18 Burst results for "Dimitri Simes"

"dimitri simes" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

11:47 min | 8 months ago

"dimitri simes" Discussed on Amanpour

"But as a speechwriter. I had not been so thoughtful about the words I personally spoke so now I still mess it up one hundred times a day but I used to mess it up one hundred fifty times a day. So I'm I'm getting a little better with. How is that different from ethics? How is that different from ethics or manners even told me what's what is the difference? I think what's different. Is Specificity specificity of it you know when you just say we'll speak kindly don't gossip okay. What what's what can I say something? That's true if it's true but it's not hurt. You can really get down into the weeds here and I. There's a lot of things I can say. Well that's not really gossip that's not really shaming that Judaism actually doesn't let you get away with that right. The more you study these Jewish wish laws you think. Oh well okay. This isn't really gossip and then they say oh no yes it is right. I think. Just don't gossip. It's just not memorable to me whereas you know you study these Jewish stories. There's one very famous one about a man who goes around saying nasty things about his. Rabbi he then kills badly ghost the rabbi admits what he's done and that says okay. I'll forgive you but I you have to take a feather pillow and cut it open and scatter the feathers to the winds guy. Thinks this this is very weird but says okay does it comes back and he says am I forgiven and the rabbi says sure but I you have to gather up all those feathers. I think about that now right. That is a very sticky with gossip does it spreads we can't get you can't get it back right and that's just different. Different than manners are ethics. Right that that is it's it's deeper. It's more the court you know at the core of for some people particularly people who see themselves as rational the problem that they have not just with Judaism with really the most faith. Traditions is the idea that you're GONNA go someplace bad if you don't do what the demand manses right. So how did you confront this whole notion of what it means to be faithful. Yeah and to be obedient said interesting. I- I rejected acted that as a twelve year old and I even more vehemently rejected now. Because I think once you go down that road of there is a God that can who controls everything and rewards and punishes you as you deserve things very hard to explain. It's like okay well. What about the Holocaust well but people have free well so people did the Holocaust? Not God. It's it's like okay. So what is God doing all day. Well it's complicated like I feel like there's a lot of mental gymnastics necessary to justify something that I just see disproven every hour of every day so I actually I reject the idea that there is a being who rewards and punishes us as we deserve. I mean that is. That's a really tough theology. I just can't can't buy it. I reject it and that is not the that's not. The Jewish God is not a man in the sky rewards and punishes right. There's a lot of Jewish concepts of the divine nine and once I was aware of that. Then things got interesting right then. I felt like I could finally develop an adult spirituality. I could make an argument that you chose. You chose to Z.. Jewish maybe you didn't choose to be born into Judaism but you chose. I chose to be Jewish and I think you hear sort of old phrase the chosen people which I've a complicated relationship with but I I think we're very much the choosing people today but jeans ING choosing people. I think we choose to be Jewish. I've chosen actively to be Jewish and I think the way relate eight to these ancient holidays interpret them for modern times right you. They have to be interpreted. We're an interpretive tradition. Jews no more live by the original version of the Torah which which is twenty five hundred years old that Americans live by the original version of the constitution. Thank God both. Those documents allowed slavery. I'm sorry the epitome of evil right treating people as property is the epitome of evil yet. We've reinterpreted than we've reimagined them to get rid of something. That was clearly evil so I think about Johanna holiday like Hanukkah and I think about well okay what is what does this holiday mean rate it has I think it has lessons about being thoughtful about assimilation and not not assimilation. I think it also has lessons about having enough right. It's like the you know. They thought they had enough oil for one night of temple but it was actually for eight nights I think sometimes. Can you feel like you don't have enough in your life. It's two Little Yorkshire realize that you do and I think there's a real lesson about about gratitude there. That is very important so now I have to interpret these for modern times. How you mentioned slavery? So how do you relate to what some would argue you are the. I don't know what we're to use. Respectfully the scars of the difficult parts of the genocides found matters. You know You Know Daniel blowing the trumpet and bringing the walls out. That's genocide I mean. How did he relate to these aspects of the texts that seemed to warrant the the wiping out of people? Because they're in your way. We Ito Lake the Constitution. You have to reinterpret them. I mean the the Torah clearly says I I for an eye is that. That's that's the clear meeting however two thousand years ago ancient rabbis said No. No No. This actually means that if you put up someone's I you have to monetarily. Compensate them. Not what the text says. They interpreted it right. We don't it says to stone people working on Chabad we got. We don't do that rate. You have to reinterpret Herbert these texts and that just like with our Constitution. We've reinterpreted to outlaw slavery to allow women to vote. We continue to do this now. I'm right here getting to a real problem. These are human human systems. took us a long time to outlaw slavery that evil went on for a really really long time. So if you're going to try to make me say well. This is a perfect assistant. It's foolproof and it's me no it's not rate. These rely on US using our humans hearts and minds to interpret these documents and kind and loving indecent way but to me you you. I think that the core ideals of America have a lot to do with equality with liberty with freedom things like that and if the if our laws aren't being interpreted with those in in light of those core ideals we are failing and we need to reinterpret are documents same thing with Judaism. How has your life changed Since you have been on this path breath yeah. Having developed an adult spirituality with jude through Judaism I am so much more open and grateful and joyful will and filled with wonder and my daily life and those towns sort of cheesier weird but like I just. I'm just more more grateful for small things I know this is silly like I was in a hotel room the other night and I just thought such a lovely hotel room is quiet is so clean and beautiful and I just felt such a sense of delayed eight and like gratitude for the incredible privilege which and how is that Jewish so how is it uniquely and specifically Jewish wishes. You know every you know urges but I think are connected to your. Yeah how's that connected my faith Judaism places a huge premium on gratitude. which you know now? It's like everyone's got the gratitude journal and we're all into gratitude. For centuries traditionally observant Jews the first words they say when they wake up in the morning are Moda Komodo on the depending on your gender which means I am thankful. That's literally the first words out of your mouth when you wake up in the morning. The first words of the morning prayers are. I'm I'm I'm thankful. And you're basically saying a prayer of gratitude for your life of gratitude for your existence. Just think you know understanding that emphasis to me. I try to feel a lot more gratitude attitude for my daily existence. You've talked about the fact that you always identified as Jewish even when you were not practicing. We're observing in the way that you you do now. What do you make of of president? Trump's executive order on anti Semitism. I mean it's caused a huge reaction and has some favorable which of it not What what is your take on as a person who worked at that level? Yeah you know to be honest my first reaction Shen at seeing this gets so much news attention just a sense of of dismay because I think so often what I'm seeing in the news. Is this narrative that win. Judaism you this sort of narrative. The news about Judaism is Israel. Plus anti-semitism Equals Judaism and this executive order dealt with both right it dealt with antisemitism awesome and with kind of anti Zionism. Is that anti-semitism. So I just felt a sense of like oh here we go again another. This is another could mark in which another moment which that equation regime is kind of playing out in the media so I just felt a little bit of just dismay like we're doing this again. I think the order is actually really complicated to be honest. I think it's Komo. I think why it's complicated into something. That haven't really heard a lot of people talking about is Judaism race nationality. We're not at this ity. Jews are of every race ethnicity and nationality. That's just a fact. nores Judaism just a religion right. I can reject every tenant Jewish religion and I'm still Jewish. So okay what is it it. It's a people which you you're either born into or you. Choose to become part of through conversion. There's no legal category for people hood and so I think we we kind of have this this clumsy thing where we're trying to find the right category for Judaism and it's just it's not there so I think you know and I just I'm a little frustrated with the divisiveness of the debates around these things but at the same time I also understand that when this is coming from administration with the president who has been repeating antisemitic sentiments and people are understandably suspicious and I can understand the kind of vehemence of the response though it's complicated. Have you shared your book with the OBAMAS. I have I did when I haven't talked to them about the book yet but when my book came out Mrs Obama send the most beautiful tweet like every time I read it I I start crying I mean it was just so kind and loving and back when I first holder at the end of the administration that I want to write this book she was just so excited base you so so proud and I think she saw passionate about it and she was like go do it. This is Great Sara Hurwitz. Thank you so much for so much. Thank you for having me and finally as we said of course it is Martin Luther King Junior Day a federal holiday that honors the slain civil rights activists this use schoolchildren pay a tribute to his legacy in a speech contest in which they were asked the question. What would Dr King's vision for Twenty Twenty America? Be If he were alive today. One one fifth grader from Dallas Texas Colin Harris while the judges with his message of love and freedom and equality take a listen. Dr Dr King's vision.

