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"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

21:27 min | Last month

"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Had to always be aware of that because we didn't really have anything in particular in mind and then in Paris we went out to film the big skyscrapers in la defense and we came upon this massive city to judge. And it's like it was just so oddball, but it's classic one up and then it's like we all like to use to go get up and get on their bed. Get up, get off there. Whenever we can squeeze in a little bit of serendipity a little moment like that. It's like, hey, yeah, let's just do it. I felt like Lily Tomlin, if that's a member when she used to sit in that giant chair. And I thought, well, we're celebrating art. Simon Griffith is the producer of my Rick Steves Europe TV series. He's with us now on travel with Rick Steves for some behind the scenes stories from our latest filming project. The 6 hour mini series called Rick Steves art of Europe. Our European travels have really nurtured a love and admiration for the great art and architecture you'll find there. We filmed hour long episodes from the Stone Age and ancient Greece and Rome through the Middle Ages and renaissance right up to the modern age. The series is premiering this month on public TV stations across the U.S.. And as producer, what are your feelings about the thing when you just look at the project knowing that people are watching it around the country right now? Oh, this is extraordinary. It's a rewarding feeling because it's just a kind of synthesis of not just European history, but for us it's 22 years of actually working and bringing all this stuff together. And then in giving it meaning giving a context, I'm very happy the way that shows you come out. I think people will learn a lot about the story of you. Over the years, we've shot most of this stuff in the context of a travelogue. I mean, here's what you do in Brussels. Here's what you do in Barcelona. Here's what you do in Athens, but we've never done it in that context with the sweep of the story of Europe, and it's just so great that our love of art now is being able to be of broadcast and shared throughout the country. Right now, thanks to public broadcasting. Simon, thank you so much for being my partner in this and joining us today in radial land. Thanks, Rick. It's been a pleasure. Simon and I remember the surprise we encountered when we drove out to do some filming at Europe's largest neolithic stone circle in England. It's in an extra from today's conversation. You can listen to it from our website. Rick Steves dot com slash radio. We'll get ideas for enjoying the countryside of Austrian a bit, but first we have a lot of Ireland to explore. That's next on travel with Rick Steves. Hello, my name is Barry maloney from county cork and the south coast of Ireland. I've got one about Irish Scottish English to quote by George Orwell, kind of sums it up he said the English and unhappy unless they're miserable. The Irish are not a peace unless they're at war. And the Scots are not at home unless they're abroad. Well, let's start provoking. Barry did you have another one? Common question is what's the English impression of the Irish? Yeah. And they always look at us with a kind of a bit of a puzzlement, you know. Winston Churchill summed that up. He said we have always found the Irish a bit odd. They refused to be English. So there you go. 20 years ago, my guidebook covering the British Isles was called Great Britain and Ireland. That's terrible. I didn't know Ireland well enough to do a book just on that. And people in Ireland and people in Britain, they deserve their own guidebook. One of my tour guides, paddle Connor, sat me down and explained why we must free Ireland from the British. Pat talked me into co authoring a guidebook just on Ireland, and this year we're celebrating the 20th edition of that book and pat joins us right now to share some of his Irish favorites. Pat. Thanks for being here. Great to be here, Rick. Thanks. Boy, pat you have you travel all over Europe, but you have a certain passion for Ireland. How many tours have you led for us on Ireland? In the mid 70s, 75 ish. The best of Ireland, you can do that for over 20 years. I'm so thankful you cornered me in my office that day and woke me up to the need for an Ireland guidebook and you've updated it with passion. What have you learned from your tourists? What they enjoy the most, what experiences provide the magic moments, you know, we always ask people, what are your magic moments? And what are your challenges as a guy? What have they been as you've worked with your American travelers appreciating Irish nature and culture? What are the highlights? Well, so people need to understand that Ireland really is a damp and moist and green place. It wouldn't be so green if it wasn't damp, you're as far north as the Alaskan Panhandle. So beach lovers, sun lovers, really they're not drawn to Ireland initially. But the people I know the people are just the amazing thing that really grows on you. There's no Eiffel Tower. There's no Alps or coliseum, but the longer you're there, the more you connect with the people, and particularly musically and in pubs, that's where I find the magic happen. So this is really insightful pat. It's like, to me, it's a lush island, and that comes with rain, obviously. We live in the northwest. I love the evergreen state, and I feel like I live in a terrarium. You don't complain about The Rain, The Rain is a blessing. And the same in Ireland, and you've got that conviviality. And when I think of the places where I know the most people per mile in all my years of researching, Italy, and Ireland, there's something about that joy of life and that accessibility that let's just get together and chat, you know. Now you've been doing this for 20 years. How is Ireland changed? Would you say in 20 years? Well, there's many more cars on the road now, a Rick Ireland became more affluent in the last generation or two, and when I first started traveling their way back in 1981, there'd be one family car, and now just like in the states, mom and dad each have a car and the eldest youngster may. So it's become traffic congested, especially in Dublin proper. The economy has certainly gone up and down. I mean, I remember the bleak days when everybody was on the door, it seemed like, and they were frustrated. And then you got the Celtic Tiger economy, and then that crashed, and then where are we since that? Because we had that huge bike up with a Celtic Tiger. And then it did come down. It did a bubble. It did. Where are we now? Would you say that? Ireland really recovered from that faster than other nations that were having banking problems, for example, Greece was on the griddle as well at the same time, and the Irish really responded very responsibly financially and they're back on track and their savvy businessmen all the way across the board. Because for a lot of international companies, they see Ireland as a great place to set up because of the low tax rate. The corporate tax rate. The corporate tax rate and the availability of educated people who are not that expensive to hire. That's right. English speaking educated people that are not that expensive to hire. And Ireland is the English speaking country that uses the Euro. So in terms of business. With Brexit, that's a huge deal. That's right, that's exactly right. So London exits the scene from the financial world as far as EU is concerned and suddenly they need to there's a huge advantage when your international banking with English and Ireland is there. That's right. Now, with the recent affluence of Ireland, we see better food. When you and I started traveling in Ireland, it made English food look good. That's true. And now I'm blown away at the creativity and the international flair, the fusion, and so on. That's right. Irish chefs who may have left for a generation to find better opportunities have come home, especially during the Celtic Tiger, and in a town like kinsale or Dublin, you can find some really Gourmet restaurants that hold their own against most other big European. You can still go to a run of the mill tiny town in the countryside and have just one pub to eat in. That's right. But you go to a resort town, a wealthy little town in the south coast like kinsale. Kinsale. Yeah, kinsale is a beautiful little coastal town that attracts a lot of yachters, so there's a fair amount of money that comes in and out of kinsale in a way, but it has grown with the rise of the expatriate chefs coming home. And I remember there's a guy who was just a globetrotter and he loves food and he came back with his partner and they'd start a restaurant and all of a sudden it's a hit. It's like a mom and pop place. That's right. Kinsale is sort of the self described Gourmet capital of Ireland. I thought I was put off by that at first because this self proclaimed Gourmet capital. But I'll tell you, there's a lot of good restaurants. Oh, there's some fantastic restaurants. This is travel with Rick Steves, and we're talking with pat O'Connor. And as you might imagine from his name, he's long had a love for the country of his ancestors. Pets the senior Ireland tour guide and consultant at Rick Steves Europe he's the co author of my Ireland guidebooks and he's also been leading tours of Ireland now for more than 20 years in pet joins us now with his well earned tips for enjoying the emerald isle. Pet, you know, for ages when people thought of Ireland, they thought of the troubles. Is Ireland united? No, the northern and part of Ireland is ruled from London, and the southern 75% is independent and ruled from Dublin. How bad was it, and how is it now? And how did they manage to get where they are now? Well, boy, Rick, my first time to Ireland was in 1981 during the maze prison hunger strikes in the north and it was a really sad and tragic time in Ireland. But things have really turned around since then. That's 40 years ago now. So the troubles, it's been two steps forward, one step back. It's a healthy evolution, and I think the more generations that grow up in Ireland without bloodshed, the more it will be in the rearview mirror for people to be my sense was there was a lot of moderates that they had their Catholic heritage and their Irish Republican heritage, or their unionist and their Protestant heritage. But they were moderates and they're willing to live together, but they were extremists that could quite easily do something terroristic and blow the middle into the fringes and then they'd have all this sort of violence. Polarized. And then they got pretty smart about it. They realized this is quite costly for their society on both sides. And they actually had initiatives where they would let the kids get to know each other and grow away from the heritage of hate and fear that they got from their parents. And that younger generation really realized that we can share this island. You know, Rick they had camps for both Catholic and Protestant kids mixed together to try and alleviate this. And it's not an easy process, but it is getting better. Would you say it's safe to travel in the north of Ireland now? Absolutely. No concern. Absolutely. And I think the northern coast is as pretty as any