35 Burst results for "Director"

Philadelphia business leader optimistic about easing of Covid restrictions

KYW 24 Hour News

01:06 min | 5 hrs ago

Philadelphia business leader optimistic about easing of Covid restrictions

"City Loosen up some of its coronavirus restrictions today and killed a piece to the menace spoke to the leader of the business community in Chestnut Hill about the changes and the end. Packed on shops and restaurants. Some of the boutiques here along Germantown Avenue had to have customers waiting outside, sometimes in the cold, because only a limited number of people who were allowed in at once. Now, though, there will be less of that, since the city double the retail capacity from 10 to 20 people per 1000 square feet. Also, restaurants can have six people at a table for outdoor dining instead of four. Philip Dawson, executive director of the chest until business District says these changes send a signal that we're headed in the right direction. And the fact that these restricts Those are easing up really communicate that to the businesses and the public and is very encouraging. Hope is more people come out, still massed up, of course, because every little bit helps these small businesses, many of them have been able to modify their operations to survive to stay profitable on to keep costs under control. But just because they're surviving doesn't mean they're thriving. Looking forward. Dawson is looking for clarity on special event restrictions and how those They changed for spring and

Philip Dawson Chestnut Hill Dawson
CDC director signs off on J&J's single-shot Covid vaccine, clearing way for distribution to begin

Squawk Pod

02:06 min | 6 hrs ago

CDC director signs off on J&J's single-shot Covid vaccine, clearing way for distribution to begin

"Fda and cdc gave johnson and johnson's vaccine green light over the weekend. The company expects to provide twenty million doses by the end of this month. And it's march. I make drill joins us now with the latest on the j. and j. roll out. I make hey joe. Three point nine million doses of vaccine expected to roll out this week arriving for the first administrations. Potentially tomorrow morning on this comes after. Of course the fda gave the green light on saturday. Cdc's advisory committee met yesterday and the cdc sign-off recommending this vaccine as well. It is of course the third coronavirus vaccine to enter the market here in the us and the first that only requires one dose now of course in clinical trials It showed to be seventy two percent effective here in the us and preventing disease eighty five percent effective worldwide at preventing severe disease and in addition to being one shot. This vaccine is fridge stable. At three months you can store it at more normal temperatures. Not the ultra cold freezers that you need for pfizer or even the more normal freezers that you need for the modern vaccine. Then we've been reaching out to states and counties trying to get a sense of how they might use this vaccine differently from the other two The cdc's advisory committee did not make any specific recommendations for this vaccine versus visor and moderna but the states will make those decisions. They get allocated vaccine based on their population numbers and some of them told us because of the easier storage. It could go to places where storage is more complicated To rural areas arizona. For example telling us it plans to allocate the jj vaccine similarly to how it's allocated the maderno want areas that don't have those ultra cold storage options also settings where it's difficult to get a second dose for example washington state telling us maybe the fishing industry where a lot of folks live in congregate settings on ships for example that could be a place where they would deploy this vaccine Others from the national association for city and county health officials saying the homeless population. Where it's difficult perhaps find folks to come back for a second shot or for people who may be hesitant about the vaccine only wanna get one shot.

CDC FDA Johnson Severe Disease JOE Pfizer United States Arizona National Association For City Washington
CDC warns against complacency as virus gains stall

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 6 hrs ago

CDC warns against complacency as virus gains stall

"Virus cases are rising again and the CDC says Americans must not let their guard down as mutations keeps spreading after sharp drops over several weeks director Richelle Wilensky says average daily cases and deaths have gone up slightly the past seven days these data are evidence that our recent declines appear to be stalling and risk being lost entirely with reports of states rolling back public health restrictions at the same time she's healing the roll out of a third vaccine but White House virus response coordinator Jeff science says the issue remains actually getting the shots scheduling remains for far too many people too frustrating he says the White House is working with states to improve their systems Sager made Donnie Washington

Richelle Wilensky CDC Jeff Science White House Sager Donnie Washington
CDC chief warns against letting guard down as virus cases rise

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 8 hrs ago

CDC chief warns against letting guard down as virus cases rise

"The centers for disease control and prevention's cheap is sounding alarm amid a rise in corona virus cases cases hospitalizations and deaths are all down since January ended but we're not out of the woods CDC director Richelle Wolinsky says average daily cases and deaths have risen slightly as virus variants spread I remain deeply concerned about a potential shift and the trajectory of a pandemic and as speech rolled back measures that help the nation make ground against the pandemic please hear me clearly at this level of cases with variant spreading we stands to completely lose the harder route we have a cyber make ani Washington

Centers For Disease Control An Richelle Wolinsky Washington
Johnson & Johnson one-shot COVID vaccine rolls out in the U.S.

Democracy Now! Audio

00:48 sec | 12 hrs ago

Johnson & Johnson one-shot COVID vaccine rolls out in the U.S.

"And johnson's covid nineteen vaccine is starting to roll out across the united states after it received final approval of the centers for disease control unlike the two other approved vaccines in the us. Madeira and pfizer. Biontech johnson and johnson requires one shot and does not need to be stored in the freezer. This comes as health. Experts warn the recent decline in cases is slowing down as more states. Move to relax restrictions this is. Cdc director dr rachelle landscape. We may be done the virus but clearly the virus is not on with us. We cannot get comfortable or give in to a false sense of security that the worst of the pandemic is behind us not now not when mass vaccination that is so very

Biontech Johnson Johnson CDC Madeira Dr Rachelle United States Pfizer
Best Moments of the Golden Globes 2021

Pop Culture Happy Hour

04:06 min | 13 hrs ago

Best Moments of the Golden Globes 2021

"Think of the globes as an entertainment event that are really big. Audience still watches in part because a lot of people see it as the kickoff for oscar season. Let me just say if you're queasy about these awards being granted any weight at all you will get. I think no argument from us. That is certainly not our position so to the degree that they mean much. There certainly were some good property. Some good movies and television that were honored Start with nomad land. Which one sort of the top top movie prize. Best motion picture drama and also best director for chloe jau. We just covered this Recently on pop culture happy hour so we don't necessarily need to rehash that whole thing but we were big fans. I loved seeing khloe jowl win. Yeah yeah The top prize for a motion picture. Musical or comedy went to borat subsequent film a movie that i like to say not for linda's but i know people who who love it really love it also winning for that was sasha baron cohen who won best actor for a musical or comedy. The best actor in a drama this one delivered one of the best moments of the night for sure that award went to chadwick boseman for my rainey's black bottom boy that was that was quite a moment accepting the award on his behalf was his wife. Taylor simone lead word and look the globes are trashy and meaningless and then something real happens out of nowhere and that was a really effective speech and a really effective moment in an evening. That felt shambolic in chaotic. Otherwise something beautiful something inspiring something that would amplify that little voice inside of all of us that tells you can tell you to keep going calls you back to what you were meant to be doing. At this moment in history he would think it kind of felt similar to the moment of that whole series of heath. Ledger getting his posthumous awards for his role in dark knight and it felt really earned and it didn't phillips just because he had passed away like this was the role of a lifetime for him and i'm really glad to see him being honored in that way. Yeah it was a very very moving speech. If you didn't see it. I encourage you to seek it out. It's all over the place that award. I think was wonderful to see not too surprising. One that i think was surprising was Andrew day for the united states versus billie holiday aisha. You saw this to the surprising not too much. I think that there was a lot of buzz for her. And i think that it was more likely she was going to win award for this. Then she might be to win for an oscar if she were to get an oscar nomination but she does a really great job of sounding like billie holiday without sounding too much like her like. It's feeling like mimicry. And she is by far the best thing about the movie and we'll actually be covering it in our tomorrow so everyone can check it out fantastic. I'm extremely excited. I haven't seen it yet. In addition to that the first award of the night actually in of of presentation was daniel. Columbia for judas. The black messiah. They had a little glitch with his audio. You know they were figuring it out. We've all had that glenn said the motto of the pandemic was going to remind your muted. It was a little bit of a mom. You're muted kinda moment. But i was not surprised that he that he won that he's wonderful in that movie. I think you didn't pay on. Is this on. Is this on a cool cool. He really is. And it's a solid win. I mean like he started speaking and you heard millions of voices crying out. You're on mute. Dan mute and i think that moment should make the montage in years to come if there is still a golden globe sincere to come because who knows but like that will be the most emblematic acceptance speech of two thousand twenty one easily that will crystallize this moment in time.

