there is an underlying national security concern here more cocaine is coming into this country. We're having overdoses every day, and that's not the president being dramatic. That's happening by community. I I know this is true. It used to be if you got two ounces of heroin or two ounces about that phetamine that was considered a big bust in my part of the world that was a big deal this past week. My deputies confiscated ten pounds of methamphetamine you. Go back fifteen years ago that would have been on thought of it. We couldn't even have imagined that the Michael those drugs are not being cooked in my county. We know they're coming up from the border. And the other thing is that we know that the large portion of that amount of methamphetamine is not gonna. To be consumed in my county. It's going elsewhere. It's going all over the nation. So it's an evolving problem. It's a very complex problem. But it is. In fact, crisis is interesting. The you're sort of Finland about this because there is a significant debate about whether or not this represents a crisis, and in your mind that doesn't seem to be any ambiguity. There is not an easy to have a debate and back version my, but if you can have a debate in New York City, it's hard for me to have a debate. When I read the resumes created by my deputies say we recovered another body in the desert. We went to another overdose. We heard that another woman has been sexually assaulted on your way up from the border. So this stuff is stuff that I live every day. So while it may be an interesting political argument other parts of the country. It's not a political argument where I live and here is an American doctor on the border. Yes. That would be the situation. A lot of these people are repeat. Repeat offenders if you want to put a lake that some of these individuals come across and have their baby and have a full family of all anchor babies in my practice and the thirty one years being doing this. I have had patients who come across to have their baby, and they themselves were an anchor baby. But had never spent a day in the United States. They crossed the border with a birth certificate from when they were born they had never seen the United States and here they are to have their baby. And it's the second generation anchor-baby. We come back. Victor Davis Hanson has asked a very simple question if the United States is racist, and it's unwelcoming. Why does a recent poll reveal that a third of Mexicans thirty four percent would like to immigrate to.

New York Times Michael barbaro United States president president and founder NPR methamphetamine Larry King Mets Julian Morris MIT Richard lindzen New York City Pima county Arizona Napier McConnell Europe Victor Davis Hanson professor
"director international" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:27 min | 2 years ago

"director international" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Money and female, I and you can beat my brother. You will win a Trump coin twenty twenty more on this in due course, also going to be playing phone Abro later on in the winter. We'll get a my pillow and also a Trump coin twenty twenty and both contestable get copies of dear father, your son. Bernie sanders. Apologize to the women who worked on his campaign who felt that they were harassed. Good question. And the answer is and I'm very proud of the campaign. We ran into sixteen. You know, we slaughtered at four percents of the polls. We ended up winning twenty two states thirteen million votes. I think we changed the nature of political discourse in this country raising issues are now kind of mainstream which were then considered extreme. And fringe what our campaign grew from. I think we started with three or four paid employees and over a period of a few months as the campaign exploded, we went up to twelve hundred employees, and I am not going to sit here and tell you that we did everything right in terms of human resources in terms of addressing the needs that I'm hearing from now that women focus respected that there was sexual harassment which was not dealt with. As possible. What I will tell you is that when I ran for reelection in two thousand eighteen in Vermont, we put forward Bush strongest set of principles in terms of mandatory training in terms of women if they felt harassed having an independent firm that they can go to and I think that's kind of the gold standard for what we should be doing. So I certainly apologize to any woman who felt that she was not treated appropriately. And of course, if I run we will better on next month. Can you imagine what would happen if a bunch of women alleged that during the Trump campaign when they were working for President Trump? They were sexually harassed. Ronnie sanders. Apologize gonna run again in two thousand twenty likely. No harm. No foul. The new chair of the congressional climate change panel. Says that we are literally quote in a race against time. Her name is Kathy castor, a Florida Democrat and Pelosi has chosen heard a chair. This new select committee on the climate crisis. Echoing the words of the outgoing governor Jerry Brown who said that climate change deniers were contributing to the fires. He said that last year, but measure all the forest in every way, we can there's not stop climate change. And those who deny that are definitely contributing to the tragedies were now witnessing and we'll continue to witness in the coming year. So the chickens are coming home to roost. This is real here. And it's not a question of pointing this way or that way. But pulling together in these tragic circumstances in thinking wisely and collaboratively, and that's the spirit in which I'm approaching all we need to do in response to this fire. So that was last year about the California fires and then in December twenty sixteen. He's. Spoke to climate scientists he spoke to the American geophysical union and said that we're going to persevere over these climate change deniers California is no stranger to this fight for a long time. We've been fighting efforts to reduce vehicle emissions to improve our environment. And in recent years, we've taken even more aggressive steps, the California vehicle emission standards, became the national standards, California. Drove the United States the Obama administration responded to the California Air Resources board. Now when Larry King hosted the show on CNN. He had Bill Nye the science guy who does not have a degree in climate science on and had on a guy named Richard lindzen who was a professor of atmospheric sciences at MIT. He's now professor emeritus there who was a skeptic and also had on an economist skeptic named Julian Morris, he's founder and president of a think tank in the UK. And here's what he said founder and president of something called, the international policy network. That's a London based free market think tank. And here's what he said about the peril. And that's in quotes the climate change poses for the world, Jillian ours in London, executive director, international policy network. Is it much ado about nothing or should we be concerned? Well, I think it's worth comparing the real problems which are facing the world today with the scenario is that have being predicted for the future every year. The moment about ten million children die of preventable incurable diseases. And yet we're concerned that sometime following the feature a few hundred thousand people maybe a few million people most might suffer in some unknown way as a result of climate change. But the same people he predict massive climate changes also predict that in order for this to occur. We will have had enormous amounts of economic growth. So the poorest people in the world will no longer be poor. In fact, there will be richer than the richest people in the world today. Average per capita income's in the poorest parts of the world are less than thousand dollars a year. Per capita. In fifty years time, those are predicted to be greater than the current levels for the richest part of the world more than about thirty thousand US dollars, which is average per capturing coming places like the UK and. Parts of Europe. So what is doing what he meaningless to them? Well, the reality is that in the future. People will be wealthy enough to adapt to pretty much any change that is likely to happen. I mean, I see barring absolute global catastrophe. We'll be able to manage the situation. I got the question is whether we want to spend vast resources today to prevent something that might happen way downstream in the future. Make the world wealthier as opposed to trying to stop climate change. And we'll all be better off. Sports entertainment, president, money and female. I will be our trivia contest. Call right now,.

founder and president California Bernie sanders President Trump United States professor UK London Kathy castor Ronnie sanders Vermont Jerry Brown harassment president Bill Nye Larry King American geophysical union CNN