part of Ireland, so don't avoid it up there. As a matter of principle, when I think of a trip to Ireland, it has to include the north. There's no reason not to go up into the north. And in the future, do you feel like it's solid? Or do you feel like it's fragile? The piece? Yeah. I do think it's solid, but I think that the Brexit tension is an irritant right now. And it's not going to really affect travelers as much as it's going to affect business. It's a tariff thing at the border. I don't see them checking passports, but because up until now with the EU with Britain in the EU before Brexit, they had that beautiful free trade. That's right. And now something that is fundamental to Brexit, the exit of Britain is you don't have free trade and that cuts to Ireland and half from a trade point of view, which is a complication. It is. It'll be interesting to follow that. Pat, when I think of Ireland, I think of the gift of gab. You know, I met a guy I think you know him even o'rourke and he picked me up when I was hitchhiking when I was a kid. And I was just reading my journal. I hadn't read this journal for literally 40 years, and I thought, I'm going to try to get ahold of emon. And I remember he was just in his little town castle well in Northern Ireland. He was even the plumber. I mean, because there's two humans, there was even the Carpenter and even the plumber. And I remember even way back then, I came into the town and I would go, do you know where I'd find emen, and they'd say, even the plumber or even the Carpenter? And it's so fun to think that they're so intimate that way. But I found him on the phone and we just rekindled our conversation, just last year. From what we had 40 years ago, and I remember hanging out with him and we'd be in a conversation and the sun would set, it would get dark and we'd forget to turn on the lights, we'd be talking in the dark. It was just so enthralling the conversation. What's your best trick for meeting locals and having those kind of person to person memories? You know, asking people for directions is truly a way to connect, and also asking them to take your picture when you're somewhere where you can't take a picture of yourself and you start a conversation that way. Just a little excuse. You know, ask somebody, if you're walking through a town, stop and ask them a question, and then be open to chat. That's right. That's right. You see somebody and you, hey, could you do me a favor? Take my picture here. And then you say, I love your town. What's the story? Yeah, yeah, exactly. You know, Rick, on my first trip in 81, I was out on inch more one of the aran islands off the West Coast, and there was a real cute little red headed girl playing with her friends in the driveway, and I asked her, could I take your picture, please? And she was holding her kitten and it was just a lovely little photo, and I treasured it. And then a dozen years later, I came back and I happened to have that photo with me and it was just a really fun moment where I was in the one and only little restaurant at the crossroads in kilronan and I was paying the bill and I held up the photo and I said, I've been looking for this little girl. She used to live down the road 14 years ago when I was here, do you know where she is? And they said, oh, that's Susie gill. And I said, where is she? And they said, well, she's in the back. We'll bring her out. And sure enough, there she came. True story. You know, that is so interesting because I used to years ago I'd say bring a ziploc baggie with postcards from your home or pictures of your family or whatever. And now we've always got that our phones, we got our photography there, and you could go back and you could do that. What a great way to connect. You mentioned Aaron islands. And my memory of the Rhode Island is the little folk dance club there was the students that did their small town version of Riverdale ragusa. I understand they're not in business anymore. Unfortunately, no, they've moved on. And I was going to ask in 20 years of music and dance, and that kind of entertainment in Ireland. How has that changed, the way they called their traditional folk music trad? And it's not just like square dancing here in the United States. It is honestly the pop culture, the trendy, this is where it's at. Absolutely. People of all generations in Ireland are listening to trad music and you go to a place like dingle that has a fantastic live music and pub sos musicians are there by choice. This isn't a little backstreet, you know, hiding place they go to dingle gravitate there because they know the best musicians. As long as I've been going to Ireland, about 30 years, there's the buzz is where's the music scene, you know, and for a long time there's a little nothing town called doolin, which is always for some quirky reason whether it's great music, Ennis, I find as great music. Galloway, dingle Peninsula. Of course, Dublin because that's where the big gigs are. Are those still the big places for music today? They are, but in a place like Dublin, you're going to see quite a bit of it on stage and maybe not quite as authentic. You have to sort of really ask locals for the traditional Irish pubs that are true. There is a pub and Galway called the crossroads. And they've got a big mural on the wall. I don't know if you remember this pub, and there's a fire, it's just in the middle of the rural farmland, two roads cross. Yeah. And that's all you need for a gathering, and the people from all four angles of that road would come together. They built a fire, and they make music. Yeah. And that's what that pub is today in the middle of Galway. It's a crossroads. That's exactly right. And it's not famous. They're not big shots there, but they are people who know their music and love their music and that session just takes on a life of its own and if you've had a Guinness and you're into it. And everything's going just right. There's not a better experience in Ireland. Oh, it's a treasure. What's your tip for getting the most out of the music scene in Ireland? Well, if you really want to check out the music scene, you want to be in the pubs early enough to get a decent seat near where the musicians are going to set up. So you can see, for example, in illin piper, the Irish version of the bagpipes, these guys are fascinating the way they make music out of wrestling with an octopus is what it looks like. They make great music. The island pipes, that's like the Irish bagpipe. It is wrestling with in October. That's kind of what it looks like. Very musical octopus. Oh, yeah, exactly. It's got more octaves than Scottish bagpipes, and you can kind of bend the notes. So it's a beautiful instrument. And then when they don't own a Scottish one, they're blowing it to fill it up, but with the Irish one, you fill it with the bellows. Underneath one elbow. Pad O'Connor has been researching and writing the Rick Steves Ireland guidebook for 20 years. We're celebrating his achievements and the many charms of Ireland he's uncovered for us right now on travel with Rick Steves. We have a link to a video presentation about touring Ireland that pat hosted a few years ago. You'll find it with this week's show at Rick Steves dot com slash radio. Pat, I think more than in most countries there is a tourist trap route in Ireland and then there's the rest of the country. What is the tourist trap route around the country? What is every big bus, the 5 top stops? They all stop at blarney castle outside of cork, they all stop at killarney. The tourist town with the beautiful lakes in Dublin, they hit the Guinness brewery pretty hard, and they hit the book of kells. The cultural treasure of Ireland and the Trinity College library. And then up in the north in Belfast, the Titanic Belfast is also pretty heavily. The button ready castle. Did he mention that? But yeah, well, bun ready castle, there's actually three castles that do castle banquets in the west and bunratty is very close to Shannon airport in Ennis. So it's the most big, big tour buses. And then the ring of Kerry is everybody's the ring of Kerry. So they're not bad, but you can do alternatives to those that are much more real and much less painted green with little limericks and leprechauns everywhere. I think the Titanic and the book of kells. Those are real cultural experiences. They are put up with anyways. The other ones, I think you could find alternatives. Also, there's the riverdance thing, they've sure milked that, haven't they? But it comes less now. Yeah. And then you got famous names in Ireland. It's so interesting. I mean, people just want to go to tipperary because they've heard of it. What are the big famous names that you can say, well, it's a nice name, but you don't need to go there. Well, limerick and cork God bless them. Our household names, but I'd rather be sleeping in kinsale than cork in kinsale as just a half an hour down the road in closer to the airport. So keep your bar high. Don't just go to the famous places. It could be good, but there are alternatives. There definitely are. They don't have the promotion. And if the place has promotion, that means it's got golf courses and big hotels that accommodate tour groups and reasons for mass tourism to embrace it, throw money at it and shape our perspective of how we should prioritize when we put our Irish dreams into an itinerary. We prefer the sleigh head loop around the tip of the dingle Peninsula over the ring of Kerry. It isn't as touristed and is more intimate. It's so fun to talk to you and to celebrate Ireland. I know Ireland is special to you. To me it is, I love all of Europe, but it is so uniquely lovable. It was never conquered by the Romans. It's the only former colony in Europe, I believe. That's right. And it's a place with a small population in a huge Diaspora. I mean, what do they say there's 30 million Irish Americans? Over 40 million. 40 million. And so it's an amazing island in so many quirky ways, what is your explanation for why Ireland is just so darn beloved? Well, I know it sounds cliche, but it truly is the people. I mean, when you meet an Irish person oversees somewhere, maybe not in Ireland, they really stand out and you find yourself attracted to a conversation with them. Now go to their homeland and let their pride show and all the way across the board that people are the real treasure. And that's our challenge to connect with the people and it's easier to connect with the people in Ireland than anywhere anywhere else. That's so true. Patrick O'Connor, thanks so much for being with us and happy travels on more great adventures. Thank you. It's my pleasure. It's actually the second city of Austria, not far from the borders of Slovenia and Hungary. A tour guide from draughts tells us about the corners of Austria where you'll find vineyards, castles, and champion horses grazing on green hillsides. Under a wolf takes your calls next at 877-333-7425 as we explore the fine points of Austria beyond Vienna and Salzburg. On travel with Rick Steves. Once upon a time it was the heart of a vast empire that ruled over 60 million people. Today, the landlocked republic of Austria has about 9 million residents who enjoy what consistently ranks as one of the highest quality of life ratings in the world. Of course, its main city Vienna is a must see capital for

