9 Burst results for "Dina Grandoni"

"dino grandoni" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

06:48 min | 3 months ago

"dino grandoni" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"We are now just over a week away from election day although we know millions of people have already voted. But in these final few weeks, we've been focusing on some of the policy differences between President Donald Trump and former vice president Joe Biden differences that might not be so easy to discern when they're buried in the middle of campaign rhetoric or debate jobs. Right now, we're going to focus on one revealing moment during last Thursday's presidential debate when the two candidates talked about energy specifically, how should the US get and use power in the future have a transition from their own minister yes? Oh. It is a big statement because I would stop why would you do that because the oil industry pollutes significantly here so let's dig into that a bit more what other two candidates competing visions for us energy policy going forward and what are the implications per workers and the environment to help us sort this out. We've called Dino Grandoni he reports on all this for the Washington Post with us now Dino Grandoni. Thank you so much for talking with us your. Thank you for having me on. So let me just start if we can with that clip that we just played there is a divide and how these to view the future of. US Energy. So when it comes to oil, where does each one stand? Yes. So the two candidates have laid out starkly different visions for what they would like to do with the oil industry and how they would like to transition away from fossil fuels or whether or not. They would want to even do that You saw a Democratic candidate Biden pledge to move away from oil in favor of renewable energy and predicted that that kind of move will generate millions of jobs president trump by contrast says that doing that would be costly and hurt the economy and in particular would hurt the oil producing states where both men are competing for votes. Well. You've recently written that president trump has very recently tried to rebrand himself as an environmentalist which would seem like a difficult sell when his administration has rolled back countless environmental regulations over the past four years and he continues to push for oil coal and gas. So what's his pitch? Yeah, and this is a man who has spent much of his life trying to rebrand himself during various business ventures. So He Over the past year has changed his position and a few different things he has promised to fund restoration of the Great Lakes when in the past White House had proposed cutting money to do that similar story with the everglades in Florida and He is endorsed this idea planting a trillion trees around the world in order to suck carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. President trump is going to have a hard time convincing the public that he is a more environmentally friendly candidate than Joe Biden, release candidate who cares more GONNA do more to solve climate change. His administration has spent the past four years rolling back literally dozens of anti-pollution another environmental rules and that kind of reputations probably baked into the public. At this point president trump has attacked for vice president Joe Biden for what trump a radical climate plant and we do have to say this has been described as by far. The most aggressive climate and energy platform that this country has ever seen from a major party candidate. So could you just just as briefly as you can describe what are some of the key elements? So what Joe Biden wants to do is eliminate US contributions to climate change by the middle of the century and on the way they're doing. So he wants to eliminate greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector in particular power plants by twenty, thirty five, both of those are very aggressive timelines and like you're saying more. Aggressive than anything any other major party candidate has ever put forward. It's in fact more aggressive in some ways than what Bernie Sanders was saying back in two thousand sixteen. So let me ask you this though how does Biden respond to the argument? That's would cost this have tremendous adverse economic impact especially in states that are necessary to for him to win I, mean, how does he respond to that cost the loss of just thousands upon thousands of jobs? Well, he says that his climate plan is also a jobs. Plan that transitioning away from fossil fuels will create millions of jobs in itself to have to install solar panels, built wind turbines. But then also all all the different sort of retrofits that his plan calls for to homes and businesses to make buildings more energy efficient. He really thinks of this as an economic plan in addition to being a plan to stop climate change or headed off at least. Well, we knew though that president trump in contrast president trump has always kind of focused on that economic impact of. This country is kind of reliance on fossil fuels and back in two thousand sixteen many people may remember he promised to reopen coal mines and to bring back coal mining jobs has that happened no that has not happened and we've seen trump talk less and less about coal in the first two state of the Union addresses. He gave he talked a lot about clean call and saving jobs but he dropped those references in the last two state of the Union addresses and we've seen coal fired power plants continue. To Shudder and call nine continue to close down during his presidency not because of any government policy. Really. But experts say it's because of economic pressure Kohl's just gotten to expensive relative to natural gas and renewable 's and what about oil I. The idea that a move away from fossil fuels from reliance on fossil fuels is increasingly popular with the public. I mean, the polls make that clear but apart from that are the economics driving oil to face a similar fate, a colleague of yours reported last month, for example. That British Petroleum VP has come out publicly and said it is shrinking it's oil and gas business and investing in wind and solar. So are sort of economic imperatives or whatever public policy imperatives regardless of what president trump sort of perspective on this are they driving in that direction anyway. So during the pandemic at least in the short term, the oil industry has been hit particularly hard as people driving fly less. There's a lot less demand for oil and that has caused a lot of oil companies to have to. Lay off people and even have to declare bankruptcy in this country that said, there are some experts who do think that oil is going to go the way of coal right now, electric vehicles. There aren't that many being used relative to the entire auto market in the United States, but there's this expectation that adoption of electric vehicles is going to pick up and that's going to really eat into the petroleum business because most of the petroleum in this country is used towards transportation field towards the gas tank in your car. That is Dino Grandoni. He is an energy and environmental policy report with the Washington. Post Dina Grandoni thank you so much for talking to us. Thank you for having me on..

