20 Episode results for "Director General"

News in Brief 25 July 2019

UN News

02:29 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 25 July 2019

"This is the news and brief from the United Nations U._N.. Secretary General Antonio Guitarist has condemned Wednesday's deadly terror attacks in Somalia that targeted the offices of the mayor of Mogadishu reportedly killing six government officials and injuring several others according to media reports the attack was carried out by a female suicide bomb and was claimed by terror group Al Chabala the mayor of Mogadishu Abdirahman. Oma Osman was one of those. Injured in the attack he is reported to be unconscious and Ju- to be flown to Turkey for treatment the new U._N.. Special Envoy to Somalia James Swan who had met the mayor at the offices earlier in the day described the bombing as a heinous attack heck that demonstrates a violent disregard for the sanctity of human life. The International Atomic Energy Agency I._R._A.. has appointed an interim chief following the death of Director General Yukiya Amano which was announced on Monday. Mr Romano who died at the age of seventy two had been ju to step down next much amid reports of an unspecified illness in a statement published on Thursday the I a stated that to ensure the orderly and smooth functioning the agency Cornel Furuta will serve as director general until a new chief seems office. Mr Fruita currently heads the I E as office of Coordination which is responsible for supporting the director general in areas such as policy. See External Relations with member states and strategy and finally Yemen and several countries in the whole of Africa region a facing increased risk of desert locust swarms threatening agricultural production during the next three months the U._n.. Food and Agriculture Organization F._A._O.. warned on Thursday the risk is being blamed on some breeding amplified by heavy rains and the F._A._O.. Says that it could affect food security and livelihoods in the country's concern.

director general Somalia Director General Yukiya Amano Secretary General Antonio Guit Mogadishu Mr Romano Mogadishu Abdirahman International Atomic Energy Ag Oma Osman Mr Fruita United Nations Ju James Swan Al Chabala Yemen Cornel Furuta Agriculture Organization Turkey
NECA Warns Economy May Contract in Q2.

Newscast - Africa

01:16 min | 4 months ago

NECA Warns Economy May Contract in Q2.

"You're listening to the news at this time. On Africa Business Radio Andrea Employers consolidative association has called on the fiscal and monetary authorities to deliver more aggressive and decisive policies to sustain economic recovery in the wake of the decrease in oil price. The Director General of Neka Doctor Timothy. Cowley made the call on Monday and the statements made available to newsmen. He sent the Association. Made this call. Because when -ticipant contraction and second quarter as economy witness the seeks week knockdown commercial nerve centres of the country away noted that similar trend was witnessed the global economy exempt China. Whose consumption of feel do you for opening of industrial hubs and transportation could pretend MoD positive growth pattern due to demand for crude oil. The Mecca boss reemphasized his call for stimulus packages for the worst heat sectors of the economy in order to avoid contraction. And that was the news this time on Africa Business Radio. You can't continue to this in life online that's www dot. Africa BUSINESS RADIO DOT COM or mobile APP. Thank you for listening.

Africa Andrea Employers consolidative Cowley Doctor Timothy Director General China
Federal Govt. Explains Reason for Increased Borrowing

Newscast - Africa

01:29 min | 3 months ago

Federal Govt. Explains Reason for Increased Borrowing

"You're listening to the news at this time when Africa Business Radio. The, federal government and Monte Seth that it was increasing its sparring in the because of the facts of coronavirus on the nation's revenue profile, it also uncalled increase borrowing on unexpected spending on healthcare in a beats concerning the current virus pandemic, the Director General of the Management Office patients on the made in her presentation, before Senate Committee on foreign and local debts, said the proposed new twenty twenty budgets of ten point five one trillion naira now has a deficit of four point five, six billion, she sat. The deficit would be financed through domestic borrowing of two point, one nine trillion naira and external borrowing of one point nine, eight, trillion there, amounting to four point one seven trillion naira. According to an increase in the new, barring for twenty, twenty is the increase in the deficit in the budget from two point one eight trillion lire to four point five eight trillion naira, she said the revision of the twenty twenty projects became necessary due to the effects of corporate nineteen online juries, revenues, and the need for new spending on health to meets the health challenges location bike, coby nineteen. and. That was denise at this time Africa Business Rating. You can continue to this in life online at Zombie. WW DOES AFRICA BUSINESS RADIO DOT COM or via a mobile APP. Thank you for listening.

Africa Monte Seth Senate Committee WW Director General denise Management Office
Monitor Show 00:00 07-08-2020 00:00

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

01:42 min | 2 months ago

Monitor Show 00:00 07-08-2020 00:00

"Hi this is Jay. Farner CEO rocket mortgage, making the right financial decisions has never been more important. We can help guide you to those right decisions now when they matter most mortgage rates are near historic lows so when you call eight three three eight rocket, or visit us at rocket mortgage dot com to start your refinance. You'll be well on your way to saving money every month. The rate today on our thirty year fixed rate mortgage is three point three seven five percents APR three point, five nine percent right now could be a great time for you to take some positive. Positive financial steps forward with a cash out, refinance from rocket mortgage, which could give you the boost that you're looking for. In addition, we may be able to help you refinance with little or no out of pocket costs at rocket mortgage were committed to every client every time, no exceptions, no excuses giving you the best mortgage experience. Call us today at eight, three, three eight rocket, or go to rocketmortgage DOT COM to learn more rates subject to change one point eight seven five percents, discount, rate, cost, information, and conditions equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states number thirty thirty. The Global Rodney poses concerned lingers over the impact of the corona virus. Fed officials highlight the scope for more action of reopening the economy stools. And tourists have begun arriving in. The emerets tries to revive. A second is crucial puts economy. We speak to the Director General of Dubai's Department of Charisma and Commerce Marketing It's just gone. Eight am across the daybreak. Middle Eastern Mediterranean Dubai and I'm usually going to need right alongside you now it is a fairly quiet sailing and a lot of these classes. At the moment, the market feels in many ways like it's holding its breath, but there are some standouts here including what is happening with the iron ore trade got future.

Eastern Mediterranean Dubai Director General of Dubai CEO Jay Rodney Department of Charisma five nine percent thirty year
News in Brief 14 August 2019

UN News

03:12 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 14 August 2019

"This is the news in brief from the united nations the u._n. Assistance mission in afghanistan says it is gravely concerned at reports that eleven seven civilians were killed during a state-sponsored security operation in a tweet on wednesday unanimous said that they had died in a search operation carried out in paktiya province in the east of the country during the festival earlier this week accountability is essential and harm to civilians must stop the mission insisted fisted the development which reportedly claimed the lives of students comes as unit continues to support preparations for the delayed afghan-led presidential election due due to take place at next month. Paraguay should take action to prosecute those responsible for the illegal use of fertilizers that allegedly led to the death of one farmer pharma and the poisoning of at least twenty others a u._n. Appointed panel of independent experts has said according to the human rights committee the large-scale spraying of of toxic agrochemicals in canon day department in the east of the country has severely impacted living conditions health and livelihoods it said in a statement that despite despite samples being found in people's homes that showed the presence of banned chemicals many years ago subsequent investigations had made no substantive progress and had not led to any any finding of criminal responsibility ought to the address of the harm caused the expert panel maintained that water resources and aquifers had been contaminated by industrial soybean food production that it caused the loss of fruit trees the death of farm animals and severe crop damage the committee also highlighted a court ruling in paraguay which found that the authorities authorities had failed to protect people from the toxic products while also calling for a buffer zone between housing and growing areas and finally to the conference on disarmament in geneva where the u._n.'s top diplomat there has urged governments to be more successful in tackling global threats to peace tatyana valla via. Who's the first woman secretary general of the conference on disarmament armament as well as the first female director general in the swiss city wanted escalating tensions around the world who are severely jeopardizing the gains made in the last forty years at the conference prince by member states new scientific technological developments and dynamics were challenging international security misspell via insisted while also calling for the conference to who overcome their differences and such results for us to move forward and get things done to deliver on the important mandate without on this body we must i ensure that the conference does what it was intended to do to negotiate and the new instruments gathering complex sensitive and urgent urgent issues of national and international security issues that impact on every living being on this plant ms valla virus comments followed recent ending ending of the intermediate range nuclear forces or an f. treaty between the united states and russia in a statement at the beginning of the month u._n. Secretary general antonio guitarist i underline the need to avoid what he called destabilizing developments and to urgently seek agreement on a new common path for international arms control daniel johnson. You're news.

tatyana valla Paraguay united nations afghanistan daniel johnson paktiya director general geneva united states russia forty years
WHO special advisor Peter A. Singer on agencys pandemic response