Chloe Jau Khloe Jowl Sasha Baron Cohen Chadwick Boseman Taylor Simone Oscar Billie Holiday Aisha Rainey Linda Ledger Heath Phillips Billie Andrew United States Columbia Daniel Glenn Dan Mute
Golden Globe Awards: 'The Crown,' No Mad Land

Doug Stephan

00:34 sec | 14 hrs ago

Golden Globe Awards: 'The Crown,' No Mad Land

"The first awards show of the year. The Golden Globes held virtually baby sees Jason Nathan's in one film and its director broke the glass ceiling. No man On Sunday night, Nomad Land became the first film directed by a woman to win best drama The Golden Globes while director closure who's Chinese became the first woman of color to win best director and only the second woman in history to take the prize. Now this is why I fell in love with making movie. And telling stories because he gave us a chance to laugh and cry together. And he gives us a chance to learn from each other and have more compassion for each other. So thank you Know, madman streaming now. Honolulu,

Jason Nathan Golden Globes Honolulu
Golden Globes 2021: Complete list of winners and nominees

WISH TV's News 8 Daybreak

02:13 min | 15 hrs ago

Golden Globes 2021: Complete list of winners and nominees

"Globe awards The night also honor the late child. Chadwick Boseman. David Daniel has the highlights from the 78 Golden Globe Awards. Even with stupid things. Inclusivity is important. And there are no black members of the Hollywood foreign press host Tina Fey in New York and Amy Poehler in Los Angeles began the 78th Golden Globe Awards, chiding the H F P A, which promised a more inclusive future, then gave the night's first two awards to black actors Daniel Columbia for Judas in the Black Messiah and John Boyega for small acts. What are you kidding me? I think you made a mistake. No mistake. Jodie Foster won her first competitive Golden Globe and nearly 30 years. Best motion picture supporting actress for the Mauritanian. Thank you. Secrecy for making the show in Canada. Thank you. Apartment looking for seriously. Catherine O'Hara's husband, Beau Welles played her off as she accepted best actress in a TV, musical or comedy for Shits Creek, which also won best TV series, musical or comedy, also winning a pair of big awards. Nomad Land Best motion picture drama and best director for Chloe Jiao. Just the second woman to win that award. Borat. Subsequent movie film, Best Motion Picture, musical or comedy and Best actor for Sasha, Baron Cohen and the Queen's Gambit, Best TV movie or Limited Syriza and best actress in that category for Anya Taylor Joy Thank you so much. Emma Korans Wind kicked off a huge night for the crown. She Josh O'Connor and Gillian Anderson all one Golden Globes for the series, which was also named best TV series drama. I Love all of you so much, And just like Andra Day was overcome winning best actress in a motion picture drama for the United States, vs Billie Holiday, and Possibly the Night's most emotional moment came when Chadwick, Bozeman's widow accepted his award for best actor in a motion picture drama for Ma Rainey's Black bottom. She was thank God He wouldn't think his parents he would think his ancestors for their guidance in their sacrifices in Hollywood. I'm David Daniel. Had on daybreak. We are going to chat more

Golden Globe Awards David Daniel Chadwick Boseman Daniel Columbia John Boyega Beau Welles Shits Creek Amy Poehler Tina Fey Chloe Jiao Jodie Foster Catherine O'hara Baron Cohen Golden Globe Anya Taylor Emma Korans Wind Hollywood Josh O'connor Los Angeles New York
Chloé Zhao is 2nd woman to win best director prize at Globes

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:29 sec | 15 hrs ago

Chloé Zhao is 2nd woman to win best director prize at Globes

"Land has won The Golden Globe for best picture in the drama category. The film a major candidate for a best picture Oscar took home two Globes last night. Director Chloe Zhao, who is Chinese, became the first woman of color to win best director. And only the second woman in history to take that prize for everyone who has gone through this difficult and beautiful journey at some point in their lives. This is for you. We don't say goodbye, we say See you down the road.

Chloe Zhao The Golden Globe Globes Oscar
As Telecoms Spend Billions on Wireless, Where Does That Leave the Wired?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:36 min | 15 hrs ago

As Telecoms Spend Billions on Wireless, Where Does That Leave the Wired?

"Telecom. Companies are spending a lot of money on wireless infrastructure to support their five g networks last week. The fcc announced that verizon spent forty five billion dollars buying spectrum in the agency's auction at and t. spent twenty three billion but in the meantime wired broadband infrastructure is not feeling the love. At and t. Has stopped connecting new customers to its dsl network. A report last fall found that it has deployed high speed fiber to only about a third of households in its network and it's got big gaps in low income areas in many cities angeles for is the executive director of the national digital inclusion alliance. Which wrote that report we are seeing. At and t. not invest in low income neighborhoods as much as they do higher income neighborhoods and to understand that in the inner in the united states. The internet is a commodity so they're looking for highest return and you have evidence of this right. You have put out a report to this effect. That essentially overlays the fiber investment with income and. It seems pretty clear we did. Yes released a digital redlining report in two thousand seventeen where we found that the really slow old dsl tended to be in lower income neighborhoods That went against the general understanding that it was rural areas that weren't getting the investment and then more recently. We did a report with the communication workers of america where their data found that. There were Large portions of. At and t. service that wasn't being upgraded to fiber and there were no plans to upgraded to fiber right. And then how does that. Connect to what we're hearing which is. At and t.'s. Plans to stop connecting even knew dsl users in those areas that have this older infrastructure right. So at and t. is really switching to a wireless model where they are relying upon the plans for five g. and their existing wireless which in a sense is probably great but for the folks on the ground. Not so great. If your internet connection you had been relying upon a wire line connection a dsl service and it's no longer. There's not going to be an upgrade. You have no chance of getting a faster speed and your only option for. At and t.'s. To switch to their wireless wireless comes with data caps. Right right so it's a lot. More expensive to maintain a wireless connection than a wire. Line connection i mean. We're talking about eighteen t because they're the biggest in heaven. Some ways been really conspicuous about this sort of weirdly slowing infrastructure. Build out but his. At and t. Any different than other telecoms in terms of this lack of investment in widespread fiber. We're seeing is is the lack of investment in the lower income neighborhoods by. At and t. With verizon we see skipping of whole cities so so they're making they're each making their own choices as to where they go with their fiber investments and for the rest of us who end up in any of these places where those investments aren't happening. We need to say. Are we okay with that or do we need to somehow influencing either their decisions or coming up with our own solutions. We currently have proposals in congress. Right from republican members of congress that would essentially prevent me broadband that would in theory expand broadband access prevent cities from building their own so those proposals that restrict cities from building their own. Assume that the incumbents are going to distribute their fiber in a way that makes sense for everybody so but it's not equitable and so it really comes down to are we. Okay with the inequity. I met okay with the inequity right. Everybody needs access to fast broadband and it needs to be affordable and so if we have places right now it's already state laws state laws that say no no. The local communities cannot build their own infrastructure and if we do that federally than limits all those options and we as a country relate. Yes we build things ourselves and then the government's like no no no. You can't build it yourself all. That doesn't make any sense. So then let's talk about this. The wireless future the five g future. Do you think that that will benefit some of these underserved areas or might we see the exact same thing where we now have next generation networks that further entrench inequity. I think we have to assume that. Five g will bring further inequities. There's no reason to think that the current technologies aren't being ruled out equitably that the newer technologies will be rolled out equitably. We all know that we should learn from history. Learn from the best and so just changing. The technology isn't going to change the business model. The business model remains the same and currently there is just to put a fine point on it. You said this is a commodity right. There are not regulations. There's nothing to prevent. Companies from not serving specific areas broadband is very lightly regulated. So at this point in time congress and others could choose to change this at this point in time. There's nothing to keep companies from rolling out broadband infrastructure. Where they feel like they're going to get the highest return. Angeles is the executive director of the national digital inclusion alliance in a statement. At told us that quote our investment decisions are based on the capacity needs of our network and demand for our services. It said any suggestion of discrimination or redlining was wrong

National Digital Inclusion All Verizon America FCC Congress Angeles
'Nomadland,' 'Borat' win at a socially distant Golden Globes

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 16 hrs ago

'Nomadland,' 'Borat' win at a socially distant Golden Globes

"The seventy fifth golden globes were handed out last night despite being socially distanced and costly distant there was still some drama at the golden globes one of the most poignant moments was when Chadwick Boseman won for Best Actor eight months after his death from colon cancer his widow told the world what her late husband would've said after his win for monitoring these black bottom he was thank god he would bring his parents thank insistence for their guidance and their sacrifice the night's top award Best Picture went to know mad land director Chloe's all saying this award belongs to the whole no management team she's the first woman of Asian descent to win Best Director at the globes and only the second woman ever to do so I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Golden Globes Chadwick Boseman Best Actor Top Award Best Picture Colon Cancer Chloe Oscar Wells Gabriel
DPH clears up prioritzation of COVID vaccine for providers