President Donald Trump Joe Biden president vice president United States Dino Grandoni Washington Post Dina Grandoni Bernie Sanders Great Lakes
How Trump And Biden Differ On Energy Policy

Environment: NPR

06:48 min | 3 months ago

How Trump And Biden Differ On Energy Policy

"We are now just over a week away from election day although we know millions of people have already voted. But in these final few weeks, we've been focusing on some of the policy differences between President Donald Trump and former vice president Joe Biden differences that might not be so easy to discern when they're buried in the middle of campaign rhetoric or debate jobs. Right now, we're going to focus on one revealing moment during last Thursday's presidential debate when the two candidates talked about energy specifically, how should the US get and use power in the future have a transition from their own minister yes? Oh. It is a big statement because I would stop why would you do that because the oil industry pollutes significantly here so let's dig into that a bit more what other two candidates competing visions for us energy policy going forward and what are the implications per workers and the environment to help us sort this out. We've called Dino Grandoni he reports on all this for the Washington Post with us now Dino Grandoni. Thank you so much for talking with us your. Thank you for having me on. So let me just start if we can with that clip that we just played there is a divide and how these to view the future of. US Energy. So when it comes to oil, where does each one stand? Yes. So the two candidates have laid out starkly different visions for what they would like to do with the oil industry and how they would like to transition away from fossil fuels or whether or not. They would want to even do that You saw a Democratic candidate Biden pledge to move away from oil in favor of renewable energy and predicted that that kind of move will generate millions of jobs president trump by contrast says that doing that would be costly and hurt the economy and in particular would hurt the oil producing states where both men are competing for votes. Well. You've recently written that president trump has very recently tried to rebrand himself as an environmentalist which would seem like a difficult sell when his administration has rolled back countless environmental regulations over the past four years and he continues to push for oil coal and gas. So what's his pitch? Yeah, and this is a man who has spent much of his life trying to rebrand himself during various business ventures. So He Over the past year has changed his position and a few different things he has promised to fund restoration of the Great Lakes when in the past White House had proposed cutting money to do that similar story with the everglades in Florida and He is endorsed this idea planting a trillion trees around the world in order to suck carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. President trump is going to have a hard time convincing the public that he is a more environmentally friendly candidate than Joe Biden, release candidate who cares more GONNA do more to solve climate change. His administration has spent the past four years rolling back literally dozens of anti-pollution another environmental rules and that kind of reputations probably baked into the public. At this point president trump has attacked for vice president Joe Biden for what trump a radical climate plant and we do have to say this has been described as by far. The most aggressive climate and energy platform that this country has ever seen from a major party candidate. So could you just just as briefly as you can describe what are some of the key elements? So what Joe Biden wants to do is eliminate US contributions to climate change by the middle of the century and on the way they're doing. So he wants to eliminate greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector in particular power plants by twenty, thirty five, both of those are very aggressive timelines and like you're saying more. Aggressive than anything any other major party candidate has ever put forward. It's in fact more aggressive in some ways than what Bernie Sanders was saying back in two thousand sixteen. So let me ask you this though how does Biden respond to the argument? That's would cost this have tremendous adverse economic impact especially in states that are necessary to for him to win I, mean, how does he respond to that cost the loss of just thousands upon thousands of jobs? Well, he says that his climate plan is also a jobs. Plan that transitioning away from fossil fuels will create millions of jobs in itself to have to install solar panels, built wind turbines. But then also all all the different sort of retrofits that his plan calls for to homes and businesses to make buildings more energy efficient. He really thinks of this as an economic plan in addition to being a plan to stop climate change or headed off at least. Well, we knew though that president trump in contrast president trump has always kind of focused on that economic impact of. This country is kind of reliance on fossil fuels and back in two thousand sixteen many people may remember he promised to reopen coal mines and to bring back coal mining jobs has that happened no that has not happened and we've seen trump talk less and less about coal in the first two state of the Union addresses. He gave he talked a lot about clean call and saving jobs but he dropped those references in the last two state of the Union addresses and we've seen coal fired power plants continue. To Shudder and call nine continue to close down during his presidency not because of any government policy. Really. But experts say it's because of economic pressure Kohl's just gotten to expensive relative to natural gas and renewable 's and what about oil I. The idea that a move away from fossil fuels from reliance on fossil fuels is increasingly popular with the public. I mean, the polls make that clear but apart from that are the economics driving oil to face a similar fate, a colleague of yours reported last month, for example. That British Petroleum VP has come out publicly and said it is shrinking it's oil and gas business and investing in wind and solar. So are sort of economic imperatives or whatever public policy imperatives regardless of what president trump sort of perspective on this are they driving in that direction anyway. So during the pandemic at least in the short term, the oil industry has been hit particularly hard as people driving fly less. There's a lot less demand for oil and that has caused a lot of oil companies to have to. Lay off people and even have to declare bankruptcy in this country that said, there are some experts who do think that oil is going to go the way of coal right now, electric vehicles. There aren't that many being used relative to the entire auto market in the United States, but there's this expectation that adoption of electric vehicles is going to pick up and that's going to really eat into the petroleum business because most of the petroleum in this country is used towards transportation field towards the gas tank in your car. That is Dino Grandoni. He is an energy and environmental policy report with the Washington. Post Dina Grandoni thank you so much for talking to us. Thank you for having me