The Current

21:06 min | 4 months ago

WHO special advisor Peter A. Singer on agencys pandemic response

"The theatres have closed. But the show look on play me. Podcast is thrilled to present a new series. The show must go on featuring provocative productions from some of North America's most acclaimed creators for the stage. Sit Back and experience. Everything from chilling thrillers to Gut wrenching dramas to arriver in comedies each month experience the exhilaration of theatre from the comfort of your own home. Plenty available wherever you get your podcasts. This is a CBC podcast January Fourth Twenty Twenty the World Health Organization sent out. Its first alert about a mysterious health. Crisis a cluster of cases of pneumonia. And we'll Han deaths and the cause unknown but as we know all too well now covid nineteen exploded into the biggest pandemic since the WHO was formed and as the disease has spread so to have questions about the weather the WHO could have done more to contain it joining me. Now is Dr Peter Singer. He is special advisor to the director. General of the World Health Organization and Assistant Director General. Dr Singer Good Morning. Good morning and thank you for having me. Thanks for being here. It's been incredibly five months now. Since that first report from China about cases of something similar to pneumonia now we're at more than five million confirmed cases. More than three hundred thousand people have died. Tell us what you're most worried about going forward. I'm most worried a going forward about the fact that even though there's been a tremendous amount of suffering and And cases and sadly death actually the worst may be yet to come. This is the worst global public health crisis that the world has faced in in century. And we all really need to work together. If the global challenge that requires global solutions and yet in spite of that This appeal for all of to work together. The secretary general of the UN said just recently on May eighteenth that many countries ignored the advice of Your Organization the W. H. O. Why do you think that cooperation is not happening even now I think she? We're seeing a lot of global cooperation last week. We had our world health assembly virtually with one hundred ninety four health ministers of the world. They came together in a resolution which is essentially a roadmap of thirty four thirty five things that That should be done. I think overall we're seeing a lot of cooperation and in terms of the advice. The core of our advice has always been the shoe leather epidemiology. If you will of testing tracking Isolating and caring for cases and tracing quarantine and contacts and I. I think that's advice that countries around the world followed because that's the way to find out where the virus is to Isolate the virus to defeat it as you know There has been though a lot of criticism of the organization and even the advice It's given for instance The reluctance to Or or or the suggestion that the organization was too slow in declaring global health. Emergency that the person who has been perhaps the harshest and certainly the most vocal in the criticism is the president of the United States. Let me play this clip of Donald Trump from eighteen we help fund the World Health Organization will use it like everyone else does. They gave us a lot of very bad advice. Terrible advice they were wrong so much always on the side of China. China paid forty million dollars last year. And we've been paying four hundred and fifty million dollars a year for many years. Somehow that doesn't work out too well so thinking about bringing our four fifty down to forty and some people thought that was too much. How big a problem is it for the W. H. O. to have Donald Trump as seemingly an adversary right? Now well let me just say In particular about the letter that President trump sent to the director general of the World Health Organization last week during the Assembly that we've received a letter and that were reviewing it but to your broader point You know tough questions are okay. They are to be expected in any crisis in any pandemic in a sense they go with the territory. I mentioned that the Effectively the the hundred and ninety four members health ministers of the world got together last week One of the things they agreed upon. And this is something that direct director general Proposed was to initiate a A evaluation which is impartial independent comprehensive of the international response including chose performance That's the kind of ongoing Accountability that WHO welcomes and in fact the initial review of the response by our own independent Advisory Committee the emergency program was published last week. So you know in summary The kind of questions that are being asked the tough questions are to be expected. We welcome them Who responded warned early and often from the first moment we received Notification Duster of a case of pneumonia on December. Thirty first. Yeah that is true but but I think the criticism now is is not when that warning went out. It's much around. Some of the statements made by Your boss terrorists at Numb Gabrielle. Who's the director general in January and February repeatedly praising China for its transparency and openness? When we know at the time. China was silencing whistle blowers. Was plane plane down the severity of the virus. Is there a thought process here behind? What the Director General said. Why would he have praised China at a time when it's clear that the praise wasn't warranted so Rosemary? I've worked with a lot of leaders over the years and I can tell you that the com- principled leadership of Dr Ted rose is really made a positive difference in this In this outbreak but to your point from the moment that we learned of this cluster of cases on December thirty first swung into action. Incident Management Team activated the next day by five days later we'd warned every country in the world technical networks issued guidance and on January thirtieth Of this year we director general issued a public health emergency of international concern the highest level of global alert and that was at a time when there were fewer than one hundred cases outside China. No deaths so who warned early and often and it had read sirens and alarm bells raging almost from the first minute we heard about the outbreak. There was no for several weeks in China. The China was actually saying. There is no clear evidence of human to human transmission and the. Who seemed to accept those claims and it seems curious. I think for many people to understand why the WHO would be so willing to accept the claims of China knowing some of the other problems you've had in the past particularly when it came to start. I think what you're referring to is a January fourteenth tweet on human to human transmission. But what I can say about human to human transmission is that same day January fourteenth Dr Maria Van Kerckhove. Who's our technical lead of the response said in a news conference that human to human transmission is Is a potential expected in this outbreak? And in fact she said from the very first moment she heard about this on December. Thirty first They factored in the possibility of human to human transmission. That's why for example. The guidance note on January twenty on January tenth is based on droplet the crop precautions in health facilities for infection prevention and Control. And that is based on the premise. That there could be human to human transmission so You're talking about one tweet. But the working assumption through January is that this was a possibility and ultimately it was confirmed and we had alarm bells raging through January. But the tweet is a public facing expression of the. Who's opinion and and you can understand why given that. The China had not been forthcoming previously. That that would be alarming. People that the. Who would not be publicly saying what needs to be a risk. I think it was publicly saying what it knew to be risk as I mentioned on the very same day that tweet was issued dot com. Maria van Kirkov Said that there was definitely a possibility of human to human transmission and all our guidance was promised on it. So I think it's really important to look at the overall picture of the warning and the overall picture of the warning is that. Who warned early and often with red blaring sirens and You yourself pointed out that that was Five months ago and so the I think we have to look at the whole international response. What people did without warning let let me just ask then on on the issue of China should the? Who have been more skeptical? in the so-called transparency the information you were receiving from China throughout this pandemic. I realize the. Who is dependent on the information you get from member states but because it's China should the? Who have been slightly more skeptical about the quality of that information. I think the WTO triangulate any information gets From member states with the experience of people. You Know Dr. Cove reached some of the conclusions that she did based on her experience. She's the world expert on mergers and SARS And We warned early and often I also as I mentioned. You know the purpose of This review that was proposed by the director general. The Independent impartial comprehensive review. That includes that looks at the international response includes but isn't limited to W chose performance. The purpose of the review is task. Exactly questions like that but what I can say is from the moment. We had the first notification. We SWUNG INTO ACTION. Worked around the world and around the clock. You know just to take one other example We've shipped tens of millions of diagnostic kits personal protective equipment for health workers medical oxygen to more than one hundred countries around the world. This is as I mentioned You know a terrible Crisis and we have to focus on fighting the fire and that's what. Who is doing for example through shipping that material saving lives? It's an essential component of the global response. That is saving lives at last week. China pledged two billion dollars over two years to address code nineteen. Do you worry that that will play into the perception that the president is certainly Encouraging that there is too much influence By China on the WHO W chose annual budget is just under three billion dollars a year rosemary. And that by the way is only a little bit larger than the budget of large teaching hospitals in Canada and its ambit is the whole world and so I think I think it needs to be I think it needs to be taken into that context every country in the world contributes to dub rituals budget to some degree and And I think that I think the whol needs to be fully financed to do the job that the member states of the world want it to do. I'm Keith Macarthur. Unlocking Bryson's brain is a podcast about my son the rare disease the keeps him from walking or talking embraces perfect and his life is really hard and our families search for a cure. Oh My Gosh. Maybe science is ready for this. It's part memoir part medical mystery. We can do just about anything. Modifying DNA heart in my throat. Cure is controversial unlocking. Bryson's brain subscribe. Wherever you get your podcasts you talked about this Impartial independent evaluation. That about one hundred nations. I believe have set. This is what we need to do. We need to see this. What kind of level of cooperation will you give to that review? Will you share documents emails? will will you be able to share documents or emails from member states? Because I imagine that would be a point of friction to. How will it work? I think it's important to note that That review was actually proposed by the director general in his opening speech and even though more than one hundred nations co-sponsor that resolution Actually all of them agreed by consensus with it. And Sodas the secretary as well the president trump to be fair Dr Singer calling for a review. Well before you moved to that last Tuesday I think The issue you know Rosemary. We do a review after every major action. It is to be expected it's part of our DNA. We embrace that accountability. We did it after he bowl in two thousand fourteen. We did it every time. This isn't a new issue. We welcome that review. We want to learn how we can perform better and it's also important to recognize that the entire international response is the performance of who the performance of the whole multilateral system and the performance of countries themselves let let's talk about the plan for controlling the pandemic the strategy in April called as you mentioned off the top for countries and communities to find test all suspected cases so that people can trace where they are quarantine people as needed. It's not happening in in many places including here in Canada we have as you probably know is a Canadian Some hot spots in places where the testing and contact tracing is not where it should be if a wealthy country with a good healthcare system like Canada. Can't seem to get there. What what does that tell you about the struggle against this virus here and in other places around the world well look. I'm not sure that I fully Bienne into that premise. I think Countries are all tackling. This problem in different ways I think. The core of it is testing and and tracing. I think there's a lot to like about the Canadian Canadian domestic response. And what I what I would say is in terms of the international response. Canada's really Stepped up in multi-lateralism. You know where it's focused has been on the humanitarian crisis and this is one of the things that really worries me. Were really worries. Me Is when we start to see the first cases in Cox's Bazar in Yemen in these desperate settings a humanitarian settings among migrants and refugees It's very very worrisome. And that's actually where Canada's put a lot of its focus Which I think is really very very strong. It's also put a focus on Supporting Garvey and immunization And by the way eight million children will have their basic immunization disrupted because this virus kills not only directly it also kills by disrupting health services. Essential Health Services and many more people may die as as we saw with with. Sars on the collateral damage and I lived through that in in Canada and in addition to the humanitarian focus the focus on him united station The prime minister also participated in a very important launch event of the Access. Dacoven tools accelerator on. May fourth along with other Heads of state and that's coordinated by. Who and that's aiming to Accelerate and very importantly ensure equitable access to a vaccine to therapeutics to diagnostics. Because while the shoe leather epidemiology is if you will the centerpiece of the response at the moment the exit strategy Potentially as science and a vaccine. I'm glad you brought up a vaccine because obviously there's this worldwide racing and a very impressive collaboration happening around the world as well but it's also going to be a competition for access and for instance the United States has already tried to negotiate exclusive rights. How do you? How is that managed who who should get the vaccine? I? How do we control that part of it? Well that's actually An extraordinarily important question and it is part of the Resolution I mentioned so all the countries in the world. There by consensus have agreed at least in terms of a resolution to equitable access. There is now this mechanism called the accelerator Coordinated by WHO and with other very very important partners That is fully committed To this to both acceleration and equitable access and working out the tactical details of the answer to your question of how to ensure that everybody in the world Gets the vaccine when a safe and effective vaccine is available and hopefully there will be more than one is at the heart of the type of thing Who Does it just shows how essential and organization this is in the Global Response Global Challenge. Because that's a problem as you implied in your question that cannot be solved by any one country alone and we've got some great examples in history of where Countries working together could solve incredible problems and probably the best example of that is smallpox which required eradicated forty years ago Required cooperation with the United States and with many other countries a strong leadership role by WHO Dino Rosemary? I was shocked when I learned that there were more deaths from smallpox. The last century than all the wars in that century combined three hundred million and now zero. Why because the Global Cooperation? I understand the need for Global Cooperation. Certainly but when you have a US administration that is Really questioning the value of the. Who I surely that must be damaging to the efforts to make this a global endeavour. Surely you would. You would concede that that it becomes problematic. Would concede is that the United States has actually played an important role in. Who for the last seventy years? You know The response of the emergency response has many embedded Americans. The technical expertise of the United States is amazing with the National Institutes of health with the. Cdc There always has been A cooperative relationship and we certainly hope that that will continue because this is an issue not just for the humanitarian crises that are unfolding at those most vulnerable people in the world that we talked about before but for the national security of the United States Canada and every country in the world the best way to protect the national security of the United States is actually to ensure that covert is put in a box in every country in the world. Because we're not. None of us are safe until all of us are safe. And if there's CO vid left anywhere it can travel to any country so the only way to ensure the national security of any country is actually for us to ensure that Cova is controlled in every country. I only have about thirty seconds Dr Singer but it does seem as though trust in the. Who has been a bit shaken? How does the organization reestablish itself in in light of this in about thirty seconds? I've never met a group of people who are so dedicated to saving lives a leader. Who only thinks about saving lives public health and protecting the most vulnerable people. I think that that dedication will help the organization to Come through this terrible challenge of this incredible public health crisis and I am absolutely confident that we will see. We'll get the global solidarity we seek and we will ultimately if we work together prevail and be able to defeat this terrible menace. Something called public enemy number one. Which is the corona virus? Dr Peter Singer. Thank you so much for making the time today. Sir appreciate it very much. Thank you thank you very much rosemary. That's Dr Peter Singer. He's special advisor to the Director General of the World Health Organization and Assistant Director General as well for more. Cbc PODCASTS TO CBC DOT CA slash podcasts.

China World Health Organization director general Canada United States Dr Peter Singer president Global Cooperation Dino Rosemary pneumonia Assistant Director General Donald Trump North America Dr Singer special advisor Twenty Twenty Bryson W. H. O. Cure
News in Brief 28 May 2020

UN News

04:01 min | 4 months ago

News in Brief 28 May 2020

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations. African nations. Must continue to be vigilant against the threat of COVID. Nineteen as some countries begin to ease lockdown restrictions amid a sharp rise in numbers of infections. The Continents U. N. health agency had on Thursday to date. The continent is the least affected label region by far. But Dr Machida some Witty World Health Organization Regional Director for Africa said that rapid increase in case numbers were now being identified while it had taken thirty six days for the continent to reach one cases. Only sixty two days passed before it hit the one hundred thousand mark. She said at a Joint World Health Organization Weld Economic Forum event. Compared to two weeks ago reported cases have tripled in five countries and doubled in ten countries noting that most countries still have fewer than a thousand reported cases. This means that as governments ease lockdowns and other social measures. It's important but the strong public health measures are in place in place all over the territories not just in capital cities but communities I'm powered and enabled to take preventive actions and that we continue working on strengthening health systems and delivering essential services to people in South Africa. The country's health minister. Dr Is where Lean Mackenzie said that the situation with stable in most areas but but there were around thirteen infection hot spots where additional restrictions and resources will being put in place to isolate infected people and quarantine suspected carriers globally. There are more than five and a half million infections and over three hundred fifty thousand deaths linked to the disease. An urgent appeal for the people of Syria has been issued by the UN migration agency CIO amid growing concerns that millions of people displaced by years of fighting are unprepared for the threat of nineteen. The disease has compounded an already devastating crisis that has left eleven million people in need of help. Iom Director General Antonio Vitorino said at the launch of the two hundred six million dollar appeal. It's hoped that donors worldwide will show solidarity to support three million Syrians inside and outside the country of the total amount. Thirty three million dollars will be allocated to preventing the spread of covid nineteen. The government has reported one. Hundred and twenty-one confirmed covid nineteen cases today while no infections have been recorded in the northwest. The region saw an alarming rise in hostilities. In the first three months of the year and the health and safety of more than one million people living in tents in overcrowded under sites remain a serious concern to the Bay of Bengal. Finally where it's feared that up to five hundred people of all ages are adrift and stranded at Sea. The development follows reports last month. That more than thirty ringer refugees died after spending two months aboard a smugglers vessel attempting to enter Malaysia. The UN Migration Agency ICM which issued the alert has urged countries in the region to bring all those at sea to shore Director General Antonio Vitorino called on them to uphold the commitments of the 2016 body declaration as well as ASEAN pledges to protect the most vulnerable a reference to the two thousand fifteen crisis in the Bay of Bengal and adamancy where thousands of refugees and migrants in distress were denied lifesaving care and support a coordinated response to this situation exclusive of search and rescue operations and safe. Disembarkation is urgently needed to ensure that those who are still stranded at sea can't be brought to safety on land. Mr Vitorino said the development comes ten days after deadly cyclone infant barreled through the region. Signaling the start of months of extremely dangerous sailing conditions for years they were. Hanger have travelled by sea to Malaysia to find and reunite with their families although I am says that their numbers have diminished in recent years conflict in Myanmar in mid thousand seventeen forced around eight hundred and fifty thousand rengo to flee across the border with Bangladesh where they now live in a series of sprawling refugee camps in Cox's Bazar Daniel Johnson UN news.

Director General Antonio Vitor Bay of Bengal Malaysia government UN Migration Agency Joint World Health Organizatio Dr Machida United Nations UN Africa Continents U. N. Lean Mackenzie Regional Director ASEAN South Africa Iom Myanmar Bangladesh
Okonjo-Iweala Optimistic Of Landing WTO DG Job

Newscast - Africa

01:14 min | 2 months ago

Okonjo-Iweala Optimistic Of Landing WTO DG Job

"You're listening to the news on Africa Business. Radio By Judas former finance minister goes according to. has expressed optimism about becoming the director general of the World Trade Organization. Irala in video on her twitter handle describe the WTO as an organization that has become more important than ever. According to her with the outbreak of the COVID, nineteen pandemic world needs to come together using trade to build a better society. She will be competing for the post alongside five other candidates which include South Korean Trade Minister Yu, Ming he? Can Years From Foreign Minister Muhammad Mexico's from WTO deputy director general. His Sarah Quarry Egyptian from diplomats Hamid Mamduh and former more Dugan for a minister to door Leonardo Vich. That was the news at this time on. Africa Business Radio. You can continue to listen live at www dot Africa business, radio, DOT COM or via our mobile APP. Thanks for listening.

