21 Burst results for "Dina Temple Reston"

"dina temple raston" Discussed on Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

05:45 min | 3 months ago

"dina temple raston" Discussed on Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

"Back in December, a small group of cyber warriors landed in Ukraine as part of a stealthy mission. It was less than three months before Russia would invade. Russia has for weeks been massing troops and tanks along the Ukrainian border. The group was from U.S. cyber command, the cyber arm of the military, and they'd been deployed to help Ukraine hunt for Russian malware and their networks. Remember, this was a time when no one seems sure whether troops on the border were part of a head fake. My best guess is still that he's not going to invade. Or were preparation for war. We have reason to believe the Russian forces are planning to attend to attack Ukraine in the coming week. A major in the Marine Corps led the U.S. team. And her guidance was this. Hey, go help them. And make sure that they're ready in terms of anything that may occur. That's the head of the NSA in cyber con, general Paul nakasone. She called back within the first two weeks and said, hey, instead of coming home for the holidays, we're going to be here for a while. It ended up being more than a while. The teams actually stayed for three months, and they just kept getting bigger. Begins with tan and then we surged to well over 30, and so we had flooded the zone. Given Russia's hacking history Ukraine before the war, people naturally expected Russian hackers to take down Ukraine's power grid or to hobble its communication systems. That didn't happen. And nakasone was careful not to give all the credit to the hunt teams. While I would certainly not say that's the key reason. I think it's a contributing factor. Having ten folks on the ground that are tied back to our command and our agency, that's a power that I think is really helpful. This is the kind of work nakasone talked about last week at the council on foreign relations in D.C.. He was joined by cisa director Jen easterly at an event focused on the importance of collaboration during a war that combined cyber with more conventional forces. And the event was moderated. Thank you so much by me. I'm Dina temple raston.

"dina temple raston" Discussed on Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

03:52 min | 7 months ago

"dina temple raston" Discussed on Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

"Here are some of the big cyber and intelligence stories of the past week. House Democrats have suggested adding an additional $400 million to president Joe Biden's nearly $2.5 billion budget request for the cybersecurity and infrastructure security agency or cisa. The spending bill sets aside some $235 million for cisos cybersecurity efforts and more than a $120 million in infrastructure security integrated operations and risk management. The additional monies are seen as a show of support for the agency, which has already received $1 billion in additional funding in the past year. The Israeli spyware company NSO group is on the block, and an American defense contractor is interested in buying it. L3Harris is said to be in talks to buy the surveillance company, which the Department of Commerce is blacklisted. For its propensity to crack into iPhones of dissonance for various governments. The Washington Post reported that the Biden administration is concerned about the possible deal as it would likely cause counterintelligence headaches and could pose a threat to national security and human rights. And finally, an animal story. Some residents in northwestern Canada lost their Internet connections for 8 hours last week in an outage that has since been attributed to a beaver. The furry one with long teeth. Though the animal was only an accessory to the outage, a local official told Canadian television that a fiber optic cable strung along with a power line was taken down when an Aspen tree fell across the wires. The official said the tree had been downed by nature's architect. Canadian authorities have been chewing on this problem for a while, communications are still at risk, the beaver remains at large. Oh, and remember that contest we announced after our episode on the video game Genshin Impact. We asked you to tell us why Chinese regulators took such a dislike to a song produced out of Taiwan. Listeners from around the world reached out with their answers, and a few of you came up with the correct response. Turns out the composer added Morse code to his song to spell out the message, liberate Hong Kong, the revolution of our times. Three lucky winners will be getting some free click here swag, suki in New York City, Carla in Washington, D.C., and one anonymous listener, in Tokyo, Japan. Today's episode was produced by will Jarvis and Sean powers, and it was edited by Karen duffin, with fact checking from Darren anchor. Ben levenston composed our theme, and original music for the episode. We had additional music from blue Sessions. Click here is a production of the record by recorded future. And we want to hear from you. Please leave us a review and rating wherever you get your podcasts. And you can connect with us at click your show dot com. I'm Dina temple raston, and we'll be back on Tuesday. Spies don't talk. It's the cardinal rule of the business. But on foreign policies podcast I spy, we get them to open up. I'm your host, Margot martindale, and on each episode of I spy, we get one intelligence operative to tell one dramatic story. On season four, we hear from a CIA officer who trained the contras in Central America and FBI agent who helped crack a Cold War spy case and a Secret Service agent who helped catch an international hacker. We also talked to a former CIA man who has come to believe espionage causes more harm than good. Season four of I spy is out now, follow and listen wherever you get your podcasts..

president Joe Biden cybersecurity and infrastructu NSO group Biden administration cisa Department of Commerce Washington, D.C. The Washington Post Sean powers Harris Karen duffin Darren anchor Ben levenston headaches House
"dina temple raston" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"dina temple raston" Discussed on KCRW

"Commercial flight to land in his country last week in order to arrest a journalist onboard. The White House says the U. S will reimpose full blocking sanctions against nine Belarusian state owned enterprises and will work with allies to develop a list of targeted sanctions against key members of Lukashenko's regime. The Biden administration called diverting the plane in the subsequent arrest, a quote direct affront to international norms. The European Union is also discussing slapping Belarus and more sanctions with leaders meeting in Portugal, describing the incident as state piracy. Russian President Vladimir Putin called the criticism with Lukashenko and outburst of emotions. Dave Mystic NPR news The White House says President Biden's planned meeting with Russia's Vladimir Putin next month is still on despite a new hacking attack aimed at the U. S federal government. As NPR's Dina Temple Raston reports Microsoft of financial supporter of NPR is blaming Russian hackers for the cyber intrusion. This week, They found hackers in a bunch of international development in human rights organization systems. And as best as they can tell, the hackers broke into a company that was helping us a I D with marketing. And they use that hack to send phishing emails. You know, Microsoft told us it wasn't a huge hack, they said Maybe as many as 3000 accounts for either hacked or threatened, maybe as many as 150 institutions, but they think the actual numbers are probably a lot smaller than that. Dispute over reparations is disrupting the centennial commemoration of the Tulsa Race massacre when a white mob attacked the thriving black community of green wood as many as 300 people were killed and what was known as Black Wall Street was destroyed. NPR's Debbie Elliott reports, organizer's have called off a headline event after no agreement could be reached overpayments to survivors. Monday's remember and rise ceremony was to honor the three living survivors of the 1921 told so race massacre and was to feature singer songwriter John Legend and Georgia voting rights activist Stacey Abrams. It was called off after negotiations broke down over the amount of payments to survivors and descendants of the attack. Talz attorney to Mario Solomon Simmons represents them in a lawsuit seeking reparations. So fire is and descendants were denied the opportunity to even be a part of the Tulsa race masses into your commission. This is something that has been a slap in the face President Joe Biden is scheduled to be in Tulsa on Tuesday to mark the centennial. Debbie Elliott NPR news This is NPR news. In a London courtroom today. An 18 year old man was charged with conspiracy to commit murder in the shooting last weekend of a high profile black lives matter, activist Sasha Johnson, who was an Oxford University graduate, was shot in the head and remains hospitalized in critical condition. Colombia's president is deploying military forces to the southwestern city of Cali. The move comes after at least three people died in anti government protests yesterday. Tens of thousands of Colombians have been demonstrating for a month. Protests were triggered by tax changes. But demands have broadened since then movie theaters across the U. S a re opening more than a year after covert 19 closed them. NPR's Mandali del Barco reports on what's opening on big screens, the National Research group reports at 70% of movie goers air now comfortable going back to movie theaters. People out there. Emily.

Dina Temple Raston Sasha Johnson Stacey Abrams Debbie Elliott John Legend Mario Solomon Simmons Tuesday Lukashenko 70% Microsoft Dave Mystic last week Portugal Monday yesterday This week today Oxford University next month U. S
"dina temple raston" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"dina temple raston" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Joining us today. We learned this week that thousands of accounts had 150 different humanitarian organizations were reached. In an attack that was first disclosed by Microsoft. Dina Temple Raston of NPR's investigations team has been tracking the recent Russian hacking operations and join Justina. Thanks for being with us, you're welcome and What can you tell us about what happened? So Microsoft Cybercrimes team found these hackers and they were in the systems of a group of international development organizations on what they think happened is that the hackers broke into an email marketing company that U S. A. I D was using a company called Constant Contact. And once the hackers had broken in, they sent fishing me emails out to other organizations. But those emails looked like they were coming from U S. A. I D And when people got those emails and clicked on the links inside of them, unbeknownst to them, they were installing malware on their networks. And the malware essentially allowed the hackers to read their e mails to steal information and even plant more malware. We should mention the constant contact is one of NPR's funders. Tina. Do we know who's behind the hack? Well, yes, I talked to Tom Burke yesterday. He's the vice president of customer security and trusted Microsoft. And he told us that it's pretty clear These hackers were linked to the Russian intelligence service, known as the SPR Curious. The association with the SVR comes from what the techniques we see them using, and from the kinds of targets that they are targeting. So it's a collection of circumstantial evidence. You might say that point in a consistent direction, and he says they think that actually was a subset of the Russian group that hacked solar winds. They're also known as a PT 29 or cozy Bear, and Microsoft thinks this because they saw a lot of the techniques and code that they saw in this new hack seemed overlap with things that cozy Barry done in the past. And they didn't want to say unequivocally that it's the exact same people that hacked solar winds. Maybe it's a subset, but what they're not equivocating about is that this hack came from Russia. And Scott. The reason that's important is because it's yet another indication that nation state actor was involved your average cyber criminal. They don't target these kinds of institutions, and they certainly don't take the time to tailor their malware like they did in this case. Do you know in a world in which hacks have now become everyday occurrences? How significant is this particular hack? The hack isn't such a big deal. Microsoft appears to have spotted this one pretty quickly, but it's the context in which it arrives. That's really important. After the major solar winds breach, president Biden told the Russians to stop and he took some real steps, he launched sanctions. More sanctions, even expelled diplomats and that doesn't seem to have been enough. And well, this hack isn't nearly as sophisticated as the solar winds hack. It's the same kind is something called a supply chain attack. So that means that the hackers didn't directly target the company's heir institutions they were interested in, but instead they focused on suppliers, finding a company's sort of further down the chain. And now here we are, with the same group from Russia launching yet another supply chain attack and president Biden is scheduled to mate with Vladimir Putin in June. How does this hack play and any discussions that they might have? Well, that's the big question. I mean, what will the U s response be President Biden has already warned Russia not to do these supply chain hacks. And now like a finger in his eye, they've launched another one so The question really is whether this is going to force the U. S to respond in some way. In a temple Raston of NPR's investigations unit. Thank you so much. You're welcome. Vice President Kamila Harris became the first woman to deliver commencement address at the U. S. Naval Academy. Remarks yesterday laid a lot of responsibility to be to the graduate, saying they will be among those defending this country from new threats, including cyber attacks. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith reports. To a stadium of vaccinated midshipmen in.