KYW 24 Hour News

01:07 min | 1 d ago

DPH clears up prioritzation of COVID vaccine for providers

"Goal in Delaware when it comes down to vaccine distribution. K Y. W is Andrew Kramer has details on how the first state plans to pull that off. Not everyone may have easy access to these larger scale vaccination events taking place, but we must not leave these individuals behinds. So Delaware's division of Public Health has a new equity plan. DPH director Dr Cara over, Tae says that includes working closer with federally qualified health centers. These sites provide primary care and underserved areas for work. You with them to prioritize getting vaccine to them to serve not just their direct patient population, but also to start providing Maura and support for community vaccine as well. There are plans for more fixed community sites and underserved areas, which should help people with traveling issues. We also are providing and our continued expand upon rotating community sites using mobile Busses and vaccinating teams were going tol Maura of Administering Vaccine and Small Scale pop up Stop. I'll events and she says they're keeping a close eye on medical providers in underserved communities, making sure they have enough supply. Andrew Kramer, Kate What Have you news Radio Pennsylvania

Andrew Kramer Division Of Public Health Delaware Dr Cara DPH TAE Maura Kate Pennsylvania
Change In Asylum Policy Allows Some Migrants To Wait In U.S.

Weekend Edition Sunday

05:06 min | 1 d ago

Change In Asylum Policy Allows Some Migrants To Wait In U.S.

"Do you have a humane immigration policy that does not encourage illegal immigration. President Biden is grappling with just that question. Biden is already facing criticism over decisions to deport migrants and open a temporary shelter at the border as he seeks to reverse the draconian policies of his predecessor to talk more about the challenges ahead is Doris Meissner. She is a senior fellow and director at the Migration Policy Institute. Hello. Hello. The Washington Post obtained an email from immigration and Customs enforcement, saying we need to prepare for border surges. Now, what do you make of that? I mean, what do you make of reports that there will be a surge of immigrants trying to cross the border now that there's a president Biden and not a president Trump I think there's no surprise that The numbers of people coming are increasing because it is very clear that the Biden administration is committed to reversing the policies of the last administration and to making it be possible for migrants who are claiming asylum and looking for protection to actually have their cases be heard. But of course, the issue then becomes a real difficult one for managing those numbers and putting the changes in place without Getting into an emergency situation. Yeah. I mean, does this administration have sort of the tools to deal with the surge? I mean, there's already concerns about opening Temporary shelters, especially for young migrants and range migrant Children. Well, there does have to be an infrastructure at the border for processing people, and so the opening of shelters Should be seen as a positive sign because you don't want to have AH humanitarian crisis on the border where people have no place to go, which is what we did see two years ago when the Trump administration was trying to keep people out. Are you envisioning Biden going back to the very heavily criticized under trump tactic of what was called catch and release that if you had unauthorized entries, you would process the migrants and then allow them into the community with the hopes that they would show up to a court date. I mean, that was virtually stopped under President Trump has a way of Dissuading people from crossing the border. What the Biden administration is envisioning is having people be able to have their case is heard but heard promptly the difficulty with the way in which this has been handled in the past. Is that the backlogs in the immigration courts are so long that people are waiting in the country for years before their cases get hurt, And that, of course, does lead to misuse of the system. And that does invite Future migration. So what the administration needs to put in place is a system where people are able to file their claims are able to get legal representation. Get a prompt decision. Those who are eligible to stay can stay. Those who are not do need to be returned. And I think that this connects also to the Biden administration's vision of working more aggressively, much more aggressively with the countries in the region because the administration recognizes that some people are eligible for asylum. Some people are not eligible for asylum. And for those people who are not eligible for asylum, the question is returning in a humane fashion connecting people with services in their country. Those services need to be built. There needs to be much more assistance and engagement with the governments in the region to reduce corruption to reduce violence. Very Circumstances that the people are fleeing, which are always a mixture of economic circumstances, more and more possibly climate problems that have ravaged these countries. And and governance. That sounds like a lot of what President Obama did with mixed success, and President Trump actually did work closely with Mexican and Central American governments. He applied. To stick more than the carrot. He forge deals so that they could enforce their own borders and curb migration. Among other measures. There is a sense that what President Trump did actually, if your goal is to reduce migration, unauthorized crossings of the border, it worked. There's no question that what President Trump did work. The issue is at what cost at what price and that's the price that has had to do with our values as a country with our laws as a country, and so the difficulty for the Biden administration is to develop a system at the border so that these decisions can be made promptly. It's the years and years of waiting That are the ultimate breakdown in the system that needs to be solved.

Biden Administration Biden President Biden President Trump Doris Meissner Migration Policy Institute Trump Administration The Washington Post President Obama
Johnson & Johnson's Covid-19 vaccine gets emergency use authorization from FDA

Purity Products

00:27 sec | 1 d ago

Johnson & Johnson's Covid-19 vaccine gets emergency use authorization from FDA

"Virus vaccine. This one from Johnson and Johnson gets the final go ahead from the FDA. With the FDA authorization and falling review by the advisory Committee on Immunization practices and with the endorsement by the director of the CDC. This additional vaccine will soon be distributed throughout the country by our federal partners who oversee vaccine allocation and distribution. Acting FDA Commissioner Dr Janet Woodcock

FDA Johnson Advisory Committee On Immuniza CDC Dr Janet Woodcock
FDA grants emergency authorization to Johnson & Johnson vaccine

Healing Quest

00:39 sec | 1 d ago

FDA grants emergency authorization to Johnson & Johnson vaccine

"Johnson and Johnson has pledged 100 million doses of its Corona virus vaccine in the first half of the year. It says almost four million air ready to ship right now. That's after the FDA granted emergency use authorization for the Johnson and Johnson vaccine on Saturday. Dr. Dan Brooks is the director of the Center for Murali Jian. Vaccine research at Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess. This vaccine has been shown to be 100% protective again. His hospitalizations and death and 85% protective against severe disease. For all the variants worldwide that's been tested again. So far. It also requires only one dose and does not need to be stored at such a deep freeze His other

Johnson Dr. Dan Brooks Murali Jian Beth Israel Deaconess FDA Severe Disease Boston
Can you file a lawsuit if the COVID vaccine causes you harm?

The World and Everything In It

05:46 min | 1 d ago

Can you file a lawsuit if the COVID vaccine causes you harm?