Ireland Rick Steves Europe Rick Dublin Simon Griffith Barry maloney Pat kinsale paddle Connor pat joins Alaskan Panhandle Rick Ireland Kinsale Simon Greece Britain Lily Tomlin Gourmet capital pat O'Connor
"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

08:39 min | 7 months ago

"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Your first time, give yourself that wonderful 360° exploratory loop. Pad O'Connor co authors the Rick Steves Ireland guidebook, and he's one of the sharpest experts on traveling in Ireland that I know. He's with us on travel with Rick Steves to help you know what to anticipate when driving a rental car in Ireland. On the left side of the road, in The Rain. Super narrow roads. I mean, with hedges on both sides and in every couple hundred yards, you've got to turn out. How do you handle that? So whoever is closest to the turnout if there's oncoming traffic, and some of these are little one lane little roads that are fantastic to be on as far as where they get you, but you need to be courteous, you pull over at the wide spot in the road if you're closest to it and let them get by you. Pat O'Connor, I'm so thankful that you've been able to work so hard for 20 years and share all of your experience in the Rick Steves Ireland guidebook. You know, I just want to close with some magic that makes you so glad you dealt with getting used to driving Irish. I'll never forget once when I was in dingle. I've always done the wonderful dingle Peninsula during the day like a good tourist lacing together all the shots and it's crowded everybody's out. But then one year I did it after dinner and it's late until late in Ireland and I finished dinner at 7 and I had three hours of light and it was a whole different atmosphere. It was magical. And I was thankful I had a car to have that mobility. You bet. What's a magic moment? A thankful moment that you've had in Ireland that we could just wrap it up here to inspire people when they go to Ireland to don't be shy about getting a rental car. I'll tell you a quick human story. I actually tried to turn around on an Irish road that was a one lane road there was nobody around the first year that I had a rental car and I high centered the car in the ditch, and I'm blocking the road, and here comes a tractor, and this Irish guy gets out of his tractor, pulls out his chains, couldn't be more friendly and jovial about it. Just a connection that I didn't expect, and I was on my way again 15 minutes later. So you're going to have some trials and tribulations but roll with it. Pet O'Connor, thanks so much, and I think what I'll be a little more confident and smart when it comes to exploring Ireland in our rental car. Great, great. Thanks. Tour guides from Prague have practical advice for visiting their city, where old world charm survived the wars of the 20th century and even the crush of tourists before the pandemic. But first, writer Mary Morris shares how she's enjoyed exploring faraway places on her own over the years. When Mary Morris wrote the book nothing to declare memoirs of a woman traveling alone, she joined the proud ranks of what at the time were a small number of female travel writers in a field long considered demands domain. Since it was first published back in 1988, that book's been recognized as a classic title of travel, describing her risk-taking solo adventure across Latin America and confronting the realities of place of poverty and machismo. Her newest book all the way to the tigers also recounts a solo trip. This time on a Tiger safari in the heart of India. Mary joins us now to talk about the joys and the challenges of traveling alone as a woman and what's changed in the span between those two books. Mary, thanks for being here. Thank you for having me, Rick. I appreciate it. Yeah, no, your book, nothing to declare. It's just filled with great travel moments as you celebrate solo travel as a woman and it's based on travels in Latin America. Can you share with us one vivid moment out of that adventure that kind of illustrates your message? Yes, absolutely. So I moved to San Miguel de Allende in 1978, I had moved into this apartment. I didn't really know where I was living. It was a very solitary. I woke up at four in the morning to a rooster on my balcony, growing its head off. I looked out and there was a woman waving at me and it was her rooster and she came into the house. Her name, she introduced herself as lupe. She grabbed her rooster by its feet, got feathers all over the house. And as she was leaving with her rooster upside down, she said, he's just like all men, he's always on the prowl. And she became my very dear friend, lupe. So there you go. Welcome to welcome to her world. So you're a woman and it seems you like to travel solo. And people always ask me, because I wouldn't know, but you can answer it. Is it safe? What's your answer? It depends. Sometimes it's safe. Sometimes it's not safe. I mean, there are just things I wouldn't do. You know, they're mistakes that women can make on the road. I think you just need an exit strategy. I think every woman traveling needs an exit strategy. So for example, I would never stay out too late. I would never drink too much that I couldn't get home in a good way. That was very important to me. There was a very narrow alleyway leading back to my house where I lived in Mexico and I always looked very carefully to make sure there wasn't anyone coming towards me in that alleyway before I would go down it. Just I think you just have to be extra vigilant. Hypervigilant. Beyond the boss, I have an exit strategy. And the ball, right? Exit strategy. And you prefer to travel solo. One of the pros and cons of traveling solo, 'cause that's a big decision for a lot of people. Right. I mean, I think Paul threw, I think, said that the only real travel is solo travel. They're just experiences that I know I would never have had if I were traveling with a friend, a husband, a lover, another person. And so for me, when I want to have that visceral connection to the world, I need to go alone. And I've been married for 32 years to a man who understands that, which is a gift, but if I want to go on a vacation or I want to do something like that, well, then I'll drag someone along. But just me as a real traveler, connecting to the world, I need to do that alone. You know, you just hit something there. If you want to go on a vacation, sure, bring your partner, but if you want to have a travel experience that's differentiating between a vacation and a travel experience, you wrote nothing to declare back in the 80s and it's written all the way to the tigers. How has the world changed for women travelers since then? Is it better now or the challenge is still the same? In 30 years. It's such a good question. I mean, there are places that I was comfortable going to 30 years ago, like the Middle East and North Africa. That I wouldn't be so comfortable going to now alone. I mean, I would go, but not necessarily alone. I mean, look, I think Rick, the world's a more dangerous place. You know, between pandemic and terrorism and all kinds of stuff, it just feels more dangerous. And so you felt more comfortable in the 80s hanging out in a dusty little town in El Salvador or Mexico than you would today. I did. I was probably a little dumber then, too. I can imagine nothing being dumber, but there'd be a little more easygoing back in a simpler time. That's right. I mean, I think particularly in San Miguel, I mean, I think the differences of class and race are much more acute than when I was there. I found a more fluid acceptant kind of culture where I think now there's a lot of resentment and it's complicated. Obviously, by immigration and all kinds of things. And it's just a completely different place than when I lived there. This is travel with Rick Steves, works exploring what it means to travel solo while female with author Mary Morris, her books include nothing to declare memoirs of a woman traveling alone and all the way to the tigers. You can find more about Mary's work at Mary Morris dot net. Mary, when we travel, especially south of the border, we hear the word machismo. What is machismo and what shapes the macho man's view of the world? Well, I guess in our speak, it would be something like male entitlement, you know, the sense that it's a kind of toxic masculinity. I would say, you know, where you have to prove yourself, you have to prove your virile and you're strong and you're not going to take any garbage from anybody. I do think machismo is less of a, of a phenomenon than it was in the 80s when I was traveling. Just as in Italy, I think that the cat calling culture and that has, you know, I think there is, for example, in Italy, I feel much more respect for women than I felt in the 80s and I think that's also true in Mexico. And.