World Trade Organization Trade Minister Yu Africa Business finance minister dot Africa director general Africa deputy director Leonardo Vich COVID Judas twitter Hamid Mamduh Muhammad Mexico Dugan
Buhari Nominates Okonjo-Iweala To Head WTO

Newscast - Africa

01:13 min | 3 months ago

Buhari Nominates Okonjo-Iweala To Head WTO

"You're listening to the news at this time when Africa Business Radio. Precedents Muhammadu Buhari has approved nomination of former coordinating minister, for the economy on Ghazi country. For the position of Director General of the World Trade Organization. The cable reported on Thursday that Buhari redrew the candidate C. of Yano. non-ferrous permanent presentative to WTO for the same position. The election is shuttled to hold in Jennifer. Switzerland twenty twenty one for a four year term that would run from twenty twenty, one to twenty, twenty five after former Director General of the organization Roberto as fatal step down a year to the end of his second term. The letter seen by the cable read that Andrea is pleased to request. The suppose of esteemed a member states as well as permanent missions and embassies in Addis Ababa in favor of the candidacy of conjure Abiola. That was the news at this time Africa Business Radio. You can't continue to this in life online at www dot, Africa business, radio, DOT, com, or arable APP. Thank you for listening.

Africa twenty twenty Director General Muhammadu Buhari World Trade Organization Addis Ababa DOT Switzerland Jennifer Andrea Roberto Abiola Yano. four year
The Morning Briefing

The Briefing

02:22 min | 9 months ago

The Morning Briefing

"Good Morning I'm Chris. Price infidelity boil with the briefing from the Telegraph bringing you up to speed in two minutes is Monday. December the twenty third and the BBC's rejected claims of bias in its election coverage. So we all remember Andrew. Neil turning to the camera then giving having a three minute monologue during the election campaign and happy that Boris Johnson had not appeared for an interview with him today. The BBC Director General has rejected. Did all claims of bias in the election. He said the fact. The corporation was accused of bias by both the Conservatives and labour proved its impartial in an article. Before the Telegraph the BBC has the public's trust and remains the envy of the world it comes to merge is the front runner to be the next Labour leader. Rebecca Long Bailey once said she wants to rule the party with an iron fist. Tony Daiva has the details and reveals how her fellow leadership hopefuls have been it pains to point out that difficult pasts. We're used to hearing stories about shortages of doctors. It may surprise she then to hear Britain's GP's are among the best paid in the Western world. An international studies found. They earn more than three times as much as the average rich employee. Health editor Laura. Donnelly has the details and if you're one of the one point two million fans hoping to travel to Qatar World Cup. What do you think about staying in a tent? A shortage of hotel rooms is thought to have prompted. Local Committee. Members to consult the organizers of the Glastonbury Austin Brie and Coachella festivals. The results may be attentive village in the desert which may hold between ten and fifteen thousand fans right right stay put. If you're listening on WHATSAPP also send you those links. Now if you're listening on spotify APP or wherever you get your podcast you'll find them in the show notes to this audio as well as links to calls for government inquiry into racism after alleged abuse by Tottenham fans in their match against Chelsea and your guide to avoiding Christmas. Dismiss burnouts. That's it you're up to date. I'll have your next briefing and then we'll be taking a short break over Christmas but stay subscribed to this feed for your twenty twenty briefings.

BBC Boris Johnson Rebecca Long Bailey Qatar World Cup Labour Tony Daiva spotify Andrew Austin Brie Glastonbury Neil Donnelly Director General Local Committee Britain Tottenham editor Chelsea
News in Brief 3 January 2019

UN News

03:05 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 3 January 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations to bolster food and nutrition assistance for some five million food insecure people in south Sudan, China announced on Thursday, it would contribute seven million dollars. A decision welcomed by the UN's World Food Programme WFP. The funding will help the agency reaches overall targets supplying rice emergency pulses and other commodities which are needed to provide school meals and food rations for more than one hundred twenty six thousand in need WFP estimates that five point two million south Sudanese are expected to be food insecure between January and March of this year, your organization was able to support five million crisis affected with two hundred fifty nine thousand tons of food in two thousand eighteen China's latest contribution is an invaluable investment in the next generation and countries overall development WFP's country director, Adnan Khan, said the director general of the World Health Organization WHO. Oh has applauded Uganda for the bullet preparedness response the country has mounted so far in wake of a recent outbreak which continues to affect neighboring Democratic Republic of the Congo tedious at an I'm Gabriel commended the risk management procedures put in place in the country, including vaccination of frontline health workers screening travellers at points of entry and engaging in risk communication. These preventative measures. The agency chief said we'll go a long way in saving the lives of health workers. Adding that WHO is really grateful for the government's commitment and support the need to amplify primary healthcare in order to prevent diseases is vital for Uganda. He said and prevention of communicable and noncommunicable disease are key to achieving universal health coverage and for this year, a new climate protocol comes into effect the Kigali amendment to the Montreal protocol entered into force on the first of January, which means the sixty five countries that have ratified. Defied the amendments. So far have agreed to do their part in a void. Ing up to zero point four degrees celsius of global warming. By the end of the century the agreement proposes reducing projected production and consumption of hydrofluorocarbons HFC's, which acted destroy. The ozone layer by eighty percent over the next thirty years controlling the ozone-depleting substances UN environment said would substantially contribute to the goals outlined in two international environmental rule books the Montreal protocol and the key twenty fifteen Paris agreement on climate change implementing the Kigali amendment means phasing down each have sees exploring alternatives in expanding data-gathering tools on the matter. The latest numbers from a scientific study on ozone depletion show that in parts of the stratosphere. The ozone has recovered by between one and three percent in the past two decades at projected rates, the northern hemisphere could heal completely by the twenty thirties, the southern hemisphere in the. Twenty fifty s and polar regions by twenty sixty Natalie had just UN news.

WFP Uganda United Nations UN China Montreal Kigali World Health Organization Sudan Adnan Khan Congo director general Natalie director Democratic Republic Gabriel Paris
The Morning Briefing: Thursday, September 10

The Briefing

02:27 min | Last week

The Morning Briefing: Thursday, September 10

"Halloween Danny Boyle with the briefing from the Telegraph. It's Thursday September the tenth and has Christmas as we know it being canceled. So, all we approaching the nightmare before Christmas Boris Johnson conceded that family festivities this year or under threat. That's after imposing a blanket ban on social meetings of more than six people. The prime minister said, it was too early to say large gatherings would be possible this winter and chief medical officer professor. Chris Witty even suggested the tough new lockdown measures could last until next spring for Monday. If you break the so-called rule of six, you'll be liable to a hundred pounds fine and they'll be new enforcement of social distancing in pubs, restaurants, and other venues to we've got a roundup of everything we know about how you'll daily life will be affected. The PM said he had no choice but to bring in the new law in the face of rising corona virus cases, he had chance to prevent, but we've got a data analysis. It shows millions of people will be affected in areas where virus rights are actually low and falling. Now it's emerged Britain could face a legal challenge from the EU that's off to the prime minister pressed ahead with plans to override parts of the BREXIT withdrawal agreement, we've received reports that the draft paper prepared by Brussels playing up it's legal options. So what happens if we get no deal Brexit we've got a reminder of the likely effect. And you might remember that Andrew Neil was taken off the air this summer we've that the BBC's new director-general's offered him a new role. It's host. Prime time shows both on BBC One and two discussions are ongoing but AL chief reporter Robert. Bendix to well-placed sources and has more details of the possible deal. Just time to mention some other pieces to including some incredible pictures from San Francisco where wildfires of turn the Sky Orange, and a review of the new Skoda. Octavia. Is it really now better than a Gulf I'll send you those links. Now if you're listening on WHATSAPP, you'll find them in the show notes if you're listening on spotify apple or wherever you get podcasts, that's it. You're up to date I'll have you'll second briefing of the day this evening.

prime minister Chris Witty Danny Boyle Andrew Neil BBC Boris Johnson Brexit Bendix spotify Brussels EU Britain Sky Orange director-general medical officer Skoda San Francisco reporter professor
Biggest nuclear fusion experiment on schedule in southern France

The Science Show

08:32 min | 1 year ago

Biggest nuclear fusion experiment on schedule in southern France

"The sun show from the players in Washington DC, and so two either one of the answers to our quandary meet the man in charge. My name is Ben B go in currently eater organization director general now, I'm in a tent that is looking at Easter your spouse, not either but eater that. Right. It'll. Yes, right. And we're over a view of a gigantic installation. It's just huge how much of you built so far right now, we are completed sixty percent of all the activities we have to perform from design to first plasma by twenty twenty five twenty twenty five and the whole design of the science anyways, talk, amac. In other words, it's something which is trying to contain a reaction, which is just like in the sun where you have fusion from which you get energy, but containing that reaction containing something like the sun with magnets. How do you do that? As you know, we are choosing either Jen nucle- as it's happens as earnings the stars. And in doing that, we need to force this matter y'all's, which indeed a plasma which means a hot gas. The temperature is one hundred and fifty million degrees. Okay. And this nucle- invis- condition. With a speed, which is so high that when they will collide they will overcome their natural repulsion, as you know, do nucle- should try to put them closer and closer they repel each other, except if you are strong enough, you will force them, and they will get so close they will be trapped and produce new particles helium and helium nucle- as well as neutrons, and we stupak fickle will flow away with an energy, which is between five to ten times more energetics that the other than nuclear we collide is exactly what's happened in the sun. But to contain that say, it doesn't just blow up you've got as we're looking here gigantic, magnets, which are contained in this panoply. How powerful magnets this maintenance very very poor. Fool. Okay. The largest Medicaid is we ever built in the world twenty meter large twenty meter high and we're very strong magnetic field. And I'm sure you learn at the school at the beginning of your learning that when you have a Maya decline, we've nectar electrical particle nearby zoological particul- is trap. And so all these plasma trap by the line, maintaining dysplasia far away from the wall of the what we call vacuum vessel. So it is a way we proceed and you've got helium being made. And you've got neutrons coming out at a fantastic speed. How fast okay, it is a central under the kilometer person. And so the helium really contribute to heat up the plasma. So is why we name it self burning plasma and unjust aside. Neutron will escape. From the medications and will hit the wall, and they will be very gently slowdown. They will lose their kinetic energy and transform this kinetic energy in heat. So it is a process we are now doing now, they experiments have gone up, and it's not all been smooth has it, and that's been the problem with fusion. And if I may, you know, the cliche fusion is always thirty or forty years away and on and on and on it's still thirty or forty years away. How the experiments gone so far so far quite well, as you know in order to be able to have is very high temperature. We need to have enough space to accelerate Ida Jen nucle- if you have not enough space, you will collide before you have the proper speed. So is why you need a minimum sides without the size. You could have very shoe fusion events. But none. Enough in order to produce a net outcome of energy, you will feed in more energy to get the proper temperature of the plasma that during g you get out from this fusion phenomena. So since early nineteen fifty lot of tuck, amac has been designed and work, and we learn a lot on this. But nobody before at the proper research facility in order to be able to demonstrate this net outcome of energy eater will be the first one in the world to be able to demonstrate this. I'm getting slightly Getty looking at the gigantic scale of your reproduction here, the vision video playing three-dimensional how big is Aitor installation. We're looking at you have a huge vacuum vessel nearly one thousand five hundred cubic meter twenty meter high twenty metre diameter around that you have. Okay. Medicare's and beyond that, you have the resistant to be able to cool down the vessel and all these things. So the tuck like building is eighty mater by eighty mater and thirty meter high. But the rest of it looks like a small town is like a small town as you right? Where is it? By the way, it is near exit for vas in fronts, and I am pleased to save at now. Australia is a partner of this larger devices because everybody wants to know if this idea, Jen fusion works or not if it works. It will be a real breakthrough for the war humanity. Because as you know, we rely a lot on variable in geez coming from the sun. But it is diffuse, and it is interrmittent. We rely a lot on fossil fuel because they are just interim storage of solar energy, and it could not last forever. And as you know, no burning all these fossil fuel we are impacting climate and the environment. And there is also the nuclear fishing have some pro and cons. But we know that we will need to find an alternate option in the future. And fusion could be a real alternate option in complementarity with renewable energy. Whenever originally the shoes intermittent fusion in Jesus massive production continuous production, and it is safe and no impact on climate no impact on environment. So it's a win win situation. Indeed. And you've got various countries how many countries are supporting it. Now, we have thirty five what we call eater members. It is China Japan Korea, India Risheh United States, plus the twenty eight members of European Union, plus Switzerland, and we have some what we call associate partner and Australia is one of these associated partners 'cause we've had physics doing this sort of work on aspects of talk. Amac, for instance, the natural university. And okay, once you've got this work twenty twenty five is the idea of it comes off you will build. Kind of reactors everywhere. Yes, exactly these facilities research facility once we have demonstrated and optimize award process. We expect some utilities will be interested to develop this type of technology, and we will Milt deploys a number of this facility worldwide in order to produce power safely without any impact on climate and undermined and then he's enough us for millions of years under of million of years for world population of ten billion of inhabitant. So is like a break food for humanity. Thank you so much. Thank you. They're not be go director general of Aita onto our prayers eater. As he insists the fusion experiment in avenue in France on display at the triple AS.