Tom Burke Vladimir Putin Tamara Keith Tina Microsoft Dina Temple Raston June NPR Scott yesterday U. S. Naval Academy Justina today Russia this week Constant Contact first Kamila Harris Vice President President
"dina temple raston" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"dina temple raston" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Big oil gets a shakeup and major winds for climate activists as ever. We're looking forward to hearing from you tweet us at one egg. Live from NPR News. I'm nor Rahm. The Biden administration released its proposed budget Friday It calls for homeland security to invest in high tech equipment on the border. Rather than a physical wall. But as NPR's John Burnett reports it would not effectively change funding for Immigration and Customs enforcement, which advocates were hoping Biden would cut be eagerly anticipated. 2022 budget proposal reflects Biden's pledged to stop construction of the border wall. DHS Secretary Alla 100 New Yorkers is asking for a billion dollars to modernize ports of entry. Better detect the smuggling of drugs in humans. There's nothing for former President Trump's border wall, and the administration seeks to cancel unspent funds. Biden's budget includes $2.8 billion for ice immigrant detention nearly the same amount Congress gave the Trump Administration last year. Immigrant advocates were hoping Biden would signal a reduction of the government's reliance on the detention of those awaiting their asylum hearings. Ultimately, it will be Congress that sets the budget for 2022. John Burnett. NPR NEWS summer camps may be able to ease up on masking and physical distancing if their staff and campers are fully vaccinated against Cove in 19. MPR's Ping Wang reports on new guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at Sunday in overnight camps this summer, it may be possible for campers to sing a place for its and weave baskets together as in the before Times Commander Aaron Sabir shots of the CDC says that if the staff and kids are fully vaccinated, there's no need for masking. There's no need for distancing. There's no need for screening testing. If someone happened to be exposed for someone with covert 19. They don't need to quarantine so it really is this potential towards mentally summer toe have a pre pandemic camp experience. Most cancer likely to be mixed settings were only some people are vaccinated. In these cases, experts they cancel probably require masks and physical distancing, but they will still provide a respite for kids who have been staring at screens all year. Ping Wang NPR news White House says it believes that U. S. Government agencies have largely fended off the latest cyber attack, apparently by Russian hackers. Microsoft of financial supporter of NPR says it appears hankers linked to the Russian intelligence service broke into his many as 150 humanitarian organizations. NPR's Dina Temple Raston has more this week They found hackers in a bunch of international development in human rights organization systems and as best as they can tell, the hackers broke into a company. That was helping us a I D with marketing, and they use that hack to send phishing emails. You know, Microsoft told us it wasn't a huge hack, they said maybe as many as 3000 accounts for either hacked or threatened, maybe as many as 150 institutions, but they think the actual numbers are probably a lot smaller than that. NPR's Dina Temple Reston reporting. This is NPR. Republicans in the Senate stop the Senate Friday from voting on a proposal to establish a bipartisan inquiry into the January 6th attack on the U. S. Capitol. The Senate voted 54 to 35 in favor of considering the legislation short of the 60 votes needed. The vote was largely along party lines. All Democrats supported on Lee, six Republicans joined them. The European Police Network. Europe whole, says it's uncovered an industrial scale cocaine lab in the Netherlands. Teri Schultz reports. Millions of dollars of cash have been seized in the stain 80 Dutch police officers, accompanied by SWAT teams and dogs raided addresses in Rotterdam in The Hague on Wednesday. He found the cocaine lab hidden in a building along with a garage where the criminals equipped vehicles with secret compartments to transport the drugs across Europe. Seven such cars were seized and more than $4 million in cash. Nine people were arrested. The site was linked to her ring broken up in March by French authorities, who found millions of dollars and millions of dollars worth of drugs. That cocaine was traced back to the underground lab and Rotterdam intelligence came from the encrypted messenger system and Crow chat. Infiltrated and dismantled by Dutch and French investigators last year for NPR news. I'm Teri Schultz. The search continues for dozens of people still missing after a boat capsized in Nigeria. Went down Wednesday after striking an object in Nigeria's largest river in Kev E. State. At least 50 people are determined are confirmed dead. Boat accidents are common. Nigeria. I'm Nora Rahm NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the George Lucas Educational Foundation, creator of Edge Utopia for 30 years.

John Burnett Teri Schultz Dina Temple Raston Nigeria Congress Dina Temple Reston Nora Rahm Microsoft $2.8 billion 60 votes Wednesday White House 30 years Nine people 54 Netherlands Sunday NPR Centers for Disease Control an 35
"dina temple raston" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"dina temple raston" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Each student follows a customized learning plan more at math. Maisie, um dot com. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish in Washington, and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. Russian hackers are at it again. The same group that hacked into software made by solar winds appears to have launched another supply chain hack. That's according to Microsoft. The company sent out an alert last night, saying hackers who appear to be linked to the Russian intelligence service broke into the email marketing company. Constant contact in order to impersonate the government agency. U S. A. I, D Dina Temple Raston of NPR's Investigations team has been tracking Russian hacking operations and joins us now. Hey, Dina. Good morning. Hi. Hi. So we should first know that both Microsoft and constant contact our financial supporters of NPR. Okay, so tell us more about what Microsoft discovered. What has this cyber crimes team that's watching for these kinds of intrusions all the time. This week, they found hackers in a bunch of international development in human rights organization systems. And as best as they can tell, the hackers broke into a company that was helping us a I D with marketing. And they use that hack to send phishing emails. You know, Microsoft told us it wasn't a huge hack, they said Maybe as many as 3000 accounts for either hacked or threatened, maybe as many as 150 institutions, but they think the actual numbers are probably a lot smaller than that. And these air phishing emails like we're talking about fake emails that looked like they were from USA Idea. Exactly so unsuspecting recipients would open these emails. They'd click on the links and by doing that the malware would be installed on their systems. And then the malware would basically give the hackers free access. They could steal data. It could infect other computers on these networks. They could read the emails. They could even plant other malware. So we talked to Tom Burt, who's Thieve Ice president of consumer security and trusted Microsoft. He was the guy was behind the advisory last night. And he said that the hackers actually kind of customized the malware, depending on who the target was. These guys are actually doing something. Ah, little different in even before the malware gets installed. They're doing some things to help them understand the environment that they are going to try to install the malware into so they can pick the right malware package. The reason that's important is because that's the kind of thing that nation state hackers do. It's not the kind of thing that common cyber criminals do. They just aren't that careful. Interesting. Okay, so Russian intelligence is definitely behind this hack what? We asked Tom Bird about that, too. And he says Right now, they think it was a subset of the solar winds Hacking group. Here's what he said. We can really be strong about our conclusion that this is a group that's operating from Russia. The association with the SVR comes from what the techniques we see them using and from the kinds of targets that they are targeting. So it's a collection of Circumstantial evidence. You might say that point in a consistent direction. So the group that was behind solar winds is known as a PT 29 or cozy Bear, and Microsoft said that they saw a lot of things that seem to overlap with Kofi's coat. Cozy bear, you see to say, but they don't want to say unequivocally that it is the exact same people. It might be a subset. What they're not equivocating about, though, is that this hack came from Russia. Okay. And is the technique here similar to what was found in the solar winds hack late last year? Yes, No, The solar winds attack was actually really complicated and stealthy, and Microsoft appears to have Seen this latest hack really quickly, and it's much simpler. I mean, the hackers aren't directly targeting companies or institutions They wanna hack. They're focusing on suppliers in this case, just like they were in solar winds. And they're finding a company further down the supply chain like a software company to hack into them Instead, the big question now is what the response is gonna be. President Biden has already warned that Russia shouldn't be doing these attacks and now they've done another one. So the question is whether or not this is going to force a response from the U. S. Yeah, All right. That is NPR investigations. Correspondent Dina Temple Raston. Thank you, Dina. You're welcome. Germany today apologized for genocide in this case the slaughter of tens of thousands of people in the African nation of Namibia. The killings came during the colonial era when German troops stamped out an uprising in Namibia by almost wiping out two tribes. And in France Earlier this week, the government admitted to bearing some responsibility for the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. Joining us to talk about these developments is NPR Africa correspondent Ada Peralta. Welcome back. Hey, thank you for having so to start. Why did Germany say now was the time for this acknowledgement? Yeah. I mean, look, this is a long time coming. Germany and the government of Namibia have been negotiating this for five years. But as you alluded to in your intro there is, you know, quite a bit of introspection happening on the continent of Africa and in Europe, you know, people and governments are trying to come to terms with the brutality. Of colonialism, You know, critics say that Germany and other European countries are looking at African countries as an emerging market, and that might be the reason for this apology. I want to come back to what amends might look like, but first a little bit of the history what happened during this uprising? When was this? Yes, As you mentioned. It happened more than 100 years ago from 1904 to 1908 and Germany was the colonial power and control of Namibia. And there was a rebellion by the Herrero and Anoma tribes and the German government reacted viciously. They took land and cattle and many hereto and Nama people were taken to concentration camps in the Kalahari Desert. On many of them died of starvation there. In the end, scholars estimate that about 80% of the hereto Anoma people were killed during this period. What's been the reaction to the government's plans to offer a billion dollars to help reconstruction and development in Namibia as part of this acknowledgement Tribal leaders, you know, say that this is a deal between two governments and that it doesn't really solve the big problems. They say that this will not lead to reconciliation. And the big sticking point is that they wanted individual reparations. You know, for example, they wanted the German government to buy land from the people of German descent, and then Return it to the descendants of the victims of this genocide. You know, Activists say that the headed O and the number of people are living in poor conditions that they live in crowded, informal settlements and a redistribution of land. They say that that could actually lead to a real reconciliation into a real change in the way that the Herero and the normal people are living. Before I let you go. Can we talk about France admitting to having responsibility in the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. At that time, 800,000 people were killed. What's being said there? Yes. Oh, President. Macron stopped short of issuing an apology on behalf of France. But this is still big news. This has been a source of tension between Rwanda and France because President Paul Kagame, who halted the genocide, his forces stopped. The genocide always saw France is being complicity because they stood by the genocidal regime. And like other western countries, they failed to stop the slaughter of tootsies. But ah, lot like what is happening with Germany and Namibia. France ordered an investigation. They opened up their archives and, you know, they have officially admitted that they bore quote overwhelming responsibility for the genocide. And this week, the leaders of both countries stood side by side, and they said that this marked a new chapter in their relationship. That's NPR's Africa. Correspondent Ater Peralta. Thank you. Thank you, Audie. Progress on an independent commission to investigate the January 6th attack on the Capitol.