Dr Dr King president executive Twenty Twenty America Sara Hurwitz Dallas Israel Little Yorkshire Texas Mrs Obama Ito Lake America Moda Komodo Martin Luther Herbert Shen Trump Colin Harris
"dimitri simes" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

11:20 min | 8 months ago

"dimitri simes" Discussed on Amanpour

"And let's pick somebody that we liked from the more moderate or pragmatic wing of the party and Amy Klobuchar. WHO's the moderate there would say? I'm perfectly progressive but that she wants to be practical and and and get things done. That is a divide that the Democratic Party faces and as a writer as a historian I can say that that is a classic American political dilemma. Lamma do I go for the candidate who stands for my ideals or the candidate who stands for some of my ideals and I think can win. It's not always. It's a really clear choice. Is it in two thousand sixteen. Republicans went for the most radical choice available and also one so the radical choice can be a winner. But you have to face that dilemma in doing my research about eighteen fifty six. I found that one of the greatest Americans. Frederick Douglass faced this kind of decision whether to go for a true through anti slavery candidate or for this New Republican Party. That was sort of anti slavery was against the expansion of slavery and he changed his mind and decided to go the pragmatic route and just very quickly. Because we're running out of time impeachments past as I said these senators are going to have to take time off the campaign trail to fulfill the jury duty so to speak. What should we be thinking in light of history as well? Andrew Jackson and and other presidents who've been through this process well Andrew Johnson in eighteen eighteen. Sixty eight was impeached and put on trial before the United States. Senate and it was Nominally Republican senator. WHO's our president who had sort of become a Democrat crat It was a heavily Republican. Senate that was going to judge him and there were a number of senators who had to make the difficult choice to vote against their party and keep Andrew Johnson in office. Now that doesn't mean that the right and patriotic thing to do now is automatically to keep president and trump in office. Let's set aside that judgment but what I think is really valuable about that. Moment is first. That impeachment was significant as historians have pointed out. Even though Andrew Johnson was not removed he was limited. He was constrained by that process. And second that it is a good idea for senators however they vote to think in the longterm to think about the long term health of the institutions that they are that they are charged with preserving for another generation that matters a lot more then then the next election even if they feel differently in their particular situation. And of course you're right. It was Andrew Johnson Not Jackson misspoke. But but what are you hoping to see all expecting to see a news person regarding evidence you just heard Evelyn Farkas and and Dimitri Simes talking about certain emails and texts that I have not been released relating to this Situation the this impeachment trial. What are you looking for as a journalist? I am just watching the statements of the handful and full of Republican senators. Who could make the difference here? Mitch McConnell and setting up this trial didn't say no witnesses. He said we'll decide a little bit later on witnesses even though he's made made his personal view clear that there shouldn't be any witnesses but they're reserving the actual decision for later and there are a few statements now from senators like Susan Collins of Maine as as evidence has come out just in the last few days that maybe we need to think about witnesses. Now critics of Collins will point out that she doesn't always follow through and that sort of thing but it seems there's an open question. Yup Indeed Steve inskeep thank you so much for joining us today. Delighted to be here now. America is celebrating as we said. Martin Luther King in day which shines a light on the importance of equality and unity in these divisive times. Our next guest asks what Judaism. Teach US Sara. Horowitz was a white White House speech writer for President Barack Obama and then for first lady. Michelle Obama her book. Here all along is about waking up to the faith that she was born into she told Michelle. Martin talk a little bit about how you grew up. I mean he were born into a family that identified NFL. Jewish right. And you did all the things in the things but what was your impression of it then yes we went to services twice here at the major holidays if your Rochas Sonya Poor Hanukkah party I went to Hebrew school and my impression as a kid who is that it was mainly kind of boring right. The services were long they they were a lot of Hebrew sitting down and standing up. And what after I had my just thought you know. I just don't think there's much see here right when you talk to your parents about what it was four and why we're doing these things. What did they say? I don't know if I actually inquire deeply with me about it. I think it was just a sense like we're Jewish and this is what we do like. We're we're proud identity. We want to be part of the Jewish community and I think it was sentenced to the synagogue twice a year we go to the Hebrew school. We have the Hanukkah party like. That's just what we do as Jews. I don't know if I ever had a deep conversation with them about what it meant for them. So after you about Mitzvah for those who don't know about this is what it is a coming of age ceremony whereby by you become meal Bar Mitzvah means son or daughter of the commandments. And that's when you're sort of considered to be responsible for trying to observe Jewish law as an adult so about Mr happens when you're wet twelve or thirteen tradition and then you went so you go. Do the things you went to college. You went to law school. You become big time speechwriter for Breath Hillary Clinton first and then for Brcko than for Michelle Obama during all this time. What what was your sort of sense of your spiritual life did did you? Did you ever think about it. Because the OBAMAS talked about those things a lot ted he did and you know it's really funny. I had a vague sense that something was missing right. I have a vague sense of like Kasha Really Nice. I would talk to people who had a deep faith and there was something that they had that I didn't. I don't know if I could articulate particularly clearly but there was just something going on that I didn't have access to and so for me I would show up at the major holidays right. Get some friends together. We'd go to synagogue. I I was proud to be Jewish but that was it you know. I think if you'd said well what do you think about God. I would have said if it's or maybe you know agnostic. Who knows just just didn't think much about it? Because I was so busy and I had a lot going on that was fulfilling. You know when every minute of your life in the White House you're rushing to do something something you're scrambling you're thinking you're working. There isn't a lot of space for other stuff. And so then the day came when you decided to dig defer. You're just described that you didn't quite get hit with a bullet wasn't that I mean not culturally inappropriate it with something. I know people want that story right there like you. This moment of crisis the honest to God truth I was dating a guy I broke up with him and I was lonely and bored anxious. I suddenly had a lot of time on my hands and I happened to get an email from the local Jewish community center about an intruder Judaism class and I swear I signed up just because I just thought I need something I do intro to Julius Judaism it could have been an intro to photography karate ceramics. I probably would have taken it. I don't look if it had been intro to Christianity. What I've taken it? I don't know but Inter Judy is just not you know I know nothing about Judaism. Some might say that the universe since you they might say that and I I don't know if I would say that but some might say it and I just thought you know what I should learn something about my heritage so we're up so I went into this classroom. Standard class in the class itself was not unusual but we started studying these ancient Jewish texts about Jewish ethical wisdom about how to be a good person different theologies different Jewish approaches to God the real thinking behind all these Jewish holidays and rituals and I was blown away. This was so deep an edgy and wise and radical and counter cultural and insightful in a way that secular society he just isn't and I just wear. has this been all my life early. Where is this new? It's like you show up twice a year for the synagogue services and you do a Seder and you do the Hanukkah party and it can be meaningful but Judaism is much more than that. This is four thousand years of people crowdsource wisdom from millions of people about what it means to be human and suddenly it was all there before me. I just thought like I cannot believe this has been here and I didn't do you remember. What is it about that class? That's so griff you even then it just that first meeting do you remember you know over the chorus of various classes. I just thought wait a second this this this is extraordinarily like I remember. I remember calling my dad. After one of the classes. We'd studied a text that said basically build a fence around the Torah and what Torres Judaism's Chore Sacred Texts Like the Koran or whatever and the idea of building a fence around it means you know what just be extra careful about observing law and I called my dad and I said that this is what you always said to us about right and wrong about when something is right you go a little further necessary to make sure you're doing the right thing and you know I said this is a Jewish idea. I think it'd probably my dad would probably learned that in Hebrew school or from his parents and we hadn't necessarily realized like Oh. This is actually a key Jewish teaching and I just thought there's so many moments like that and I just thought okay. I need to learn more. Look what else for example and things you also say in the book. Is that you. You found that you didn't need need Judaism to be a good person but you did need Judaism to be a great person. Factly another example of that you know look I. I think I'm a good person. I don't don't lie cheat or steal. I follow the letter of American law. I try to be kind to others. That is a low bar. I mean American law is designed to ensure that I don't to physically assault people or take their property or infringe on their rights is not designed to ensure that I am honest generous loving kind fair. That's not and good. I don't want American law in doing that. But in studying Jewish lots like there's all this Jewish thinking about speech about gossip about shaming people. An studying I just I felt busted. I thought it was like they were saying like Sarah. We saw you do this last week. And don't do it right. There was just so many little things about how I'm so casually cruel with my speech every day. I don't even think about it and casually cool. Yeah usually cruel. Yeah you know there are these moments comments where okay I think an example. If we're colleagues we get into an argument furious at you. I go out and I just held bunch of friends. Michelle's the worst. She's the worship worship that she's not smart she's better job she's dishonest. I really got it so angry. I'm back the next day. We apologized. This is news misunderstanding. I just told a bunch of people some pretty tough things about you and maybe they tell other people maybe a month from now. You're playing for a job at a company company that one of those people who owns and they say remember something about that woman some remember initial issues with this thoughtless speech. I there's a real cruelty I've I've actually done real harm to your reputation. I didn't even think about it and that was sobering to me. You know that that that ethic of being really careful with your words ironic..