Jen nucle amac director general Australia Jen fusion Washington Ben B Maya stupak Milt Getty Medicare France Aita partner European Union
Thursday 30 January

Monocle 24: Midori House

26:51 min | 8 months ago

Thursday 30 January

"You're listening to Monaco's house view. First broadcast on the thirtieth of January two thousand and twenty on monocle twenty four molecules house. Few coming up today today. Many countries drifted away from them. And it's like the energy has gone out of the fight. My guests Carol Walker. Enjoy a deco. We'll discuss the mood around. Brexit and whether Britain has actually set itself up for success as the lone divorce finally knees reality will also discuss how to execute a good political interview as is the outgoing director general of the BBC says journalists too often approach the conversations as if they are speaking to liars and Crooks and we discuss where to get and how to get a good cup of coffee and whether the world of Boutique Coffee has all just gone too far and whether or not. It's all Australia's fault. Plus there are a number of requests being bandied around. Maybe tax breaks some initiatives. That could practically help the color and not just encouraging new customers to come through an attempt to breathe new life into Italy's fabulous newsstands. I'm Andrew Moolah. monocle house view starts now welcome to the show. We begin as usual with our news panel. Which today is Carol Walker the political analyst and former BBC correspondent and join the deco the journalist and broadcaster we'll start in the UK with Brexit and the customary pause for listeners to cy again at the spectacle of hitherto broadly sensible nation torturing during it so fears and proceeded outcome which might if? We're all lucky. Leave the country only slightly worse off than it presently is because a little less than thirty hours from now the U K will who actually leave the EU bound for a limbo of yet to be determined length as a new relationship is fashioned. There is a hard headed policy aspect to this of course but it also a less tangible emotional aspect joy I'll ask you. I did the spectacle. Yesterday of 'EM EP singing all Blang Zayn Stir Anything in you. How are you feeling about this? I think left me with a sense of embarrassment. I think having speak- spoken to friends of mine who are kind of prominent remain as Many of them just feel countries drifted away from them and it's like the energy has gone out of the fight. The fight is over. The fight was lost on December the twelfth and and so I can well. We're looking forward to the next year thinking. Well what are the places that we can actually make a a difference whereas whereas the point at which we can in some way Steve Future the the and some of us. I think it's just GONNA go books. which is my plan and some are going to? I think. Try Law over politics to try and hem in the government but otherwise it's just sensitive is the UK all UK anymore. Carol thing I was struck by especially after the referendum Kim vote In Two thousand sixteen which was a surprise I think to most people whether they would leave or remain and it was something that didn't really touch me deeply because I remain an Australian in citizen. I live here entirely legally before anybody gets any ideas but I'm not British Food Not European but I was struck talking to a lot of my British friends that it it hadn't occurred to them before just then they had grown up thinking themselves as Europeans. That it was part of their identity and ironically the the Brexit exit thing having been largely about English identity had caused them to think about their own identity and a whole new way. Did you get a sense of that. Feeling all of a sudden. Someone's trying to take something something away from me well. I think that in a lot of people didn't really wake up to that until after the referendum result. Because I think a lot of those those people that you have talked about feeling as they have a European identity assumed that the Brexit vote would go the other way I think the thing that I am really struck by is that after more than three years of incredibly passionate heated debate h on all sides when everyone has somehow been expected to have a positional one side or the other of the great divide side. There is now this strange sense of of resignation that is going to happen. the the UK is going to be outside of the European Union By later on tomorrow night An almost a strange sense of anticlimax in that of course immediately north very much is going to change because McCain be into this period when a very much will remain the same into the transition period. I think the other thing is that what this debate has done is to force people to take sides. I actually know quite a lot of people who in the run up to that referendum were. We're quite divided thought. Actually you don't like all those eurocrats putting down on lots of pesky rules but on the other hand I know that for the sake of my business business and my mates who European as quite nice to have that multi European Identity and I think what the brexit decision it did was it forced people to move to one side or the other. Well it did exactly that joy did create an entire new political identity in a very fervently felt one in in this country. I mean if if four years ago you went around identifying yourself as an ardent remainder above and beyond all else people would have reached certain conclusions about about you. You were talking earlier about that sense of resignation. Carol mentioned anti-climax. Do you think that energy matt identity. Remain ISM if you like. He's going to go anywhere because there is now an argument to be had about which actually might be the more interesting one about okay. Brexit has happened but we don't no yet. We don't even know what the Prime Minister thinks what. Brexit is actually going to look like we upset nervous idea about that one remember people at the People's rights and various other they second referendum campaigns now have huge mailing lists. Nothing will happen for a little while but providing the they keep those live and taking over you have the a mailing list and potentially one of the biggest pro European movements inside the EU sadly but that that can always be reactivated late date. We actually don't this is meant to be the implementation period we're going into the idea is we'd already sorted out our future. We already got our vision for the future and this was the time we were going to be working out the detail. We still have absolutely no idea what's going to happen. Saw Old enough to remember when trade deals. We're going to be signed a matter of minutes. Yeah okay all going so in fact the next nine the next September that it's all going to be sorted out it's been incredibly rocky ride so although we've got a total lull energy at the moment and very we are all kind of Londoners who are therefore largely in the remain camps. Anyway all. That's the general feeling around here. That's a good start picking up again as we begin to realize various things that have been promised are becoming possible or we look at Boris Johnson. Saying we've had a huge triumph when in fact anybody the any serious analyst says as she does a huge disaster of a trade deal. But Carl do you think that energy vote can be whipped up even by mailing lists of that size because the thing is that remain much like Brexit is an extremely simple binary proposition whereas what the country now faces is a much more when you won't document and one might hope possibly in vain for a more sensible one. You're going to see people getting as excited about the idea of taking to the streets in support of I. Oh I don't know why Norway or Switzerland Variety version of brexit. She'll answers you are. I think the overwhelming feeling amongst many people in the country is that they just want. This argument settled and they are actually tired of it. Of course there will always be a halt cool a very passionate former remain a campaign China's. Who would want to try to do this? And it may will be some at some future date. They may be able to revive their mailing lists. But I think in the short term Anyone with a strategic. Look at this will think that this is not the time to do that because I think that there is a huge feeling amongst people who are outside of the Westminster bubble in the political world. WHO's who are simply tired of the argument There will be an incredibly really difficult process of trying to reach a trade deal with the European Union the EU is making very very clear. That if we WANNA just with trade deal will then we've got to stick to what they call this level playing field. So we sign up tool those you rules and regulations Boris Johnson Michael Gov and so on a making it very clear that they're absolutely not GonNa do that. The whole point of Brexit was that we don't have our rules dictated in Brussels so that is going to be very difficult and the UK at the same time as an. Oh and by the we're GONNA do a great trade deal with the United States and hold of these other nations with whom we currently have a trade deal through the EU and all of that is going to be wrapped up in the next few hours that is simply not going to happen. And I think that does spell huge difficulties for Boris Johnson. But I still suspect. Act that the the confusion the difficulties over those trading Arrangements will not grip the country in the way that the brexit divide and the brexit arguments have done Simply because we've got a government with a huge majority. They will battle their way through it at the last minute. They'll call something together. And there are still only a comparatively small number the businesses who will in the short term be directly affected or of course the longer term economic fallout is potentially very serious at once more to that which is just wait for the. I told you so moment because all the people who are being quiet now will be saying I told you so in about six months time Jolla Deco and Carol Walker back with more from you both in just a moment first monocle. Daniel H has some of the other stories. We're following today. Thank you Andrew. Chinese officials have confirmed. The Corona virus has now spread to every region in mainland China. Health authorities have reported a sharp rise in the number of cases in recent days and the World Health Organization is now considering whether the virus ariss constitutes a global health emergency. The Australian State of New South Wales has announced an independent inquiry into the ongoing bushfires. The six month inquiry will examined the causes of the fires. And how the state prepared and responded to them it will also report on whether climate change and human factors have played a part and finally it's it's been revealed that two satellites have narrowly missed colliding over the US state of Pennsylvania. The objects are travelling at a speed of fifty thousand kilometers an hour but fortunately US base command has said that they crossed paths without incident. Those are some of the news headlines. We're following now back to you Andrew. Thank you done. You'll this monocle house view. Boundary Remillard here with Carol Walker. Enjoy Deco. Well let's look now at the craft of the political interview. A thing at which all of us here gathered have some experience. Lord hold all the outgoing director general of the BBC has taken a swipe at the fashion for approaching all political interviews on the assumption that all politicians are liars bungalows or frauds woods and in search of enlightenment but opportunities to embarrass or infuriate the interviewee journalists as Lord whole sees it have a case to answer for contributing to a toxic political discourse. Carol does he perhaps have half a point. Well I think the first thing I would say is that I think our democracy crecy absolutely requires politicians to put them themselves up for scrutiny. Answer some tough questions and in a world where all politicians very well schooled in the art of the sound bite. You need to have an interview. WHO'S GONNA stand up to them and prevent them from simply spouting the lines to take where? I think that Tony Hall. My former boss does have a point. Is that some of the longer form more discursive conversational national style interviews can be quite revealing about politicians am can engage the audiences in a different way. I think that in this day and age when we've got not just one or two flagship programmes on the BBC but a whole multiplicity of radio stations like this of podcast and so on there is room for those Longer more conversational less combative interviews. But you've got to have opportunities still led to try to put politicians on the spot. Make them come up with some answers and defend their politics in their behavior but joy do journalists too often proceed from A place of assuming bad faith on the person they're talking to you because the the the belligerent Gotcha interview has become if not necessarily the default certainly the thing that journalists and broadcasters knows going to attract the most attention well Louis holy slightly out to step out of step with the Times if he thinks politically interviews with bunglers unglued liars and Crooks out say that this was the exact point in time in which to do that. I think what has changed is it's very difficult to politicians titians really understand the media now in a way that you know under Brian Walden under Robin Day they would sit down for the hour long interview. They might get caught out by the question. elegantly framed now. You know it sound by. Do you know it's clipped you know you've got to get one message out. You know how to just keep repeating your message. Nicky Morgan fifty thousand nurses over and over again. So that that's what the view is so in a sense that if you regard politicians and broadcasters as the enemy the ones understood the tactics six of their opponent of the politicians At this point the media probably starts needing to change how it does those interviews having said that does do wonderfully long interviews. The Andrew Neil's interviews are not on the presumption of lying there and fight very heavily federally based interviews and those are the best interviews. Carol occasionally one myself quite bleakly in this. This conversation comes up a lot. In reference to the BBC's I guess flagship current affairs panel show question in time which does generally descend and is indeed encouraged to descend into in basically into a bear. Pit that if they instead spent that our broadcasting thoughtful thoughtful nuanced political discussion focused on the minutiae of policy which allowed room for doubt and questioning an argument. Would anybody actually actually watered. Well I think that the great value of Question Time is that the questions are coming not from schooled political interviews but for members. This is the public and I actually think that is hugely valuable that you can have for example a nurse or a teacher who can stand up to a politician. He's trotting out a sound bite about some extra money. Some extra stopping some extra investment saying well hang on. I'm a nurse and these are the problems that I'm facing acing it facing. Yes in a long form interview as joy is saying you can approach things from a different way my point is that when you have I mean even the BBC itself how so many different programs. I'm platforms radio. TV Online facebook conversations podcasts. And so on there is room for all of these things and I think there's there's room for some shouted arguments and there's room was well for some perhaps more reflective conversational interviews as well just a final thought on this one joy isn't isn't the fetish is Asian and I think the media's court guilty of as guilty of fetish izing it as as the audiences are of the shouting confrontational interview. Does it contribute to a general lowering of the tone. I speak personally. I get quite bored by them. I don't really feel like learning anything to be honest. I think well I think. Do we want to argue against the death of difference in modern culture is the kind of broad question there in some senses. I think yes. The difference was a very good thing But I do think in the end. You don't end up with a political political class. That can explain what they're doing in the deep emotions behind it. But I would also say that. It's a second stream going on while you've got these very confrontational tation. Bliss confused in places like they'll be occasion. BBC You have this slow stream now which is podcasts. And they don't require that sound soundbite. They are deliberately sort of slow radio. And so let's see how these two things balance out as they both develop in political terms. And if I could just say very very quickly I think the bigger problem at the moment is a scenario where you've got government with a big majority which is boycotting many of those much tofte Hoffa interview style programs But where the prime minister's happy to have his own cameramen to film him taking questions from school children in Downing Street need. I realized now. I've done that automobile wrong. I should've talked straight over the top of both of you and exactly Carol if that is even your real name Finally on today's news panel the Tate Museum here in London has attracted a measure of online com twombly for advertising for a head of coffee. The position comes with a salary of thirty nine thousand five hundred pounds which is as angry people who only read the headlines have noted more than debate. Pay Some of the people who curate. It's it's actual exhibitions. The outrage walls is outrage of this sort of news. Misplaced head of coffee is a management position overseeing the cafes at four galleries but it did serve as an illustration of the onrushing in Super Bowl. Hegemony of coffee a commodity which almost no enterprise feels now able to offer a reminder that manacles excellent cafe is just around the corner from where we are broadcasting. Carol have you noted yourself idiot especially we'd purveyors of coffee in your travels well having just come from the most ludicrously overpriced. Okay Confession here. Oat Milk Cappuccino in a trendy coffee. She literally every year where I was shocked at the price of My four pounds fifty for a cab for a Cappuccino. My dear your mother rest her soul would be turning her grave. She knew what spent but one of the best ones I had was at the end of a walk. Luke threesome mountains in Georgia Georgia next door to Russia. Not The one in America and we arrived at a tiny little village which which had unmade streets and goats walking down the streets and beautiful medieval towers and I wasn't it's the most epic of walks but it had been three or four hours through the mountains and There was a guy shattered as please come to my cafe. Please come mm to my caffeine in the garden of his house He had got his own little coffee cart and he made the most superb Cup of coffee which was entirely unexpected an absolutely delicious and did not cause four pounds fifty two at this point. I feel obliged to confess that I have witnessed a in the far north shore of Sydney somebody with an espresso machine on a small motorboat sailing between yachts moored while the occupants cheapens thereof took a swear. I did have a profound moment of thinking. Yeah we will all be first against the whirlwind. The revolution comes joy. Is this basically Australia's fault. I wonder if it is because at some point in the last ten or fifteen years Australia. My people seem to decide. That coffee is something we're really going to care about. Don't she. Grew coffee beans out there or are you reporting the more I think. We're importing time when your homes or something in Italian cafes you just get you coffee on the ball nice and quick five minutes of Hugo indeed. I have a lot of sympathy for about mobile. Yeah looking here I was just from. My grandmother insists least make a lovely bowl all of milky coffee from my grandfather which bred into before going off to the farm in the mornings and it was just a kind of other casualty of the of the of the routine sunny it will become you know incredibly high flight when I was a kid. My father runs around the cafe. London and I operated the coffee machine if I used to sleep with an old guiger coffee machine sheen at the end of my bed with the kind of food precious of so is a high octane. Tees and I was very very good at it and I now feel that I have somewhat Mr Trick in knock staying in the Barista the profession then. Journalism in fact is now the kind of cul-de-sac profession. You you could be making nothing under forty grand a year during the DECO and Carol Walker. Thank she both. In a moment. We will hear a little bit more about the importance of Italy's newsstands. You're listening to Molecules House view. Do Stay tuned. This is Monica House view. I'm Andrew Muller Italy's new stones were once a fixture of urban life not me retailers of the morning papers offers end the months magazines but community hubs which the events of the day would be vigorously discussed. Sadly the numbers have dwindled from over thirty. Six thousand in two thousand thousand one to less than half of that today. A step has been taken to remind Italians of the value however joining me now to explain what is molecules culture took Kiara first of all what is special or different about Italian. Newsstands well I think that differ a main difference lies in the fact that Italians will probably always take a good occasion to have a good old neighborhood Chai around politics specifically and I think the news agent agent is obviously a fixture of many cities but in Italy It's often kiosk. It's often in the middle of square. It's often a focal point. The square S Not only in big cities but in towns specifically and it's often felt like the place where people would gather to discuss the events of today So the fact that that the numbers are decreasing I find is is quite a start occurrence in terms of the privacy neighborhoods of a place where people can come together gather and normally you know the person who does manage to newsagent is always the same old faces every day of your life and I was watching a report about this initiative last night and and the data took part from Rome is managed by this man who's been behind accounts for forty years that keeps the community together seeing the same face every day. Day having a friend in a retailer near you so this initiative that has taken place to remind Italians of what Marvel's institutions they are. What did it consist stove? It consisted of Eddie across the country in forty cities to be exact Staying Open until later than usual. Some state up until eleven PM. I'm for example Many offered toast at nine pm because why not but mainly just keeping their lights on into the evening to to show in quite a literal metaphorical sense how much they are a beacon of kind of culture and Democracy for for US squares and the fact that they shouldn't really go off does the fact though that an initiative like that is necessary suggests that everybody does kind of understand that trying to sweep tied back here that now that we have reached that blessed state in which people can just stay home in yellow to each other via their computers. They don't need to get dressed up and go into the town square yell at each other in person. It's obviously it's a sad distinctive profess but I think what's also very important to consider in this whole discussion is that and the aren't surviving because newspapers spatial imprint are selling less than they used to but the more addicted die the more. The publishing industry will suffer as well because obviously without an appropriate in Houston and without something at entice new readers into publishing than the overall sales numbers will definitely decrease as well so it's in the public interest says as well to try and help the three situation because they kind of support each other in this microcosm of of of publishing washing so one of the things that was also organized was a petition to try in a request of public funding for for the there are a a number of requests being bandied around. Maybe tax breaks some initiatives that could like practically help the color and not just encouraging new customers to come three. Do you have a favorite decorator of your own. You would like to direct our listeners to well obviously I'm personally attached to the Edeka the I I used to go to as a child in cheering. It's unviable Zona close to my home. It's nothing special. I in fact it's not even a kiosk which might deter some people but it's it's beautiful number all the same and they used to stock a lot of music magazines But they'd always just have the one copy Theo Real Maura which was my favorite music magazine and I just get the one for the month every month and it was just a lovely tradition. And I'm sad that I don't buy everyone. was that part of the appeal of as well that the proprietors news news. The local community in new which magazines hold for which people of course I mean. It's it's like doc. The ball is like the cafe. They they already know what paper you're GONNA pick up in the morning you're either going to be at a public reader or somebody there our career there and you walk through the door and they've already got your paper ready for you because they know what you read and you always get the same every day. It's the usual for the customer. So final message message to our listeners wherever they are in the world. Go out to your local news standby something from it. Perhaps argue with one of the customers. Don't push it too far though you never quite know who you're dealing with that was Kiara Ramallah and that is all for today's show Monaco's house view was produced by Daniel studio managers were stronger and Christie Evans. Coming up at twenty hundred the brand new edition of the urbanized with Andrew. Talk Monaco's House fee returns at eighteen hundred London time tomorrow. I'm Andrea Mullah. Thanks for listening.