Tom Burt Dina Tom Bird Elsa Chang Dina Temple Raston Microsoft Los Angeles Europe Ater Peralta Ada Peralta Washington five years Macron Kalahari Desert 1904 Audie Cornish Rwanda NPR 800,000 people France
"dina temple raston" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"dina temple raston" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's 5 22. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin. The Office of Intelligence and Analysis is a little known agency within the Department of Homeland Security and what that agency did or didn't do in the lead up to the January 6th attack on the U. S Capitol could have big consequences. Today. A Senate panel will examine that very question, and NPR has obtained a report by a former New York Police Department intelligence chief about why DHS did not anticipate the violence that day. Him back and Dina Temple Raston of NPR's investigations team report. The Office of Intelligence and Analysis, or Diana is the intelligence arm of the Department of Homeland Security. And a key part of its job is to provide an advance written analysis of possible domestic threats. These threat assessments on just done for events that might have the potential for violence. Julia Kayyem, former assistant secretary at DHS says that I am a assessments are routine, even for gatherings like the Kentucky Derby or the New Orleans Jazz fest. Its job is to create these threat assessments so that its consumers have a better sense of how to deploy resource is how to think about what a threat maybe, and ahead of January 6th the consumers of an irony assessment. Would have been the Capitol police or the D. C. Metropolitan Police Department. The threat assessment that would have put everyone on notice never came. Mitch Silber is the former head of the New York Police Department's intelligence unit. He's the author of an upcoming Atlantic Council report, which looked at what went wrong ahead of the riots. He says the FBI, the New York Police Department, and DHS all had the information they needed to see that there would likely be violence. What failed, he says was the analysis because when we think about an intelligence agency, they have three functions collecting intelligence. Analyzed the intelligence that you know, when you connect the dots. What does it look like? And when you have that picture, then you warn the appropriate authorities so they can take some actions to mitigate what you think is coming. Former DHS officials and intelligence analysts interviewed by NPR. Make plain that any review of the failures ahead of January. 6th should start with the I n A. It turns out that despite its critical role and identifying threats here at home The division is not seen as a plum assignment. If you're a 23 year old and you want to get into the intelligence business, the fun stuff you're not picking DHS i n A and that has been a struggle for the department from the beginning that sky am again and remember, she used to be the assistant secretary of DHS within the intelligence agencies. DHS. Ayanami was Not an equal partner. It might not even have been viewed as a zit cousin. It was a distant friend that you tolerated who showed up to the party. What makes teaches I in a different from other intelligence agencies is that its priorities have traditionally been set by the White House. The Obama administration focused on Isis and its effects on young people here in the United States. For the Trump administration. It was the border with Mexico and threats from extremists on the left. Todd Rosenbluth, a deputy undersecretary of intelligence is DHS up until 2015 still has contacts in the department. And he believes that the Trump administration was pressuring DHS analysts. They were insisting on a narrative that wasn't true, which made it far harder for I n a You had the president screaming and T fi antifa is behind all this And do you just leadership was very much aligned and accommodating the president. And though there were warnings, raw intelligence from the NYPD warnings from the FBI and threats on social media that the entire world could see I named, never put it all together. In one assessment, DHS has said it provided the general report about threats during the election season. Rosenbloom sees a failure of imagination as part of the problem. The dots were all there. Absolutely. Um, but I mean, I'm among the many who could not conceive of an insurrection against the capital being led by the president of the United States. For Mitch Silber. The way to learn from the right is to see it as a turning point for intelligence officials just is 9 11 was certainly for the last 20 years. We've sort of been externally facing and now obviously, we have to take a look within within within our borders for people who would do the country harm. And that is a different type of challenge. The Biden administration announced last week that it was creating a new branch with an eye in a it will focus under mess tick terrorism, and the House of Representatives has plans to form a bipartisan commission to examine the events of January 6th. Investigators are expected to focus on what happened at I n a until Mac and I'm Dina Temple Raston. NPR NEWS Washington OK, Boomer for those who don't know that's a term of derision said with an eye roll to someone who offers outdated thinking. But 57 year old Gary Ryder says it helped to save his life. Two months ago, Gerry's doctors told him he needed a liver transplant. He's taken medication for another illness, which damaged his liver. But a transplant was going to cost $40,000 in the prospect of raising that much was overwhelming. The first week was the hardest. I really didn't know whether I was coming or going. Jerry's daughter started a go fund me page for the first two months. It raised less than $200 more than $39,000 short. With just months to live very desperately started selling things I've sold my guns sold my hunting equipment, fishing equipment. You know anything that I was able to sell anything included an old air compressor. The ad for that compressor caught the attention of a Facebook group called This is the name of the group Ah car group where everyone talks like boomers. Terry Easterling is a member of The Cole group for a bunch of us get on there and comment, Godless and crank your hog on people trying to sell like lawnmowers and stupid stuff. We're just a bunch of heathens. Basically, the group started by mocking the air compressor ad. But when they learned Gary writer's story, they said, Okay, Boomer will help. Group flooded Gerry's go fund me with donations. He got about $50,000 enough to pay for his transplant and care. Afterwards, I went from the depths of desperation. And thinking, Hey, I got a shot. After all. He also went from being broke to having more than enough money. He stopped accepting donations after reaching his goal and says he wants to pay the extra forward. As for that air compressor I still have it. I never planned to get rid of it left the money to scare confessor in the world. Okay, Boomer for millennial..

Gary Ryder Terry Easterling Steve Inskeep Julia Kayyem Rachel Martin Mitch Silber Dina Temple Raston Todd Rosenbluth FBI NYPD United States D. C. Metropolitan Police Depa NPR DHS House of Representatives Department of Homeland Securit New York Police Department Kentucky Derby $40,000 Facebook
"dina temple raston" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"dina temple raston" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin. The Office of Intelligence and Analysis is a little known agency within the Department of Homeland Security and what that agency did or didn't do in the lead up to the January 6th attack on the U. S Capitol could have big consequences. Today. A Senate panel will examine that very question, and NPR has obtained a report by a former New York Police Department intelligence chief about why DHS did not anticipate the violence that day. IMac and Dina Temple Raston of NPR's investigations team report. The Office of Intelligence and Analysis, or Diana is the intelligence arm of the Department of Homeland Security, and a key part of its job is to provide an advance written analysis of possible domestic threats. These threat assessments aren't just done for events that might have the potential for violence. Julia Kayyem, former assistant secretary at DHS says that I am a assessments are routine, even for gatherings like the Kentucky Derby or the New Orleans Jazz fest. Its job is to create these threat assessments so that its consumers have a better sense of how to deploy resource is how to think about what a threat maybe, and ahead of January 6th. The consumers of an iron. A assessment would have been the Capitol police or the D. C. Metropolitan Police Department. But the threat assessment that would have put everyone on notice never came. Mitch Silber is the former head of the New York Police Department's intelligence unit. He's the author of an upcoming Atlantic Council report, which looked at what went wrong ahead of the riots. He says the FBI, the New York Police Department, and DHS all had the information they needed to see that there would likely be violence. What failed, he says was the analysis because when we think about an intelligence agency, they have three functions collecting intelligence. Analyzed the intelligence that you know, when you connect the dots. What does it look like? And when you have that picture, then you warn the appropriate authorities so they could take some actions to mitigate what you think is coming. Former DHS officials and intelligence analysts interviewed by NPR. Make plain that any review of the failures ahead of January. 6th should start with the I n A. It turns out that despite its critical role and identifying threats here at home The division is not seen as a plum assignment. If you're a 23 year old and you want to get into the intelligence business, the fun stuff you're not picking DHS I n a and and that has been a struggle for the department from the beginning that sky am again and remember, she used to be the assistant secretary of DHS. Within the intelligence agencies. DHS. Ayanami was not an equal partner. It might not even have been viewed as a zit cousin. It was a distant friend that you tolerated who showed up to the party. What makes teaches I in a different from other intelligence agencies is that its priorities have traditionally been set by the White House. The Obama administration focused on Isis and its effects on young people here in the United States. For the Trump administration. It was the border with Mexico and threats from extremists on the left. Todd Rosenbloom, a deputy undersecretary of intelligence, a DHS up until 2015 Still has contacts in the department. And he believes that the Trump administration was pressuring DHS analysts. They were insisting on a narrative that wasn't true, which made it far harder for I n a You had the president screaming and T fi antifa is behind all this. And do you just leadership was very much aligned and accommodating the president and that there were warnings. Raw intelligence from the NYPD warnings from the FBI and threats on social media that the entire world could see. Nate never put it all together. In one assessment, DHS has said it provided to general report about threats during the election season. Rosenbloom sees a failure of imagination as part of the problem. The dots were all there. Absolutely. Um, but I mean, I'm among the many who could not conceive of an insurrection against the capital being led by the president of the United States. For Mitch Silber. The way to learn from the right is to see it as a turning point for intelligence officials just is 9 11 was certainly for the last 20 years. We've sort of been externally facing and now obviously, we have to take a look within within within our borders for people who would do the country harm. And that is a different type of challenge. The Biden administration announced last week that it was creating a new branch with an eye in a it will focus under mess tick terrorism, and the House of Representatives has plans to form a bipartisan commission to examine the events of January 6th. Investigators are expected to focus on what happened at I n a until Mac and I'm Dina Temple Raston. NPR NEWS Washington OK, Boomer for.

Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Julia Kayyem Mitch Silber Todd Rosenbloom FBI NPR United States NYPD Dina Temple Raston D. C. Metropolitan Police Depa House of Representatives DHS January. 6th Department of Homeland Securit Kentucky Derby 23 year New York Police Department White House Today
"dina temple raston" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"dina temple raston" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin. The Office of Intelligence and Analysis is a little known agency within the Department of Homeland Security and what that agency did or didn't do in the lead up to the January 6th attack on the U. S Capitol could have big consequences. Today. A Senate panel will examine that very question, and NPR has obtained a report by a former New York Police Department intelligence chief about why DHS did not anticipate the violence that day. Him back and Dina Temple Raston of NPR's investigations team report. The Office of Intelligence and Analysis, or Diana is the intelligence arm of the Department of Homeland Security, and a key part of its job is to provide an advance written analysis of possible domestic threats. These threat assessments aren't just done for events that might have the potential for violence. Julia Kayyem, former assistant secretary at DHS, says that I any assessments are routine. Even for gatherings like the Kentucky Derby or the New Orleans Jazz fest. Its job is to create these threat assessments so that its consumers have a better sense of how to deploy resource is how to think about what a threat maybe. And ahead of January 6th. The consumers of an irony assessment would have been the Capitol Police or the D. C. Metropolitan Police Department. But the threat assessment that would have put everyone on notice never came. Mitch Silber is the former head of the New York Police Department's intelligence unit. He's the author of an upcoming Atlantic Council report, which looked at what went wrong ahead of the riots. He says the FBI, the New York Police Department, and DHS all had the information they needed to see that there would likely be violence. What failed, he says was the analysis because when we think about an intelligence agency, they have three functions collecting intelligence. Analyzed the intelligence that you know, when you connect the dots. What does it look like? And when you have that picture, then you warn the appropriate, authorities said they could take some actions to mitigate what you think is coming. Former DHS officials and intelligence analysts interviewed by NPR. Make plain that any review of the failures ahead of January. 6th should start with the I n A. It turns out that despite its critical role and identifying threats here at home The division is not seen as a plum assignment. If you're 23 year old and you want to get into the intelligence business, the fun stuff you're not picking DHS I n a and and that has been a struggle for the department from the beginning that sky am again and remember, she's to be the assistant secretary of DHS. Within the intelligence agencies. DHS. Ayanami was not an equal partner. It might not even have been viewed as a zit cousin. It was a distant friend that you tolerated who showed up to the party. What makes tea chest I in a different from other intelligence agencies, is that its priorities have traditionally been set by the White House. The Obama administration focused on Isis and its effects on young people here in the United States. The Trump Administration. It was the border with Mexico and threats from extremists on the left. Todd Rosenbloom, a deputy undersecretary of intelligence, a DHS up until 2015 Still has contacts in the department. And he believes that the Trump administration was pressuring DHS analysts. They were insisting on a narrative that wasn't true, which made it far harder for I in a You had the president screaming. Auntie Fei Antifa is behind all this And do you just leadership was very much aligned and accommodating the president. And, uh, there were warnings raw intelligence from the NYPD warnings from the FBI and threats on social media that the entire world could see. I ain't never put it all together. In one assessment, DHS has said it provided to general report about threats during the election season. Rosenbloom sees a failure of imagination as part of the problem. The dots were all there. Absolutely. Um, but I mean, I'm among the many who could not conceive of an insurrection against the capital being led by the president of the United States. For Mitch Silber. The way to learn from the right is to see it as a turning point for intelligence officials. Justus 9 11 was certainly for the last 20 years. We've sort of been externally facing and now obviously, we have to take a look within within within our borders for people who would do the country harm. And that is a different type of challenge. The Biden administration announced last week that it was creating a new branch with an eye in a it will focus under mess tick terrorism, and the House of Representatives has plans to form a bipartisan commission to examine the events of January 6th. Investigators are expected to focus on what happened at I n A. I'm Tim Mac and I'm Dina Temple Raston. NPR NEWS Washington OK, Boomer for those who don't know that's a term of derision said with an eye roll to someone who offers outdated thinking. But 57 year old Gary Ryder says it helped to save his life. Two months ago, Gerry's doctors told him he needed a liver transplant. He's taken medication for other for another illness, which damaged his liver. But a transplant was going to cost $40,000 in the prospect of raising that much was overwhelming. The first week was the hardest. I really didn't know whether I was coming or going. Jerry's daughter started a go fund me page for the first two months. It raised less than $200 more than $39,000 short. With just months to live. Gary desperately started selling things I've sold my guns sold my hunting equipment, fishing equipment. You know anything that I was able to sell anything included an old air compressor. The ad for that compressor caught the attention of a Facebook group called This is the name of the group Ah car group.

Gary Ryder Steve Inskeep Julia Kayyem Rachel Martin Dina Temple Raston Mitch Silber FBI Tim Mac Todd Rosenbloom NYPD United States House of Representatives NPR D. C. Metropolitan Police Depa DHS January. 6th Department of Homeland Securit Gary Capitol Police $40,000
"dina temple raston" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"dina temple raston" Discussed on KQED Radio

"W. O m p l y dot com slash NPR and by the listeners and supporters of KQED Public Radio 88.5 FM in San Francisco. And 89.3 FM in Sacramento, 5 22. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin. You might remember that just before President Biden took office, the U. S discovered a massive Russian hack of a Texas software company called Solar Winds. Now the Biden administration plans to release an executive order to prevent future hacks. Dina Temple Raston of NPR's Investigations team spoke exclusively with the senior White House adviser in charge of the response. The U. S. Hasn't had much of a strategy to battle cyber attacks, and Neuberger thinks it requires a change in the way we think about them. We're working to shift our mindset from responding incident by incident to preventing them in the first place. She's the deputy national security advisor for cyber and emerging technology at the White House. She's working on an executive order slated for release in just a couple of weeks. Among other things, the order will create something like the National Transportation Safety Board. Think of a hack like a plane crash. Justus. The NTSB inspects the wreckage to see if there needs to be a systematic fix. Ah, Cyber NTSB would paw through code another evidence to do the same. What can we learn with regard to how we get advanced warning of such incidents? What allowed it to be successful? Potentially what allowed to be brought if itwas which sectors were affected? Why And so do you think that the NTSB is a good metaphor for it? We do new Burger says. We need a new strategy because we've become so connected. All of us are vulnerable to attack. There still isn't a unified plan for how to respond. For example, when companies get hacked a lot of them don't tell anyone a way to fix that New Burger says would be to require federal contractors to report any breach. If you're doing business with the federal government, then when you have an incident, you must notify us quickly. Because we'd like to take that incident and ensure that the tactics techniques and procedures information is broadly shared Cos they're supposed to report attacks to the Department of Homeland Security now. But because it isn't required many don't in next month's executive order, Newberger said. They'll set this as a goal, provide a timeline and then establish a process to work out the details. Alex Thomas runs the Internet Observatory at Stanford University. This is actually kind of a weakness in our overall. Cyber strategy is a country is that nobody is really in charge of looking at the big picture. He liked the idea of a cyber NTSB and getting perspective on the threat. You have the FBI, which is deeply involved in instant response, but they're there to enforce the law, right? It is not their job to come up with conclusions for the entire society. You have DHS Sista, the Cyber Security Infrastructure Security agency. Their job is to work on defense, So they're probably the closest of the agencies to this, but they don't have any investigative powers. And so we're in this weird position where It's really nobody's job in six months to tell us what happened. What happened is that Russian hackers piggybacked on a solar winds Software update and then slipped right into fortune 500 companies and government computer networks. Neuberger says. That's a problem that needs to be addressed. If you are, I are going out to buy network management software like solar winds on we want to buy the software that is most secure. We have no way Dina of assessing which that is, she suggests there's a way that the federal government can incentivize private companies to be safer. One of the government contract no longer went to the lowest bidder, but instead was awarded to a company that could document exactly how and where their software was built. You know what I'm willing to pay $5 more for the more secure software because I don't want to bring more risk into my network, and they would need to say where they're code was written and maintained. Kirsten Todd is the managing director of the cyber reading this institute. She helped the Obama administration think through cyber issues, and she's been briefed on the new order. I think it's a first step. It's definitely not the Holy Grail. Well, it's not a destination. It's the departure point, but it's easier said than done. The key is going to be and how each of these elements of the executive order executed. And really how government is going to bring industry and to perform the functions to really look pre event middle of event post event and how we take those lessons learned and integrate them. Todd thinks the government is going to have to work with companies to tell them what secure software looks like. And an executive order alone won't do that. And while you may never have heard of solar winds have been affected by that attack. We are all increasingly vulnerable. You know, cyber threats loom large in a way that Americans feel and Neuberger again. Can we trust on water power to be resilient? We see a small companies being forced to pay a ransom to get their business back up and running and we see school systems networks down due to criminal so those risk touch everyday Americans lives as well as at the national level. The Biden administration has already leveled sanctions against Russia for the solar winds attack. And the White House has said there would be more seen and unseen responses to the breach. The unseen responses like whether the Biden administration is preparing an attack of cyberspace, Neuberger declined to talk about directly. Dina Temple Raston NPR news Let's take a moment now to remember Michael Collins, the third astronaut on one of the most famous space missions in history, 5432. One Syria Way had left.