Ireland Rick Steves Mary Morris Pat O'Connor Mary joins dingle Peninsula de Allende Latin America dingle tigers San Miguel Prague Rick Mary Mexico India North Africa Paul El Salvador Middle East
"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

03:15 min | 8 months ago

"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"And poems. And also animals. She was a patron saint of animals as well. This is travel with Rick Steves. We're talking Irish saints with two Irish tour guides, Kathy Ryan, from county louth, and Stephen with felony from dingle Peninsula. When I think about Ireland, I think of a heroic struggle against the English, a lot of great patriots were martyred in the struggling against the English, are some of them considered saints. Yeah, we've had saints who were martyred in the 1600s when the English would come in. These were mostly priests and bishops who refused to accept the rule of the Church of England, so they were executed and then they have been since been beatified by the Catholic Church official. Officially. Okay, so Rome embraced the importance of this. And the most famous are my favorite and we have sent Oliver plunkett associated with the town of drogheda, and sent Oliver plunket was a great man, but he was sort of framed and set up and convicted of treason, and he was taken to the Tower of London where he was hung drod and quartered, and his head was chopped off and thrown into a fire with the head never burned. It never decayed in the head is now in a glass box in Saint Peter's cathedral in the Main Street Andrade. It's in a big gold box. There's an ornamentation on the box that must be 25 feet tall. They have DNA tested this head and they've done tests with local people who would be as descendants so we can see if we say it is his head. And it's also you just look at him, but he was made a scene. That's an extraordinary sense. So you're driving north of Dublin and that's quite a remarkable little side trip as you head further north. Absolutely beautiful. If they call it the emerald valley and it's the gateway to the north, continue on up the highway and then stop at Fahrenheit. Which is the birthplace of saint Bridget, and her healing stones are there, which predate the oracle at Delphi, and there's healing stones for the eyes, for the mind, whether it's mental illness or whether you're suffering from depression or headaches. She has a knee stones, a heart stone, fertility stone. It's an extraordinary place to visit. We're talking 500 BC. Yes. Talking a long time ago. Long time. And then when you're finished there, if you want, you can continue on up the road to a time called down Patrick, where there's a three for one special waiting for you. In the graveyard in the graveyard of the church there, you have Saint Patrick, saint brigid and saint Columba all buried in the wonton. Come together. Oh my goodness. And eternal party. Yeah, just to make that point saint Columba is also called saint column kill and no discussion about Irish scenes would be complete without mentioning that great man as well because he was the man who brought Christianity to Scotland, you see. From Ireland. From Ireland and he's also supposed to have killed the Loch Ness monster. He's a double hero. Double here. And he was a great copyist. He inspired the copiers of the monasteries to do the books like the book of castle. This was the great art of the dark ages of the 8th and 9th century that area. You talk about the history like you lived it. It's amazing how close people in a place like Ireland are to their heritage. To be able to dip into that in your travels, brings your travels to life. And of course, as a tour guide, that's your profession to share that with all the people who visit your country so they can be inspired by the rich heritage and history that's all around when you travel. Steven mcfarlane,.

Oliver plunkett Irish saints Kathy Ryan saint Bridget Saint Peter's cathedral dingle Peninsula Rick Steves louth emerald valley Ireland drogheda Church of England patriots Andrade Stephen Catholic Church saint Columba Rome eternal party
"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

07:56 min | 9 months ago

"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"On my first visit to Ireland, I found that they lived up to their reputation. We all know about the blarney stone it's an actual stone in a castle in county cork that is said to confer the gift of gab on those who kiss it. And for such a small island, Ireland has produced more than its share of the world's great storytellers. William butler yeats, James Joyce, Oscar Wilde, one and this young man. Over 500 years old. So what's behind this? The roots of Irish eloquence run deep. In ancient Celtic Ireland, bards called were the official keepers of Irish culture and history. There was no such thing as murder. And I'm sure you're all woman how the women manage when there was no mirror. And it was an entirely oral storytelling tradition. With nothing written down shanky mastered a repertoire of stories and performed them artfully to wrapped audiences. Thereby passing folklore and stories down through the generations. They would talk about stories. They would go on for three nights. There are still professional storytellers in Ireland today. Johnny Daly is one of the modern Irish storytellers who's trying to revive and preserve the tradition. It's like something ancient primeval in us that we just love stories. We entertained ourselves for thousands of years of stories, you know? Daly told me about the work of the Irish folklore commission. Which was set up by the government in 1935. They were afraid that they were going to lose a lot of the folklore in the stories. And they actually got things about a 100,000 children to go out to all their grandparents in particular with their copy books and get them to tell them the photo and the stories that they had grown up with the faith stories. Daily made a study of Irish folklore. He now holds court most evenings at the brazen head in Dublin. Which claims to be Ireland's oldest pub. He treats customers to an evening of Irish folklore and fairy stories. And the fairies realizing what had happened. They turned around and they started to stampede around them in a circle to try and get her back. They finally gave up, but just as they left, one of the fairies leaned over his horse and I came across this man who was singing songs and telling stories in the back of a little pub in county Mayo. He told us he was 82 years old. The place was packed with tourists and locals hanging on his every word. I think to put it very crudely, we're very good at both. And you know, there is it's in our genes that we like to talk. We like to notice things. That's miho demura, director of the great basket heritage center, on the tip of the dingle Peninsula on the West Coast of Ireland. The center is a museum devoted to the people who lived just off the coast on the rugged blasket islands until the 1950s. They were subsistence farmers and fishermen who spoke only Gaelic, which is called Irish here. But what's most remarkable about them is the literary legacy they left behind. In the 1920s and 30s, the tiny population of the blasket islands spawned its own literary renaissance. And produced a collection of books chronicling their lives and local folklore, all in their native Irish language. I don't know of any community that numbered less than 200 souls that produced so many books. I would like to hear about such a community anywhere in the world because I haven't heard of them up to now and I've been here a long time. Demura doesn't think it's an accident that this happened in Ireland. The basic psyche of especially people who speak Gaelic is they need to communicate with people. They need to say what's in their head you know and they are sometimes they bore you sometimes you get very, very good speakers and you listen to them forever and ever and then. The blasket heritage center isn't an area of county Kerry designated as part of the goyal tucked. Regions within Ireland, where Irish, not English, is the official language. Bernie is sending them. Bernie Moriarty grew up in a village in the Carrie goyle Texas. Her family spoke Irish at home, and she was taught in the Irish language at school. Moriarty thinks there's something about the Irish language itself that explains her people's penchant for lively self expression. It does have that richness that English just doesn't touch. Turn a phrase that generates a feeling a lot quicker than English does. Moriarty teaches Irish to school children, and also offers classes in dingle to tourists, wanting to learn the language. She gave me a little lesson. That's any story, so you could greet someone with that. Any story. Now that can't be a coincidence. I was here before me. That's it. From the island of silvertone storytellers, this is Sarah McCormick, for travel with Rick Steves. Are we bit of banter and good chair to get you into the spirit of Saint Patrick's Day. That's just around the corner on travel with Rick Steves. Hello, my name is Barry maloney from county cork and the south coast of Ireland. And I'm going to share with you my favorite artist saying. In the Irish language, the saying goes on to harvest scale cougar. Which means he who comes with a story will bring two away from you. And I love that saying because it makes me think about the way the Irish love to talk, share stories, gossip, basically. And an example of that is Montreal. I was in my hometown can sail, walking through the little farmer's market, and I overheard two ladies kind of whispering, half whispering, one, whisper to the other, she said, tell me more about that story. And of course, I listen in. The second lady replied, she said, I can't tell you any more about that story. Sure, I've already told you more than I heard myself. I think Ireland is one of the best places in the world for interacting with people. On the street in a shop and definitely in the pub. Joining us now for a taste of the Irish gift for entertaining conversation is my longtime Irish tour guiding friend Stephen. Stephen was raised in Derry in the north, but he's been living in the Republic of Ireland now for the last few years where he operates the mill town guesthouse. It's on the harbor in dingle. And not far from there, Liam o'riordan hails from county cork deep in the south of Ireland. Liam is a singer of traditional Irish ballads, and he joined Stephen and me right now to help define what the crack is all about in Ireland. Liam and Stephen, welcome. Great to be here. Thank you. Guinness or Murphy, Liam. I just thought when you order a beer in Ireland and it comes Guinness. Unfortunately, yes. But you live in a disadvantaged part of the Deep South and you don't get it. Guinness is brewed in Dublin and I'm glad to believe that it has one chemical which they use to break down the yeast because it makes they have to brew so much. Murphy's is brewed in cork, where I come from. It doesn't have any chemicals. Okay. And it's the only city in cork that I know that bruise two stouts. It proves more float and beam is out. Okay, okay, now a stout so Guinness is a stout. It's the dark beer where you can draw a shamrock on the head and it's still there in three minutes later. We're not drinking Guinness here, but we are drinking a nice beer. Let's go. And Guinness has drunk all over it and it starts very popping up the north but we don't really have much murphys in Northern Ireland where I love Murphy's, we don't drink it.