President Donald Trump Joe Biden President Trump Vice President United States Dino Grandoni Washington Post Dina Grandoni Bernie Sanders Great Lakes
"dino grandoni" Discussed on The Daily 202's Big Idea

The Daily 202's Big Idea

06:24 min | 6 months ago

"dino grandoni" Discussed on The Daily 202's Big Idea

"Good Morning I'm Alison Michael's with The Washington Post and this is the daily two. Oh two for Wednesday July fifteen. James is out, but I'll be here with the day's top headlines. Here are three stories that you need to know today. Number One. On Tuesday, the trump administration dropped its plan to require international college students to leave the. United States unless they're enrolled in the fall term in at least one face to face class, the posts Nick Anderson and Susan's for Luga report that the abrupt reversal came a little more than a week after us, immigration and Customs Enforcement issued an edict that stunned us, higher education, leaders and students worldwide under that July six policy from ice, international students enrolled in US, colleges and universities for the fall semester faced a mandate to take at least one course in person. Those students I said may not take a full online course load and remained in the United States. That mandate posed a meter obstacle. The plans for online teaching and learning that colleges are developing in response to the novel coronavirus pandemic. In the spring, the federal government had given schools much more leeway to teach international students online Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology had sued to block the new policy in a hearing in that case on Tuesday. The judge announced that the schools and the federal government reached an agreement that made the lawsuit moot, the judge said the agreement reverted policy to the status quo that had been developed in March, when schools nationwide were forced to halt in person teaching because of. Of, the pandemic campuses have been sparsely populated in the months since Harvard has about five thousand international students and MIT has four thousand international students in their sued Harvard and Mit argued that the trump administration's action violated the Administrative Procedure Act which governs how federal agencies make rules. They also claimed the ice decision was a political move calculated to force universities to reopen campuses and hold classes in person, despite the soaring toll of the coronavirus in death and illness, scores of universities supported their lawsuit along with more than seventy higher education associations, so did Google twitter facebook and more than a dozen other tech companies. Number two Joe Biden's campaign announced a proposal Tuesday to transform the nation's Energy Industry Biden pledge to eliminate carbon pollution from power plants by twenty, thirty five and spend two trillion dollars to turbocharged the clean energy economy. My colleagues, Matt visor and Dino Grandoni report that the plan would dramatically reduce the country's reliance on fossil fuels. The fifteen year timeline for one hundred percent clean electricity standard is far more ambitious than anything Biden has previously proposed. It's the latest sign of Biden's attempt to reflect the liberal energy in his party. It's also a response to calls for more sweeping plans to lift in economy that is expected to feel the impact of the coronavirus pandemic for years. The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee also proposed. Four million buildings, and whether rising two million homes over four years, his campaign estimates that would create one million jobs. Homeowners would be given cash rebates to upgrade home appliances and install more efficient windows. Car Owners would receive rebates to swap their old less efficient cars for New Orleans that release fewer pollutants. Many of Biden's proposals build on the recommendations of a Task Force made up jointly allies of Biden and Senator Bernie Sanders, the ratcheted up targets team after Biden faced pressure from young left, leaning activists and major environmental groups to do more to address what they see as a generational crisis, Biden's plan is likely to trigger a vigorous debate with president trump, who has a much different approach to the country's energy sector and climate policy trump a strong backer of fossil fuels has sought to roll back Obama. Obama Administration policies aimed at decreasing carbon dioxide emissions and setting new standards for household items like light bulbs. He's also downplayed the science behind climate change and twenty Dini. The United States out of the Paris climate pact. Trump's embrace of the coal industry was one of his signature issues in twenty sixteen part of his portrait of Hillary Clinton as disdainful of America's industrial workers. It's not clear if trump can level similar attacks against Biden, or if the political landscape has shifted so much to make that difficult. Number three three big banks J. P. Morgan Chase. Wells Fargo and Citigroup reported significant decreases in quarterly profits on Tuesday and according to those banks. The recession triggered by the coronavirus pandemic will be deeper and longer than initially expected instead of a quick economic recovery at the end of the year J. P. Morgan chases chief financial officer expects the recession to be much more protracted city. City group said in a statement that he was preparing for a higher level of stress, and or a somewhat slower economic recovery. The posts rename rural reports that the banks more pessimistic outlooks come as millions of people remain out of work. Thousands of small businesses closed permanently, and some states begin to shut down for a second time to contain the spread of the corona virus. The recession marks the first big test of the banking industry's resilience. Since the last financial crisis when banks took billions in taxpayer bailouts this time the industry says it is much stronger, but last month the Federal Reserve, but new restrictions on how the country's biggest banks spend capital with an eye toward protecting the financial system from risks to the economy, posed by the pandemic, a fed analysis of the bank's finances showed that they are in good shape now, but some struggle in the worst case scenarios of the economic recovery banks have already allowed millions of customers to skip mortgage and credit card payments during the pandemic. Their customers financial health could get much worse as massive government stimulus efforts that have kept many afloat. Including expanded unemployment benefits begin to expire. And that's the daily to two for Wednesday July Fifteenth Stacey and thanks so much for listening..

Joe Biden United States trump Harvard University Massachusetts Institute of Tec federal government Alison Michael James Federal Reserve Obama Administration J. P. Morgan Google New Orleans Stacey Wells Fargo
"dino grandoni" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