Carol Walker BBC Times Brexit EU Brexit United States Andrew London Boris Johnson UK Australia Italy China Monaco director general Prime Minister Kiara Ramallah Andrew Moolah.
Babbage: The forgotten pandemic

The Economist: Babbage

25:21 min | 2 months ago

Babbage: The forgotten pandemic

"Access to HIV, medications has been severely disrupted by covid nineteen. What can countries due to keep treatment going to those who need it? So low and welcome to baggage from economists radio, our weekly podcast on technology and science. I'm Kenneth Pa a senior editor at the Economist and coming up on today's show. Hydrogen power has had many false starts. Could it now be about to take off if all of these potential uses came true? Then we get a hydrogen economy, which is WHA, fuel. For the past fifty. And as we changed the state of technology, how does it change us? We have a lot of technologies that are on the horizon that will shape us, and we want to make sure that they shape us no way that's best for all humanity. I up covid nineteen has dominated the attention of health professional since its outbreak. But with all eyes on the corona virus, pandemic efforts to older enemies like Berkey losses, malaria and HIV AIDS have been hampered threatening the lives of millions. At the end of two thousand nineteen, there were thirty eight million people living with HIV. And almost two million new infections happen that you. Nearly, seven hundred thousand people died. Now more than seventy countries have raised the alarm that they risk running out of HIV medication because of the disruptions from Covid Nineteen These warnings come as leading researchers, doctors and activists gather virtually of course for the international aid. SOCIETIES BI annual conference this week. The Director General of the World Health Organization has urged that we cannot let the covid nineteen pandemic undo the hard won gains in the global response to the disease. We had who are deeply concerned about the impact of antiretrovirals during this time of the COVID pandemic majority overseas global HIV policy at the World Health Organization we have antiretrovirals that are being developed in and made, but they are difficulty getting them around to where they need to be. Because the countries are closed down, and or flights are delayed, but more often now we're hearing that even clinics are being. closed down and people are not able to access. Access, their enter. Tomorrow's at the clinic sites as well one impact. Can this have on the progress made against HIV AIDS W. H. O. U., N. AIDS with a set of five very well established experience model errors looked at a modeling scenario, which is essentially the worst case scenario that if these anti-retrovirals are interrupted for a six month period of time, we could have in excess of five hundred thousand deaths in sub Saharan Africa and if they were interrupted for less time save fifty percent or twenty percent, we will continue to see in excess deaths, but relatively fewer deaths that would be attributable to the lockdown of ARV's. And I think this year we're starting to see that even before the covent pandemic that we're going to have to step up our efforts to be able to continue to have the great progress that we've seen before in terms of reducing new infections in reducing the deaths related to HIV. Let's look at that a little bit more closely. What needs to happen to stop the short term crisis from jeopardizing our long-term public health goals? I think we have to think very creatively right now and give good guidance to countries about how to think about what we call build back better. War is sort of we get into this mode of panic. Big Response We must address the the pandemic, but we neglect the other diseases, and we neglect health systems, those of us who represent the health system and systems like HIV and TB. We need to ensure that we're working with those who are leaving on the covert efforts to work on an integrated view and how we can do this together. How many? Many. Laboratory systems are devoted to cove it in. When can they start to come back on for HIV? How can we share the resources at the same time US opportunities? If they're going door to door for covert or testing ad in a TB test added an HIV test. See if that's a way that we can do this in an integrated way. That actually shows us at the base. There's primary healthcare in which is essentially the base of universal health coverage. Obviously covert is taken away a lot of the attention from these other diseases notably HIV AIDS. What are the positives that of come out of the conference this week? That would've been headline news. If not for the corona virus, some of these news pieces are still getting a headline for example the as twenty twenty. There is a new study that has shown long acting Cava Tiger Vir injectable. For, prepar pre exposure prophylaxis for prevention of HIV infection, and this is a great new tool in our toolbox to prevent HIV we have known for many years that if people take antiretrovirals during periods of time, piracy sex that they can prevent HIV acquisition, and this just gives another choice of an injectable option that has been now proven successful career, compared to already very effective oral to no fear, and this appears to work in men and transgender women. We are excited to know that there will be another trial that will soon report out for using this injectable prep. Let's say in women as well said we'd to be able to see. That is effective, both men and women. Other important findings for WHO in particular, we've recommended using all you tag Rivera's first line for adults women adolescence, there is a new dosing for pediatric Dahlia Tiger Vera that can be used down to four weeks of age, so that's a very important piece of news where we have a better drug for infants and children, and it's also going to be safe to use in pregnant women, whereas before we were concerned about some of the safety BA- final question I have for you is HIV sales. No vaccine. There's still no routine cure, but there has been a lot of progress something happening in Sao Paulo. Yes, there is a team from Brazil that have noted that they have at least one patient who has been shown to have what we call this functional pure by using two drugs that really do look to try to yet the HIV out of its reservoir, and then helped to kill HIV over time or suppress it over time with. Without having to use the anti retrovirals, and so there is movement in the cure arena to find out how we can eventually start to have people live with. HIV over a longer period of time without necessarily having to take medications daily, and if we can figure that one out then I think it will be. Quite an advanced for our HIV epidemic majority. Thank you very much. Thank you very much for having me. To hear about how the lessons from the HIV AIDS pandemic have informed the African response to Covid nineteen. You can listen to our daily. Current Affairs. Show the intelligence on Friday Find it wherever you get your podcasts. Next up. Small traffic floor. For a better. The South Korean super boy band. Has Teamed up with high undying carmaker on a new viral jingle though it goes like this. I'll take. Jean Driscoll. To excuse me. They're referring to hydrogen power technology, which after many years of slow development may now be on the path to deployment. Conventional Wisdom has been back. Battery powered cars are the future of motoring Ion die sells those as well, but it is hedging its low-carbon bets, developing and singing about the potential of rogen. Fuel cells there a way to generate electricity directly so rather than storing energy that you got us in the mains like a battery might fuel-cell generate literacy from a control chemical reaction between hydrogen and Oxygen Tim. Crosses our technology editor. Oxygen from the air, the hydrogen you often compressed is stored in a tank and I'm like a battery you get exhaust out of a fuel cell, but the exhaust is just the reaction product that hydrogen oxygen, which of course is water, and it's not just high getting excited about the potential of hydrogen hydrogen bit of Purple Patch at the moment, so we've had Toyota who make. which is the world's selling battery hybrid? They announced a joint venture with some Chinese. Comic has developed hydrogen fuel cells, people talking about using fuel cells to pal, buses or lorries or ships re maybe aeroplanes people saying hey, why did we use hydrogen to heating instead of natural gas if all of these potential uses came true than we get hydrogen economy, which is what fans of the fuel been hoping for for the past fifty years. Hydrogen in itself poses several obstacles. One is flammability. Hydrogen is highly explosive, and when it's compressed as it usually is in a fuel cell, it is even more risky. If you want to implement hydrogen at K., you need to find a reliable safe and a a cost effective way to store it for long duration. Dr Inas Abu Hamid is the CO founder and CEO of H to go power. The reason that we went to avoid compression is because we want to bring hydrogen technologies closer to the user. A hitch to power is focusing its efforts on addressing the storage question. How does that work? What is the alternative? Our technology replaces the NEED A in compressing hydrogen to store it under three hundred dollars, seven hundred boys by converting it in a chemical process in two solid state or liquid state, and when we know that the demand is at peake, we reconvert the hydrogen is stored in a solid state form or liquid state form back in two gas. That is ready to be converted. Converted using a fuel cell at the other end. So how was it to go? Applying that? Technology to practical use hedged power is working on to products powerful drugs, so increasing energy stored per unit, weight and volume to power drones for ranch, three times longer than typical little mind batteries, and the product is energy stored for long duration in the form of hydrogen. This spacey could be power to power solution whereby renewable energy is captured for as long as needed in the form of hydrogen, and only when the demand of the user, the other end peaks than hydrogen is converted back to power. So Tim there's clearly a lot of experimental development going on in hydrogen power and a lot of optimism, but this is not the first time that hydrogen has had a big buzz about it, is it? Not The joke is hydrogen is the fuel of the future. No was will be or that. We have one of these mini boomlet every ten years and they they never go anywhere through a big drawbacks to using hydrogen. One of them is if you're GONNA change over the world's fossil fuel infrastructure. That's a huge job, but I think maybe the most fundamental drawback is hydrogen navigates to say hey, it's the most abundant element in the universe which. which it is if you're on a stronger and you're looking at the University of the whole, but on earth hydrogens actually pretty rare leasing it it. It's mental full. You can either make it by putting it out. Fossil fuels all you can make running electric current through water and splitting into hydrogen and oxygen. Both of those things of course need electricity to run, and that means it's inherently inefficient, and of course less efficient means more expensive. Okay so a lot of this hinges on the ability to make hydrogen at scale. How is that currently done? and Are we good enough at it? Yes that's right so the two ways to make hydrogen at the moment we extract from fossil fuels, fossil fuels hydrocarbons. You just you take the carbons away and you're left with hydrogen process steam reformation is the most common what the problem is. You then have all the carbon to deal with that ends up carbon dioxide, and you emit seven tons of Cobb docks so there will maybe even more if every hydrogen so if we're GONNA use hydrogen to bring about some. Some kind of of green economy. That's the ideal, so there are two ways that people think might work in the future for the first is called hydrogen, and that's basically the same old steam reformation process you just bolt on another technology, carbon, capture and storage where you take the carbon emissions, and you do something with. Maybe you bury them underground. The other option is called green hydrogen on. That's the electrolysis process. I mentioned what you just get a big tub of water. Water stick to electricity and run a current through them, and you get to gases hydrogen oxygen, so you ignore the oxygen the hydrogen if you pal about with renewable Fistula low-carbon atrocity than create any greenhouse, gases, and most people think that green hydrogen, probably if we're to have higher numerically, it will be made in that way, so what are the large scale? Commercial uses that you see is the most promising both in terms of cutting the carbon impact as well as cost. Cost effectiveness I think the places where hydrogen might find her role other the places where for whatever reason you can't use electricity directly. She's just simpler, probably less costly and more efficient, one of those reasons. If you look at transport, the