3 Burst results for "Director Jason Orly"

"director jason orley" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

07:16 min | 2 years ago

"director jason orley" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Like I was still growing up and five years later. I was like I wrote the script night based on these characters is school. But like have in ages, you know, and did you reach out to any of them delegates because it's a lot of people, you know. And it's it's more. There's one specific right? But but it really what I realized was like while the ending a sad. And it's you know, it is this is what is true. These guys are great. These people are really important in your life. And they really shape who you are. But you don't always them. And that's okay. I think it's like, it's okay. That these guys don't stay around in the end of this movie and as much as people are going to want them to be running off in the distance like to go on their next venture. That's not a life works. I think the the audience maybe doesn't want the off exactly they wanna see the protagonist succeed and a lot of ways. And I think I think that's out of a lot of the things that have heard about your movie, I think that. The ending has been very highly praised among my colleagues. I'm glad to hear that. We'll say, yeah, it was very refreshing to see. While you're when you're talking about, you know, these adjustments you made to the scripts once you brought Pete on. I know you kind of luted to this again in the QNA yesterday he brought him on as a executive producer producer. And it seems like the role the role of z is sort of an amalgamation of his experiences and your experiences. So as wondering if you could maybe speak a little bit about how you actually the process of actually like writing that into the script or like working with him to find this character. Absolutely. I mean, there's so much Pete in Zeke, and when I wrote this script, and that's why people like this your life. And I'm like, I really belives of all of our actors because we really wanted to have I really wanted to play this in a way that authentic to them and felt honest, and for p people he was picturing when he read Zeke were like people knew very personally and for like growing up in Staten Island, and you know, and kind of older New York guys like people in the comedy clubs in the comedy scene. And so. So. So a lot of that was the the look of who's Zeke was I let it because we realize early on that as long as that relationship. We've protected that dynamic and stay the same. It's a he can play Zeke, however, Zeke it doesn't matter as long as those two kids have that dynamic and so. But we did do was we we infuse the story with more like, okay? So with pita Zeke than probably ends to reason than that. This kid would wanna get a tattoo at some point. Right. Because like your best ran in guy. You idolize is covered in tattoos that wasn't a script. Let's right that that's a great opportunity for a funny moment of like this kids first tattoo. So that was written into the script once became aboard. So something like that. Yeah. As an example, it's a big it's a big it's a huge plotline and other things like that just like, you know, the the apartment the texture of the music that Zeke, listen sue is all we really kind of collaborated on making that feel right because it's like, maybe if my zeke's listened to like the strokes, you know, and listen to like, you know, and I liked converse and Taiji like his listened to Tang clan. And maximum like, you know, I wasn't gonna try and make Zeke make Pete into the mid. Western jewish. Yeah. Zeke that I had written. Well, that's that's a big. I think like step for a writer to make to to notice that that's Aker Feis needs to be made into like shift gears as soon as you can. Yeah. How early into the process of filming this thing, did you guys get together and start making these changes. I mean, I knew I wanted Pete for a long time to do this to do this. And so as soon as he came on board. I was an again like I said I'd written a long time ago. So I was very open to didn't think there's like a perfect script. So I was very open to working with the actors and bring another voices to really get this. Right. I was not precious with it at all. I was precious with story precious with like beats that I felt really needed to happen with the women at the end with the friendship at the end between the two boys. There were beats that. I was like I had to protect it all costs, but beyond that as long as the arc of the story. Is there I I was open to interpretation of who these characters are cool. Yeah. I guess I'm getting the wrap up symbol here. So I'm just gonna ask a question that I ask all my guests. And well, first of all did you did you film score? Did you did you go? Tissue. Cool. Did you screen were you part of the screenwriting program ended up taking several screen writing classes? I wasn't sure I'm not sure if that was that there was like part of the film. Yes. But I ended up really enjoying those classes towards the end was that like very would you say that was formative in you know, who you are today as director which recommend that people take like sparring directors take screen writing classes. Absolutely. I think that why director should take acting classes screened classes, every class cinematography classes. But you know, unless you worked on the no film school podcast on. But so that's just me for me. And it was really just about I took the writing classes because they got me to write. I probably wouldn't have had the motivation to like sit down and write a script at the age of twenty. I didn't have an idea because I didn't have an idea. But they're like you need to have idea you need to write so kind of forces you that thing where it's like every day. You're not gonna wake up inspired. And like, right. A million right thousand words, but if you have to you know, so trains you to kind of like to kind of have to right half to be creative on demand. Like, it's like it's a day job. And I've I've tried to make that for me a day job like getting up and writing as if there was a script due at the end of the semester every six months that discipline is so hard to find hard. Yeah. Yeah. It will if you had any one piece of like, golden advice to aspiring filmmakers. What would it be for me? It was about rolling with the punches for me. It was like have a plan b you're always gonna use it. And it was about don't be. Yeah. I think that you should be open to happy mistakes and happy accidents onset one thing in every scene. Whether it be an element production, Zayn Cosmas, and align which is more obvious like an improv line that wasn't planned in the script. That is one of my favorite things when I watched them like this something like some detail that I could never conceive on my own. So just like surround yourself with crew hire the best grew and not just people that are going to execute your vision the way you see it. But people are going to elevate your vision or push you change what you think this source should be. Yeah. That's that's great. All right Jason. Well, thanks so much for joining today. Bigtime adolescence will be around. I'm sure soon. Yeah. All right, man. All right, man. Take it easy. Bye. Thanks for listening. If you like what you heard, please. Subscribe to the new film school podcast on whatever podcast pods. New us. Give us a rating and let us know Howard doing tune in every Monday for interview podcast such as these. And of course, check out the site for the latest in film, making news in tips and tricks every day, I'm John disco. You can follow me on Twitter at you underscore John's for Jim you can fall in new film school at no film school and we'll see next week.