"Take a moment and slowdown here. Challenging the constitutionality of a vaccine mandate is one type of legal action suing over an injury from a vaccine or an adverse effect is another type of legal action related but not the same a constitutional claim normally with a bodily injury. Person would bring a claim for damages in state court vaccine. Injuries are rare. But they do happen. The centers for disease control and prevention issue warnings about vaccines. I talked with a half dozen doctors for this story. Here is one of them. Talking about the first rotavirus vaccine to hit the market when i was in residency The rotavirus vaccine came out um which is a a virus that causes diarrhea and kids and after they released it they found that there were very small percentage of kids. Were getting Necrotizing necrotizing client s so their was getting not getting enough blood supply because of various stuff but they found it out within a very short period of time and so the vaccine was removed from the market. Gone another dr paul off. It is director of the vaccine education center at children's hospital of philadelphia. He co invented different. Rotavirus vaccine one. That's in use today. His motivation to make vaccine goes back to his childhood. He had club feet when he got an operation. Well he will always remember what he saw a polio ward. And i remember those children and traction those children in our lungs. I think it certainly drove me to pediatrics. And it drove me to child. Advocacy's bashes about childhood that become air drives as adults covid. Nineteen is a devastating virus. That is especially serious threat for a certain segment of the population. The elderly so far the covid nineteen vaccine appears to be effective vaccine of saved their lives and for the most part of saved our lives safely for the most part. Vaccines are safe but not for all vaccines help. One group of vulnerable people but could possibly harm another vulnerable group. Recent news reports have revealed that some people are reluctant to get the covid nineteen vaccines because of potential adverse reactions. A few moments ago we introduced vaccine lawyer rene gentry today. She is the director of the vaccine injury litigation clinic. She identifies some kinds of injuries. Vaccines can cause. It has everything from a nfl access to encephalopathy in death. The majority of the injuries that we see today are the shoulder injury. related vaccine administration and gambari syndrome following the flu shot. But it runs the gamut. We see immunological or injuries. We see neurological injuries occasionally cardiovascular injuries and things like that gentry represents people who have suffered an adverse effect. She says as soon as people hear that they automatically characterize her and her clients or rather mischaracterize. Once you save vaccine injury automatically characterized as anti vaccine people. Say that all the time your client back to my all. My clients got vaccinated. They're not anti backs. i like. They got back. Stated i'm on antibac- i've been vaccinated mary. You just explained that lawsuits for bodily injuries. Normally take place in state court but vaccine. Injuries are not treated that way. An individual with a vaccine injury cannot sue. The drug company for damages. Drug companies are immune from such lawsuits. You're not allowed to sue a pharmaceutical company for a vaccine injury for covid vaccine instead. Those claims use a different process. An injured person must go through the v. I c. p. the vaccine injury compensation program gentry says vaccine court as it sometimes called came about in the nineteen eighties after some children develop seizures because of the dtp shot it requires filing a petition with the united states court of federal claims. It's an actual court an actual court setting. You have a right to counsel you have the right to appeal your other evidence and things like that. If the person proves a vaccine injury they receive no fault. Compensation pay the claim without admitting blames caps on pain and suffering. And things like that. But it's full medical care for the future of past etc but only some vaccines are covered under the v. Icp covid nineteen vaccine is not one of them again gentry. The covid vaccine is considered a countermeasure and by the prep act that was established by congress in the early two thousands. She said countermeasure countermeasures program is a different plan. It limits legal liability for a product device. The government puts in place during a public health crisis. The co vaccine was put in that program instead of the vaccine program. is a much worse program. There's no right to counsel. There's no right of appeal. it's not a legal process. It's a one year statute of limitations. Is you know there's no pain and suffering. It's it's it's a terrible program. In other words. If mandates come down and someone suffers an adverse effect that person has little legal recourse if any and with the in nineteen vaccine. There are still a lot of unknowns. That has another component to mandates with so many question marks. Is there enough information. Does it offer lifelong immunity or will it be a seasonal vaccine. Will the vaccine against mutations of this virus are there long term effects of the vaccine. Who knows we're in a real time epidemiological. Study

Centers For Disease Control An Dr Paul Vaccine Education Center Children's Hospital Of Philade Rene Gentry Vaccine Injury Litigation Clin Gambari Gentry Diarrhea Polio United States Court Of Federal NFL FLU DTP Seizures Congress
Ithaca, New York, Mayor's Police Reform Plan

All Things Considered

05:06 min | 2 d ago

Ithaca, New York, Mayor's Police Reform Plan

"Going to stay on the topic of policing. As we have noted, Changing the way policing is done is hard, so we in trying to hear the experiences of people who are trying. That's what we call the mayor of Ithaca, New York, Savante Myrick. This week he announced plans to replace the city's police department with a civilian lead agency. If passed, it would be known as the Department of Community Solutions and Public Safety. The agency will include both armed and unharmed first responders who are trained to deescalate a number of situations, all of whom will report to a civilian public safety director. This proposal has been called one of the most sweeping police over halls in the country. So we've called the mayor to tell us more Mr Way. You're welcome. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for having me. I'm really thrilled to be here. So first. What can you just tell me how you started to think about this in this way? How and when. You know, starting in 2014 and culminating this summer, It was very clear that we were in a moment that was unlike any other. You know, the death of George florid triggered uprisings that were in some cases centuries in the making. So the governor issued an executive order that said Every police agency should do a deep restructuring. They should talk to the community. Gather data and figure out how best to move forward. I, um kicked off process and end of collaborating with our partners in Tompkins County. We brought in the center for police Equity, which has been wonderful partner as we analyze our data and do a landscape of view of other communities of the tactics. And it really wasn't until the end the last couple weeks of this process where we looked at all of our data, and it became clear His date with the police officers themselves are saying, Look, we're too stretched. You're asking us to do too much. You need more tools in the tool kit because you can't just call us for every problem and then get mad. When every problem isn't solved the way you want it to be. In the community was saying we don't want public safety to go away. We all want to feel safe. But we too want to see a different kind of public safety. We want to see people walking the beat again. You know, we want to see people engaging with the community and There a lot of problems we want a response for, But the presence of guns, the presence of a militarized force triggers people who are carrying past traumas was in the last couple weeks of the processes that were synthesizing all the data it became clear to me. And ended up in the report. The thing to do is to start over, but it helped me see it. So what happens every day like if you I wake up unethical, like if you had a chance to implement this. I wake up in Ithaca. What do I see? Is that do I see Offers armed individuals and around individuals walking together. Do I see how what does it look like? Yeah, all of the above. What? So what you would see is Sometimes you see the armed public safety workers, which is what we're calling them by themselves. Sometimes you see the unarmed community solutions workers by themselves on foot walking around engaging the community. Solving things that we know will never lead to an arrest and have extremely low chances of leading to violence. And sometimes you see them dispatched together, right? Somebody's barricaded in their house there in mental distress, their neighbors worried. So they called. Maybe for that we send the community solutions officers that they Start to feel on easy. They think they may need some armed backup. We can dispatch both together. So So what you're seeing is actually is more tools in your toolkit. Their proposal has its critics. I mean, the police chief called the draft called the Draft radical. The president of the Ithaca Police Benevolent Association. The P B A. The union said he was deeply concerned by the proposal. The Ethical Police chief statement said that he agrees that police shouldn't respond. Every crisis. But he I think is concerned about you know, losing resource is so so, What do you say it and I'm guessing some of the public might be too. So what do you say to that? I understand I truly do were officers were coming from because this is not just a career for many of them, and it's not just a job. It's an identity. And any deep structural change like this might threaten their identity. And that's why you're here inside the same statements, they say. Now we understand that things aren't going well. Morale inside the department is low trust from the community is a slow it's it's ever been. We've watched the uprisings. We understand that we need real change. And then when real change is presented to go well, do we really have to have real change? It is a tourism in local government. That the only thing people hate more than the status quo. Is change and that managing that change. It's just gotta be necessary, and I think you know the governor's executive order and what we put it. The center of our effort is that we have to have a collaborative process. The police were invited to provide a ton of input and a ton of their input did make it into the report and the 19 recommendations that are in that report.

Savante Myrick Department Of Community Soluti Mr Way Center For Police Equity Ithaca Tompkins County Ithaca Police Benevolent Assoc New York Ethical Police George
"director" Discussed on Sup Doc: A Documentary Podcast

Sup Doc: A Documentary Podcast

03:58 min | 2 months ago

"director" Discussed on Sup Doc: A Documentary Podcast

"I am paco. Romane george chan. You're listening to sub dock and we're doing a special clip show today we're going to play some interviews from directors because i you know if you follow the show the whole time you'll know that we usually were just comedians and we talked to our friends and sometimes we actually talked to real hardcore film directors like award winning folks that have really been in the trenches so we got different sides. We want to show you for our show. Yeah that's right. I mean we've we set out just basically to communities wanting to talk to comedians in them five and a half years later we've talked to people who have been on tv journalists other host of other podcasts and some of our favorite documentary Talks we've had is with the actual filmmakers of those documentaries. We're talking about and that is what today is all about so george. Why don't you set up the first clip. Yeah this is a film that actually i. I was lucky enough to get a really early screening Right before this showed at sundance. I think it's basically the same cut that was shown at sundance and this is feels good. Man which is independently produced independently released. They did not get picked up by one of the bigger probably because the topic is about pepe the frog so you can imagine like the billboards. No net didn't want to like have a giant pepe. The frog billboard on sunset arthur jones and georgia angelini. Were gracious enough to come over to my house and talk to me Yeah we talked to them after sundance happened but before the film was widely available so this is actually very early on it. You can get it anywhere now. You can rent it. Buy it on itunes and other places but yeah feels good man. It's the story of matt. Furey and this is more of a chat where we kind of talked about the entire process that arthur first time director arthur and giorgio. The producer went through to make feels good man. Were you doing this between doing. Paid work essentially or kind of like to keep this going for the last few years. Yeah yes i mean. We both on an obvious question. But i don't know how many of our listeners are actually filmmakers themselves. But i know this is like a. It's a different system than like pitching fiction film type situation. Especially if you're new to it you know no one wants to give you money until you've already made the money for sure. That's just the reality of the business. Yeah the first year in particular like yeah. No i worked really hard. I know we both did on a lot of different projects. And the maybe the last nine months a year we were able to work on the film full-time which was an amazing thing We found great partners a wavelength productions and the chicago media project to come in and help us but yeah the first year and a half. We were just bootstrapping it ourselves. Or they're gr- i think With some types of documentaries maybe grants you or we applied. We're also talk about the nazi frog. That i think was i think. Yeah you boil down the problem with the film. Initially when they heard about it. Yeah that's the thing is like in your head you're filmmaker and you're like know what it's gonna feel like the final product is so hard to render that in other people's minds and like in a substantive way until you actually finish the film so we were kind of up against the fact that we didn't really have much of a track record to prove like just trust us so this really potentially toxic film and then what's been so rewarding now that we've kind of started to screen publicly and the people have started to respond. It's like oh had no idea about matt's life and this is such a surprisingly heartwarming story..