consensus seems to be. The hydrogen caused a probably on a on a hiding to nothing because they just they just can't compete with the efficiency of battery ones, but as you start to talk about bigger forms of transport so you. Trucks and lorries. Maybe it other advanced as maybe start outweigh the inefficiency and the Big One. There is its energy density so batteries take up a lot of room to provide not very much energy hygience quite as good as fossil fuels when it comes to that, but it's it's a lot better than batteries are. So there are several companies looking at whether hydrogen lorries make more sense than of battery electric ones. If you then go bigger again. Shipping which accounts for about two and a half percent, the world greenhouse gas emissions does no kind of. Technological silver bullets to decarbonised shitting. You can't use batteries. You know the ship just have to go particularly ocean going cargo ships. They just don't give you enough. Energy and is like you can stop and plug into shore every few miles, so some suggestion hydrogen might find a use there, and then I the last big one I think is industrial processes, says some of these just require hydrogen anyway like if you'll making artificial, you need hydrogen to do that. The hydrogen at the moment comes from fossil fuels. Seems like a pretty clear win if we could make that hydrogen from green sources instead. Okay, so tim. How convinced are you by this positive energy? Could hydrogen be poised to become significant part of the energy mix? Take my neck out too much like I said. We've seen false dunes before I. DO think the economics appointing in encouraging direction. I don't think we'll ever get the full on hydrogen economy that people have been talking about a half a century I think that that triplication just using electricity to power things is much better wherever you can do it, so I think maybe for me. The Way to think about hydrogen is to refer back to another famous ad campaign and say that it might be the Heineken of green energy in that it might be able to refresh the parts of the economy that electrification con reach. Tim Cross. Thank you very much action and our thanks to Abraham at. A. And finally. Science and technology has changed humanity throughout the agents the Telegraph, the railroad instant photography the mobile phone. But although we changed technology, our technologies also change. Dr Nissan Ramirez is a material scientist and a self-declared science evangelist in her new book, the Alchemy of us she explores some of the hidden ways that are technical creations have subtly, but powerfully transformed how we live act and think. It's very crucial that we think about it because we have a lot of technologies that are on the horizon that will shape us, and we want to make sure that shape us in the way that's best for all of humanity, so it may be a simple premise, but we don't think about it, and we certainly don't discuss it. Before we look in the past which book does. Let's look into the future since you raised it. What are these future things that you're concerned about well? What's in the new cycle? Quite a bit of artificial intelligence and face, recognition, software, and things like that, and and the Internet of things all those things are on the horizon fast approaching, and as I say in the Alchemy of US I talk about how technology has shaped us, and so in that discussion besides talking about how great these technologies are, we should also be asking okay now that this will be part of our lives. How will it shape us? Okay so with this is a based now. Let's look into the book and let's look into the past. You make this claim that we're being shaped by technology, and you come up with a lot of very interesting stories, some of which are kind of haunting. Let's go right into it polaroid. Polaroid story was surprising to me. I love Polaroid's instant camera was one of my favorite cameras at my grandfather owned, but what I found out that while I was standing in front of a camera that I loved there were people who were standing in front of a camera made by polaroid. who weren't too happy about it. It's because polaroid was used by the South African government during the time of are tied all black South Africans were required by law to carry with them a passbook which told people where they could go where they could not go at the heart of the passbook was a picture made by polaroid, so this was a technology that was buttressing very oppressive governmental system. and. How do you think it actually changed us? Rather than it was misused, polaroid was informed about the use of this technology, and they nord it, and so the chapter from the Alchemy of us is called capture and when I. Try discusses that this film It's misuse captured. The value of what people thought was important. It captured what corporations believed was important. Sure there are people being oppressed, but look we're making some money, so that's what's the value us, so the film was also capturing. What was the value of the time, not only the images of the people who are in front of the lenses. Now this is commingled with other things like artificial light to change us. The light bulb has disrupted our sleep patterns. Tell us more. That's absolutely correct. It ends up that before the industrial revolution, our ancestors used to sleep differently. They used to sleep in two intervals. They would go to bed around nine or ten o'clock and sleep for about three and a half hours then they would wake up on purpose and stay up for about an hour or so. And then they would go back to sleep for three and a half hours. This was changed by two inventions, the clock and also artificial lights the light bulb because of the light bulb. We would go to bed later, so one of those segments of sleep would be truncated and because of the clock. We need to get up earlier to go to the factory, so the second segment would be truncated soon. It didn't make sense to consolidate those doses of sleep, and it resembles the type asleep that we have today now your day job is as a material scientist when you're not trying to muscle in my action as a writer. The materials that we use the actual physical materials shape ourselves as well, and who we become as a society, an example that I'm leading to is how we're closer together than ever before because of steel. Well Yeah I mean still is a fantastic invention. Most people ignore because they're writing on it in the railroads, and not thinking about how that material came to be, but before steel rails, time and space were very different to us. Traveling fifty miles was something that was aspirational. If someone live fifty miles away, your chances of seeing them with very very slim, because you would travel by stagecoach, however wants the rails became. became popular fifty miles, no big deal. The world's shrank culturally. It changed us, but also because it was very robust and strong material, it made it possible for us to build this infrastructure, so that information and products and people could travel all over the country, and that enmeshed us that made us become this whole unified entity as opposed to be forced deal where we were just separate pockets separate from each other. Okay, I'm with you that our technologies shape us. What does this all mean? What is the deeper point here? What do we need to really not understand? What's the warning in your book? Well, my premise is that technology shapes, and I wrote the alchemy of us as a gymnasium. If you will so that we can look at older technologies that are simpler and seem fairly innocuous and show in eight cases how they've changed us, and my hope is that we feel empowered and emboldened to ask questions about future technologies right now. There's a lot of technologies that are out there. That are going to shape us, and maybe people don't feel that they have enough information to ask questions, or they feel afraid. I'm giving them the opportunity to exercise that critical thinking muscle so that they will feel empowered to ask questions, because that's the whole point of science asking questions, and I want people to feel empowered to do so right now. Amid a global pandemic society, as we know, it is being rewritten by pathogen less than a micron in size. So as the world adopts this new normal. What technology would you like to see invented to shape the next moral? Technology hasn't really helped us all that much. Except in connecting with zoom and all these different technologies that allowed us to connect, but it hasn't solved how we go about in mitigating this disease. We're using technologies that we've used in the nineteenth century in the twentieth century. Look, we have two separate from each other. We got up. Just wait it out and we have some medicines that are also new technologies so I'm not really sure what we're. GonNa gain, but I do think that it will be a combination of old technologies and new technologies in this new normal because we can see the technology's not going. Going to solve all our problems, and what scares you? What scares me is that we are in the midst of this pandemic. We're getting a lot of information about how this new world will be, and I don't think people are really adhering to that. They really want to go back and going back didn't work for everyone. That's what we've learned. Through all of this upheaval, the good old days wasn't good for everyone. So I'm a little concerned that there's going to be this friction between what the new normal should be, and going back to the old normal and I'm not certain about what's going to win. And he's so Ramez. Thank you very much. Thank you so much for your. And that's all for this episode of average for more great signs of technology stories subscribe to the Economist to get the best introductory offer wherever you are in the world. Just go to economist dot com slash podcast off, and the link is in the show notes. I'm Kenneth Kooky and in London. This is the economist.

HIV World Health Organization Covid Tim Cross COVID US Kenneth Pa scientist Sao Paulo Director General polaroid AIDS Jean Driscoll senior editor Toyota Oxygen Tim University of Brazil
News in Brief 21 March 2019

UN News

02:48 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 21 March 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations states must take urgent action to stem, the tide of hate and discrimination, which helped fuel the deadly shootings in two New Zealand mosques last Friday by self declared white supremacists. Several top officials in human rights experts f stressed marketing national day for the elimination of racial discrimination on Thursday. They said that the tragedy reminds us that racism xenophobia in religious hatred are deadly. They also noted the growing political appeal of racially based populism in some countries saying that result of supremacist. Ideologies is racial violence, exclusion and discrimination, racial discrimination. Still has not been banished to the east rebukes said Audrey as allayed director general of the UN educational scientific in cultural organisation, UNESCO describing it as a vicious form of exclusion and intolerance. She noted that it's become common on the sports field in the media on the streets in the workplace in even in the corridors of. Our urgent and sustained funding for government led response to what it's now, a massive and protracted humanitarian crisis across the Democratic Republic of the Congo. DRC is required said the heads of the UN children's fund UNICEF in UN emergency cordination office Oeser following on from a fact-finding mission to DRC this week, UNICEF executive director and Rita four in the UN. Stop humanitarian affairs official Mark Lowcock said the funds were urgently needed to meet the needs of children families invulnerable communities including people with disabilities. The relatively peaceful political transition taking place in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is an opportunity that we must seize on top officials said in a statement, referring to the first peaceful transfer of power following elections on study, December we can beat back the massive in protracted humanitarian crisis said Mr. Lowcock, but Donner's urgently need to provide further generous funding in the face of overwhelming needs. They are conditions. Assist. Invest areas of southern Africa affected by seek Lonnie. Die is heavy rain continues to cause massive destruction UN said on Thursday while eighteen skip efforts to reach those most in need warning that the situation is likely to deteriorate the world foot. Programme WFP said that people are still stranded on rooftops after the storm began its sweep through Massembe Malawi and Zimbabwe six days ago in Mozambique alone. The agency seeking more than one hundred twenty one million US dollars to help one point seven million people affected through the next three months said WFP after the government declared a state of national emergency. Do any emergency crews nation office Ocho reported at the latest desktops to two hundred forty two in with numbers expected to rise and a carbon United Nations.