Zeke Pete Twitter QNA director John disco Aker Feis Staten Island New York Howard Zayn Cosmas writer executive producer Tang Jason producer Jim five years six months
"director jason orley" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

05:25 min | 2 years ago

"director jason orley" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Just in Europe? I honestly don't know. Just I think that if you know that the dialogues there, and the, you know in the the descriptions of the characters are fully realized, and you can really kinda picture it. Than and you're not taking you're not going to bog down and things, you know. And that's just I'm just being myself, some fantastic movie that you need that kind of dense, you know, especially here. Yes. Especially here where you need you need descriptive really feel that weight. But for me, it was just like, I I I wrote a really quickly because I really I had in my head pretty fleshed out. And and from us on those was like you should be able to read this quickly. It's a fun little movie. It's not not taking itself too seriously. And that was I think comes comes across on the page when you do right? Is it often something that you're able to get out there quickly and move onto the next project, or is it sometimes more laborious depends? Generally, the better things are the ones that that. You know are are easier to write they end up. There's a reason that they're easy to write. But for me, I spend a lot of time thinking about an idea before. All right. And so it's the like if I'm not still thinking about it. After several months. I probably don't start writing it. If I get an idea I kind of like getting a tattoo exactly which I don't have. I haven't there's no tattoo. I that. I've thought about wanting that long. But that's really it for me is that like all of my park late in my head for all over maybe, you know, several ideas, but for years even before and if there's something that still keeps coming back over and over like like an inch. Then that's when I'll write it. And at that point the writing is is pretty fast, and you mentioned the blacklist a little bit earlier in. I think like some of our listeners from Ilya with the name. But they're not so familiar about the whole process of like, how'd you apply to the blacklist or what what was the deal there? How did you get on the blacklist? Yeah. For me. You know, once I got representation from the script. They my agents kind of managers send the script out to the industry as to like, you know, various producers around town, basically saying here's this new young writer. This is script. We think he's an interesting boys. And everyone reads it, and I'm sure these. Producers and production companies get the hundreds like this from one hundred agents every day. And so then it's my job to go around and sit and I'm not like, there's no campaigning for the blacklist. I've the black something like in my head is something that was a thing. It was more. Just add add out about six months into having the script. Many people had read it because it was kind of my introduction to industry as a writer. And so at the end of the year when blacklist reaches out to all of the the industry professionals producers, they say, what are some of the scripts that you've read that you love. I was fortunate enough that you know, enough people had mentioned the script that got put on the list. And then once it was on that list. What how did your career sort of blossom Mawr headed affect your career from the change in a couple of ways the script got in the way of like, you know, it's just a nice thing. You know, it's an accolade accolade, and you can say it, you know, you can attach it to the script, and people's, you know, if people think that that's a cool thing, then they then they'll think yeah. I think it's cool thing to do that. Then. Impressed or not impressed. But I'm and so I was able to get more writing jobs, which was really the goal know staff writing on TV show, or or rewriting scrip or somebody else really, you know, honing my writing skills, which is funny because like this was the first guy out, and I feel like I really took a journey as a writer because I got much better since then. And then I finally got to make this script. I looked at it. And it's like when you looked at something really old old homework assignment. Like an essay you wrote when you're in high school, and you're like this. I didn't think it sucked. But I definitely was like this needs a lot of work. So and I was in a different very different place. When I wrote it I was young I was single, and I, you know. I didn't have a lot perspective. And I think being able to make it however, many years later just out of sheer block that some company found it and wanted to make a high school Indian they were looking for a the cool, the original high school script and had found this, and they approached me and said would you want to make this and I said only directed because that folic smart things. I sure and. And. Yeah. And that was like, okay shit. I've read the script. Now, see if I still even like it or want to make it. And like fortunately like there was a lot in there that I loved and and I was able to take the perspective of how many years, and I was at this at this point married and kid on the way. Now Kidman born was able to to fix the script in ways that I feel like really benefited from. Then if I had gone to make that script as soon as I wrote it like having time in perspective away from the story things like glaringly and things change making a story about high school boys and tourney boys like in, you know, running over long on your revisit now in this new era that was something that was important to me is like, you know, a lot of the ending was rewritten. Based on really feeling it was important that the, you know, women stronger characters at the boys get rejected by these women and not just like whatever they do. They still get the girl like, right downright rejected. And then the ending of the movie was something. That I even changed because I think when I had written the script I was closer to those zeke's in my life. I was still so I I had just kind of like