Romane george chan angelini arthur jones arthur Furey giorgio george georgia matt chicago
"director" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

07:37 min | 6 months ago

"director" Discussed on Toure Show

"This kept got involved, but it won't be. It's got the viable what was going on? Any. He I think he's a limited. So while from me nine this out. So Great. You know we had a chance to your saying seafood. So we sees other passing sometime we never got a chance to work together. You know on the space light in a space like this. It was just such a blessing on the come down rocking me. Did in terms of working with him. Did he he took the pipe but did he do anything? That made you go. Oh Wow. This is a whole other level of master actor I'm talking to right here I'm working with right here. Yeah. Of course I was like you. You ever watch the chess player always giving his Sunday Vice. Way doesn't. You know. Even. Even. His is even if you notice, he puts a little trio voice every once in a while. That's still doing his own inflection best him. Capturing. With the charting is a guy who lives in a shot. Near the swamp. For crawfish. But yet a father. Son. You black on the lower knife with respect. And his son. Charles y'all. That's not an excuse to their. No, it's not an excuse not. But he says in a way. That idiom they understand that sometimes. Like. These the cause to be dealt guests, you gotta overcome it. You gotTA, overcome it, but accept that I. In dead overcome it don't be blind to it. Terrence Howard is in this picture and he's one of my favorite actors out you know and just he has this bite. He radiates he's one of these master actors talk about working with Terrence Howard. Yeah I mean yeah. I mean he's he's he has so many elements of. Art and personality you know musician. I chance met each other. One day was at the grammys. And they set not such a sat me beside him. I guess it was also a flow year. Right At with. Each Other. Respect each other's land we started talking about some of the performances laughing and we of became cool. You know. And you get a chance for him to trump. and. If it's art, this film was such a the on of a stage and I would say that once again he's another guy. WHO's prepared? He don't do nothing. Without understanding the reason in fact, there was a part where he was like what along this? Why am I? Why would I say that? I said no thank you will say not. See Wow was it. I may assess I say I don't. I don't Understa I said let me tell you why. Why thank you say that? If you look at your challenge. I gave him some backdrop and think about the China got day. That's not on the page. Right? Is that He he's he's a contradiction of themselves. Yet, he's a belief of itself. So I made by that is like a preacher. Preaching all the world's for banging all the people in Church. Desolate Saudi I I felt that his child the was in an internally. and. In. He wants. He got that he just eat as Lebanon so well, you ever. Watch that scene again when he comes on the screen, a Saas talking about his history any. Any walks and you see you see ways all today as wide reaching is something really mad about that. Why with Ti as another major part of this movie? I thought is, why did you decide or why did anyone decide to change the look of his face What? What was that about? Well that was written screenplay. So you know. I honestly I'm with you I honestly always and I got. Out to about twelve directors have I ended up when it got to win the shit. I ended up winning it and Method land played that fine. I thought mess will come in and just be this big. Who Just ripped this thing up? You know many immeasurably that. As an actor right now he's not looking for bad walls nothing for good goodwill's I saw. Can I spent a? I needed somebody to play the role. I didn't know who I was GonNa get and then when my agent Chairman Mitchell say yo already is interested. What does he wants to get up? You know girls love Ti Yo, and to disfigure herself. On. Means Saulius? Acting moves. And it was written and he came in. And focus slated. To to be honest with you. Ask a question, but I was GONNA, say. When we when we did the first two season Cut. The half of the crew. Especially, the DP. This, fucking guys amazing. Because you you. You read it you. WanNa be. I haven't seen deliver that kind of subtle was. Some of his road, another minute anthrax comedic timing, shock right? Agitate not is going to have your ass lapping fucking eating your popcorn, but he did it. In this spill. Is Danger. In the weight of his position is older his voice in all his act and I was very. Who kind of shocked me? See. Shop. Well now, I didn't know that you had to really kind of fight impolitic politics and win this job. So just to explain to me a little bit of that process in how it is, you came out on top in one the job in this case. That goes with. That you don't write yourself if you don't write it a so writer who wrote that. These. Rock I didn't write that Song Lionsgate own bathroom. It was their screenplay. They had a writer and so that in the Ryan was in different directives, knock came in read it came in pitch but I thought. And I went home and then. Say. Okay when they ended on. You. So. That's the process like if you write yourself is different now the I wrote it. In opt myself as the director. When a writer rice a screen play. You know they have a voice and who's GonNa be director the agency you know there's a lot of moving parts and so. What I think You know I wasn't opposed guy with the screen play even without even with a announcing I was GONNA do it out if you other people that I was yeah, I was up for that. Megan about that or whatever. Would were the right. Give me octane was. The released was not just A. was like even if you took Katrina out.

writer Terrence Howard director Lionsgate Charles TA Megan Chairman Mitchell Katrina Lebanon trump. China Ryan
"director" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

01:51 min | 6 months ago

"director" Discussed on Toure Show

"But look delegate. You know because of an actor has made his mind about something he may not understand what you're trying to get out of them. and. So you gotTa have a memory bank in emotional memory bank to know off chop if there is a Place in accomplish what discarded leads to be with the river does is he goes and he was so you the Congress. Can you talk about how your acting career has helped you? In your directing career. Guess. Both of all I've been blessed to work with some of the best directors in the world. So I'm not on I mean I've done some? You know some some you know independent films, things of that nature. And even those films I've been blessed blessed to have a great. You know just repertoire of opportunities. And I never take opportunity for granted. So you see a guy like me I'm working with Scott was probably one of the most sensual intelligent directors. He has called multi efficient. Working with a guy like. One of the most innovative. Two Time Oscar winning writer director. Okay who has? Who has a encyclopedia of film in His head? On working with guys like John Woo Master of Action Ninety Cinema who who films inspired. Hollywood to be what it is. Never, seen to guns out like that until John who did the baby? Of The chance to work with comedic timing actors like Judd Apple. So I was blessed you know Jim Jarmusch Lagos dog. You know. So I was blessed to have. Great Directors. Directly..

John Woo Scott Jim Jarmusch Congress Judd Apple Oscar Hollywood writer director
"director" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

01:38 min | 6 months ago

"director" Discussed on Toure Show

"Technical. On the guy that you know when we used to put the headphones inside the mixture to make might. Speakers bust. We put tape on the speaker get a magnet something out used to take the speaker out of TV sets. Get wired it does put them in a box and make. You make your music. So attended co- quality of life. HAS BEEN FODDER NINE NATURAL As a musician as a hip hop artist and then when I realized what film was. I take the time to study it. And I mean by studying studying from every angle from would've EP needs to do with a PD needs to do with a group A gaffer. I you know I tom with some great teachers talk into gaps in grips at at at at and at and production designers. A directors in all these departments that it takes to make. You Know How many masters orders? and. By doing that, I'm able to understand the language and for me, this is like the best expression of art could be doing today. I always I'm always curious. Between takes go over to the actor and you tell them something. Would and that interaction is Perhaps. The center of what director does, What Is Your Style on coaching? The actors in between takes like how do you do it? Well. It depends on what we're looking.

director
"director" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

02:10 min | 6 months ago

"director" Discussed on Toure Show

"Take it. Over there. But that's are you know in some art you read about giants. Jacket, the base is about. Our Selassie shrinks out and go down the rabbit all it's all art. Directing is. Different sides of your brain because you've got to have that are part that left brain where you're telling a story and working with creative artists. The actors and then all the technical stuff with the the lighting the cinematography and. I'm always impressed at how directors can deal with both sides of those. Is there one side? That comes easier to you or guest like just what is the biggest challenge for you in directing a film like this? I mean the biggest challenge I think it's I. The biggest challenge is getting done I drink it a green light. You know film has to be the most expensive expressing of art ever I mean to make an album. Maybe what you know in a good old days, they'll get a million dollar buddy you know. Whatever you know to paint or you need his campus in some pain. The player, Song, you can just really get a good song. You can make a song you know to make a movie. Jay? That's the most expensive form of art. And this particular chase an average case you know a movie cost you two thousand dollars a day. Okay and. So that's the biggest challenges to get the industry and your peers in the in the executives who give you a chance to. Play with that type of. Economic. Slump in gathering all these people, there's a lot of people to make ourselves to get everybody to come on board focus into a laser beam focused is save you wanna tell. That's the most challenging part once you get that. For me. Everything goes spores right in my own Tibia. I'm actually. I'm very.