07:48 min | 8 months ago

"dino grandoni" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"Death for so many communities whose design impacts meant their whole futures connected them more pollution over and over again. Add that to all the background information on how most folks who are African Americans have come through from the south to the north moved for industrial jobs. A function of taking up. Those jobs was living closer to that work and everything we do at the. The local municipal and beyond level for zoning only reinforces it. This is true whether you're rich or poor and I think Bob Bullet had a lot to do it. Make an important to people to recognize that it's not a function of wealth that makes you more likely to be risks as a function of Thomas. Mellon, Melanin you have. Can we just talk about who Robert Moses wasn't what you meant by that historical example, sure well, so let's talk about to folks. Robert Olmstead, who designed prospect park where it was the part that I grew up near, he designed greenspace so that it functioned as a communal opportunities own Robert Moses. designed highways. Intersected them through parks largely to separate people by race that is set of conversations that have been had in architectural and urban design circles for a long time. About what does it mean to develop and plan cities? And what are you planning for their folks who are notorious for good reason because deciding to put communities under over and near a bypass, a highway increases their likelihood of being poisoned, and even before all of that science was at the top of people's minds. It was really clear that what we were doing a separating people from opportunity. So tomorrow that is a really interesting point and I think about how we're designing cities now and I live in Arlington County, which is supposed to be a really smart green. It's a county, actually not a city. It's very densely populated and the Metro quarter has grown up It has become much more affluent. That has a lot more commercial establishments in it. It allows for higher density. And at the same time seems to push people out because there isn't enough affordable housing, so it seems that even in the neighborhoods that they're trying that are supposedly improving the people who have lived there for decades are not able to continue living there so I just would love to hear from you a little bit more about how do you design things in a smart way where you make sure that the people who've been there and who have built those areas up and made them. them their own aren't then pushed out. Yeah, so I'll go back a little and talk a little bit about why. I mentioned Robert Moses, so he was known as the Master Builder for the Twentieth Century Things. He did that. We shouldn't do change. Shorelines build bridges. build tunnels where people have had their lives at roadways and transform the way people live. He is the person who created the modern concept of suburbia. So folks are taking claim to things that they own. It's because the. Dream told them that success would be to move from the places they where they were new. York will always be my baseline context in New York people came on every kind of boat. Let's just leave it at that for the moment. And as they moved onto the original shoreline, they moved out further when they had money from tenements from really compact housing structures to being able to move out towards suburbia and when we think about. About the idea that they were trying to do that because they were crowded, but also pushed to do that. Because it made a made for an economic success story, we built people into a set of lifestyle choices in into a locked into a transportation system that ties them forever to fossil fuel economy, because we've gotten rid of communal transportation opportunities and I think that there is a lot to say about new design. there are a lot of really great ideas. One of my