writer Europe blossom Mawr Ilya Kidman six months
"director jason orley" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"director jason orley" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"This episode in all of our Sunday's coverage is brought to you by road, microphones and black magic design. Hey, everybody. This is John fuseco. And you're listening to the new film school podcast. Time out leci- is a feature close to director Jason Orly's heart. And why shouldn't it be? In addition to making its world premiere at Sundance back in January. The film has the unique distinction of being the first screenplay he ever wrote. It's not often that the first thing you write ends up being a first feature. But the fact that this is the first feature not from lack of trying in the process of cheating. This seemingly unachievable feet early pen multiple scripts with the goal of quote unquote, proving could write a few of them, including big time analysts ended up on the blacklist. And if you don't know what the blacklist is. It's time to get the millier because it's an accolade that could end up changing your career in screenwriting ever. That's what ended up happening for orlean. Any case adolescence tells the story of a suburban teenager who comes of age under the destructive guidance of his best friend and aimless college dropout that dropout is played by none other than Saturday night. Live standout p Davidson who in addition to joining the film as an. -secutive producer turns into star confirming performance. I sat down with Orleans Sundance to discuss the basics of writing to prove you can write what the blacklist can do for your career using the star of your film as your greatest collaborator and more. Hope you enjoy. Hey, everybody, this is John few. So I am here with Jason orally director and writer big-time outta leci-. Which is just had its premiere yesterday here at Park City. Congratulations man, I wanna talk a little bit about how you got this thing made. Specifically, I think I'm really interested in hearing about the journey that your scripts took because you mentioned yesterday during the will both Acuna and the introduction that this was the first group you'd ever written. Did you think that this would be the one that would you know, propel you to the point that you are now where you're at Sundance. I really didn't. I I mean, I I wrote I wrote it as kind of a Colin card to kind of prove that I could write I wanted to be writer, and this is a relationship that was in my head for a long time that kind of that mentor meant he you know, that bad influence story that I liked and I doubt it'd be fun to tell a high school kind of coming of age story that was a nod to like movies risky business. John Hughes movies that I liked. But really, it was just like I wanted to write something that I thought it'd be fun for people to read and get a sense that I could write and maybe hire me to write for a TV show or write another movie. So it was very much like this. Is a very personal script that is going to be a calling card for me. And hopefully, I can get an agent that was like my my literally my first goal was like, maybe I can get an agent maybe I can get like another writing job from this. And that was what it was for me for a long time. Because. You know, I use the script to get representation. And then after about a year, it got on the blacklist, which was you know, I'm sure your listeners know what that is. And that really changed things because then it became like, oh, maybe we could actually make this didn't expect anything 'cause it's kind of like a druggie highschool dark comedy. That's like most studios production companies read, and they're like love your writing. Like what else? Do you have that is more commercial and that kind of became the ongoing conversation? We're let's like I would meet with someone because they liked the script. But they wanted to talk about something out. Like, you know, what else do we like we know you can right now. Can you write something? That's like we think could sell. So then when you were writing that script, you know, you saying that you're trying to demonstrate certain things that can prove that you can write. I can you may be like described some of those from screenwriting standpoint, you know, it's it's it's about like the mechanics of like, you know, I went to NYU I took extreme classes, and I had like. Britain's like one acts like pieces of scribes or like almost finished grips that never finished. And really for me was about it's kind of. Establishing my voice I had worked in the t the network TV space for long time as an assistant prior to writing the script. And I think that like I had been around so much of that kind of like broadcast network television that when I went to write I kinda wanted to write something a little bit different. And so it was it was more about like having something that felt original and. And with great dialogue. And but also like I read so many scripts when I was working as assistant that descriptors great. But it's still not so fun to read like for me. Like, I wanted the script refunder read, and I want the movie to be fun to watch. And that was kind of like my my number one goals, which is like, you're you're enjoying yourself. And you can see it. And you're like you can read this in one sitting which is people who've read the scripts. No that that's not always the case. Can I ask what makes it fun scripts when you are reader just

Sundance Jason Orly director writer John fuseco Orleans Sundance leci John Hughes orlean John Park City p Davidson producer Colin Britain