Alex Thomas Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Kirsten Todd National Transportation Safety Dina Temple Raston Michael Collins San Francisco FBI NPR Sacramento Newberger Department of Homeland Securit six months NTSB White House NPR News third astronaut DHS Sista New Burger
FBI Still Hasn't Found DNC, RNC Pipe Bomb-Maker

Morning Edition

01:58 min | 1 year ago

FBI Still Hasn't Found DNC, RNC Pipe Bomb-Maker

"Authorities have charged hundreds of people for allegedly participating in the January 6th right of the U. S Capitol. But one person still eludes them. The person who placed two explosive devices in Washington D. C the night before Here are Tim Mack and Dina Temple Raston from NPR's investigations unit. The crime the FBI is trying to solve happened between 7:38:30 P.m.. That's when authorities believe the suspect planted two pipe bombs just blocks from the Capitol. The suspect was wearing a gray hooded sweatshirt. Ah Cove in mask and expensive sneakers. They were Nike Air Max speed turf with the yellow logo. Surveillance cameras captured the figure walking through a Capitol Hill neighborhood the night before the January six riots. One of the bombs was placed on a park bench near the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee, the other behind Republican Party headquarters and surveillance footage caught the suspect walking look at how close their feet are to each other. So that is a narrow base of gate. That's Dr Mike Nierenberg, who wrote the textbook on Forensic Gait analysis. He helps identify people based on how they walk. He's watching along with us as we review surveillance video from that night immediately. What you notice is the arm swing of the person on that left arm. There's not a lot of rotation in their upper half of their body, their torso. The FBI has asked for help finding someone who walks like this. The explosive devices they found were made from one by eight inch galvanized steel pipes. Plumbers typically used And they had plastic kitchen timers mounted on top. The con Jews been around set. The FBI said the explosive inside was homemade black powder, which could be a mix of just about anything that will ignite. Typically, it includes salt Peter and sulfur and gunpowder. The FBI is yet to say exactly what explosive was

Tim Mack Dina Temple Raston FBI Dr Mike Nierenberg U. NPR Democratic National Committee Capitol Hill Washington Nike Republican Party
"dina temple raston" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"dina temple raston" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Juror and one side is doing a great job and the other side's doing a terrible job. On the issue at hand as an impartial germ. I'm going to vote for the side that did the good. Joe Cassidy was notable among the six Republicans who joined Democrats in voting to move forward. He was the only Republican to switch sides after voting last month to block the trial on constitutional grounds. Democrats need 17 Republicans to convict Trump. Royal Snyder, NPR News and NPR analysis of the more than 200 Capital. Riot cases pending so far has turned up current and former military extremists and hardcore Trump supporters. NPR's Dina Temple Raston reports that nearly all of them have one thing in common. While the group is large is the one that stormed the capital defies generalization. An NPR analysis of the records collected on the more than 200 people charged so far has found some common threats. For example, more than 86% of the people who were charged. Are men, almost 15% or either current or former military and about 17% haven't avowed connection to an extremist group. Michael Kimmel wrote a book about what drives angry white men to violence. They grew up believing that if they worked hard paid their taxes were good guys that they would be able to live the lives that their grandfathers lived. Kimmel says that when that doesn't happen, a kind of aggrieved entitlement takes hold and that can lead to violence. Dina Temple Raston. NPR news. The Biden administration will soon begin direct allocations of covert 19 vaccines to federally funded community health centers. Story from NPR's Ping Guan. Covert 19 Vaccines are not given out of hospitals, mass vaccination sites pharmacies next week, the government is launching a program to get vaccines to community health centers. Marcella Nunez Smith TERROR. Biden's Cove in 19 Equity Task Force says the new effort will help bring vaccines to populations that are hard to reach. So this includes people who are experiencing homelessness. Agricultural and migrant workers, residents of public housing and those with limited English proficiency. The initial phase will push vaccines out to 250 community health centers that sort of large populations of racial and ethnic minorities. Community health centers around the country. Serve around 30. Million people. Ping Wang NPR news And pre market trading. U. S futures are higher. This is NPR news. You and experts say that North Korea has modernized its nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles. Through financing obtained through cyber attacks. In a report to the Security Council, the panel says the North is flaunting U. N sanctions and using cyberattacks to help finance its arsenal and seek technology from overseas. The panel suspects that hackers backed by North Korea have stolen more than $300 million in virtual assets over the past two years. And more has experienced its worst violence since the military seized power last week. Police clashed with protesters in several cities on Tuesday as Michael Sullivan reports from neighboring Thailand. At least four people were injured in the capital Nippy dog, including one woman in critical condition with a gunshot wound to the head. The other three are being treated for wounds from rubber bullets. Police used to disperse the crowd. Water. Cannon was also used against protesters in nip it off and in Myanmar's second largest city, Mandalay, with dozens arrested. Military run television said Several police officers were also injured. The protesters are demanding a return to democratic rule and the release of the democratically elected governments leader Aung Sung Souci. Police on Tuesday also raided the Yangon headquarters of her National League for Democracy shortly after dark. For NPR News. I'm Michael Sullivan in Chiang Rai on stock markets in the Asia shares are mostly higher lower in Tokyo. In pre market trading. U. S futures are higher after.

NPR News NPR Vaccines Dina Temple Raston Ping Wang NPR Joe Cassidy Michael Kimmel North Korea U. S Michael Sullivan Aung Sung Souci Trump National League for Democracy Ping Guan Marcella Nunez Smith Biden administration Yangon Biden Royal Snyder
"dina temple raston" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:07 min | 2 years ago

"dina temple raston" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR news. I'm Jack Spear, Lead House Impeachment manager, Democrat Jamie Raskin grew emotional as he concluded the first round of arguments and former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial. He reflected on the damage done when a mob stormed the U. S. Capitol. Have sort of a heart attack. Officer lost three fingers that day. Two officers have taken their own lives. Senators. This cannot Be our future. Trump's defense lawyer, Bruce Castor, meanwhile, condemned the loss of life that day, but defended the rights of free political speech. I don't believe that the former president expects anybody. Walked back any of the language. If that's how they feel about the way things transpired over the last couple of years in this country, they should be allowed to say that and I will go to court and defend them if anything happens to them. As a result, the Senate voted the trial is constitutional testimony will continue this week. At NPR analysis of the more than 200 Capital Ride cases the Justice Department has brought thus far has turned up current and former military officers, extremists and hard core Trump supporters. One thing they had in common. They were all men. Dina Temple Raston of NPR's investigations team has more While the group is large is the one that storm the capital defies generalization and NPR analysis of the records collected on the more than 200 people charged so far has found some common threats. For example, more than 86% of the people who were charged. Are men, almost 15% or either current or former military and about 17% haven't avowed connection to an extremist group. Michael Kimmel wrote a book about what drives angry white men to violence. They grew up believing that if they worked hard paid their taxes were good guys that they would be able to live the lives that their grandfathers lived. Kimmel says that when that doesn't happen, a kind of aggrieved entitlement takes hold and that can lead to violence. Dina TEMPLE Reston. NPR News President Joe Biden's choice to head the Office of Management and Budget says while the U. S needs to keep a close eye on inflationary pressures, the Federal Reserve has the tools to deal with inflation and interest rates. You're a Tandon. President binds choice to be budget director asked by lawmakers about concerns proposed $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief measure might touch off inflation and then saying the aid package is vital, providing help for families suffering as a result of the pandemic. U. S employers reined in their hiring in December, especially industries hard hit by the Corona virus pandemic like restaurants and hotels. Labor Department reporting today its monthly job openings and labor turnover survey otherwise known his jolts. Showed the number of jobs rose, but just slightly mixed close on Wall Street. The Dow was down nine points. The NASDAQ closed up 20 points today. You're listening to NPR. And on a Tuesday, February 9th is his KCRW. I'm Larry Perella. Very good afternoon to you. Here's the tapping at 704 Has Donald Trump Second impeachment trial moves ahead in the U. S. Senate, A large majority of Californians would like to see the former president, convicted and barred from ever holding public office again. But a new poll shows the California Republicans are largely sticking with Trump despite the deadly right at the U. S. Capitol more now from KCRW's Gerald Saxman, fewer than 20% of California Republicans say the former president is to blame for the insurrection at the Capitol. And this new poll from the UC Berkeley Institute of Governmental Studies says two thirds of state Republicans would support Trump if he decided to run for another term. But California, where Democrats far outnumber Republicans is generally sour on Trump Two thirds of state voters see Trump has a major factor in last month's violence. In Washington, D C. Voters also cited social media, political polarization and disinformation about the presidential election as factors in the insurrection. More than 90% of state. Democrats say Trump should be convicted in the Senate and disqualified from holding public office and this KCRW's Gerald SATs been reporting. If you want students back in class, stay home this holiday weekend. That's what public health officials are saying that the upcoming Lunar New Year Valentine's Day in President's Day celebrations could set the county back in the fight against covert 19. County public health director Barbara Ferrer said today We are just weeks away from reducing transmission to a level where elementary schools will be able to offer in class instruction comes as Ellie's winter viral surge claims the lives of another 227 Angelenos today and his case numbers and hospitalizations have dipped below 4000. Parents and coaches are ramping up pressure on California leaders to loosen restrictions on youth sports, Citing concerns over physical and mental health. Some parents also worry they're teenagers could be losing out on scholarship opportunities. Team sports have been suspended since the onset of the pandemic and at least one unsanctioned basketball tournament near Sacramento late last year led to more than 90 confirmed coronavirus cases. Governor Newsome says it's something his office has been reevaluating. We've been negotiating the details of that. Real progress is being made. But the governor says youth sports is part of a larger conversation on reopening schools. He plans to release a deal with state lawmakers on schools later this week. Former California Democratic governor Gray Davis, who was recalled in 2003 and replaced by Republican Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger says Don't compare what happened to him with the current effort to oust Governor Newsome. It is totally different, too quick reasons. First of all, President Bush was not for me. President Biden is totally behind Gavin and was instrumental in getting us to Super sites Open Oakland and Cal State Elaine. I assume there's more to come He's referring to the mass covert 19 vaccination sites announced last week. Davis says the recall effort is also different in that the number of California voters identifying as Republican have dropped to just 26% today. And Capt. Radios. Politics reporter Nicole Nixon says Newsome is still popular among Democratic voters..