Ireland Johnny Daly Irish folklore commission miho demura great basket heritage center rugged blasket islands William butler blasket islands Demura James Joyce Oscar Wilde blasket heritage center cork Moriarty Bernie Moriarty Rick Steves dingle Peninsula Daly Celtic Sarah McCormick
"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

06:47 min | 9 months ago

"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"The traditions of Ireland are doing better than ever. In fact, the old Celtic language that had to be hidden from the colonial rulers is now a required course in school. The Irish language is so close to our hearts and it's an expression of what we stand for as Irish people, coming up will also hear how the 18th century Ellen pipes a uniquely Irish type of bagpipe or making a comeback. Illinois is a funny word, it's an Irish word for elbow, and it is the most complex form of bagpipe in the world, and will share a bit of the teasing that's part of the crack you might find at a lively Irish pump. Because we've been oppressed and ruled for so long. We kind of had to make fun of ourselves. And the Irish are known for being good storytellers too. Remember that time at the hurling championship, Muhammad Ali wants the final once in our prime minister turned to him and said, would you like to be out there with a stick Muhammad, and he said I'd hate to be out there without them. It's an all Irish hour ahead on travel with Rick Steves. Stay with us. In Ireland, they call it the crack. Coming up on this all Irish edition of travel with Rick Steves. We get a taste of the ribbing and the friendly banter that you might encounter in the pubs of Ireland from a couple of friends who live in the rival counties of Kerry and cork. And musician Kieran O'Hare tells us about the wind instruments that keep Irish traditions breathing, like the ill and pipes and the tin whistle. If there's one thing everyone in Ireland can agree on, it's that the Irish really have a way with words. Let's start with a look at the eloquence that springs from their original Celtic language. He grew up speaking Irish as his first language on the scenic dingle Peninsula in the southwest of Ireland. His family has run the local dingle music shop for years, where folk musicians have often gathered for gem Sessions. Just down the street, there are also owns bar. It's also a music venue. He just reopened it a few months ago after a lengthy pandemic closure. Dara, welcome back to travel with Rick Steves consortium and so live gurgle here and so I'm saying a hi, how are you all today? It's a pleasure to be here and thank you for having me. I'm thankful you speak English too. Say that again and what you just said and falter row of Gillette, good idea not sure how she only asked him. There are how many people on the planet do you think could understand what you just said? I'd say about a million people give or take. There are probably about a 130,000 people in Ireland who actually speak the Irish language, but they're probably upwards of a million to do a good comprehension of the Irish language. It has gone less up to the time of the famine and after the family had a mass emigration and mass debts in the Irish language for a lot of it died, and in the last 20 to 25 years as when a huge revival of the Irish language, now we have great grand someplace for people to speak the Irish language. So a million people understand Gaelic now is the number going up or going down. The numbers going off definitely is going the right direction. It's a very slow and steady pace, but there are great incentives in place for people to learn the Irish language. Now, if you're doing your leaving certificate, which is the equivalent of your finishing school, you get an extra 10% on your points for your educational system. If you do through the Irish language, they favor you if you speak iron if I were you in high education on the island of Ireland. That's correct. Because the practical person in me says, why bother to learn a language that only a million people speak when you can learn English? What is it that drives a person to speak a language that only for centuries it's been down the Irish language has been we've been told that we can't be Irish we can speak the Irish language whereas now we have a chance to express ourselves and the Irish language is so close to our hearts and it's an expression of what we stand for as Irish people, which is why it's such an important part of our history. So it's an assertion of being Irish. Absolutely. It's proud of being Irish and it's just right to have that language. Totally not really and, again, because it's not vastly spoken. It's like having a wrong private language in some respects. Which can be very traveler wants to hear Irish spoken, what part of Ireland would you go to? A variety of pockets of Ireland and they're called glass areas and the Irish for an Irish speaking area. So an English I would say Gale tech speaking region literally precisely is literally translators and dingle is one of those areas. Now are these subsidized by the government so that people are sort of having an easier time economically there you live the traditional ways. There are grants given to schools to encourage the Irish language and they're also grants given to local communities in order to have language programs so on and so forth a lot of people participate in those. So the central government in Dublin is encouraging this, absolutely. And it's effective what they're doing. It's widely encouraged and again, the Irish language is unlike past centuries it's now cool again. So this is a natural revival for the Irish language, which is great. Good. It's interesting to me when I go to Ireland that I'm so charmed by the gift of gap. We all know about the gift of gab, but the gift of gab really in a nicer way to put it, I think, is the art of conversation. Now help me out on this. Because my theory is when you speak to an Irish man who speaks Gaelic as his first language and speaking to you in English, he thinks with a template, a linguistic template of Gaelic, and then he's translating it literally and talking to you in English, but he's more interesting and entertaining in his English language because it's got this Gaelic kind of structure. Does that make any sense to you? I understand what you're saying, but I think that the Irish are just natural born talkers. So whether they speak Gaelic or English precisely, I know people who are born with English and people who are born with Irish and they can tell a story as good as the next fella. I think it's the love of storytelling and the art of storytelling. I mean storytelling dates back to the very early times in Ireland and were big into where Irish jokes and Irish culture and like my sense is you go to a pub and it's driven not by a screen with a sports event, but by people talking to each other. That's something I love about Ireland and no disrespect to the U.S. I love it over here and I do a lot of things here but I walk into a barrier and there's 50 flat screen televisions in front of me and everybody's staring at them. You walk into a bar in Ireland and more often than not there is no television there's Irish music in this interaction with a beer in front of you and there's a great sign on a pub and Northern Ireland that says no Wi-Fi please talk to each other. And that's a perfect example of stuff. And as a traveler, what a great untrained getting into connecting with the locals. Absolutely. Is it right that you'd better sit at the bar than at a table if you want to speak absolutely. That's a practical tip. You sit at the bar you walk into an example because it's my hometown, but you're walking and there's an awful lot sitting at the bar account and he's the best guy to talk to because he knows everybody in the room who's a tourist wears to go what the weather is going to be like tomorrow, and even if he doesn't know he'll lie about it. And it's all part of the entertainment. Entertainment. He's like, he's like an entertainment machine..