Andrew Johnson Hebrew school Michelle Obama Michelle White House Andrew Jackson Republican Party senator writer Senate Amy Klobuchar Democratic Party Martin Luther King Susan Collins president Frederick Douglass United States Lamma Mitch McConnell
"dimitri simes" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

11:40 min | 8 months ago

"dimitri simes" Discussed on Amanpour

"For joining me there on the wrong side of history. That's me Daniel Radcliffe can steeper semi dark ages of Miracle Work Permits January twenty eighth at ten thirty nine thirty central on. TBS turning out to another contentious election year eighteen fifty six in imperfect the union the CO host of NPR's morning edition. Steve inskeep tells the story of America's first political power couple. John and Jessie Fremont Fremont was the first I ever Republican nominee and the campaign was dominated by immigration race and political demagogy. Does that sound familiar. Steve inskeep joins always me now from Washington. I can see you smiling because I recognized a train. How is it possible that these things just last and last first and last that is the nature of democracy there are politicians who said of democracy that in our politics nothing is ever over and you understand why we have new generations? We have new people entering the political system every single time. We have the same essentially political system with that. We've had for centuries now and and as a result. Christiane what I'm able to do here by going into these years before the American civil war is find the backdrop to the discussion. You've just been having we're in this time of extreme politics in which a Lotta people fear not just losing election but that their side will lose for all time forever you have. Republicans concerned about the demographic change in the country. Democrats are confident that demographic changes in their favor over time but they are also so now worried about being shoved out of power forever by President they see as an authoritarian. So there's a lot of anxiety in the air and in the eighteen forties and fifties It was similar. The United States was divided between the North and south free states and slave states and there was a big demographic change going on causing the free states to be far more populous which the south found really really threatening and in my story. I traced the story of an ambitious couple Bowl Jesse and John Fremont as they He was a western explorer. She helped promote his experiences and they ended up so famous that John ran for president in aged fifty six and this brutal election. So tell me about it because I'm fascinated I mean first of all. It is the first Republican nominee. So I don't know whether everybody knows that. The Republican Party was so news right then and then also. His wife was so impact but important. Explain the dynamics between Republicans and the other party and then the role of women now okay. We've Seen Hillary Clinton really powerful first lady and then in her own right. Michelle Obama really powerful first lady but then it wasn't so much not at all women of course had gender roles that were much more limited but the emergence of Jesse as a character and in of women more generally at that time and the creation of the Republican party are connected In the early years of American politics slavery did exist in a bunch of states. It's in the south and if you wanted to have a national political party that was viable you needed to accommodate what was called the slave power you needed to be pro slavery or at least keep your mouth shut. The Republican Party was founded in the eighteen fifties on the idea that the north had become so populous that they might be able to win a presidential the election with northern votes alone which meant they could be anti slavery. They weren't actually for abolition at the beginning. That was considered extreme but they were against the expansion of slavery and so they captured a lot of the energy in the country in eighteen. Fifty six when they ran their first presidential candidate. Women had not been allowed to be in politics up to now but they were allowed to take on what was called Benevolent. Cause and a lot of women took that opportunity grabbed that loophole in order to to speak up against slavery they were a big part of the Anti Slavery Movement and win. The Republican Party nominated John C Fremont as their first candidate. Jessie Fremont who was prominent herself. The daughter of a United States senator was taken up as a kind of symbol of there. 'cause she was a southerner from a slave owning family whose mother had turned against slavery and had translated her views to Jesse and in a way that was unprecedented. At the the time people would go to the Fremont House by the thousands and demand to see the candidate that asked him to come to the balcony but when he came and waved and went away again they weren't satisfied aside and they would shout for Jesse to come out to let me read this passage from your book where you say. It was no coincidence that his career began to soar a few months often. They eloped when he was twenty-eight and she was seventeen I thought as many others did said one of their critics that Jessie Benton Fremont was the better man of the the two. Well there's a compliment in eighteen fifty six. Yeah the guy who said that may have actually been trying to diss John Fremont and away by saying that his wife overshadowed him but he was also in many ways telling the truth she was a young woman who had grown up very close to her father in some ways you could say that she wanted to be a man by which I mean that she wanted to do things that were supposed to be limited to men. She couldn't really do that but she was able to operate through her husband and he explored the American West in the eighteen forties and fifties went out in these dramatic. Expeditions even took part in the United States. Conquest of California from Mexico was considered a huge hero but as an explorer. He didn't actually discover that much. That was new. What he did was come back east and write these dramatic accounts of his adventures and also make great maps which were intended to promote the American settlement of the West Promotion was the point which is one of the ways? This is a really early modern story and Jesse helped him with that. She was his secretary as he wrote sometimes his editor sometimes his CO author Sir occasionally even his ghostwriter she was his political adviser someone who had grown up around senators and even presidents and was entirely confident. Even there's a young woman telling President her opinion even when she knew they did not agree. With that opinion. She was a remarkable figure who even before this campaign of eighteen fifty six had begun to develop public profile of her own now. It's not unprecedented. That women in Washington in the early days of this country were influential. There were a bunch launch of influential women in that time but it was unusual that a woman would becomes so public and so publicly associated with her husband's policies and when he did run for president she was also viciously attacked as a woman for being so forward. Yeah that hasn't changed has it Let me ask you this though if if John was the first Republican nominee president trump or candidate trump in September. Two Thousand Sixteen just before the election. said that he might be the last Republican nominee. Because of the situation of demographics. You're just talking about now and how you know immigration then and now is still obviously a a major issue and and used by demagogues really this is what president trump said about why Americans should vote for him. I think this will be the last asked election that the Republicans have a chance of winning. Because you're gonNA have people flowing across the border you're going to have illegal immigrants coming in and they're going to be legalized and they're going to be able to vote. And once that happens you can forget it. So Steve I mean look you know clearly politicians being pointing the finger and pointing the the fear at the other. It's happened for hundreds of years. I mean is there any way you can see a society. Changing political campaigns campaigns would be less like that in the future or is this just something this country and many others are going to be living with well let me say two seemingly contradictory things I Christiane one is what I said before. Nothing is ever over. There will always be new voices in the political