Donald Trump President California NPR president U. S. Senate President Biden Governor Newsome KCRW Trump Gray Davis Michael Kimmel Dina TEMPLE Reston Jamie Raskin Officer Jack Spear Dina Temple Raston Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger
"dina temple raston" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:53 min | 2 years ago

"dina temple raston" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Hey, What's up? This is Michael K. Williams. Hey, this is John legend. Hey, this is Fauzia. And you're listening to Q And you listen too cute. You're listed in the queue with Tom power. When you're Andre Leon Talley. There is no such thing as overdressed. The former Vogue editor is the king of formal wear, and he'll tell you how he developed his bold, gutsy style under the bright lights of studio 54. Why you still might want to get all dolled up. Even if you're working from home, then do you have a passion that you've been putting off? Maybe there's a ukulele under your bed or a set of paints. You've been meaning to crack open damp. Eaton's is an artist who knows what that's like. He spent years holding down different jobs until recently when Something happened and he'll tell you why. It's never too late to live your dreams. All that coming up on cue. Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear, Lead House Impeachment manager, Democrat Jamie Raskin grew emotional as he concluded the first round of arguments and former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial. He reflected on the damage done when a mob stormed the U. S. Capitol. Off start a heart attack. Officer lost three fingers that day. Two officers have taken their own lives. Senators. This cannot Be our future. Trump's defense lawyer, Bruce Castor, meanwhile, condemned the loss of life that day, but defended the rights of free political speech. I don't believe that the former president expects anybody. Walked back any of the language. If that's how they feel about the way things transpired over the last couple of years in this country, they should be allowed to say that and I will go to court and defend them if anything happens to them. As a result, the Senate voted the trial is constitutional testimony will continue this week. At NPR analysis of the more than 200 Capital Ride cases the Justice Department is brought thus far has turned up current and former military officers, extremists and hard core Trump supporters. One thing they had in common. They were all men. Dina Temple Raston. NPR's investigations team has more While the group is large is the one that's doing the capital defies generalization and NPR analysis of the records collected on the more than 200 people charged so far has found some common threats. For example, more than 86% of the people who were charged. Are men, almost 15% or either current or former military and about 17% haven't avowed connection to an extremist group. Michael Kimmel wrote a book about what drives angry white men to violence. They grew up believing that if they worked hard paid their taxes were good guys that they would be able to live the lives that their grandfathers lived. Kimmel says that when that doesn't happen, a kind of aggrieved entitlement takes hold and that can lead to violence. Dina TEMPLE Reston. NPR News President Joe Biden's choice to head the Office of Management and Budget says while the U. S needs to keep a close eye on inflationary pressures, the Federal Reserve has the tools to deal with inflation and interest rates. You're a Tandon. President binds choice to be budget director asked by lawmakers about concerns proposed $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief measure might touch off inflation and in saying the aid package is vital, providing help for families suffering as a result of the pandemic. U. S employers reined in their hiring in December, especially industries hard hit by the Corona virus pandemic like restaurants and hotels. Labor Department reporting today its monthly job openings and labor turnover survey otherwise known his jolts. Showed the number of jobs rose, but just slightly. Mixed close on Wall Street, The Dow was down nine points. The NASDAQ closed up 20 points. Today. You're listening to NPR and this is W M I C in New York I'm Shawn Carlson Governor Andrew Cuomo says that if a person does not show up for their second dose of covert 19 vaccine You can now go to someone else. But there's a small catch. Vaccine providers must keep the dose available for the missing person for at least 42 days. If they wait much longer than that quality, said they could run the risk that that those could expire. Morgana and fighter vaccines last about six months in cold storage, But some of that time is lost by getting the supply from the assembly line to the national stockpile and then to the vaccine hub spread around the state. All that said If the missing person eventually returns, the state has pledged to find a second dose for them. Allegations of officers abusing inmates at New Jersey's women's prison culminated in criminal charges last week. But lawmakers say that is not enough. W my sees Matt Katz has more Prosecutors say officers pepper sprayed and punched inmates in the January 11th incident at Edna Mahan Correctional Facility. 31 officers and supervisors plus the prison administrator were suspended. Three were criminally charged, but violence has been a long time problem at the facility documented in a report by the Department of Justice last year. State Senate Majority Leader Loretta Weinberg says she wants Governor Murphy to fire Corrections Commissioner Marcus Hicks. The Department of Corrections seems to be steeped in rape culture. And permits abusive behavior. Murphy's ordered an independent inquiry into the prison. Partly cloudy tonight Love about 21 degrees Should be sunny tomorrow, hon. You're 34 Windchills tomorrow between 10 and 20. With more snow possible late tomorrow night, we'll see loaf about 24 degrees. W When my CIA 10 06 support for NPR comes from Eric and Wendy Schmidt through the Schmidt Family Foundation, working together to create a just world where all people have.

NPR President Donald Trump Senate Andre Leon Talley Michael K. Williams Michael Kimmel Officer Tom power Fauzia Department of Corrections Dina Temple Raston Vogue editor John Governor Murphy Dina TEMPLE Reston president Justice Department Bruce Castor
"dina temple raston" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"dina temple raston" Discussed on KQED Radio

"S. Believes Russian intelligence Service hackers had likely already begun work on a new project cracking into a network security company called Solar Winds. Good Evening America Under virtual invasion, security experts are scrambling to assess the damage after hackers reach sensitive government and corporate computer sources say the attack took advantage of the widespread use of software. From a company called Solar winds. The solar winds hack makes clear that something experts have been warning about for years has finally arrived. The supply chain attack if one contractor, say a company that does network security Falls prey to a hack than a company is on. Lee is safe as that outside contractor Richard Bait. Lick is a former military intelligence officer who's now the principal security strategist. A core light a cyber security firm. If you were one of those organizations that had enough money to say we want to have inventory management, we wanna have network management. Let's go with solar winds. Suddenly that's open you up to a whole new set of problems. The investigation into what actually happened is only just begun. But at this stage, what seems clear is that hackers got into the networks through a company software update. And it appears that targeting a company like solar winds is a very efficient way to crack into US systems because intruders can slip into thousands of company and government networks all at once. And one of the questions that's come up in the wake of the attack is this did not go so news discussion of defense forward inspire Russian hackers to do something spectacular. Just to prove they could Kiersten Todd is the managing director of the cyber reading this Institute. And she says the Russians hardly needed an excuse. I think the Russians are emboldened toe work against us and come after us for lots of reasons. Not the least of which could be us saying, Hey, we're gonna you know, have a secure and save 2020 election That would inspire them to say. Oh, no, you're not. And while you're focusing on the election, we're actually going to come into your networks. What the hackers could do next is unclear. Was this Justin intelligence operation aimed to grabbing sensitive information, or are the hackers lying in Wait? Having created back doors that will allow them to come and go as they please. Officials are trying to determine that now. Dina Temple Raston NPR news later today on all things considered with air fares low right now, some Americans are looking beyond the pandemic and making travel plans again. Ask your smart speaker to play NPR or your member station by name. This'll is NPR news. It is 7 19. We're checking in with Joe McConnell, who says Once again we have a Bart delight. It's a 10 minute delay now getting through the Fremont area between heading both directions to San Jose and two deadly city. Because of the new equipment problem in the Sierra. They're chained controls on 80, but.

US NPR Joe McConnell Kiersten Todd Dina Temple Raston officer Richard Bait Lee Fremont Bart managing director San Jose principal
"dina temple raston" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"dina temple raston" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I think you said it really bad tone, at least for for months and maybe for the first term the first two years. At least, I think we should take a deep breath re read the Biden inaugural address. And get to work will appear sleaze and figure out how to find common ground. You hear Portman? They're saying that the reaction of this could not just be about this bill. It could really poison the well going forward. Democrats are pretty unmoved by this. I don't know if they think that the Republicans are ever going to come around and support this bill. So they're looking at starting that budget process next week. All right, that's NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Thank you. You're welcome. Joe Biden had his first official call US president this week with his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin. They touched on things you'd expect arms treaties, Ukrainian sovereignty dissidents and also the massive cyber attack on American companies and the government that was discovered last month. Dina Temple Raston of NPR's investigations team looks out. What's behind that bold new strike A little over a year ago, the head of the National Security Agency in Cyber Command General Paul Marcus, Oniy. Decided to do something unusual. He decided to give the American people an idea of what the U. S military was doing in cyberspace. You went public with a new strategy he called defend forward. So defend for it is d O d strategy. It looks outside of the United States. That's General Nakase owning an NPR interview about a year before the last election. We're gonna expand our insights of our adversaries. We're gonna know our adversaries better than they knew themselves. Secondly, we're gonna harden our defenses and the third thing will be poised to act. Not a Sony was sending a message of deterrence to Moscow. If you meddle in the presidential elections the way you haven't passed, he was saying The U. S is poised to respond. It's a little bit different in cyberspace because you have photos that can come and go very, very quickly. Taken by infrastructure. They can develop their capabilities. They can conduct attacks and what you have to do from what I've learned is, you have to be persistent on them and making sure that whenever they do that type of thing, you're going to be there and you're gonna be impact them, it turns out is not a Sony was talking about being persistent on them. The U. S. Believes Russian intelligence Service hackers had likely already begun work on a new project cracking into a network security company called Solar Winds. Good Evening America Under virtual invasion, security experts are scrambling to assess the damage after hackers breach sensitive government and corporate computer sources say the attack took advantage of the widespread use of software. From a company called Solar winds. The solar winds hack makes clear that something experts have been warning about for years has finally arrived. The supply chain attack if one contractor, say a company that does network security Falls prey to a hack than a company is on. Lee is safe as that outside contractor. Richard Bait. Lick is a former military intelligence officer who's now the principal security strategist. A core light, a cyber security firm. If you were one of those organizations that had enough money to say, we want to have inventory management, we wanna have network management. Let's go with solar winds will suddenly that's open you up to a whole new set of problems. The investigation into what actually happened is only just begun. But at this stage what seems clear is that hackers got into the networks through a company software update. And it appears that targeting a company like solar winds is a very efficient way to crack into US systems because intruders can slip into thousands of company and government networks all at once. And one of the questions that's come up in the wake of the attack is this did not go so news discussion of defend forward inspire Russian hackers to do something spectacular. Just to prove they could Kiersten Todd is the managing director of the cyber reading this Institute. And she says the Russians hardly needed an excuse. I think the Russians are emboldened toe work against us and come after us for lots of reasons. Not the least of which could be us saying, Hey, we're gonna you know, have a secure and save 2020 election That would inspire them to say. Oh, no, you're not. And while you're focusing on the election, we're actually going to come into your networks. What the hackers could do next is unclear. Was this Justin intelligence operation aimed at grabbing sensitive information, or are the hackers lying in Wait? Having created back doors that will allow them become and go as they please. Officials are trying to determine that now. Dina Temple Raston NPR news. Later today on all things considered with air fares low right now, some Americans are looking beyond the pandemic and making travel plans again. Ask your smart speaker to play NPR or your member station by name. This'll is NPR news. And you're listening to morning edition here on W N Y c. I'm David first Coming up all the news about covert 19 vaccines and variants can be a lot to digest will break down What's new this week? And what it means for people in the New York City region that still ahead this hour and then on the BBC news hour, coming up at nine the U. N secretary general is pushing the military in Myanmar to respect democratic norms amid fears of a coup. And what a chance encounter on a New York doorstep says about international migration That's coming up on the BBC news hour starting at nine o'clock on 93.9 FM w N. Y c W N. Y C supporters include Netflix, presenting the White Tiger. Directed by Ramin Bahrani and produced by Ava Duvernay and Priyanka Chopra. Jonas A. Netflix January 22nd awards eligible Been curious about the history of.