Ireland Rick Steves Kieran O'Hare southwest of dingle Peninsula Muhammad Ali Dara Ellen Muhammad Gillette Kerry Illinois dingle Gale Dublin U.S.
"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Means the honed of cullen now. I've walked by that many times. I've never really appreciated it. It sort of enlivened your experience when you know the stories. Did you learn that in school. Did your parents teach it to you. Did you read a book. How would you know these kinds of legend. Yes learned it in school. But the eighteen hundreds we had this celtic revival and people like william butler yeats and other great artistic irish people brought these legends back to life in poetry and songs learn about them in school but we also hear about the poems and songs laughing all the time out it so it comes up in your music all the time. Yeah and also our art joe. That was fun to hear stevens. Can i just had the whole kuku. Saga is called the ulster cycle And one of my favorite parts of the cyclists demand of ulster were gathered at a big games The king of ulster boasted loudly that his two horses could outrun anything in the kingdom and one drunken minor chief close by said. My wife could run faster than those so the king made him proves and his life would be forfeit. If the woman didn't win the race fortunately for this man he was married to a woman with a little bit of magic and she won the race but she was also forced to run naked and she was heavily pregnant and when she collapsed over the line having beaten the two horses and saved her husband's life she gave birth to twins who with onto hob legends of their own but a goddess named bucker was looking down she was not happy with the treatment of a pregnant woman so she called a curse on the men of ulster and the course worth that every year for over receivable future for three or four days in a particular mont. The men of ulster would be confined to bed with the pangs of childbirth. So i always got a great reaction from the women under coach. But i was just amazed that you guys both know both of these legends and that right there is just scratching the surface of you. Guys it's a deep appreciation of the history and the heritage in mythology and it goes way back so you do need to have kind of an understanding first of all how far back to those stories go. It's impossible to tell because they were only handed down in an oral tradition. We one of the very influential people in celtic or gaelic society was the storyteller. The bart before Christianity arrived in knowledge that we had no written language. Stories were not written down until the sixth seventh and eighth century and written by monks sometimes with a little bit of embellishment to make it all pre christian. Not right. yeah the fact that they weren't christian obviously dates it a bit at there. Were two thousand years right. Well and in the stories you see a talks about the types of weapons used so there's some bits of contemporary evidence there that would put this to around five hundred busy five hundred. Never take no stephen when we go back to five hundred bc. We have all this movement to people's and just very briefly give us ervin overview got angles saxons and celts. And then he got. Norman's and vikings has just kinda define how all that mixes together. Yes important to say though that the british isles are the british and irish aisles. At this time that we're talking about when cucolo was running around. Were all celtic generally see. That's fundamentally was all celtic and then what happens to celts. Had an empire that stretched from croatia and northern italy. All the way through. France done and to spain an open to britain and ireland. But they didn't have any common king or we were. We were a cultural empire. There was no political empire. Lisa in spain and brittany and france. There are also celtic. Exactly the romans went to war with the celts. Which kelt comes from cal. Toy which is greek for dirty smelly barbarian or something to that effect and they They started crushing us. Sending us into the fringes open to brittany up into galicia that you just said. And then when they cartland into scotland and wales and also cornwall in the south to hang on and they never came to ireland the romans so the celtic culture lived on there whereas in the rest of the countries it became more a fringe clear the romans and and later what are the angles and the saxons. Then they were the germanic tribes. Who came in to britain. After the romans were were the roman. I wish the celts and then the angles saxons took that land that the romans were running after rome fell yes. The celts. don't have a connection to. The romans are to the angles and the saxons germanic so an angles came over and made angle land england. Yes now then you got the normans and you got the vikings. Vikings came first and then the normans. Yes and the normans of course are descended from the vikings who came from scandinavia. Don't into northern france okay so it really that movement from people up in the north that came and they were just warrior tribes and they terrorize and settle different areas. So all that works together today when we want to travel on ireland. Let's just talk about some of the sites. You might see joe. If you're driving around ireland you wanna see different kinds of mysterious sites stonehenge age sites sites that go back to the places stonehenge. We have some remarkable neolithic monuments and our at at the most famous would be new. Grange sony Less than an hour's drive north of dublin. And then and then we we know about stone circles in england in ireland at we have lots of stone circles That i know of one just a small stone circle we know nothing about it or the dentist there outside the town of ken mair well and when you when you travel around dingle peninsula for example one of our favorite places in the southwest of ireland. It's like an open air archaeological museum everywhere. You look. there's these mysterious stone structures that date back to over a thousand years ago in celtic crosses to me are just very evocative. The celtic cross. That's the early christians artem. They used the mythology that was already there and the worship systems that were already there and they incorporated them into christianity on the celtic cross incorporates. The sun a circle into the crucifix. And that's is that a way to make pagan people a little more comfortable with the nabulyato to incorporate they're not necessarily worship song but their belief that the song everything. That's gordon badge. This is travel with rick. Steves were talking about celtic and ancient ireland or guides are joe darcy. Steven mcphillips our phone. Number's eight seven seven. Three three three seven. Four to five and brent is on the phone from columbus. In ohio brent. Thanks for calling one. Thanks for taking my call. Yeah how's your experience in ireland when it comes to You know mysterious spits of the past. Well i'm actually planning a trip to scotland and ireland coming up. And i've read so much about the fairy forts and ferry mounds and some of the ferry gardens and really interested in where i might be able to best experience or see some of that. And how do i respectfully bring that up as a topic. Because i understand there might be some a little bit of some superstition around that and how i bring it up. Might be kind of important stephen. Any thoughts for brent brent. It's good that you've asked the question because there is a little bit of sensitivity around. There's people that you would say. Can you show us where the ferry ford isn't. Everybody will know where the ferry ford is. But not everybody will believe in it but we do have a lot of respect for it. So it's good that you're gonna be sensitive about people will embrace you two and there's people in every parish every village in ireland who happy to take you to the ferry ford or share the legends with you but also tell you the doom that awaits dare you upset the ferry fort because you took me to a place stephen. In dingo were the road was straight and then it actually went around ferry. Ford could have continued to go straight. But you didn't want to disturb it. That's right yeah. And you say that popping up everywhere people changing role directions and not not wanting to cut down hawthorn trees in the middle of a field and certainly not wanting to damage a stolen throat. so brent should say when. He's talking to his irish friend. Excuse me is there. I mean it was rookie to ask for a very fort. Just.

ireland Vikings bucker gaelic society cucolo william butler kelt france cullen joe spain stevens britain Grange sony ervin ken mair southwest of galicia stephen croatia
"dingle peninsula" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"dingle peninsula" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"They're really popular are you can do them all over the place. is especially famous for because they get the best waves in ireland Simply because of the location bread it's more popular among the younger generation than anything. I know family members still went up. There they lova and they were of an older age as well so it has something for everyone but the real hot spot donegal is definitely the league cliffs. These cliffs are dramatic is the only way to ca. Put them delake rages. They only have one side that you can fall off if that makes sense. They're like you can walk along these small little Would be safe and get clean of experience. That's what these cliffs are like. And they're about an hour and a half from donegal airport. I was there once again. I've been gone once. When i went on our trip now employment to go back this the place i really wanna go back to disown roy hair if you see pictures of these cliffs to sunrises here are incredible actually follow a few people on like instagram. Still fund. their wakened old butler's four in the morning and then they're going to catch. The sunrise is here and it's like wow. This is incredible. You don't get this year. The one thing we didn't say about this part of the world it sort of true when i was talking about the dingle peninsula but it's true the pictures i'm seeing donegal also is it's very much a windswept landscape. It's kind of like the joke about. If you get lost in the icelandic forest what do you do. Stand up there. They're not a lot of trees. It's wide open rock and fields and such. So you've got these spectacular views of miles and miles from on top of these clips that you're talking about here because there's there's nothing to break the view. There's no trees to speak of just so open. I think that's why a lot of people call them for the surfing as well..

donegal airport ireland roy dingle peninsula butler donegal
"dingle peninsula" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"dingle peninsula" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Another talking about Advise anyone if they're taking a road trips. Be careful on the roads yes won. The roads are shocked Onto the drivers their use them roads on these fellows are rootless. They don't care they don't see you someone that's not from there i've driven on a few different continents at this point. I didn't find the drivers in ireland to be bad. And when you're on the motorway going from dublin down the colonia or corker. Something like that. The roads are great. But then you get off the roadway and you're on a little narrow road and you're driving across a stone bridge that was not meant for cars and that stonewall is really close to your rear view mirror and things like that. You should know that car insurance is more expensive in ireland. Think there's a reason for it. It's more likely that you're gonna scrape off your mirror than it is. I think that you're going to get into a bad accident as long as you're paying attention and not just watching the scenery but i didn't mind driving in ireland but it is challenging as you get out to the west and he get out to some of those little tiny roads and of course if you're on the ring of kerry then you add the buses to it and that adds a little more just a little more stress. That's the worst thing during kerry like. It's beautiful don't get me wrong. It's just it's not the tourist. it's the bosses. You're going down these small roads and you're like hey amoah gonna get past the bulls on. This rallied underlying double decker bosses. Yeah it's a little more challenging. And i'll have to say i've driven the ring of kerry loved it. I probably more a fan of the dingle peninsula so you basically from where we were here wherein killarney we can go out to the west to go to the ring of kerry or we can go up a little to the north and out to the west to go to.

ireland corker kerry dublin amoah bulls dingle peninsula
"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Traveling in Ireland

Traveling in Ireland

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Traveling in Ireland

"Now off the beaten tracks can still be a very well known location. It can still be very popular but it probably will be. Our reload will require a little bit. More standing on your part. So for me i one of those would be the baskets plastic more on just off the dingle peninsula there you can get a ferry from dingle and you go ahead for the day or you can get a ferry out and a new book. The cottages and stay there overnight and and the baskets for d. initiative's were home to pigs sayers and pig sayers Was on the high school honors irish syllabus. As an autobiography that you you just went through torture to have to study and it's probably because of this woman that the island is famous will ish is a may zing all in capital letters another island. I have to say he's going to and draw my so again and that would be skinny and again that's down you would go down. Oh my goodness gotten the name of the village. Frago go dan to get very an oak port mcghie and you can get you can go after the ferry takes an hour and a half to go out from the ferry and there's common the whole way israelite dependent as to whether you get onto the island but you can an amazing obama god is really is. It's unbelievable lucy. The gannet colonies see pumpkins on that. Chart put your neither into boats and washer. Or you're nauseous. you probably i mean roads motor. so let's do. It has nothing to do with before before we go onto that. The skelly eggs are one of those places obviously Star wars made them even more popular. There are limited numbers of boats. That can go out to this colleagues. It is whether dependent do not want to just give yourself one day just in case the weather canceled you and you definitely want to go out but also that is not necessarily safe for everyone. No i would agree now. Here's your sister. Because even though i absolutely wanted to see it is seven hundred phase bo psy level. There are no handrails. There is no safety.