system there will always be people entering the political arena. And they may well start with certain views that have to be argued over again and again and again there is a similarity between right now and the eighteen fifties because there was a demographic change that people found to be threatening In modern times you know. The elite of the Republican Party tried to deal with that demographic change by shifting Republican Party policies to be more welcoming specifically Latinos a huge growing population in this country. But they found out that their electorate had a different set of concerns. And I'm sure that many people watching this who voted for president trump would say I'm not against immigrants but what they did did want was a reduction in immigration. They did want less illegal immigration as well they did want a wall or some kind of border security. These were things that people voted for more explicitly. It wasn't just a metaphor to them that has been profoundly divisive but the other thing to realize is that America gets passed asked these faces phases and changes and the people that we worry about assimilating end up fitting into America just fine in the eighteen forties and fifties John. Charles Fremont running for president was revealed to be the illegitimate son of immigrant which was true and then the opposition press has turned him into an immigrant. said he'd been born outside the United States there were burgers in eighteen fifty six. He was also accused in a way that can sound familiar to us a being a member of this dangerous alien religion. We talk about Islam today or some of us do in that way. In those days the dangerous religion religion was Catholicism and there was a great deal of paranoia that Catholics would be used by the Pope or by European forces to take over the country. It was a very very real fear in a lot of people's minds in a very big thing driving the anti-immigrant sentiment in the fear of change in the country. But one thing about looking back in history is that we can see how our fears of the moment. Turn out over time and as we know very well. There is a very large Catholic population in the United States today and they fit into America just fine and there was a Catholic president. Of course John F. Kennedy. I had to go through that as well. Look we're talking on the anniversary of Dr King's birthday a federal holiday and we're in the middle of a presidential election race. There's not a single candidate of color left in the Democratic race and obviously not on the Republican side either Ah But but there are women and the New York Times has come out and endorsed two women running for the Democratic Nomination Elizabeth with Warren and Amy Klobuchar two senators who will be sitting in on the impeachment trial. Of Course A. What does that say to you? You're not just an author your a host of a morning newscast which is massively successful. What does that say to you and did you see that coming? I didn't see the joint endorsement coming but it would be hard not to know about the conflict at the time chose with this endorsement to illustrate they explicitly said let's pick somebody that we like from the more progressive wing of the party..

Republican Party President United States Bowl Jesse John C Fremont John president America Steve inskeep Jessie Benton Fremont Jessie Fremont Fremont Washington Christiane trump Daniel Radcliffe Fremont House NPR TBS John F. Kennedy Hillary Clinton
"dimitri simes" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

05:13 min | 8 months ago

"dimitri simes" Discussed on Amanpour

"And in the meantime they also strategically embracing embracing China. America's other major strategic rival. So Dimitri can you translate for US deconstruct for us. What President Putin route just done at home in terms of paving the way for this big constitutional change towards parliament and away from the presidency? And he's the president what ladies He. What is he actually doing? Well when he has done what he has done in his address to the federal assembly. I was in Washington so so I don't come in you particularly inside from private conversations and most goal but what I can tell you that from informed Russian observers to whom I talked talked by phone or visit in Greece in Washington including last week. I hear that this was quite significant. That they're looking for formula. Went in Portugal would be able to maintain power or at least considerable influence of his presidential term in two thousand twenty four at the minimum q wants probably two straight that he's not a lame duck in he's still number one and remained number one is the details are still be incorrect out but I think that what we should expect that there would be continuation of the Putin era will after twenty twenty four. If of course else cults and she seems to be good girls if sculpture would allow so let us just play a sound by when he described why he was doing. This we're just play this sound bite from President Putin last week go national. She's I know that's a constitutional provision is being discussed in our society that the same person should not be president the more than two consecutive terms. I don't think this is a fundamental issue. I agree with that. It's somewhat mixed messenger. NJIT DMITRI and indeed Evelyn because he's also said that people you know somebody's shouldn't be in power for forever and ever you said it would be very worrying to return to the situation we had in the mid one thousand nine hundred ninety s when state need is stayed in power one by one until the end of their days and left office without ensuring the necessary conditions for a transition of power. So thanks but I think it would be better not to return to that situation and yet it looks Evelyn from here as returning to that situation but just using different public public offices to hold onto that power. Yeah what I predict. Is He'll end up behind the scenes holding onto power so the the the person that he put into to the prime appointed or said we'll be the next prime minister. He's a tax guy. He's a technocrat. He's not a threat he's fifty three years old and doesn't seem to have major ambitions and so he's. He's not considered a threat to Vladimir Putin. And I think what Putin we'll probably do if you can find someone else to be president who will be as obedient As Medvedev was he'll put that person in place and then behind the scenes he can control. Levers we see it in Republic of Georgia actually the oligarchy their bids Eva Zena. Yvonne is really. He's he's still the power behind his party. So it's doable in this kind of system where you don't have a full fledged alleged civil society full-fledged democracy I hate to criticize Georgia in the same breath but because they're trying very hard unlike in in Russia but there is a mechanism for Putin to hold on behind the scenes. So he doesn't look like Brad Chef Brezhnev's you know lean in Russia the old Soviet leader getting wrinkled in the public eye and dying. And then somebody else so Dmitri final question to you because people are looking at all these popular protests that are going on around the world from Iran and around the Middle East to wherever Hong Kong and everywhere and even some of them that turn out on the streets of Moscow. What impact do you think? The young people might ever have in Moscow or in Russia. Because there's been a huge amount of attention on how so many young people I mean. Forty percent forty million Russians born and raised in the age of of Putin two-thirds of Russian schoolchildren's say they have no interest in politics. On what sort of. I don't know social movements. It's can you imagine that could ever challenge Putin well obviously depends upon social conditions in Russia in the major part of his speech. The Federal Assembly was what she's going to do to provide different benefits to the people all people young people Mazdas the CETERA I do think that Putin is still popular but the level of popularity does not remains the same and they think that one reason he proceeded to resist changes right now that he's concerned about forthcoming relation relations too reluctant to the parliament. In that you may not have a full control over the next State Duma and he needs this full control to make changes in the constitution which would show his influence so so I think that Putin is clearly awarded but there is no yet crisis that would be a looming right now really interesting Dimitri Simes Evident Farkas. Thank you both very much.