Selassie Jay
"director" Discussed on Page To Stage

Page To Stage

03:53 min | 8 months ago

"director" Discussed on Page To Stage

"She's fine right now but it's on our mind that tried to keep her as far away from this as possible in terms it isn't so like that's that's in the air also. So it really. That's a challenge but I have found it to be a real reprieve. If I can just schedule in certain amount of writing time because I, you know we're all fighting to keep. The arts going in our country because we know that when we come out of this, not all arts organizations will survive. There's no way right there and there it's just a matter of like how significantly our field will be reduced coming out of it that that is really the only question at this point, and so you you add all that in and you realize like everyone's fighting to keep the arts going. But no one is really making arts or those that work in arts organizations are often not making art you know, and so it's like Oh. That's right. We were artists saying. That's why we kind of got into this the first place. So for me, it's just been helpful to spend even if it's just one hour each day. working on it, and sometimes an hour on a play. Just you end up deleting the pager to that you had written a day or two before you know rewriting is writing and so that's what it is but I think for me, it's just it's just reminded me of. Why we got into this and what is powerful about it in what could do You know I think a lot of us are. Artists and we learned to be administrators because that was the best way to be able to make sure that we could make art or to make. One of the great things about being an artistic director is not making plays but making the work of other artists possible right like that. You believe in giving them opportunities and letting them run with it and so. We don't get to do that right now either you know we talk about cash flow..

director
UK's Digital Economy: The Future of Payments

The Economist Intelligence Unit: Digital Economy

02:30 min | 1 year ago

UK's Digital Economy: The Future of Payments

"K. Is a country that is adopted many payments innovations faster than most and it has risen to the challenge set by the European Union's Second Payment Services Directive which requires banks to open up their payments infrastructure. The resulting open banking promises to unleash even greater innovation by reducing the barriers of entry to the payment services market the UK's experience therefore is likely to foreshadow the evolution of payment systems around the world. My guests this month are Adrian. Buckle head of research portrayed dissociation. Uk Finance Steve Everett Managing Director of payments for global transaction banking Lloyds Banking Group and Fiona Roach Canning Co founder of UK based Fintech pollinate. I started our conversation by asking Adrian. What explains the apparent outbursts of innovation around payments in recent history? That hasn't been a lot of innovation. I'm payments in recent years. Although I think the changes in consumer behavior the patterns of payments that we've been seeing over the last five years probably driven more by innovations. That happened in the five years before that because people are very much creatures of habit when it comes to the way that they pay for things. It takes a lot for people to decide to change the way they pay and slow for example. The things that we've been seeing really growing over the last five years one of the key examples would be contactless payments and that has really exploded since about two thousand fifteen but actually the first contact and contactless cards were introduced in two thousand seven. So it's taken a long time for consumers to come round to the idea of contactless cards and then really take them and use them in a huge way such that by twenty eighteen. I think one in five payments made by consumers were made using contactless cards so we have seen some real innovations and real changes some of that due to changes in technology so for example contactless technology coming in but also mobile devices. And the fact that we're now all essentially carrying a mini computer around the time which gives us access to a huge amount of data and huge mountain information but also regulatory changes which have opened up the information that banks provide access to in the ways in which we can interact with all banks and those are going to provide changes that perhaps haven't had an impact on consumer behavior in recent years but are likely to be really key defining factors in the way that we pay for things over the next five or ten years

Steve Everett Fiona Roach Canning Co Fintech UK Adrian Lloyds Banking Group European Union Buckle
"director" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"director" Discussed on The Signal

"Dan would you mind terribly? Introducing yourself for his full name and title. So I'm Dan I'm investigative reporter at the ABC. So this is a story that Dan is down to the Weekly Investigative Audio Program Background Briefing. And it's been literally years in the making it's about dummy directors which is the actual terminology by the white so no slurred. Yes so these are. The people left legally responsible for the debt of a company wants. That company has folded and the catch. He is that they either didn't know they were direct up or they didn't understand what they were getting themselves into. That might be because they were homeless or mentally ill or elderly. Or in Jamie's case dealing with substance abuse problems Giannis a very Complex character is deeply suspicious. Deeply Paranoids It took a think quest two years. He came to agree to make me. We Rolling Yes we are rolling Couple we just get your name. And if that's not gain nine Jamie Cox. You're pretty hot man to fun. Johnny reasons of this war. Would I want to be fan yet? Vetting vice he was living in a caravan in the Bush And he moved out there as he explained to us. He moved out to these caravan because he didn't want to be found because he was so paranoid about his involvement in this game he set up as he told us he set up some trip wise with gunpowder and some buckets of rocks and other things around the caravan side that he he would know when people were approaching and he'd be out of getaway we'll get into the bush and watching them without their knowing that is extremely paranoid and you have to wonder. I guess what makes a person like that? How did all this stop for him? Well he he was as he freely admits he was struggling with drug and alcohol abuse and he worked in. The trucking industry was a truck driver. And it was a fella truckdrivers. Someone would he'd worked with etta trucking company whose facilities sort of interest in this and have that conversation. What was the bitch? Yeah I was pretty simple. It was a few hundred bucks main And for a main sort of Jamie circumstances as he said to us. It's like a million dollars when you've got the sheriff on your back and your courage Jew and debt collectors chasing you. Four hundred bucks is a pretty decent. Some go need help. Run run the joint Get a job ever Blah Blah Blah. When he signed up to do you have any understanding of what he was signing what he was getting in getting himself involved in on what. The responsibilities were pace as definitely not inclined to believe. You might think that. Hey like others. We spoke to really had any conception of what would come said. What was it understanding? It's a good question. I think to human to others that we've spoken to. It was just. They didn't think beyond putting Pace Viper and what was that first company that he ended up signed signed up to it was a company called Chew. Bt Bulk Transport so it was ostensibly a trucking company. What came next was just the one company with a mall. Well as Jamie tells it he he signed up for one company and then over time Lettuce started arriving which indicates he was infected. Director of a number of other companies stuck his world. Wars in the pressure's gone law. Indict much the word that Eloi Nasons not Roy went over the second and third company? Coming in on things on sort of words and decide Buddy Roy on us. We opened them up from full time. Job Nixon I got knowing and Guy Freedom quite often dame point why the hell and who's been signing for I say these forgery invo heavy responsible for other companies had been responsible if audience on anything. Did you ever have any experience before being director of a company or Hell APPLEFORD system works no not run as Providence? Lumo and Shit like that when in company. They'll just call him. Mike money a not now the on you about transport is Jordan tracks lying tracks so nat lives with the forklifts gay as for the other side of it. Nobody already I guess at first blush like Kay. What's the problem with being a company direct What kind of companies these though? What kind of state are they in? So most of the companies that I've identified as being suppose involved the company's Piper basically just on pipe did that I have any physical presence. A lot of them were addressed to particular addresses which is where the people who signed up as company directors. Were leaving at the time. There's a few places that have been described to me as Halfway houses boarding houses There was one guy. Who's the director of six or seven companies in the address on the acid records? Fahim was the Salvation Army homeless hostel So they didn't they didn't exist in any real since They were show companies. Was that debt involved with any of these companies. A lot of these companies the majority of them went into liquidation owing anything from a few thousand dollars up to a million or million and a half. So yes they they. The vast majority of did have attached to them when they went on. So what were the consequences for Jamie? I mean there's lettuce showing up shore. What does that mean? Well it means that Hayes on on the hook for the debts that were incurred by those companies when he was the director of them. So when you say that Johnny was on the hook for this dead what what is the like. What'S THE WORST CASE SCENARIO? Here like his. Hey could he go to prison like what is? Where does that Roy go? Well if if you leave Johnny one second and you look at another campus new interview for the story Jackson. He was my bankrupt by the Texas Because he was had been saint. Lettuce sign you. I will this money as you in your role as records company. And then they bankrupted he also another dummy director for a free fury he was also bankrupted by the Texas and a third another dummy directory expected Lisa Baker. She received letters saying containing fines and as she told us that. You know some of those phones. well sorry potentially trek up to a couple of years in prison. Some of the things that she was being sent letters. I what did all those people who you found who'd been targeted in this way to be dummy direct as having common they were certainly What you would describe as paper from the margins of society. The drug uses the homeless alcoholics. Don employed Pretty much anybody who would be happy to take a few hundred dollars for for pregnant. I'm on a PACER.