favorite books is called twenty, one, hundred, a dystopia and Utopia Vanessa Keith. It's actually a really good book about what kinds of structures would have to be built once we've ruined everything so when extreme flooding is happening every day all over Maryland from? Talbot county to city what kinds of things will last? What kinds of things will be able to stand water coming in and out and I think in thinking about smart growth, which Maryland has largely been huge on urban housing design and rural housing responses what we build where we build it and why we build it I. Think there's a new generation. Generation of folks who are taken this on, but the question of how do we move? People who were displaced on an entirely different regime is an open question for city planners now, and that means It's especially going to be a unique challenge given that pandemics will only continue to come and make the timing for all of these things really difficult to pull off. Tomorrow I Read the article from Dino Grandoni on the environment in post a couple of days ago, and it just got me thinking about all sorts of perspectives right. I think when you think about the urban planning perspective, but even you know some of these other pieces that piece really focused on the fact that the environmental movement is largely built and run by white people for White people and I think you know there's been some obviously introspection and changes last few years, but one of the side effects on the urban planning side that they talk about. Is that when the CAP and trade? Trade Bill was pursued in two thousand, nine, hundred ten, the lot of studies after the fact showed that it would've actually exacerbated problems for frontline communities and actually concentrated pollution, even more with an unintended side effect. I want to believe and that then begs the question of whether more voices could have pointed that out to people people who are probably susceptible to hearing that and changing legislation to accommodate for that, but they never sought out those voices in a way that brought to the table and I. Say that as somebody who construction projects in a regular basis and I fear that I. have similar. Issues, with where I'm citing my own power, plants or aware, you know, we're doing wind and solar or interbike digesters, etc, like I just I fear that we're not allowing enough voices to participate in the process because of the you know desire for speed I couldn't agree with you more I think someone who am I. Former work at the Maryland. Environmental health networks basically spent my in a period of two years trying to lobby the Public Service Commission, the Maryland General Assembly at the same time to to take up the question of whether or not. Not a basic health impact assessment could change the way we design our energy grid, response and transmission lines so looking at that process it was a series of asking the call and the question over and over again if I can bring people into the space who live in communities where there are five or six different things killing them at once, and mentioned that not being consulted in a meaningful way, not have being presented with all the information, not being given given information that can be cumulative so that the problems will continue to be cumulative specifically health impact assessments in. In, Maryland we're super lucky to have johns. Hopkins in our backyard. Right and University of Maryland in our backyard. There are some really incredible people there who are thinking about what it means to a measure. What you already know. The data that the Public Health commission art that that that public health records would already have about how sick people are what kind of conditions they face, what the community design plan is doing or not doing so a lot of the fixes that I worked on were just demands for pull agencies talking to each other about information..