President Putin Federal Assembly Dimitri Simes Evident Farkas president Russia Evelyn parliament Moscow Georgia DMITRI America Washington China Portugal NJIT Brad Chef Brezhnev prime minister Yvonne Eva Zena
"dimitri simes" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

16:22 min | 8 months ago

"dimitri simes" Discussed on Amanpour

"Hello everyone and welcome to on for. Here's what's coming up. You solemnly swear in Washington. Senators prepare for jury duty in president. Trump's impeachment trials while he flies off to join world leaders in Davos Switzerland. We ask where the Putin's Russia is making hay out of this DC dysfunction plus imperfect union. NPR's Stephen Steve inskeep tells me about his new book on America's first power couple and impeachments passed. Then I would show up at the major holidays. Right get some friends together together. We go to this then. I God I was proud to be Jewish. Full the White House. speechwriters Sara Horowitz says signing up for an intro to Judaism led to her own spiritual awakening. Welcome to the program everyone. I'm Christiane on four in.

Stephen Steve inskeep Sara Horowitz Trump Davos Switzerland Putin Christiane NPR president Russia Washington White House. America
Putin talks impeachment at annual press conference

PRI's The World

04:35 min | 9 months ago

Putin talks impeachment at annual press conference

"Every year Russian President Vladimir Putin holds an end of the year marathon press conference. Cook this new shows not not the viewer Putin talked about the. US impeachment trial. He said President Trump was targeted for made up reasons reported. Charles Maine's has been following the press conference in Moscow. Russia has his point of view that seems to often be in line with Fox News with the trump White House and once again we heard Putin say he thinks this is basically it invented scenario by the Democrats to take trump out he was actually asked a Russia. Pundit who's an American citizens Dimitri Simes about how we saw U S Russian relations in the post trump era. He said look. I'm not so sure that trump's presidency is coming to an end. You noted that the impeachment bill still needs to go through the Senate where of course Donald Trump has awesome much more support from Republicans. But he went on to say the things that these are completely fabricated charges against trump. Charles what is the premise of this annual event. Anyway well well it happens every December. It's kind of a year closer to assess What what success? The Russian government had what to failures as they were it's also an event where Hooton is essentially essentially cast is the father of the nation he has had. He was over eighteen hundred journalists. This time in a row in a room coralling essentially to get questions put to him. Of course not everyone it could but the session did go over four hours spell. It's been kind of test. Also of I suppose Putin's endurance and it's everything from small regional issues of thence of national concern as well as geopolitics. Charles are the questions that Putin gets are they vetted or there any surprises or critical questions. Slip through it's funny. You ask I think the sense is that it is pretty free format on this occasion. There may be a few planet questions but of course there are two moments where western journalists for example. Get to ask a question. There was a tough one for example from the BBC asking about Putin's daughters which has been a taboo subject to Putin kind of didn't quite answer. You don't really get a follow up question and that's part of the issue so he can control the format but but you had several questions that were tough regarding issues that have been sticking points between Russian the West Also some questions Russian journalists talking about tough issues involving healthcare problems with things like that but on the other hand you also have a moment when a Bulgarian journalist suddenly regards Unorthodox doc prayer to Putin and everyone applauds so somehow there's a lot of applause. Come from the journalists themselves in the hallway which suggested that had exactly independent players. I was surprised to hear that Putin raised global warming. He in fact he made really strong comments about how the Russian Arctic is being affected by climate change. What did he say? Well you know again. His He's given different signals on this today. He was asked about climate change and he said look. You know we have He somewhere between I guess you would call it a Republican position in the US the Democrats he says. Look some of these patterns. We don't know why it's happening so it sounds a little bit like it. Climate denial climate science denier And then they'll sunny said but look we also recognize that this affects the Arctic more More than other areas and so and which is true and he noted the fact that Russia has more cities up in the Arctic than most countries in the world in fact has the most so He looked at he pointed out the fact that have cities built on permafrost here in Russia. And we if the permafrost to melt love to structures of these cities would be affected. He's just. This is something that Russia was planning to tackle. He noted they were part of the Paris. Climate talks and had signed the Paris climate accords. But the same time he seems to suggest just that it may be other factors at play here but Russia will do its part now of course another big issue is how long Putin will remain in power. He's been in power and Russia for twenty years as president or Prime Minister his current and final term ends in five years. But there's so much speculation he'll find a way to actually remain in power. How did he deal with that? The topic today. We'll kind of that's it was interesting. It came up in a question that wasn't directly related to that he was talking about constitutional reforms involving the lawmakers with the Duma Ma and then he just noted some in the came up relative the presidency as well of course lew illusionist email console. Look if you're doing so that's Putin saying that one thing that could be changed about. These presidential terms is removing the clause about successive terms arms. In other words that you could take away this successive two-term limit which opens the way for Putin to stay in power. So of course that garnered a lot of headlines. Here I bet Charles Means in Moscow with the highlights of Russian President Vladimir Putin's hours long question and answer session today. Thanks a lot Charles

Vladimir Putin President Trump Charles Maine Donald Trump Russia United States Moscow Russian Government Dimitri Simes Fox News Senate Paris Arctic White House LEW
"dimitri simes" Discussed on Mueller, She Wrote

Mueller, She Wrote

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"dimitri simes" Discussed on Mueller, She Wrote

"I wish loomed Ascii would have gone to him and been, like, hey, can you only do future stuff, and then he'd be like sure fingers cross, and then just come out with two reports. That's my fantasy world. I like it. All right. So part A here of Russian government contacts. With Trump folks covers the entire campaign period from some twenty fifteen to November twenty sixteen in this section is beefy has eight sections, the Trump Tower Moscow popadopoulos Carter page Dimitri Simes and the center for national interest, the June ninth two thousand sixteen. Trump Tower meeting, the Republican national convention post convention contacts with Kislyak and Paul Manafort, but we're only going to be covering today, the Trump Tower Moscow and popadopoulos, and then the next episode we'll get to Carter page, and Dimitri Simes and so on, and so forth. That's how giant this section is on. And this entire sections begins by saying, Russians and Russian media began showing interest in Trump just months after he announced in June, two thousand fifteen and that Muller investigated the Trump Tower Moscow deal to see if there was any coordination related to the election. He then let us know that as the campaign progressed, Russian outreach, progressed, and that the office also looked into to Trump's policy advisor. And their connections to finding dirt on Hillary Clinton in the form of emails, a DC based think tank with Russia connections. The Trump Tower meeting, the national convention post-convention contacts between Trump aids and Kislyak. And then, of course, context Manafort, there's a footnote here that gives an example of Russian outreach at the bottom of page, sixty six and how an August of two thousand fifteen a Russian journalist reached out to hope Hicks. And for an interview with Trump and that a day earlier the publication registered, the domains, Trump, 2016 dot are you and Donald Trump twenty sixteen dot Maria. I am are you? Got those from go daddy. Oh, yeah. I bet time to renew go a dictator. World. Domination vol rolling today. Just ten ninety nine a month. Definitely go dictator dot com. It's our next..