UN United Nations Democratic Republic WFP Congo Audrey DRC UNICEF New Zealand mosques Mark Lowcock Massembe Malawi US Mozambique Ocho Zimbabwe f director general executive director
NPR News: 04-08-2020 3PM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 5 months ago

NPR News: 04-08-2020 3PM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Louise Schiavone Bernie. Sanders is pulled the plug on his presidential campaign in Corona virus plagued election year. That's become more unpredictable. By the week the senator from Vermont is yielding to what he believes to be a certain nomination. Victory by Joe Biden although not a Democrat himself sanders told supporters today. He's still pushing to shape. What the Democratic Party stands for twenty twenty well Vice President Biden will be the nominee. We must continue working to assemble as many delegates as possible at the Democratic convention where we will be able to exert significant influence over the party platform and other functions seventy eight year old sanders had been off to a strong start overcoming questions about a heart attack. He suffered last October but a convincing South Carolina win and a string of several. More victories by JOE BIDEN LEAD SANDERS TO CONCLUDE. He could not win the nomination. The head of the World Health Organization is defending the. Who's handling of the Corona virus outbreak? Npr's Jason Boolean reports after President Trump lashed out at the W. H. O. Director General `Tatoes Adnan Gabriella Cities Agency has been working tirelessly to provide technical guidance research in logistical support to countries around the world trump. On Tuesday threatened to cut off funding to the. Who saying the. Who's response to? The outbreak was slow in China. Centric `tatoes said personal attacks. Don't bother him and added that throughout this crisis he's been subject to racist slurs and even death threats. He said what is important right now. Is that nations come together to fight this pandemic unity's the only option to defeat this virus. If you don't believe in unity and unity please prepare for the worst to come Jason bobbie-ann NPR news and Italy. The number of people who died from Corona virus in the last twenty four hours is lower than the day before but new cases are higher NPR. Sylvia Poggioli has more the death toll in Italy since the outbreak came to light on February. Twenty first is seventeen. Thousand six hundred sixty nine while the number of total cases is almost one hundred. Forty thousand on Yeti Guera World Health Organization Assistant Director General said that the Corona Virus Curving. Italy still does not show a definitive decline. The European Union's Disease Monitoring Agency said that despite evidence from Italy and Austria that the number of cases and deaths are declining. There is currently no indication. The peak of the epidemic has been reached agency director Andrea Ayman said. It is too early to lift all social distancing measures even though they disrupt society. Sylvia Poggioli. Npr News Rome on Wall Street at this hour a positive day. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is up seven hundred fifty one at twenty three thousand four hundred six this is NPR news British Prime Minister Boris. Johnson's condition is improving in the intensive care unit of a London hospital according to Britain's treasury chief Rashid Sue. Knock says that today. Johnson's been sitting up in bed. Engaging with his doctors at Saint Thomas Hospital Johnson was admitted to the hospital Sunday. Ten days after being diagnosed with Kovic nineteen he said to be breathing without any assistance beyond standard oxygen treatment. He was transferred to intensive care on Monday. The Afghan government released one hundred Taliban prisoners today. Npr's Diaa Hadid explains from Islamabad. Reuters reported the release which is part of a broader deal signed between the United States and the Taliban and which the Afghan government said it would uphold the deal calls for the freeing of thousands of Taliban prisoners as a gesture of goodwill before peace talks between the Afghan government and the insurgents there was no immediate comment from the Taliban which announced yesterday that it was withdrawing from the talks saying that the delays of releasing the prisoners was unacceptable. The peace talks and mental resolved four decades long conflict in Afghanistan and find a wave including the Taliban in the country's political fabric dea deed. Npr News Islamabad. The Olympic flame arrived in Japan from Greece in late March. When there were hopes the Cova nineteen DEMOC would show sufficient signs of abating to permit the Games to go forward now that the Olympics have been slated for next year the flame has been taken off public display and Japan. I'm Louise Schiavone. Npr News Washington.

Npr Taliban Sanders Vice President Biden NPR Corona Sylvia Poggioli Afghan government Louise Schiavone Bernie Npr Italy Trump Islamabad Washington Democratic Party Louise Schiavone World Health Organization Saint Thomas Hospital Johnson Health Organization Assistant
News in Brief 27 January 2020

UN News

02:55 min | 8 months ago

News in Brief 27 January 2020

"This is the news. In brief from the United Nations commemorating the seventy fifth anniversary of the liberation of the auschwitz-birkenau death camp and the six million Jews and others murdered on Nazi orders during the Holocaust. UN Secretary General Antonio Cherish told a ceremony in New York on Monday that the world must recommit to preventing any repetition of those crimes. I'll solidarity in. The face of hatred is needed today. More than ever as we see deeply worrying resurgence of antisemitic attacks around the world. He said marking Holocaust remembrance. Day there is a global crisis anti Semitic hatred a constant stream of attacks targeting Jews the institutions and property Mister Gutierrez spelled out these upsurge event. Semitism cannot be seen in isolation from an extremely troubling increasing. Snow Phobia over phobia this cremation and eight hundred. In many parts of the world's targeting people on the basis of their identity including race ethnicity nationality religion sexual orientation disability and immigration nations stops warring parties in Libya as well as foreign governments. Supporting them are being urged to investigate deadly strikes last July which killed at least fifty three migrants appearance and refugees at detention center in the country's northwest the appeal was made by the US support mission in Libya unseal and the UN Human Rights Office in Geneva which on Monday they published a joint report calling for accountability for the attack targeting the demand complex UN human rights chief. Michelle Basch let said the TADJOURA attack. Depending on the precise circumstances may amount to a war. Crime Libyan's migrants and refugees trapped amidst violence and atrocities fueled by impunity. She said an anyone. Guilty of crimes onto onto international law must be held to account. The July attack was one of the deadliest incident. Since the start of April's assault by militia who opposed the recognize government government on the capital Tripoli. The report found that while it appeared that the strikes were conducted by a craft belonging to a foreign state. It remains unclear whether these air assets were under the command of the self-styled Libyan National Army or operated under the command that foreign power and finally the Director General of UNESCO Odriozola has called on Iraq Iraq to ensure that those responsible for the killing of television reporters. Safa golly and Ahmed Abdul Samat earlier. This month brought to justice. She condemned the murders in uncalled authorities to investigate the killings and ensure that the perpetrators are brought to trial the UN scientific and Cultural Organization. Chief said that all attacks on media work because present an intolerable threat to press freedom and to free and open debate. The two journalists was shot while driving away from protests in the southern Iraqi city of Basra which which they've been covering for Iraqi Satellite Television Channel Digital TV UNESCO promotes the safety of journalists through global awareness raising capacity building deranged your actions notably within the framework of the U._N.. Plan of Action on the safety of Journalists Matt Wells U._N. News.

UN Secretary General Antonio Cher Libya United Nations Libyan National Army Mister Gutierrez Basra Director General of UNESCO Odr Semitism Iraq Matt Wells Michelle Basch Safa golly New York Tripoli assault Geneva US TADJOURA
News in Brief 27 May 2020

UN News

03:32 min | 4 months ago

News in Brief 27 May 2020

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations further evidence of the unprecedented impact of Covid nineteen jobs has emerged in a new study by the UN Labor Agency which on Wednesday said that more than one in six young people have stopped working since the pandemic began. Those young people who still have a job have seen their working hours cut by twenty three percent said the head of the international organization. Ilo Guy Ryder who also urged governments to conduct widespread corona virus testing and tracing of relations to help get economies back on their feet countries. Such as the Republic of career and Iceland had invested ineffective virus hunting techniques which had cost less than one percent of their economic output developing countries. Where most people worked in the informal sector should be helped to do the same. The ALO Director General said we have to be very concerned about this coincidence of strongly useful populations high inform of economies limited capacities for testing tracing and want to call it the perfect storm but it is a combination of circumstances which I think combine to lead us to this concern that labor market outcomes could be particularly damaging and long lasting according to the workers in the Americas have suffered most from the economic fallout of the pandemic in terms of working hours lost since April thirteen point one percent followed closely by Europe and Central Asia. The decision has been taken to temporarily. Halt the use of hydroxy chloroquine as a trial treatment for people suffering from covid nineteen the UN World Health Organization who has announced development follows scientific reviews on these safety and efficacy of the antiviral against the coronavirus hydroxy. Chloroquine and chloroquine are accepted as generally safe for use in patients with autoimmune diseases or malaria. Who noted one study published in The Lancet Medical Journal last week? Found that among one hundred thousand patients. The drug was linked to high mortality and more irregular heartbeat. A final decision on the use of hydroxy chloroquine is expected in mid June. Who said in a statement experts will base their thinking on evidence from the? Who's international solidarity? Trial involves dozens of countries and thousands of patients along with other ongoing trials around the world in a statement. Who noted that patients already enrolled in the hydroxy chloroquine arm of the solidarity? Trial will continue taking the drug until they finish the course of treatment. In addition to hydroxy chloroquine three other anti-viral drugs have been selected as possible treatments for Covid nineteen they include Rendez Severe Lapenne aveer return aveer and Lopiano Vera Tanovic with Interferon Beta one. A finally to the U. N. Working Group on discrimination against women and girls whose independent rights experts said Wednesday that some. Us states appear to be manipulating the COVID nineteen crisis to curb access to abortion. In a statement the panel said that Emergency Corona virus orders suspending procedures not deemed immediately medically necessary had been used in Texas Oklahoma Alabama Iowa. Ohio are Kansas Louisiana and Tennessee. It was be regretted that these states which had a long history of restrictive practices against abortion appear to be manipulating the crisis to severely restrict women's reproductive rights said Elizabeth Broderick Working Group Vice Chair. The working group which was established by the Human Rights Council in September. Twenty ten insisted that access to abortion services was crucial during the pandemic as women grappled with new restrictions on them ability to quarantines and lockdowns Daniel Johnson U. N. News.

chloroquine Covid Us United Nations U. N. Working Group UN Labor Agency Ilo Guy Ryder Covid Human Rights Council Iceland Elizabeth Broderick Group Vice Chair Europe Daniel Johnson U. Director General Central Asia Lopiano Vera Tanovic World Health Organization
This Land Is Your Land