Frago sayers dan obama
"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Travel WITH Stephanie Abrams!

Travel WITH Stephanie Abrams!

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Travel WITH Stephanie Abrams!

"Part and western part of ireland To take care of your four vacation rental houses that in ireland would be called self-catering cottages and take care of the coffee shop that you won their little gift shop and whatnot I thought you had been inspired by what they did in australia. But that's not. The case knows just just an accident. Fortunate accident where you kinda desperate in twenty twenty to get people because i'm with lockdowns and whatnot getting staff to do anything would have been a challenge will. Yeah we're definitely worried to vote us Yeah we said we. We literally put one facebook also an it it absolutely never it. I don't know how it happened was brilliant and it was amazing to see so much interest i suppose even worldwide interest in you know so many people interested in the basket islands. Well for the moment. let's talk about what. What do the two people that. You're hiring to live on the island. Where these four self-catering cottages and the little business that you run that's a coffee shop or whatever What are their responsibilities. What are they have to do It's it's just just just turning overdose so making sure to houses are clean and tidy and looked after for the next guest two houses you see they all. There's no electricity out there so it's gas stoves and And fire and Solid fuels fire stoves to for heating so not. A people wouldn't be familiar with that. So they need to make sure the house clean and tidy for two new guests who arising out and then they need to make sure that they're they're they know how to light defy your work the gas cookers and an anything anything like that. You know some people out of their comfort zone out there so just to make sure their time anyone's questions or queries. Yeah we what you look. Coker we call a stove and oven little. We have a little language thing turtle to jump there Yeah well we call cooking schools. You guys call cookery schools. So there's all vocabulary and i've done features on ballot melas cookery school and the cookery school at held castle and there used to be all of the corey school at a castle. Leslie up and county money. And but when the executive chef moved onto another resort that ran into some obstacles. I don't know that they're even running it anymore but They built a gorgeous kitchen. And whatever are for students to learn and do and whatever but now for the people in my audience who when this of covid thing lifts would be interested to coming to the dingle peninsula and going to basket island and maybe saying one of these houses that you operate under the name. The what is it. The great blasted island experience and the website. People is great basket island dot net. But you'll find a link at sap. Rooms dot net in the show notes so not to worry bite before we get into focusing on that and you know what the experience would be like staying there. I really thought it might be a good idea for us to explore. You know the experience of how do you get there. I mean talking about an island so you gotta make your way to the dingle peninsula which is in the western part of county kerry and now how how often are their boats. That will take you out to the basket islands. Well it's all old voter are wetter dependent. There's no it's the most westerly prior of the country so the next piece of land. Dr basket islands would be newfound canada if you went. Us so you can imagine are prevailing winds are from the west so we get fairly even a small breeze will will make the see quite rough there too. It's very very dangerous very very dangerous. Stretch water across from the mainland to the to the baskets. So there's only about one hundred days in the whole year. Maybe maybe hundred twenty that you can actually access the island by voice and you can go from dingle from then tree from dingle harbour which is nice and easy to get on the board and you might see bit away light on the way out you can go from venturi and you can also ashore to crossing from don quinn. Which is just two. Two miles across is the wildlife. You're referring to dolphins you'd see so we used to have a dog dingo dot when he disappeared. Target for thirty eight years phobia disappear Last winter two months ago. no yeah. He was here tortilla to her. You would have seen honky everyday. You would see common dolphins minke waves and the right time of the year. We have pictures of him. Yeah poorly fungi. He's gone tis pity. Yeah oh. I'm so sorry to hear that he was he was like the town mascot good. Yeah he absolutely made. That's a shame of saris a but so you you take a boat now if you made a reservation for let's say four nights and you took one of the boat services that runs out the basket islands and you arrived and on your third night. An unexpected unpredicted unforeseen storm whips up. You may wind up being there more than the four nights see. What brands is that. Now right they have some flexibility. You would. It's very unlikely because the forecaster socal It could it could easily happen. Yeah if you stuck there until they're wetter pro into the weather satellite again. Well we got stuck for five months in ireland because the planes were flying regardless of what the weather was. But you know what. I wouldn't give back those five months for all the money in the world. They were the happiest most joyful lovely experience and i. I rarely ever use the word stuck. As a way of explaining are being marooned on the island that is ireland. And a sh- listen. I didn't leave was some some guests have got stuck on the island even.

australia five months facebook Two miles ireland don quinn two twenty twenty third night basket island two houses canada two people venturi four nights basket islands one one hundred days Last winter two months ago thirty eight years
"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Travel WITH Stephanie Abrams!

Travel WITH Stephanie Abrams!

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Travel WITH Stephanie Abrams!

"Got your bags packed yet. Here's travel with stephanie. Abrams entered traveling. Companion david is be. The magic is happening. Yankee candle village in south deerfield mass one of new england's most popular attractions. The village is a unique entertaining world of fun fantasy food and fragrance for the whole family. It's also the world's largest candle shop where kids and grown-ups can make their own candles. The village is home to the enchanting black forest where it snows. You're route santa's workshop where he welcomes visitors. Every day of the year hanoverian. Christmas village filled with sparkling holiday ornaments in addition to over four hundred thousand candles. You'll find toys gifts and more from great names. Like pandora and vera. Bradley him with tasty treats from yankee. Gandhi fresh fudge and popcorn pless. Every day is a holiday or sit down with the family for a wonderful meal at the award. Winning chandler's restaurant. Yankee candle village in south deerfield mass where families come for the candles and stay for the fine take the mass pike. Anyone exit twenty. Four cure sow the island that offers vacationers fifty five cultures wrapped in history and terming traditional european architecture. Like those you'd find in the netherlands but dressed in southern caribbean sherbert colors. Curious capital city will m said is a unesco world heritage city waiting for you to explore its many attractions and when you've whipped up an appetite and thirst after sightseeing and visiting your choice of over sixty diving snorkeling sites complete with intimate coves and beaches. You'll find a wide variety of cafes gourmet restaurants local eateries and markets to satisfy every palate slide into cure sows live and let live way of life curious. How feel it for yourself visit curious. How dot com or call toll. Free eight hundred three to eight seventy two twenty two. That's eight hundred three to eight. Seventy two twenty two. Here's a unique gift for everyone on your shopping list. Do a meet. The author chat online with stephanie. Abrams after reading rumors her critically acclaimed novel. Just purchase a minimum of five copies of rumors in print or ten in e book format from any online bookseller. Email stephanie three convenient dates and times in two thousand twenty. One when you and your gift. List recipients of rumors are available chat. Perfect for your next book club. Discussion to contact rumors mute up at aol dot com with the dates. And times. And stephanie will confirm this special event ask questions share feedback and be a part of a memorable experience for every gift giving occasion. Filled with conspiracies lies love lust and intrigue contact rumors. Meet up at aol dot com. Visit s dot. Net for details rumors by stephanie. Abrams the perfect and unique gift. For everyone on your shopping list. Own travel with stephanie abrams. I am delighted to have on the line with me live from dingle down on the dingle peninsula which if you're looking at a map of the republic of ireland is in the south west corner and Goal again to s abrahams dot net. Click on travel tv and choose episode two and also i think it's episode fourteen called characters with character in which i interview john moriarty who owns Lord bakers gastronomic restaurant and bar in dingle great food. great atmosphere. Great people and john is truly a character and you'll see me sit by the fireplace We're on each side of the fireside having our chat in the restaurant you'll love it. That's in episode. Fourteen episode to is called captivating. Carry a starts out in the limerick. You can find your way to limerick make a left turn to dingle so Do you do anything else or your life. Revolves around these cottages and the gift shop. That's their no. I don't turn us two minutes Probably have eventually hopefully if their workloads down which which which it is. We're we're getting the phase. The standard is getting higher every year. And we're getting jobs so hopefully when this hopefully once we have a small bit more. Don't have to put my attention as for. But at the moment my life revolves around the basket highlands reading pretty much. My family in the basque died. And so when when i contacted you You are busy getting the fire. Ready to warm the house before your children got home and I heard you clunking and scraping. And whatever i don't know it sounded if i can comparative sounds in our fireplace. It sounded like you were taking a little shovel. And taking out the ashes from the last fire Because it was kind of scraping sound going on there. What were you doing. Yeah that's exactly soon. okay man. Fire put a nuclear colin. Tim brown wow you know they also make peat briquettes they look like charcoal briquettes but they say pete and i don't know if you can get them in america i should try. I really has nothing. More wonderful than peat fire but We generally have woodfires as apparently you do as well so You've been up to some mischief. I'm looking apparently you have. This is not the first time that you are looking for two people to come and live on blessed island and Oversee being caretaker of the four cottages and The gift shop and a tea room or something as well. Is it yet. Just their coffee. Shoppers close okay Have you done this before. Look for look for someone to staff to run the comedy to run the now but i did do it as a kind of. I don't know it sounded like it's a contest. It isn't just a apply for a job kind of thing. Well it is. We didn't it was never intended to be contest. We we just put out the application asked. Your reaction didn't think we were worried before we put out the application. We were worried that would actually want job and want to live on the island for six months and by the end of the year we have sixty thousand people emailed us regard physician so i suppose we could bear. Go to ten percent of that. Wow and outta so..