Trump Tower Moscow Donald Trump Trump Tower Trump Dimitri Simes Paul Manafort Carter Kislyak Hillary Clinton dot Maria Muller policy advisor popadopoulos Russia Hicks
"dimitri simes" Discussed on Don't Worry About The Government

Don't Worry About The Government

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"dimitri simes" Discussed on Don't Worry About The Government

"Yeah. Ladies and gentlemen. Hello again, in welcome back to don't worry about the government. My name is Chris November. No. And on today's show we're going to continue our episodic look at the mole report. This installment is going to focus on the center for the national interest, in particular an individual named Dimitri Simes. So let's get right into it. There are a lot of thing tanks in Washington DC, and one could be forgiven for not being able to keep them all straight, because they are by design named with fairly boring and generic sounding things that are vaguely patriotic like the center for the study for greater American prosperity. In the twenty first century that one's a little bit wordy but has a lot of the key hallmarks of a think tank in Washington. So one could easily be forgiven for seeing a name like. Center for the national interest and not giving to thoughts about it. In fact, my only encountering with this thing tank, in my professional career. Is it occasionally, I run across images when I'm doing image searches for those wonderful image grabs, I have on, don't worry dot TV gotta go and check them out, and I will find a public speaker standing in front of a podium, that says the national interest, and it's a speaker.

Dimitri Simes Chris November Washington
"dimitri simes" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

14:25 min | 1 year ago

"dimitri simes" Discussed on Amanpour

"Planet can also make governor young people are helping us get it done. They are leading the charge governor, Michelle Luhan Grisham. Thank you so much joining us from Santa Fe tonight now while the. Democrats jostle to try and shape the future of their party, the world of science is shaking up something even bigger, and that is the future of humanity DNA is becoming a commodity one that can be written in hacked, like a piece of IT, the futures, Jamie. Mattel says genetic engineering now threatens the very things that make us human in his new book hacking, Darwin he wounded could be honest for good all descend into a new form of a kind of an arms race, and he sat down to discuss this with Hari Sreenivasan. Right now when you are pregnant there are screening tools available to figure out if there's a horrible disease a hardship that you're about to face you have. A tool in the book where you look forward and into a fertility clinic twenty five years from now. Right. And you kind of lay out the scenarios help our audience. Explain what that could look like right now, most people who are pregnant in the United States have noninvasive prenatal testing to learn more about the embryo that they are carrying, and if there are significant problems, those parents, those mothers are often faced with a very difficult choice, and the choice is to carry that that embryo to term or to abort, and whatever anybody's us are of the politics of abortion. That's an extremely painful excruciating decision for parents, but we are moving increasingly towards using technology that already exists for preimplantation genetic screening. So rather than having to make that determination. Once the mother is already pregnant, let's say you have fifteen fertilized eggs, also called zygote s-, and you can screen all of those and you. Can figure out which are the ones which are perhaps carrying deadly diseases and not implant those and then going forward into the future because we're going to have so much more information so much more understanding about our own complex genomics, the choices that we're going to make that we will make in the context of decisions made at fertility clinics is not just about disease states, but about all kinds of traits, and then beyond that, and certainly within that twenty five year timeframe, we are also going to be able to do something that we already can do but not well, which is make a relatively small number of gene edits on these pre implanted embryos, either to eliminate risks or perhaps to provide enhancements. So let's talk about that. There's eliminate risk quotient that I don't think most people have a problem with right? But then there's this enhancement idea where people do have a problem with it. Right. When you can start to say selectively say, well, I want to go ahead and. If I had if I had figured out the gene combinations for longevity, right or for height or for IQ personality. Yeah. Well, I'd like to engineer my kid to give them an edge, or at least make them baseline. If that's what everyone else is doing and a lot of people. If you ask them, how do you feel about genetic engineering? We'll say exactly what you've said they'll say well uncomfortable with therapeutic applications and I'm not comfortable with enhancement. But when you push them when you say are helped me draw the line between where therapy ends and enhancement begins. It's really really difficult because there's a gray area in many many circumstances. Let's say somebody it looks like a child is going to be three feet tall. People would say. Well, that's really sure it. It's hard to live. If you're three feet tall. There's a lot of discrimination their health health issues. Does it make sense to use some kind of genetic engineering to make sure that you have a child? That is taller than three feet on. I think people would say well that maybe that sounds right because we mean being three feet tall. That's a difficult way to live, but not not everybody would say that. And then you well four feet tall. Or what are we going to define like a specific height where that's below that height that is therapeutic application and be on that height is an enhancement, and you can go to many many traits, but different societies will have different views and some societies will vary legitimately say. We only want to address the most dangerous genetic diseases and that will be fine. But other societies will say, hey, we recognize that there are benefits to be had that we think we think as society did maybe it's better to have a higher average IQ among our population. We think that will make us more competitive. We think that will help us have new innovations that will make life better for everybody. And so there's no right or wrong answer. But these will be real choices. Once you start describing the aggregate impact of what these tiny genetic modifications can do I think that gets very scary for people to say. Well, this is what I read about in college in the Uber Mench. Yeah. Right. This is a world like was describing the movie Gatica, right? All of a sudden, we have a society of haves and have nots based on whether you had access to this technology is more likely than not not going to be equally distributed to all parts of the world at the same time. Right. So we're going to have a class or a country or county of people that would have this access and then a generation later. They're perfect. You know, six foot tall have every advantage hierarchy you, and then here's a whole country or continent that doesn't have it. Yeah. I'm really sensitive to this. You this issue? I come from Kansas City. The reason I come from Kansas City is that my father and grandparents were resettled there after the war as survivors of the holocaust victims of Nazism, and what the Nazis saw themselves as do. Doing was applying Darwin's principles. And so for me as a child in many ways of the holocaust victims of the holocaust. I'm very very mindful that what I'm talking about could be interpreted as a form of eugenics, and that's really a big deal. But on the other hand when you talk to people, and you say, would you if you could choose from fifteen of your pre implanted embryos, and you knew that two of them were going to have some kind of heritable genetic disease that was going to been sure that they die before their ten years old. Would you choose to implant those embryos and most people say, no. And that's a whatever the word is that's a form of eugenics. So we are going to have to make choices. If you're worried about genetic inequality in the future. The best thing that you can do is worry about inequality now. Because if we if this is the we've we who lives the way we do we were perfectly okay for. To be born with very little opportunity or people who are born in places like the Central African Republic who in in effect have brain damage because their mothers are malnourished. And so their chances of success at life are so much lower than than our kids. If we're okay with that now, how can we expect that we're going to be different in the future? Our government's anywhere close to creating sound policy around this given that not everybody even understands the underlying science. Yes. Oh, some governments are doing better. Some governments are doing worse and some governments are doing nothing when I look around the world, I would say the United Kingdom is probably the best jurisdiction in the world where they are addressing these issues. Very thoughtfully. They have national forums on issues like Mike Okon drill transfer. They have a very effective body called the human fertilization and embryology authority that oversees these these many of these issues that the houses of parliament have had. Full body votes in both houses on issues like like meadow country drill transfer and they have a national health service, which allows rational decisions to be made on a national level here in the United States. The FDA is certainly an excellent and world class agency. But we don't have that level of government wide by let alone population wide by. And we don't have as informed of public on these issues and that certainly creates a danger. And then there are some countries that have nothing and the danger is that certainly in countries like ours, we need to do a lot more. But as these technologies become more widespread and come to be seen as more beneficial. Even if they don't prove to be people will go to where they can get get these benefits if they perceive them as as benefits, it seems like to me, there's three groups that are likely to abuse. This one is dictators who want to create an army of super strong, whatever people. Right. Another is rogue scientists who don't really care for the ethical standards. And we're starting to see a little bit of that. Now and three his parents looking for an edge. So let me quickly dispelled the first two and focus on. So I have advised the US military on this and have talked to them as they brought a group of futurist thinkers together. And my feeling is the real competitive edge is in just super soldiers. I mean, maybe that would be would be possible. But it's kind of a waste it's competitive societies. I mean, that's the which leads to your second point of dictators that if I was thinking, I've written a scifi novel Genesis coat about this about if I were a country. Let's just call it China and my goal was to be highly competitive in the future. And I wanted to use these technologies what might do. So what I would do is. I have a national genetic engineering program focusing on. Embryo selection, made with small amount of of genetic then I would sort people into categories based on their super capabilities based on their genetic profiles. But not just military or sports. It could be business. It could be engineering. It could be math. It could be all sorts of things and then put them into the equivalent of Olympic sports schools, but in all of these different disciplines, and then see who does the best and have a pyramid of these people who are having a genetic likelihood of being great at something. And then get a number of superstars in those areas and invest huge resources in building national champions. So that rogue scientists we've seen that in China last year, John que-, who is certainly a rogue. Scientist extreme doing extremely irresponsible. A work in my view of genetically engineering what became these two two Chinese girls, but they won't have the incentive to do to make these kinds. Of changes on a population wide scale. So they're going to need some kind of mechanism behind them which leads to your third category. Which is parents and everybody would agree that the kind of state sponsored eugenics of Nazism, or what happened in the United States is wrong. But this is going to be very different parents are going to demand these services, particularly once they see if and when they see that there are benefits to be having these benefits would be reducing the roughly three percent risk that parents now have that their children will have some kind of harmful genetic abnormality. And that will be a big driver. But also conferring certain kinds of advantages. I have a friend in Korea and his eleven year old daughter has twelve tutors coming to the house every week in Korea that they had to pass a national law closing their cram schools at ten pm because people are having their seven eight year old kids going to these cram schools seven days a week past midnight to prepare for college entrance exams. They were going to take a decade in the future. And when I asked his friend. I said if you could select your pre implanted embryos to give about a fifteen percent IQ boost to your kids, would you do it. And he looked at me like, I was some kind of idiot. How about everybody would you know that you would they do it. And again, he looked at me like I was like it was like, obviously who wouldn't do that. And so I'm not saying it's right or wrong. I'm just saying some people, and parents are going to want to do this and some parents and maybe countries won't, but there will be real consequences for those decisions. One of the things you keep coming back to his pre implanted embryos, which leads me to ask. Well, we just be having sex for pleasure. Not for procreation. I'm celebrity number of articles on the end of procreative sex. And I believe that whatever the year thirty years from now twenty years from now conceiving of child through sex will seem as dangerous to people as not vaccinating your children is today. Because when you think about it, not vaccinating your children, that's very natural like nature didn't invent vaccines. We developed them and again conceiving a child through good old fashioned. And sex is very natural. It's actually been a great strategy for our species and for all sexually reproducing species. But there are dangers associated with sexual reproduction. And we are going to be able to reduce and in some cases, eliminate many of those dangers, and that will be a choice, and so right now people are carrying diseases that won't exist twenty years from now or thirtyish registers like when you see somebody with polio. If you see a child with polio. What do you think you don't think? Wow. That's terrible fate that that kid has pull you you think we'll something went wrong because kids aren't supposed to have polio. And there'll be lots of genetic diseases and disorders that in the future. If you see somebody with that thing, you say white how did where did the system breakdown because humans in large part aren't getting those diseases anymore. You know, there's going to be someone who safer Jampel lives with a family member who has down syndrome. That's going to say listen. That person is an incredible human being they've grown up with these challenges and