What A Day

18:51 min | 2 months ago

This Land Is Your Land

"It's Friday July tenth I'm Akilah. He's and I'm getting. This is what day were. We are giving up our to daily cans of Goya mango next year. Because the CEO loves trump I mean honestly drinking multiple cans of every everyday was a bad idea in the first place. Oh, yeah, my teeth or melting and I haven't sat still in three years. On today's show, we'll go over the final decisions from the Supreme Court. This term then some headlines, but first the latest. My friends make no mistake. The greatest threat we face now is not the virus itself. Rather it's the lack of leadership that was the director general of the World Health Organization giving an emotional speech yesterday in Geneva. He went on to say that we can't defeat the pandemic in a divided world. I agree hopefully trump gets the message. anyways the World Health Organization also had a policy update yesterday to that's right so as we talked about earlier this week, scientists had been pressing the WHO to acknowledge. The coronavirus can linger in the air and be spread in that fashion particularly, if you're in confined spaces with bad ventilation, so the organization said yesterday that they agreed with these outside scientists, and that transmission via aerosols may have been responsible for recent outbreaks in places like restaurants, nightclubs or places. Places of worship, so the WHO is still largely emphasizing spread from those larger nasty droplets from coughs or sneezes, but they're now also saying people should additionally quote avoid crowded places, close contact settings, and can find an enclosed spaces with poor ventilation. The organization also revised a previously confusing position where they had said as dramatic spread was uncommon. They're now saying more unequivocally that both people with and without symptoms can spread it. Yeah, so where that damn mask. Here in the United States where we're just continuing to post daily highs, yes, indeed, and it's really gotten to a point in the last few weeks, where mass might only begin to stem the tide in a number of the states in earlier this week, Dr Anthony Fauci of the NIH went so far as to say that states that are having a quote. Serious problem should actually consider shutting down. Of course we've seen isolated cities and states, rollback or slow down the opening process, but as of yet there hasn't been state that has. Has Actually reissued something like an across the board shutdown that we saw earlier this year that she also said that some states went to fasten the reopening process, but he didn't explicitly say which ones had then yesterday thou- She recalibrated slightly in another interview, saying that shutting down again would be quote and extreme, but to his point about those reopenings it's become even clearer that many of the states contributing to the rise in nationwide cases are the ones that open too early. I cannot say. I'm surprised, even a little bit. All right well as cases have been going up. One of the only encouraging signs we had was that deaths weren't also going up, but that also might be changing now. Yeah, definitely could be and death. Slag case counts so we'll have to keep monitoring that goes on, but yesterday for instance Texas more than one hundred deaths for the first time and the governor. There is now pleading with residents to wear a mask to. Having to shut the economy down which? Again Late to the Party and Florida, which is one of the worst outbreaks in the country, reported one hundred twenty deaths. Also a record high yet. We have a Republican Governor Rhonda Santa's still eager to open schools in the fall, likening it to things like fast food home. Depot and Wal Mart, being open which I don't know about your schooling, but I feel like when I go to home. Depot I'm not there for eight hours with a lot of other people in one cramped room. That's right. Yeah, and one quick update on schools and something that we talked about in yesterday's show so on Thursday, Robert Redfield of the CDC. CDC said that they're not going to revise their guidelines for school reopenings as had been suggested by the president, but rather give out more information to make sure that parents and communities can help decide so still a challenge will continue to keep track of all of that, but switching gears quickly. Yesterday was the final day of Supreme. Court decisions for this term. They saved some biggies for the end. Let's start with the Oklahoma case. Yeah, super glad to all right so yesterday, the Supreme Court ruled that much of eastern. Eastern Oklahoma is actually native American land, and that's a huge victory for tribal rights. Essentially, the court was deciding on whether Congress had officially eliminated the Muskogee Creek nation reservation when Oklahoma became a state in nineteen o seven in a five four decision, the court said no congress did not do that. And therefore the land remains reservation justice. Gorsuch wrote the majority opinion quote. If Congress wishes to withdraw its promises, it must say so unlawful acts performed long enough, and with sufficient vigor are never enough to amend the law. Law basically just because the land was taken a long time ago, doesn't make it legal now, which was sort of one of the arguments, put forward by the state of Oklahoma that returning the land now after all these years would cause too much legal chaos today right, so let's get into what the ruling actually means in practical terms because we're talking about a large area it's a good question so to start for Oklahoma's criminal justice system. The ruling means that only the federal government. Not The state government has. Has the power to prosecute major crimes committed by tribal members on the land. The reason this case ended up at the Supreme Court in the first place to do with a man named GMC mcgirt a tribal citizen who was convicted in Oklahoma State Court of molesting child, but because of where the crime occurred on what he said was tribal land maker appealed arguing that the state didn't have jurisdiction in at the feds would have to prosecute instead crooked has investigative podcast all about this case, but also about the history. History of the tribes in Oklahoma in the long ago promises to them that were made and broken. It's called this land, and it's hosted by Rebecca Nagel and Oklahoma journalists and citizen of the Cherokee nation. It is definitely worth your time more than ever is important and beautifully told Rebecca Talk to pods of America yesterday after the decision came out I'm going to start crying, but it's just over the course of history. You know we have really just asked for the United States to follow its own lost its own. Own Constitution its own set of laws that govern our lights, our rights and our land rights, and so so rarely it does, and so it's just such a big win win. People empower us that power the right way. Also Rebecca has an update episode out next week so definitely go listen to that on this land feet, but to get back to your question about what this means more broadly, there are a lot of questions about how this will affect taxes, zoning and other regulations, and all of that is still. Still to be worked out as well as what this decision means for other neighboring tribes who hold similar broken treaties rate, and the other big decision from the court yesterday was around trump's financial records, so this one involved two separate questions, and the court decided to separate ways, so let's go over what they said. And what this all actually means all right so spoiler Stephanie Unlikely that we're GONNA. See Trump tax returns before the election in November but Kim. Let's get into the specifics here. I know it's a bummer. All right so the first decision is whether the state of New York has the power to subpoena trump's financial records. It stems from a criminal investigation and grand jury trial. Trump and his lawyers have tried to block investigators from getting his records, arguing that he as president is immune while in office, but the Supreme Court totally disagreed saying quote, no citizen, not even the president is above the duty to produce evidence. Evidence in a criminal proceeding, it's a big deal in terms of how we understand the limits of presidential power so practically the grand jury will get these documents, but we won't see them for now. It's all behind closed doors, plus there's still a possibility for trump's lawyers to slow this thing down and we still don't know that much about this investigation. Overall except that part of it has to do with. Hush money. Payments made to adult film star Stormy Daniels. During the two thousand sixteen campaign men have not heard that one in many a moon right then. Okay the second decision. What's that about right? So that was about whether Congress can subpoena trump's financial documents in this case. The court said that they couldn't because Congress didn't justify the request well enough. The Supreme Court said Congress would have to try again. In the lower courts to refine their subpoena and arguments for it. That's GONNA take a lot of time. If it ever happens and as expected, trump went absolutely insane twitter following those decisions. We will spare you and that's the latest. It's Friday wad squad. For today's Tim check. We are talking about another new policy idea. After getting stuck on a packed American Airlines flight out of DC Oregon Senator, Jeff Merkley says he will introduce legislation to ban the sale of middle seats for the duration of the pandemic senator. We thank you for your bravery giddy apart from the mandatory empty middle seat. What are some new airline rules that you've made you recommend? I think on the seating front. We gotta have no seats near bathrooms. Oh. Yeah, that's always growth. We gotta stagger it, so you get like an extra or something. That's just empty space or something of that sort, maybe like you're getting comfort plus seats that are all around there so like you're kicking back and getting farther away from that stink, but like we can't be doing that anymore. Especially in pandemic right and people are always like brushing against you and you're near the bathroom or like standing there. Waiting and I'm like that goes down. For me I, don't want the popcorn spilling effects like a movie theaters, but in the planes when people are like getting up in passing you and then like turning or something like that and they knock you. It can't be done anymore, so I'm hoping. The airlines are listening and none of us have to sit near a do in the like again, but Akilah. What else are you thinking about? In terms of altering the whole plane experience k., so I have had this idea for a really long time, and it is controversial to some people, but I know that we have a certain baggage allowance which I think is great. What I do not like is when people who sit at the back of the plane. Put their bag right in the front of the plane so that if you're sitting somewhere in the middle by the time you get on the plane, there is nowhere for your bag to go. Yes, I think you should sit with your bag i. don't think it's asking too much I. I. Never understood why you would do that because if you're sitting that far back anyway, you're not gonna be able to like be line past everyone to get off the plane. You're still going to have to wait. So why does your bag need to wait longer? I hate that chip. It drives me crazy and usually I'll get on the plane. It'd be like okay so. There's no overhead space which doesn't make sense because I'm sitting under this little container. So who should have been here? It's maddening. It should be viewed as an appendage. Not Depart with your baggage on the flight. It's gotta be within a three foot, parameter, view or buddy. You're not getting right. It's like if I was just sitting in the airport. I wouldn't be allowed to put my bag over there. It's true I have to stay with my stuff. So why is it different on the plane? Yeah, I think they should change that whenever people get on planes again. If you're flying good luck, I am probably not gonna fly for a while. I'm definitely good. Well just like that. We have checked Tim's I am looking forward to a trip one day, but again not going to happen, but stay safe. We will check in with you all again next week. In, Africa some ads. What's WAD squad? Stay? We're talking about parade underwear, so parade was launched by two best friends Cami and Jack in October Twenty nineteen and Cami. The CEO is a first generation Latina go off all their underwear starts at nine dollars, and they're made with a breathable cotton liner package in one hundred percent compostable packaging that biodegrade within three hundred days since your other underwear. That I doubt it. Their replay style is made of recycled nylon yarns, and for every sale made one percent goes to planned parenthood, so your underwear is doing some good in the world. Alright features four. Four unique core styles Thong, boy, short cheeky, and brief a brief girl myself in addition to their high-rise Thong and high cut thong with sizes, ranging from extra small three x l right. Their underwear is truly buttery, soft and designed to never dig in or roll down. It's truly amazing, and you gotTa wear are eight. Go to your parade dot Com Slash Wad, WMD for twenty percent off five or more pairs. That's your parade dot. Com Slash Wad for twenty percent off five or more pairs, your parade dot com slash. What is it what see site for details? All Right? Let me tell you guys a little bit about public goods. The one stop shop for affordable sustainable healthy household products from home and personal care to premium pantry staples all in one place, so it was like this, rather than buying from a bunch of single product brands, public goods members can buy all of their premium essentials in one place with one beautiful extreme, lined aesthetics and public goods searches. Searches, the globe defined clean, healthy ECO friendly innovative products like sulfate, Free Shampoo, organic, Pesto, sauce, and tree, free paper products, one of the things that I've been buying a ton of are the different coffee filters that they have because I'm going through a lot in quarantine, probably having too much for my health, but that's besides the point and they've got a great selection that is cheap and easy to get. Get and they use a membership model to keep costs low like I said impasse on even more savings to their customers, and they plant one tree for every order that's placed. They planted over a hundred thousand trees, since September, Twenty nineteen, and we worked out in the exclusive deal. Just for what today podcast listeners receive fifteen dollars off your first public goods order with no minimum purchase. That is right there. There so confident you will absolutely love their products. Their coffee filters, et CETERA and come back again and again they are just giving you fifteen dollars to spend on your first purchase. You have nothing to lose. Go to public good dot com slash wad or use code watt at checkout. That is P.. U. B. L. G. O. S. DOT COM FORWARD SLASH WAD to receive fifty dollars off your first order. Let's wrap up with some headlines headlines. A man who drove into a Seattle protests, killing one demonstrator has been charged with the Hickey homicide. The driver allegedly drove up the wrong side of the highway on July fourth and struck twenty four year old summer Taylor. Who is participating in the Black Fem? March Taylor died in the hospital later that night. This is one of the more recent incidents of people driving into black lives matter protesters across the country, according to an expert at the University of Chicago over sixty car tax have happened since officers killed, George Floyd on Memorial Day and seven of those cases, police officers were the ones behind the wheel way to set an example there. A lawyer for the driver claims that his actions were not politically motivated and that he feels remorseful. I don't think that's a good enough excuse. Record Thailand is one step closer to legalizing same sex unions. The country's cabinet approved. A bill legally recognizes same sex partnerships, giving them the right to own property together. DOPP kids and pass on inheritance. Critics point out that the bill avoids the term marriage, and that calling these unions civil partnerships still feels like a cop out. Although other see this move as an important milestone for the country and the region, if it passes through the parliament, which activists say is very likely Thailand would become the second country in Asia to recognize some form of legal equality for same sex couples last year Taiwan became the first and only country in Asia to fully legalize same sex marriage. We have another essential of the on soap opera shooting during Cova so long running soap. The the beautiful has resumed production with the standard precautions plus a few new ones. First performers are cutting down on risk by delivering lines to dolls and mannequins, instead of other performers very cool Liam Niessen let. Let a tennis ball on a string. Kill him with a lightsaber for the phantom menace, but your thing seems like a real acting challenge to and to prevent the dreaded kiss of Covid the bold and the beautiful is hiring the spouses of its lead actress to stand in as make out doubles for certain scenes as we all know getting paid to kiss, one's wife is every hubby stream. We wide can only hope to be hired for this job in some unknown future pandemic for those of us who watch passions as a soap opera. We have seen the dolls in action. They're adults that act on all the time. It doesn't seem farfetched. Well time for a key race alert on Lauren bogert Colorado Republican who beat out a five term incumbent in a congressional primary last week by loving Cunanan and being proud of it. We call that drinking the lead. Over is a far right conservative, running on her business skills, but those skills are being called into question after daily beast article revealed that her restaurant gave a lot of people gi symptoms in two thousand seventeen, after serving them tainted pork slater's glucose. That restaurant shooter's Grill is famous for its waitstaff. That carries guns in holsters. That's one way they support the second amendment. The other is forcing customers to blow huge holes in their toilets. Much like our first responders risk it all to serve our country shooter sacrifice their food service license in May by staying open state mandated closures of restaurants in another blow to over its business record. Her restaurants were apparently operating at a huge loss. Though to be fair, that could happen. Any of US decide to open a pro second amendment E. Coli, infested wingstop Beaubourg will go up against Democrat Dianne Mitch Bush in Colorado's general election men. That's just too much and those are the headlines. Before we go. If you haven't already check out our new bonus series on the vice presidential selection process, it's called. That's the ticket and it's hosted by Dan Pfeiffer and Elissa master. Monaco who've worked on the inside of this betting in decision making process in previous cycles, new episodes are out every Friday on the pod save America. Feed. Check it out. That's offered today if you'd like to show. Show me Cherie Subscribe Review Hire us to kiss are future husbands or wives until your friends listen, and if you're into reading, not just the delicious selection of poison meets shooters girl like me. What a is also nightly newsletter? Check it out and subscribe at crooked dot com slash, subscribe ign Akilah Hughes. I'm getting sick and don't drink mango nectar this weekend or ever. Your stomach is important. Take care of yourself. Take it from me. You'll never stop shaken. What are they is in media production? It's recorded and mixed by Charlotte Landis Sonia ton is our assistant producer writer is John Milstein in our senior producer is Katie Long. Our Theme Music is by Colin Gillard and CACHACA.

trump Supreme Court Oklahoma Congress United States trump Akilah CEO president Tim World Health Organization Colorado America Dr Anthony Fauci Geneva NIH Wal Mart Texas Robert Redfield director general