Jamie Cox Director director Johnny Buddy Roy Dan I etta trucking company Bush ABC investigative reporter Texas Bt Bulk Transport Halfway Lettuce Salvation Army Chew Providence Don Lumo Eloi Nasons
"director" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"director" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Director and the influenza division director for the CDC centers for disease control and prevention it runs about an hour and a half committee chair is Democrat it beneath Johnson of Texas this hearing will come to order and without objection the chair is authorized to clean a recess at any time let me say good morning and welcome to our witnesses of today's hearing on vaccine science and innovation small pox once played the world's population killing approximately three hundred million people in the twentieth century alone smallpox is the only human disease to be eradicated thanks to the relevant of the vaccine another devastating disease polio had just thirty three cases reported worldwide in twenty eighteen compared to three hundred fifty thousand cases in nineteen eighty eight every day vaccines are saving lives the specialize of children and other vulnerable populations there's no such thing is healthy skepticism when it comes to vaccines unfortunately there is a well funded this information campaign targeting the public and weakening public health laws vaccination requirements have been commonplace in the US the generations and exemptions were granted only for legitimate medical reasons however in my home state of Texas the number of unvaccinated children his spikes since twenty two thousand three when the Texas legislature expanding the exemptions to include non medical reasons the number of exemptions rolls from two thousand in the year of twenty third two thousand three the fifty seven thousand last year we're seeing this three played across the country an innocent children of falling ill health officials have confirmed twenty one measles cases in Texas this year and twelve hundred the sixty one and nationwide sixty one of which lead to serious complications as the first nurse elected to Congress I have been dedicated to the improvement of public health my entire career the science committee may not have jurisdiction of the health and human service agencies but we have long had a role in supporting improved public health through good science this morning we will explore the science and innovation challenges for vaccine development through the lens of influenza for the hilt is among us the flu just lays out for several the flu just lays us out for several days with no lasting sad if it's hot for the very young the elderly pregnant women and other vulnerable groups the flu can be deadly the centers for disease control recorded an estimated four forty eight point eight million illnesses and seventy nine thousand deaths during the twenty seventeen twenty eighteen flu season approximately six hundred of those deaths which children each year influenza vaccine production begins with the collection analysis of data many months before the beginning of the flu season the challenge with influenza is that the virus is change constantly and by the time the flu season begins the vaccine may not fully met the circulating viruses scientists are working to develop viable and more effective alternatives to the color current eight a basic vaccines as well as a universal vaccine they will not require annual updates yet another scientific chalice been fluency and many other infectious diseases in Italian complete diseases is incomplete data an antiquated data systems through modernization of data systems and data analytics tools across the federal and state levels we will be able to accelerate vaccine research and development for many diseases we have two expert panels that will help us understand the full cycle from basic research the vaccine development production and deployment and surveillance the witnesses will also describe the role of federal agencies state agencies and the private sector including the partnerships among all stakeholders I want to expand my warm welcome to all of you this morning and I want to thank the vice chair got the better of for his leadership on this issue I look forward to today's discussion I might say that I have a mark up in another committee so I will have to leave before we get through all of the deliberations the chair now recognizes Mr Lucas for an opening statement good morning Cheryl Johnson I would like to thank you and vice chairman Vera for holding this hearing especially given that we are in the middle of flu season in the United States nearly a million individuals are hospitalized for the flu every year including more than forty eight thousand children in Oklahoma since the nineteen for the twenty nineteen flu season began on September one who's been at least one death and seventy three hospitals rations from the flu however these numbers would be far worse if we did not have vaccines vaccination is by far the most the best flu prevention measure we can have today it's easy to forget the little over a hundred years ago the world faced one of the deadliest pandemics in history the nineteen eighteen H. one in one epidemic also known as Spanish flu it killed an estimated fifty million people worldwide including roughly six hundred and seventy five thousand people United States medical technology and countermeasures at the time were limited the isolation and quarantine influenza vaccines did not exist and I antibiotics had not been fully developed yet thankfully due to basic research advancements were made both in treatment and prevention the flu the development of vaccines is placed played an important role in reducing and eliminating deadly disease I can still recall my father stories about how late summer and fall were terrifying time as a child because of the threat of polio during those seasons lucky for me I do not have did not have to experience this fear because of the first polio vaccine being available the United States in nineteen fifty five and thanks to widespread vaccination polio it's been nearly eradicated the United States just thirty three cases reported in twenty eighteen however polio remains a threat in some countries with the world becoming more connected through modern transportation it only takes one traveler with polio to bring the disease in the United States and as I'm.

Director division director CDC hundred years
"director" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"director" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"Danny alpha on my hand in hand like uh-huh kumbum didn't they didn't i loved going anyway. Where are you going to say more about not really really. I mean pretty much. I like tim burton but things have changed and i'm not as infatuated as once i was the thing that's that's cool with him. I think is that like even though i think it's a far cry from what his original works were. It's like he's still get to work and i still think he has a knack for holding adding onto a genre that is his is allowed like like it is in a sense not to work kind of thing where it's like. He does a gothic dark comedy stuff. It's like but it's also like versus is how fincher does dark comedy versus cohen brothers dark comedy. It's a fincher burns stamp on it for sure yeah like that. You can't really i don't know if there's any other the director right now that can replicate his aesthetic. You know what i mean like. No there's a lot of people like if you took a cohen film and offender film made them my closer together like they kind of look the same but but there's no way in hell that a timber and film will look like another filth which next to it this is just a tiny little shoutout to nerd on update. We had a question for mitchell g about why make anything when everyone's already made stuff that is a great point to tie into it of like. Everyone has their own stamp on something. Go listen to that episode targeted in-depth whatever yeah yeah between all in mine. Mine's a little nicer well. Yes i agree with that will be based on science the warriors second boy john carpenter charlotte anthony seeps caves crusaders long bomb john. John carpenter is famous for me. You've heard me talk a lot about one of his films. Specifically podcast is a fucking thing is just thing is but he's also famous for things is like a halloween escape from new york the fog christine <hes> they live memoirs of invisible man the in the mouth of madness <hes> <hes> so he's got a big list of words and most of them he actually writes himself and also does the soundtrack for wow so he's kind of this renaissance man <hes> <hes> and he's highly into practical effects which for me is a golden ticket to me like you're seriously like i i really respect respect people who of course at the time they had to but they're also on the verge of switching to digital effects and he's still chose to stay away from it for me. This guy is a master of suspense <hes> i i think there's very few directors who can so so well tie a story together and make you feel like you can't breathe for two hours the way john carpenter can and you can watch his growth which is really nice from from halloween to things like the thing and they live and all his films have sort of a purposeful campinas to it that i really enjoy. It's not too much but it's enough to know that you can see where he started right. You can see that like when they made halloween. There's no budget and he just had a story and so he he wrote it. He directed it and he wrote the soundtrack himself and shot it out here so like i really respect over the last couple years. Tom and i have discussed disgust and he's seen my growth. Tom specifically in my trust and horror film directors and because a lot of the time they are they start in this place where like horror doesn't didn't get a budget..

John carpenter fincher kumbum tim burton cohen Danny alpha Tom director mitchell new york two hours
"director" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"director" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"See it but it's like there's there's just different shades of it and there's a picture of it and i wait. It's not true. It's the more you well. How do i know this. It's not as many as the mantis shrimp. Is anyone anything about women when you're kidding. That's where we have heard on. Thank you <hes> <hes> but yeah so. I think it's important to talk about director specifically. It's not writers or producers or you can have those episodes too but we will have those episodes yeah i. I like in myself as director <hes> i've written myself as a writer director <hes> and to me what that means like. I can write my own scripts and i want it done in a certain way and i have a certain style that i wanna i do. I wouldn't call myself an outdoor. I haven't made that many films to create my own fee matic sense of meaning or also. There's things i want and things i wanna have in all the things i do but <hes> <hes> to be considered. Not tour is a high claim high critical acclaim from a lot of people and a lot of people tend to want to do that but it's also like risk right so like if i wanted all eat to like write the story for it and i told him no. I'm not going to have this in my film then again it could be. I'm an asshole but and not collaborative right but then it's kind of like the pristine and procedural but <hes> what i was saying with directors while we're talking about today they do at the end of they have to make a lot of decisions and they do the director you know. The word were changes from theater to tv. Two film director means such a different thing in t._v. World than dozen theater and film and at some point there is a level of decision making <hes>. There's some level of collaboration but at the end of the day it's weird because they get a lot of the credit. Versus like writers are not a highly hollywood. They wanna sleep with the writer only in california -cation but that's the only time they sleep stars. They want to see what the producers well blah <hes> <hes> but the thing i've always noticed with directors anyways is the fact that they they're kind of seen as that visionary right to like their vision is the film becomes whether it's through their words or not if it's through their own words then it's almost as if it's sort of like these have the formality of writing and it's all in their head if the if you give him a camera amarna crew they could just shoot it. You know but it's like you gotta write it down. You got to do the formal process whatever the ship yeah and so when you're when you're with a different writer the incidents have to collaborate. There's always going to be like some of compromise somewhere where you were you. Can you might that's where you might lose some of that the funny thing that i want to kind of if <hes> take note of after losing this episode is we'll look at how many press tours that the actors go onto for blockbusters and then how much they do for artisan films because most of the time the artisan films are the ones that the directors are doing the press tours versus the actors the actors will do the big blockbusters because those seats seat sellers directors seat sellers. Let's for the artisan films..

director writer mantis t._v california
"director" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"director" Discussed on WDRC

"Director that song i oh vdi thank goodness you me nine.