NPR US Joe Biden Dina Temple Raston Sony Portman BBC National Security Agency Vladimir Putin New York City Ramin Bahrani Cyber Command Susan Davis Paul Marcus Netflix U. S Richard Bait
"dina temple raston" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"dina temple raston" Discussed on KCRW

"Overall relief. His plan also includes funding to ramp up vaccine distribution and extension of extra weekly unemployment benefits and another round of federal aid for state and local governments. FBI Director Christopher Wray says he remains concerned about potential violence on Inauguration Day in Washington, D C and in state capitals nationwide. Abigail Sanski with member station Wkrg says Michigan's capital is under heightened security. There's a 6 ft fence that's going up around our Capitol building today. There's already been an increased police presence and that will stick around. For the next couple of weeks. We've heard from officials that there's been constant coordination with the National Guard, local and state police. And also that federal officials as well as local officials are monitoring chatter, But they've not said anything about credible threats of violence. This is NPR news. The FBI and the Department of Homeland Security did not issue threat assessments ahead of last week's deadly violence at the U. S Capital. NPR's Dina Temple Raston says some are asking why There have been hints that something was going to happen. On January, 6th for weeks, Social media Post threatened violence. Even the president himself promised that a rally ahead of the certification of the electoral vote count would be wild. Even so, NPR's learned the DHS and the FBI didn't issue a specific threat assessment to help U. S Capitol in D. C. Police plan their response. Some people like former DHS Secretary Michael Chertoff said that federal law enforcement almost didn't have to. He didn't take rocket science to see you there was a realistic foreseeable risk. There's a chapel and you would enhance the security, Chertoff said. There needs to be a bipartisan commission to figure out what went so wrong. Dina Temple Raston. NPR news. Former head of the Food and Drug Administration is President elect Biden's choice to be his chief science advisor in the White House. The Biden transition team announced David Kessler selection this morning. Kessler has been a top coronavirus advisor to Biden for months. A strong earthquake and Indonesia today has killed at least 34 people on toppled many homes and buildings. There are reports of people trapped in rubble. I'm Dave Mattingly in Washington. Corona virus pandemic has triggered a huge wave of business closures across the country. But at the same time Americans have starting businesses at the fastest rate in more than 10 years. You'll get the details coming up right here on morning edition on case here. Tell me. Good morning. I'm Cherry Glaser. Good too heavy here on this Friday. If you're making plans for the weekend should be gorgeous. One out.

"dina temple raston" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"dina temple raston" Discussed on KCRW

"The threat assessment was almost beside the point. It was perfectly obvious. She read the newspaper that there was gonna be a big rally that the president was talking about being be wild and that the focus was going to be the capital. Where they were having a certification vote show. They didn't take rocket science to see you to lose a realistic foreseeable risk to the Capitol, and you would enhance the security. I mean, but maybe they need the threat assessment to put the process in place to get troops on the ground or security forces on the ground. I mean, DHS and the FBI have issued intelligence bulletins for four as we mentioned Black lives matter. Protests what was different this time around? Why didn't they treat this the same way? Our reporting found that one of the reasons that they didn't treat it the same way may have been bias. We talk to someone named R P. Eddy and he used to be in the National Security Council. He's done a lot of counterterrorism work. He worked with the NYPD and the LAPD. And now he has his own intelligence consultancy, and he thinks It's something called the invisible obvious. Was it work and basically, that's things that sit right in front of us that we don't notice. It was very hard for these decision makers in these analysts to realize that people who look just like them could want to commit this kind of unconstitutional violence and get little he tried to and want to kill them. So in other words, in other words, this was supposed to be pro Trump rally, and then it wasn't and it was hard for these law and order people to see that this mob these people who were so pro Trump, who had bumper stickers, just like theirs on the back of their cars were going to commit violence. And by the time they figure that out, it was too late. And then it really begs the question. Did they not see it? Because they didn't want to see it. I mean, or they couldn't see it were their blind spots. Exactly And that and that, In fact, a lot of these people that they were seeing, right? I mean they were wearing pro Trump T shirts. They were there to support the president. When you think of those kinds of people. You you don't think about those being the people that you might have to worry will resort to violence and that was what went wrong. It wasn't you know something nefarious. It was just when you looked at it without the analysis. It seemed like this'll was just going to be another rally. And then it wasn't NPR's Dina Temple Raston of our investigations team. Thank you. You're welcome. New York City is canceling its business ties with the Trump Organization. It's pulling out of $17 million in agreements with a company owned by the president. MPR's Sally her ship's checks in with New Yorkers for their thoughts on the end of Trump's deals in the city, New York City as four contracts with the Trump Organization managing a golf course in the Bronx to ice skating rinks and a carousel in Central Park. But de Blasio says city contracts come with an exit clause. New York can opt out if company leadership is engaged in criminal activity, which is what he says the president has done inciting an insurrection. Let's be clear. Let's say these words again. Inciting an insurrection against the United States government clearly constitutes criminal activity. So the city of New York will no longer have anything to do with the Trump organization. They have profited from these contracts. They were profit no longer and at $17 million. The deals represent just a tiny fraction of New York City's annual budget 98 to 95 billion, But Brooklyn residents Glenn Justin and his wife, Isabel Wessel, say the mayor is doing the right thing. Sitting in the sun on a green bench in a park in Brooklyn, Intent on a folded up piece of paper, a crossword puzzle. They say the puzzles theme is the perfect fit for how they feel about Trump's business deals in New York City says Get out of here. That's actually the theme. I swear to God, it's it could be better for an impeachment day. Get out of here. A few minutes later, Michelle Val Adar as a poet and lectured city college walks by with her dog. She says she's disgusted by the president's actions. She's glad to hear the mayor's news. But she says this is a precarious time and passions are high, so she hopes the mayor moves slowly before reacting. I think it's really important to calm our minds and to really not abandon what's legal and illegal ballot. Doris wants to make sure what New York does with the contracts is legal. Review by the Citizens Budget Commission says that two of the four agreements were already set to expire in just a few months. The Trump Organization.

New York City Trump Organization president Trump R P. Eddy Brooklyn Citizens Budget Commission United States NPR Michelle Val Adar DHS MPR NYPD National Security Council de Blasio Dina Temple Raston FBI Doris LAPD
Why Didn't The FBI And DHS Produce A Threat Report Ahead of The Capitol Insurrection?

Morning Edition

05:07 min | 2 years ago

Why Didn't The FBI And DHS Produce A Threat Report Ahead of The Capitol Insurrection?

"Before most major protests are rallies, the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI. Usually produced a formal intelligence report explaining the possible threats, and then they send that report to local law enforcement to help them plan. DHS and the FBI did one of these threat assessment assessments ahead of the demonstrations in Portland, Oregon, after the killing of George Floyd last spring. He also did one before Black lives matter Marches in Washington in June, But there was no threat assessment done ahead of the deadly attack on the U. S Capital. NPR's Dina Temple Raston of our investigations team has been looking into this. Good morning, Dina. Good morning. I mean, all you had to do. Deena was look at social media for the weeks leading up to the January 6th rally. To know things could potentially get really bad at the Capitol. You didn't even need a formal threat assessment to tell you that did law enforcement Just not pick up on that. No, that was part of the raw intelligence that they were putting together like the New York Police Department scrapes social media, and they sent what they found A Washington There was sort of unverifiable threats, that sort of thing. Bond. There was more raw intelligence that came before that. Just a day after that, Just a day before the pro Trump rally, the Norfolk Field office in the FBI confirmed that They had found specific threats against members of Congress and exchange of maps of the tunnel system under the Capitol complex, and there were people online talking about gathering in Kentucky and Pennsylvania and South Carolina. To meet up before convoy Ng up to Washington and things. Norfolk report was first reported in the Washington Post a couple of days ago. So they were gathering this together then then what happened to where did that raw intelligence go? Well, that's the problem. It never made it much past that raw intelligence stage, so basically they might have picked up a thread or had a human source. Tell them something or that or say that they saw something, but it didn't go to the next step, where it's validated and analyzed and Put into a larger picture put into context. So when the FBI does that they put it in a report called an Intelligence bulletin. When DHS does some something like that they call it a threat assessment report. And then sometimes the two of them put out a report together and typically, then they would send that that finished product out to local law enforcement. So we're going to talk about why that didn't happen. But first, can you just explain? Why is that assessment so much more valuable than straight? Raw Intel? What's the difference? Local law enforcement sees threat assessment says actionable intelligence I mean the bulletins are considered finished right there a synthesis of validated and analyzed intelligence and that helps local law enforcement make informed decisions. So we talk to the former head of DHS Michael Chertoff and get into your point. He said that in this case, the threat was so out in the open. The threat assessment was almost beside the point. It was perfectly obvious. She read the newspaper that there was gonna be a big rally that the president was talking about being be wild and that the focus was going to be the capital. Where they were having a certification vote show. They didn't take rocket science to see if there was a realistic foreseeable risk to the Capitol, and you would enhance the security. I mean, but maybe they need the threat assessment to put the process in place to get troops on the ground or security forces on the ground. I mean, DHS and the FBI have issued intelligence bulletins for four as we mentioned Black lives matter. Protests what was different this time around? Why didn't they treat this the same way? Our reporting found that one of the reasons that they didn't treat it the same way may have been bias. We talk to someone named R P. Eddy and he used to be in the National Security Council. He's done a lot of counterterrorism work. He worked with the NYPD and the LAPD. And now he has his own intelligence consultancy, and he thinks It's something called the invisible obvious. Was it work and basically, that's things that sit right in front of us that we don't notice. It was very hard for these decision makers in these analysts to realize that people who look just like them could want to commit this kind of unconstitutional violence and get little he tried to and want to kill them. So in other words, in other words, this was supposed to be a pro trump rally, and then it wasn't and it was hard for these law and order people to see that this mob these people who were so pro Trump, who had bumper stickers, just like theirs on the back of their cars were going to commit violence. And by the time they figure that out, it was too late. And then it really begs the question. Did they not see it? Because they didn't want to see it. I mean, or they couldn't see it were their blind spots. Exactly And that and that, In fact, a lot of these people that they were seeing, right? I mean they were wearing pro Trump T shirts. They were there to support the president. When you think of those kinds of people. You you don't think about those being the people that you might have to worry will resort to violence and that was what went wrong. It wasn't you know something nefarious. It was just when you looked at it without the analysis. It seemed like this'll was just going to be another rally. And then it wasn't NPR's Dina Temple Raston of our investigations team. Thank you.