Robert Moses Maryland Robert Olmstead Bob Bullet Arlington County University of Maryland Talbot county Public Health commission Mellon York Thomas Vanessa Keith Public Service Commission Dino Grandoni Master Builder Hopkins
"dino grandoni" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"dino grandoni" Discussed on KGO 810

"Seven seven seven seven forty four fortyfour that seven zero seven seven seven seven forty four fortyfour i'm the graham kgon luke maye the holding various no know it's one thing to say hey i i want businesses to be able to me more money in that in the tax reform was one way of that we have the new trade war heating up in depending on where you stand on the political spectrum her which uh school of economics you believe in that might be a good thing or a bad thing but i'm just really curious who in their right mind thinks that this is such a good deal i mean yeah coal ash waste such a good day oh man i mean it i'm going to rip into this and is now i'll i'll hold back has i'm gonna let washington post energy and environmentally environmental policy reporter dino grandoni explain what's going on first dino thanks for coming on the show today hey and thanks for having me on now uh absolutely although this upsets me because coal ash is one of those things that i don't think most people realize how polluting it really is how dangerous it is and one of the things that's never talked about is the coal waste in the united states actually releases more radiation every year than our nuclear power plants do that's going all the way back to 1978 oak ridge national laboratories published a page paper on that one but so dina what's going on with the trump administration epa and coal ash waste yeah that's right cooler than they are polluting their people often think about when when they think of our coal fire power plants they think about the smoked at a releases and the are the way that form smog and can cause asthma but um anyone who's uh burnt a player in the fireplace knows that ashes another residue of burning fossil fuel and um deep coalfired power plants in the united states produce mounds on mountains tonnes on tons of coal ash every year and um what the trump administration has proposed doing uh today um or yesterday was to uh to consider rewriting a rule that the obama administration issued in two thousand fifteen that.

"dino grandoni" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"dino grandoni" Discussed on KGO 810

"Are spinning your day highs only in the low 50s were seen some snow falling on the mountain to mountain tops right around there and they hills just above gilroy as well and it's going to turn to scattered showers tapering off tomorrow morning sunshine for the rest of the weekend i'm bring it on in the old guard armed no it's it's one thing to say hey i i want businesses to be able to me more money in that tax reform was one way of that we have the new trade war heating up in depending on where you stand on the political spectrum her which school of economics you believe in that might be a good thing or a bad thing but i'm just really curious who in their right mind thinks that this is such a good deal i mean yeah coal ash waste such a good day oh man i'm gonna i'm going to rip into this and is now i'll i'll hold back 'cause i'm gonna let washington post energy and environmentally environmental policy reporter dino grandoni explain what's going on first dino thanks for coming on the show today hey thanks for having me on at uh absolutely although this upsets me because coal ash is one of those things that i don't think most people realize how polluting it really is how dangerous it is and one of the things that's never talked about is the coal waste in the united states actually releases more radiation every year than our nuclear power plants do that's going all the way back to 1978 oak ridge national laboratories published a page paper on that one but so dina what's going on with the trump administration epa and coal ash waste yeah that's right um clashes in a are polluting their people often think about when when they think of our culture power plants they think about to smoked at a releases and the are the way that formed smog and can cause asthma but um anyone who's uh burnt a player in the fireplace knows that actors another residue of burning thoughts fuel and um deep coalfired power plants in the united states produce mounted on mountains trends on tons of coal ash every year and um what the trump administration has proposed doing uh today um or yesterday was to uh to consider rewriting a rule at the obama administration issued in two thousand fifteen that would on.

"dino grandoni" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"dino grandoni" Discussed on KOMO

"A throughout the evening hours here we got a little bit of rain out there especially in the conversion so and i think for most of you it's not going to be an issue temperatures not too bad as we go to the nighttime hours as well the overall forecast calls for some showers especially in the home is county and then tomorrow we go to showers and sun breaks it's going to get a little bit cool especially over the weekend the overnight low temperatures will be dropping into the '30s haven't seen that in a while so make sure if you're out and about that you grab that extra coat are they have it in the komo weather center i'm steve pool overcast him fifty two degrees in seattle twenty minutes of nonstop news continues on komo at 506 governs least says he surprised the white support he seen in eastern washington for a tax on carbon pollution inslee says a measure that cleared a key committee villa last week isn't as strong as he likes but he likes it and he says so do people and industries that would have to pay their tax sr was really encouraged what i heard because i found an unprecedented level of interest in in a in a bill that we are now pursuing that will reduce carbon pollution and helped grow clean energy jobs in the state of washington i never heard this before the bill now moving through the legislature would slap a ten dollar a tonne tax on carbon pollution stay republicans want to see a constitutional amendment that would prevent the tax rim going any higher is global warming a bad thing environmental protection agency chiefs scott pruitt has suggested global warming is not necessarily a bad thing the washington post dino grandoni has been following this story and joined come was tom hutyler to talk more about that committee expressed honoree ferry local television interview in las vegas either that peavy climatechanging but he doesn't necessarily know that it is a bad thing for humans if it does foul and this kind of built on something else that he said for the past year that he's been administrator of epa which is that the link between human activity the i mentioned uh from burning fossil fuels and climate change isn't so clear to him okay and he said that.