United States polio Mattel Hari Sreenivasan Michelle Luhan Grisham Kansas City Santa Fe Jamie Korea China United Kingdom FDA Genesis engineer Jampel Mike Okon Olympic sports schools
"dimitri simes" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"dimitri simes" Discussed on Amanpour

"Election. Glad that you have a Smith. I wasn't a Russian TV this morning and reminded them again about the interference in US elections and the cost of this interference. I said many times on a Russian TV when I was invited to be the that. I think that the Russian interference was serious ordeal and came into considerable cost. I think that Zohreh this interference is described in the special counsel report is again, objective and well-documented. What is in dispute is why they were doing it? In the special counsel deserves credit for sayings of the Russian interference correction started not in two thousand sixteen not even in two thousand fifteen but in two thousand fourteen when Russia's settler was not aware of. Branding and becoming president. You could see from Missouri interactions to Trump with his business organization is ever not doing Trump any favors kill tomato. Less moment is option in most Moscow was that Hillary Clinton was very likely to win. So why was the Russians interfering? I cannot quote, you particular document, which I can cite as a kind of explaining all of this document coming from the Russian side, but they could numerous conversations in Moscow, and that things that this conversation's they impression which got is widely shared by US intelligence community impression number one is Russian wanted to respond to what they thought American interference in elections into your role in Ukraine in two thousand eighteen they sold that it was the payback time and they were doing in their own clone distant individually, often not very effective manner. Second is. Really despite Hillary Clinton, they were not so much thinking about coping Trump, but they wanted to do something to the Hillary campaign to retaliate against personality sold that she was particularly hostile to them. And that kind of retaliation was a part of the immigration. Okay. So I've got one last question that I need to ask you on that. Because clearly we know that Allah Gatien's the Trump administration was seeking so called oppo like on the Hillary clamp campaign and in this big volume one on the Russia collusion investigation. It says in the report that you offered Kushner details of quote, highly questionable connections between Bill Clinton and the Russian government. But in here, it's redacted. So you want to? Enlighten us. Well, what is not reducted? Of course is where good this information clearly the special counsel when he said that we will not delivering any, and I was not delivering messages for most co is made very clear, they did not think that I got any information from the Russians which relate to the campaign and in this, but equally instance in that paragraph is they mentioned who I come alleged. Leitch wasn't my sauce away could mentioned a former very senior intelligence official who before it was a Heaney national Security Council. Official. I it so happens that this fischel have just done an extensive interview with the Washington Examiner way goes for the confirmed that he was my soul is he'll was the one who brought this situation to my attention. It could nothing whatsoever to do is Russia. All right. It was talking to somebody who was forty member. We wanna feed the member of the community. But Dimitri Simes has been really interesting talking to you. Thanks so much for joining us tonight. They go. Thank you. Tired of spending hundreds of dollars for prescription glasses. Our friends at Zanny optical offer, a huge variety of high quality stylish frames and state of the art optics starting at just six ninety five. You can get multiple frames with this great pricing for less than one pair. Elsewhere start building your eyewear wardrobe from the comfort of your own home at Zanny dot com. With the latest trends in eyewear available and hundreds of frame styles and materials there isn't a better way to change it up for every season. Plus is any offers prescription sunglasses. Incredible prices visits any today at Xeni dot com slash CNN. That's Z E N N. I dot com slash C. N N. I'm Biagio Messina. And I'm jokin soon. We are the producers behind the H L N television documentary series unmasking killer. Join us as we explore the identification capture and arrest of Joseph James, Di Angelo the alleged Golden State killer in a special ten part podcast series unmasking killer, all new episodes premiering Tuesday. February twelfth subscribed today at apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Russia Hillary Clinton special counsel Trump US Bill Clinton Dimitri Simes Moscow Smith Xeni dot Washington Examiner Biagio Messina president Missouri H L N Ukraine Kushner Zanny optical apple Allah Gatien
"dimitri simes" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