FBI DHS George Floyd Dina Temple Raston Norfolk Field Office Washington Nypd Deena Department Of Homeland Securit Dina NPR U. Portland Oregon NG The Washington Post Norfolk R P. Eddy Michael Chertoff South Carolina
CDC Report: Officials Knew Coronavirus Test Was Flawed But Released It Anyway

Morning Edition

04:37 min | 2 years ago

CDC Report: Officials Knew Coronavirus Test Was Flawed But Released It Anyway

"We're also tracking the pandemic where the United States remains the world leader in cases and deaths this election week the U. S surpassed 100,000 cases per day for the first time, and today we have more of the story of how we got here. And NPR investigation has revealed news of a failure of Corona virus testing early in the pandemic. In February, a test designed by the Centers for Disease Control did not work, which set back U. S efforts now on internal investigation from the CDC, obtained by NPR shows the microbiologist who produced that test new it was flawed. And send it to the nation's labs. Anyway. Here's NPR's Dina Temple Raston. The covert tests arrived in New York City on a Friday in early February, when there were just a handful of confirmed cases in the United States that there was a little box with a few little tiny screw cap test tubes in it. That's Jennifer Rickman. She's the director and assistant commissioner of the New York City Public Health Laboratory, and she was one of the first people to learn that the cove in 19 tests the CDC sent to labs around the country. Actually didn't work. It became clear as soon as her lab technicians tried to verify the test. But the e mails from the lab stuff for saying something looks not quite right. Call us what jumped out at them. When the lab brand specimens that were supposed to be negative. The tests seem to indicate those samples contained a low level of the corona virus. It was truly an oh, crap moment like what are we going to do now? Everybody is waiting for us all over the city to have this test online. Everybody was holding on to this moment that we were going to have a test and now we don't have it and they wouldn't have it. It turns out until nearly a month later in March, which meant public health officials were hobbled from the earliest days of the pandemic health officials across the country reporting a shortage of tests. Despite promises from the federal government comes amid growing criticism that the delay in testing may have compromised the nation's ability to detect cases The CDC lab appear to have failed in a spectacular way. Though, as recently as July, the agency was still saying the test didn't have a problem. Here's CDC director Robert Redfield. When we did try to expand that test to give it to each of the local health departments, there wasn't manufacturing problem in one of the re agents that had to be corrected. That took about five weeks, But the agency's internal review suggests that isn't so It determined that the scientists who built the test used the wrong quality control procedures. The review also found problems with the lab's quality standards and problems with the management of the Latin more generally. The infectious diseases lab was run by a highly regarded scientists, Dr Stephen Lindstrom. He'd been an expert in influenza at the CDC for more than a decade and became director of the infectious Diseases lab a couple of years ago. The CDC declined to make Lindstrom available for an interview and declined to comment for the story. But Kelly Rib Lusky, director of infectious diseases at the Association of Public Health Laboratories, Said she was surprised that Lindstrom's lab would be called out on a report for something basic like quality control. That hadn't been her experience with him. I've done studies with Steve, and he's meticulous. And so the documentation failure was really surprising, So that was one thing the CDC found. A problem in the way the lab was run. The second thing that review found was that right before the test, we're going to be sent to hundreds of public labs. The lab ran a final check that showed the kids might not work. Ah, third of the time. But rather than pull the kids back, lab officials sent them out anyway. Kelly Rib less key again. The thing that hangs me up the most is probably the the 33% and not recalling you're not immediately going toe remanufacture or something at that point, because 33% is clearly a lot. To ensure this never happens again. The CDC review has recommendations for change. It sets clear criteria that must be met before the kids could be sent out rather than allowing lab directors to make a judgment call. An outside group must review all the CDC test kits before they go out. Stephen Lindstrom, for his part, no longer runs the lab and none of the same people who oversaw the making of that test. Are in charge. Now. New York's Rickman says that month they lost was crucial to the outcome in the response nationally as well as in New York City would have been different if we were able to have all the tools we needed in our toolbox earlier than we did not having the CDC tests, she said, was like building a house with just a saw and not a hammer. They needed a hammer, she said. Dina Temple Raston NPR news

CDC NPR Dina Temple Raston Jennifer Rickman New York City Public Health La Robert Redfield United States Dr Stephen Lindstrom Lindstrom U. Kelly Rib Lusky Association Of Public Health L New York City Federal Government Kelly Rib Influenza Stephen Lindstrom Steve
How two promising lawyers found themselves facing life in prison for alleged Molotov cocktail attack during protests in New York

All Things Considered

06:50 min | 2 years ago

How two promising lawyers found themselves facing life in prison for alleged Molotov cocktail attack during protests in New York

"Rahman Rahman and and Colin Colin Furred. Furred. Mattis Mattis were were kids kids from from immigrant families who made good both graduates of prestigious law schools. She represented tenants in Housing Court. He was an associate at a corporate firm in Manhattan. Now they face life in prison in one of the government's highest profile cases against protesters. Dina Temple Raston of NPR's investigations team reports. The night of May 29th in Brooklyn was chaos as curfew Jew near police in riot gear began to make arrests. Protesters started throwing water bottles and bricks. The NYPD tried to break up the crowd with pepper spray in swinging batons being excessively aggressive with this crowd here, and it is inappropriate. 70 woman Diana purchased and I'm an elected official, and they just pepper sprayed me for no reason. Rouge Rahmon was there to local journalist stopped her for an interview. Her face was covered with the scarf. She was wearing a black T shirt that read. The struggle continues. This protest is a long time coming. I think that the mayor Should have pulled their his police department back. The way that the mayor and Minneapolis But the part of the interview that ricocheted around the Internet was this. Won't ever stop unless we Take it all down. And that's why the anger is being Express tonight. In this way, prosecutors say in NYPD surveillance camera captured images of Rockman a short time later, she was writing in the passenger seat of a van. Her friend Colin for Mattis was driving. What allegedly happened next defense attorney Shipman says is the basis for the charges against them. It's alleges that a rouge threw a Molotov cocktail into a police car and empty police car. Essentially abandoned police car police car that had been previously vandalized. Two police officers were across the street They gave Chase and Rouge and Colin were arrested. The NYPD video apparently shows it all Rothman and that T shirt. Beige van slowing as it neared the police vehicle. The lighting of a toilet paper fuse the arc of a beer bottle as it crashed under the cruiser's dashboard. The whole episode lasted just seconds. Rahman and Mattis now face seven felonies in federal court. The charges include the use of explosives, arson conspiracy, the use of a destructive device, civil disobedience and the use of a destructive device in the furtherance of a crime of violence. This last charge alone, known as 9 24 C of the criminal code carries a mandatory minimum sentence of 30 years in prison. Add that to the other charges against them, and they could face life behind bars. Attorney Paul Shechtman represents a rouge Rockman and he says his client's case has been singled out ever since. It's been taken federally it has been treated with a seriousness. Ah, harshness unlike any I've ever seen. NPR reviewed 47 Molotov cocktail in arson cases filed across the country. That involved the destruction of police property. And this case to which prosecutors added 1/3 person, Rahman Mattis say they don't know is the only instance in which that 30 year mandatory minimum charge appears. Molotov cocktail cases are usually charged his property crimes in state courts. A spokesman for the U. S Attorney's office declined to discuss the case or they're charging decisions. Attorney General William Barr has been saying for weeks that extremists plotted the violence that erupted during the protests. And he said as much to NPR's Steve Inskeep in an interview last week when we arrest people in charge them at this stage anyway. We don't charge them for being a member of Antifa. We charge him for throwing a Molotov cocktail or we charge them for possession of a gun or possession of gasoline and things to make bombs with. Those are the kinds of charges that are filed. And while prosecutors haven't offered any evidence that Rothman and Madison, part of an extremist group You wouldn't know it from the way they were charged. Good afternoon. Your Honor, This is David Kessler. I'm in the U. S attorney in the Eastern District of New York. The harshness and the Rothman and Mattis case went beyond the charges. Prosecutors also fought their release on bail even though it was supported by two different judges. 56 former federal prosecutors found the government's position so alarming. They filed an amicus brief with the court. A panel of judges heard arguments last Tuesday and because of the Corona virus, all this happened over the phone. This is how it began. The District court's order releasing the defendant on bond should be reversed. And when I want to focus on here is the core issue the danger to the community government attorney David Kessler. This is not a case about a youthful indiscretion or crimes passion. It's about a calculated Dangerous crime committed by adults who risked the lives of innocent civilian first responders. Their crime is so serious, Kessler argued. It negates any mitigating factors that came before it. To throw that Molotov cocktail, he said, required essentially a fundamental change in mindset about for them. That's really what the core of the cases, Shenkman told the judges. Thie entire evening was an aberration. Here's their exchange. You can't imagine what a soldering event this arrest was. Mr Shipman. I can imagine how these people did what they're shown on video to have done. I find the whole case unimaginable. But having during that happened once I'm I'm wondering why it is so unimaginable that it wouldn't happen again. I think because that night Wass really unique. It was young people not just used to people out to protest police violence who saw more of it. Right one. Khun lose one sense on an evening like this. That argument appears to have convinced two of the three judges that Rockman and Mattis aren't a danger to the community. The judges said in an opinion yesterday that they agreed with the lower court that the pair could be safely released on bail. Rahman and Mattis were allowed to go home last night. In the months ahead, they have more than just the government charges to fight. They also have to battle the suggestion that they're mixed up in what theater knee general is called. A witches brew of extremists. Dina Temple Raston. NPR NEWS New York

Mattis Mattis Rahman Rahman Attorney Colin Colin Furred Nypd NPR Rothman Molotov David Kessler Arson Rockman Dina Temple Raston Mr Shipman Housing Court Npr News Rouge Rahmon District Court