seattle washington dino grandoni tom hutyler las vegas administrator epa komo scott pruitt peavy fifty two degrees twenty minutes ten dollar
"dino grandoni" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"dino grandoni" Discussed on KOMO

"The leaders of the world's economic superpowers we're going to convene in hamburg germany over the next few days for the g twenty summit president trouble level one on one talk with vladimir putin abc news senior white house correspondent cecilia vega tells us what the two leaders my talk about president trump plans to talk a lot about syria that he isn't going to i'm crack hard on this issue of russian hacking in election out a lotta question all find out now in just a matter of our faith got a thirdly watching right now house minority leader nancy pelosi adding her name to a list of high ranking democrats who are demanding that the president confront should leader putin over moscow's election meddling pelosi saying in a statement thursday today that her trump needs to tell putin the us will not tolerate any further interference in the us campaigns trump says russia meddled in the 2016 presidential election but as repeated his assertion that other countries may have done the same thing the environment and energy issues will likely to come up with the saba one area where the us and russia may find themselves at odds as the trump administration pushes the have the us sport more energy washington post energy and environment reporter dino grandoni wrote about this today and he joins us from the post newsroom afternoon herb so we're talking about l and g liquid natural gas so because administration last week during socalled 'energy week has made it clear that they want the united states to export more natural gas being pumped here two countries abroad and these countries include india south korea and relevant to us today this week with trump to visit to europe he wants to push more liquefied natural gas in eastern europe and we have a lotta gas to sell on the international market yes michelle fracking boom over the past decade has given us a glut of natural gas and this isn't just a trump administration policy this is an obama administration policy of pushing more natural gas abroad trying to solve this extra natural took that we have here and make a profit for us companies so as you're right in the story the russians would see this as more.

liquefied natural gas obama administration michelle india reporter trump nancy pelosi white house correspondent vladimir putin germany europe hamburg south korea united states natural gas dino grandoni presidential election russia moscow president syria cecilia vega
"dino grandoni" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"dino grandoni" Discussed on KOMO

"Than just taking tree dollars away they use sales of energy for political purposes explain that so ever since the 1980s russia has pumped natural gas pipelines to face european countries and they've could use this kind of lever with which they can pressure european countries most notably ukraine and by shutting off natural gas or demanding a higher price for natural gas and the way that the russian government the russian federation has been able to keep some level of control over the former soviet republics trump administration is also talking about sowing more coal over there right yes trump last week during a speech he gave at the energy department called for more coal exports to ukraine which as i said is the country that russia's probably pressured or than any other with shutting off natural gas so severe here hear mr poon will see this is more than a trade situation but a way that the united states is trying to interfere with the how they run the world well i tend to read what the commission wants whip if they are pushing this energy dominant agenda across the board and i'm sure that they are willing will we know that they're willing to sell natural gas to countries both in eastern europe that russia really cares about and countries that russia cares little about like india they wanna so much after oh gas as possible but yes russia may view this as a threat but frankly defend european countries have started lng terminals that can take natural gas from practically anywhere else in the world to so even if the united states weren't too fell this natural gas to eastern european countries like lithuania poland countries with probably be getting at from other countries that are showing lng abroad by australia or canada dino grandoni covers the environment for the washington post you can read his story on their website washington post dot com thanks a lot they'll problem thank you thursday of taiwan fifty time head over to the cobbled propel insurance money update descures grew sale stocks closed sharply lower today as government bond prices slid the dow jones industrial average fell one hundred fifty eight points closing at twenty one thousand three twenty the nasdaq composite lost sixty one points the sp five hundred slid twenty two points costco shares closed down a half percent even though the.

lithuania costco nasdaq dow jones industrial average insurance money taiwan washington washington australia poland russia ukraine europe the commission united states mr poon russian federation russian government natural gas