Director
"director" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"director" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"Give different and i'm just wondering why of stealing intimidating thing also very hardly keep how do you keep the consistent tone well i think there's really no other way to do it right because they need time to prep beforehand and then to shoot that assode and then to edit afterwards so essentially you couldn't have a director go continuously for thirteen or over many episodes although the right exactly that's what you have direct producer who can oversee the whole thing although they do seem to occasionally some of these shows now have somebody direct ten episodes which seems incredible what does that person do prep all ten episodes head of time what happens is now they're all written then they're all shot then they're all added in other words you're not adding in the same place but i will say that on west wing we actually ended up in the third year we brought in two other people i brought to other people who co ps to direct along with me so that those three of us directing that show because it's a pretty high you know sort of we didn't always be able to get paris who got nominated for every episode he ever did but and actually that was it's really the actors more than anything i mean for me it's the actors i think feel so comfortable with the people that they already know instead of somebody coming in and as an episode of director you have a very short window of time to get the crew and the actors to believe in you that you in fact are the captain of that particular ship and that particular stuff yeah on nypd blue which we did before this obviously you've heard of david milton david melts would write scripts.

director producer west wing paris david milton david milton
"director" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"director" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"Look i think every i think the greatest opportunity for someone to learn how to direct is to be on television show is just an incredible gift to those who have an enormous desire to do that because it school right in front of you and you can you know you can take advantage of that and really taking advantage and those that do it they make end that being wonderful directors dp's actors what it should never be from my point of view is a perk it shouldn't be got them on the show i think i mean maybe it'd be fun to direct and then never wanted to reckon after that i think it what it does is it dilutes the craft that i believe so strongly and so i think it's something whereas you look at math matthew rhesus episodes on the american that's a real director that's a real director and i can't wait for him to finish the show so that i could hire him to direct something because he's really really good and so i think that's the most for me the most important thing i will also say as director the best actor to ever work with is the actor that just directed their first episode of television because they are the most accommodating human being on the planet but that only lasts for one or maybe two at the hey maybe one last question right here don't care about disturb you strange that tees.

director
"director" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"director" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"Wondering about this and i'd be interested in your perspective that these tone meetings which jolson gone so long they're like important but unbearable at same time and i finally near five i asked are producing director chris long how he actually utilizes all that stuff that comes out and i'd be interested if it's the same for you or totally different he said well i take in everything you say and then i put in the back of my head and when i'm on set if something's happening that totally contradicts it then it comes into the front of my mind so i can say oh that's kind of not what they wanted but otherwise it's sort of sitting there in the back which made sense to me can you talk just a little bit about what tone meeting is and you have seen through the script scene by scene and we talk about often even line by line just what we were thinking what our intention was what we want to get across with that well it's interesting because for me the americans is very different experience than basically what i've been doing for the last fifteen years the american is the only show that i have an executive produced in fifteen years and and working on it and it has been an absolute joy an absolute joy on many levels but so it's you know have to put on a different hat most of the shows that i've worked on as being a producer director executive producer on that show it is an incredibly collaborative process and specifically if it i mean dave and i are working together on snowfall and and in fact i didn't direct on snowfall i just came in and executive produced and worked with dave and we ran that show together and trying to figure out the best way to sort of move these very very ambitious television shows and so for me it's just the more there is a sense of collaboration between those entities right away so whether it's the director working with the writers of that episode and part of it is i think chris makes a good point do you know i have to say it's pretty deeply stored with me because at that moment all i wanna do is take ownership i mean i think my job as director is to take ownership my job is no longer too.

executive executive producer dave director jolson producing director chris long producer fifteen years
"director" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"director" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"This is like starting to lose people also a lot of our listeners our young upandcoming directors what what would you advise at young you know or any director to do if they are starting to feel like they're losing their their cruel little bit what what are some tactics firkh for reining in all back in getting the confidence back up as if he were being wake in the director do like from the perspective to de it he ravages the rest of the crew i mean it's hard because lowbudget because we have the capability of making films at such a low budget it means that people who might not be ready to direct the film gets direct to film in and so a lot of i worked with a lot of first time directors and a lot of my job is to leg helped them and like bringing them to get their power back but sometimes the power is not always there so it is about empowering them it is about leg bring them back and i think when director start to lose the crew you know yeah like taking a step back even like taking a half day off and just kind of like reorienting or something or like doing something blake build group morale up again because making films as hard and there's a lot of sensitive emotional people on said as there should be but like feelings are involve sinoe you just have to lake knowhow to kind of right the ship when it's going off course and it is tricky because you know it can original form from an actor that the they've been cast and then you find out it's a miscast what do you do with an actor that doesn't perform that over acts that you know that's a that's a very hard situation to begin because the script this written especially in feature films.

director
"director" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"director" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"So long for a director in our minds but every directing collaboration ndp collaboration is kind of unique in its own way and for me i think what i really love in a director is somebody who can get the whole team on board behind their singular vision you know when i when i am asked to do things that are uh kind of beyond my capabilities in terms of timer equipment or um sort of they want something that looks higher budget than it is whatever it is if if i feel like i'm in good hands with their vision i feel like if the crew feels like they're in good hands with their vision than everybody's working towards the same goal i think it's it's easier said than done to kind of get everybody marching in the same direction on a film set and dumb to me a good director is somebody who's got a vision doesn't have to be visual but it has to be some sort of direction that we're all moon moving towards and i really look for that and a collaboration i totally agree just completely nail those yes thing that i'm kind of stands out to me in terms of looking back in terms of the films that i shot and the experiences that i had with directors there are some really some circumstances where you working really really hard and everybody thinks that they are on the same path and then you feel all of the sudden lack of respect that just starts happening it starts happening with the crew all of a sudden there is a judgment that is present and we are not making the days and all of a sudden there's is wavering on the director on it and it affects the entire mood and when this respect for the director drops than you know you're in trouble and you know i i always look out for that lake water is happening here what's the pulse overall you know where is the expectation are we really as you said all going in on along the same path and working for the same goal and does he really have or she really have a um a vision and an over arc arching vision of what the film will be because look the fact is and when you onset things change you can have a script.

director
"director" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

The Smoking Tire

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"director" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

"And by thanks for calling in this is as the good interesting session i have great edit and uh thanks for coming out and we're on a break i'm going to sell some real estate we are going to come back and i've got a an interview with a really interesting germany roger donaldson who is the director of a new documentary called mclaren about a bruce mclaren which is it's a really cool documentary rajaonson was also the director of the world's fastest indian with anthony hopkins which is an awesome movie and we have a good discussion about kiwis in motor sport and bruce mclaren and stick around we right back simpson of the smoked our podcast is brought to you by dr line drive line is the world's first social driving up coming exclusively to the iphone discovered the pleasure of driving not to get somewhere but simply to be on the road whether you're a longtime driving enthusiast or just someone who wants to discover why driving can be fun this is the app for you you can map and classify your favorite driving roads based on style location or whether it's a a lose a loose surface a cruz an offroad trail while capturing basic metrics and driving data with dr line you can use your phones camera to capture video of your driver using external camera or maybe even a drone posting those videos to the feed so everyone can see why your time behind the wheel matters or keep them for yourself in your library new can build a profile share your cars track your drives and earn points towards contests and giveaways now.

real estate roger donaldson director bruce mclaren anthony hopkins iphone basic metrics