john moriarty america six months two people stephanie abrams two minutes eight hundred Abrams Tim brown sixty thousand people ten percent new england Bradley two thousand fifty five cultures over four hundred thousand can vera Fourteen episode john three
"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Traveling in Ireland

Traveling in Ireland

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"dingle peninsula" Discussed on Traveling in Ireland

"It's likely that they are going to be restrictions on the number of visitors attractions and visitor. Centers in the coming year and while it removes the impulsiveness from your explorations for those tours and sites that you really really want to visit. I just i highly recommend making a booking if they take them to be sure that you are going to get that experience that you've been looking forward to stay current on rules and regulations as you make your plans. Be sure to research those locations. You plan to visit know what their rules are for visitors and be ready to abide by them. When you are looking to book your flights i first of all i recommend booking them early and also. Don't expect to find really amazing bargains. The airlines are working to entice you to book your flight and you may find some deals. But it's more likely you're going to find very lenient change policies but you have to remember that flight routes have been reduced. There are routes that are no longer even available and the number of flights into ireland have been they've cut almost maybe even only a third of them are flying right now so just remember that. There are not as many flights going which means as people are able to travel or a comfortable traveling demand will be up and supply will still be low so book early. Don't expect amazing deals but you can still look for good deals and just know those change policies. I do have an article it's called booking your flight to ireland and it teaches you how to set flight alerts with three easy easy to use tools and offers tips on how to get the best airfare. So if you need some tips on booking a flight that is going to be a great resource for you. Now as you're thinking of where you're going to stay in what you're going to do. I really do advise staying fewer places and taking more day trips. It's a perfect year to explore those hidden spots of ireland and get out of the busy tourism centers. I have a podcast. Ireland's natives to ireland's most popular location so it lists the most popular areas in ireland. As well as those places that will give you a very similar feel and experience but just aren't going to have as many people so do have a listen to that i when you thinking again about things to do plan more time outdoors. Ireland is an amazing country to get outside and explore. Ireland is an island so there are so many beautiful. Amazing cliff walks. You're going to find secret. Beaches that are kind of hidden down these little bitty roads there's mountain biking hill walking. Or maybe they'll just come upon a ruin that time and most people have forgotten. I do have some book recommendations on my website for resources that can help you with that. The ancient east by neil jackman and the wild atlantic way also by jackman and then felicity hayes mccoy has a great guy to the dingle peninsula. Those are just three books that are going to be really really helpful as you make those plans to get off that tourist trail and then i highly recommend that you join me over on facebook. The ireland family vacations facebook page is where share news and updates from ireland as it hits my newsfeed so anytime i find out about restrictions or lockdowns or reopenings..

neil jackman Ireland ireland facebook three books jackman first three easy easy to use tools ancient east third wild atlantic way
Locked Down in Switzerland and Belgium

Travel with Rick Steves

05:29 min | 2 years ago

Locked Down in Switzerland and Belgium

"Start with Stephen mcfeely he operates being be on Ireland's dingle peninsula in just before the pandemic head Stephen an interest in the hotel Oberland in October and Switzerland that's where he's had to ride out the first few months of the global lockdown good and. My goodness. My Irish friend is learning Spitzer dykes. Good here in the Alps where I've been for four months. Now in splendid isolation, my plan originally was just to come for February and March, but I've I'm still here right well, what does the vibe in Switzerland right now there's a positive vibe. The society is reopening. Tourism travel has started again just no we're on the same level as it was before we had two weekends where there was crazy crowds here huge big crowds from all over Switzerland everybody who was here was from Switzerland or had to be from Switzerland. They weren't necessarily all Swiss because there's lots of international people living in Geneva and Derek and whatnot but everybody from within the barger of Switzerland over with crowds, and then it just died and Monday to. Friday went back to being really really quiet. Okay. Well, this is sort of the very beginnings of the rekindling of tourism I would imagine it'll be people traveling with within their own countries first, and then traveling within Europe, and then finally international travel and transatlantic travel. Yes. That's exactly what we're seeing. The borders here have just reopened. So we're expecting Germans and some Austrians and maybe some French to come now also, I don't anticipate huge numbers like that would have been heretofore. One. Very noticeable thing in the Valley of course, there's no American visitors. As you know, the valley also is very popular with. Chinese travelers Indians many people from Dubai and Saudi Arabia would come here and they're not here this year. So there's a noticeable difference there. So the people getting the real cultural change would be the French speaking. Swiss. German speaking part of his Switzerland and not even leaving their own country exactly. Fifty percent of our guests. Last week were French speaking Swiss and it was the first time I've ever actually met those people and I would say to them. Are you French Swiss would say no, no, we are. All MOM and so I I learned something new immediately the K. The identify as swirl. They were saying exactly what you just said they said it's like we are in a different country it's very dramatic here it's different toossion either those on the do shut down it was really cool. They were very excited to see a different part of their own country. So that was wonderful. Now Stephen you own a hotel in Ireland in Dingle Peninsula and now you own a hotel in Switzerland in Loudoun valley two of my favorite places as a businessman working in both these countries how do you compare the support getting from the government and how the two governments are dealing with this crisis? Well, the difference is. Very. Big. I'm still on team. Ireland. So I want to be positive about my own country, but there's not a lot of support coming. Heretofore in Switzerland for example, within two weeks of the crisis occurring. The. Swiss Federal Council which is the Swiss government offered ten percent of the previous year's turnover and So that's quite a considerable amount of money and they offered that as a loan which was repayable over seven years. Zero percent interest. So they're not looking to profit from it and in Ireland we really struggled to get some assistance. And we got ten thousand euros of overdraft line of credit and but repayable at seven and a half percent interest in Switzerland. We got three hundred thousand. So it's quite a big difference there no-interest at all. No interest at all. Of course, Switzerland may have much stronger and deeper reservists than Ireland, but they were able to immediately come up with assistance very little bureaucracy paperwork, and they immediately got to help us in Ireland. The experience was just simply much different to the government really weren't as proactive for as immediate as were here in Switzerland. The roots here what's around her a lot less strict as well There is a two meter rule here, but I haven't seen anybody wearing masks very much, which is kinda shocking for me because I know in Ireland the whole north of is people should be wearing masks. People definitely are observing social distance. One of my friends said to me that the two meter rule has actually brought Swiss people closer together so. That is so insightful to the Swiss society. It's more difficult thing. It's more difficult thing for Irish people or Italian people are Spanish. Two meters distance than it would be for this people or maybe the. Scandinavians. I can see by home people are wondering. Is the Irish pub culture ever going to come back the way it was with social distancing whereas in. Switzerland. Here for me like I'm I'm in the Alps I'm surrounded by fresh air and. Of of lovely space and it's been a wonderful place to be stranded, I don't even want to complain about it because although I I was stranded here for four months. It was the perfect place I felt very safe. I might have felt different if I was in the middle of Zurich or something or Geneva but I felt very safe. I'd in the Alps and it is lovely and peaceful and quiet, and of course, that's what people are coming here for anyway

Switzerland Ireland Alps Stephen Mcfeely French Swiss Dingle Peninsula Swiss Society Swiss Federal Council Spitzer Europe Geneva Swiss Government Dubai Zurich Saudi Arabia Derek Loudoun Valley