11:25 min | 1 year ago

"dimitri simes" Discussed on Amanpour

"Will not see in this particular statement by the Washington Post, it is entirely false and offensive because first of all was not whispering anything to them. It was talking to them quite openly. And there's a role in the Princess of quite a few others, including a number former senior officials so it was. Wolman was very much an open book. The second thing is when your ask about what they want. I think it would be better to ask them. But you know, I was on your show in the past. I wrote for the New York Times for the Washington Post on many occasions, and that kind of sinkers at the people who are looking for him. Why expertise not only on Russia, but on foreign relations in general publisher and CEO of one of reading American foreign policy publications the initial interest, which by far as the greatest presidents of internet in terms of eight years, American or international publication. I don't think that it's appropriate to imply there was something unusual about the compaign being interested in talking to me. Okay. So let's just break it down. Then because there was clearly something enough inch. Interest that the mother investigation and the mother team talk to you and mentioned you quite so this just taking, you know, point-by-point then at one point in the report it says the u provided bullet points on Russia for Donald Trump to us is that accurate. Do not remember that particular portion of the report, but I did communicate with a campaign. Some of my colleagues people not associated to the centers, well, provided multiple impetus speech. It was agreed that she's fast speech on foreign policy would be delivered under the center almost Pacific law magazines, initial interest or specific, and they were interested in our input into speech in preparation of the speech together with maniacs organizations in Washington. So from this standpoint our involvement, my enrollment was spefically appropriate and normal for Washington syntax, and they don't seem to demolish reports imply Denison girls. About the speech at the Mayflower, which all of us covered because it was the first major Trump candidate foreign policy speech, and we all want to know what his priorities, and what is focused was going to be. We know now that Richard Burr, the former US ambassador to Germany, also, I believe a director at CNI, the think tank yours helped write the speech, and this is what he has said about it. And it's just play a little bit of a let's just play a little bit of what Trump said in the speech. I believe an easing of tensions and improved relations with Russia from a position of strength. Only is possible absolutely possible. Common sense as this cycle. This horrible cycle of stability must end. And ideally will end soon. Good for both countries. Now, obviously, I assume you agree with that. And that was clearly a part of the perspective here. But I just want to ask you a little bit about how this came about. Because again, it says in the report that you received subsequent draft outlines from Stephen Miller who is a prominent Donald Trump and remains upon prominent Donald Trump advisor, and that he and CNI executive director Paul Saunders along with Richard Burt spoke to Mila by phone about substance substantive changes to the speech, again, how appropriate is that. And why was that that degree if you will of kind of micro managing of this speech? Well, first of all, there was absolutely no micromanagement comes the speech to the extent that I did not when she is the final version of the speech. So I did not know what would be in the speech before it was delivered by by Mr. Trump, and I'm sure the disabled through with Mr. Saunders. That's what I thought. And I'm busted the bet when you ask appropriate. I will tell you. I think that, you know, Washington, and you do knows that Washington think-tanks are not only entitled but fully expected to help to the candidates and to assist them in developing programs in statements. It is a process with many participants. And it doesn't LSU MD is that if you helped in this process that means is that they went along with all your conditions, and that are responsible for speeches, which are not have seen before they were actually deliver. Just a very. Quick issue. He had me something tanks. Avowedly partisan others are not yours claims to be nonpartisan. So I guess what I want to know is why did you feel that you wanted to reach out and help this campaign? And was it like Russia felt you know to make sure that Hillary didn't win. And maybe there was be a different policy from the United States towards Russia. Well, say I you describe the beginning of Russian American will I was born in Russia. I am an American citizen since nineteen eighty and they think that by far the greater part of my life, and settling practical all my career took part in the United States. And you know, what I think when titled to an American who was born in Russia, and that's exactly how I feel and incidentally, when they feel and the Russian TV that's always how a position myself and Calway. Being user point number one point number two. If you're would look Damola reports, you would know that we help star inch a couple of dinners with a number of leading foreign policy experts. And there were chairs they were kind of presided by Senator session school late. Of course, became attorney general sessions for your understands in each of his Dina's where we provide our input to compaign fest. Everyone who attended his dinners with an exception of me who was a former here official or at least three or four star. General this dinner, civil included former director of national intelligence, second son of people who took part in the dinners at should or not Trump supporters at all they ended up being Cutie Clinton supporters. But we invited them to take part with a clear understand. Adding that we would not be called advisor to campaign is that people who take part in this DNS would not describe themselves as vice to complain. But we would be decades compaign, and which one final point eucheuma ask me, why wouldn't you do it for Hillary Clinton Wickham? Unlike chiller Clinton on a very senior level, unfortunately, she could not do it. But a month later, we had Tim Kaine who became of course, Hillary Clinton's running mate. No, just being speaking at the center being owner, the dissenter delivering the foreign policy speech and before that he spoke twice at the center. So we genu- new Andom partisan. Okay. You know, obviously, I've been reading things here to you that that that point out that the Senate did advise the campaign, and you also obviously arrange for instance, at that speech introduced Donald Trump to the to Sergei Kislyak the Russian ambassador. I mean, there are all these issues. You might call perfectly normal. But nonetheless, they've been raised in the course of this investigation. But I do actually to your points right now. Want to ask you them? Why you know, I assume having been Ocelot lot by the Trump campaign. You seem to have said to Jared Kushner that certain to close contacts would be quote, bad optics. Let me read you a paragraph from the Mahler report, the golden lot of attention Symes. That's you raise the issue of Russian contacts with Kushner advise that it was bad upticks for the campaign to develop hidden Russian contacts and told Kushner both the campaign should not highlight Russia as an issue and should handle any contacts with Russians with care. So you know, unpacked that for us because it seems to basically be your answer to some of the issues that people are asking you right now about the exceptionally close contacts with one campaign, which is the Trump campaign. Well, I I think that. The special counsel has described where a fairly my input to the Trump campaign in my suggestion that they should not have any secret contacts with the Russian government and more broadly is they should be extremely careful about any contacts with Russia during the campaign. I myself was not even a single time in Russia since Tramper became a candidate and till two thousand seventeen when radio was president. My view was that what Trump said about the personality of a better relationship with Russia from the position of strength is that it was appropriate. I did not think that he was always describing the reasons for this interest in a better relationship appropriately. When he talked about putting praising computing, calling Kim brilliant. I thought it was not what. The US interest was about the interest was about in having a relationship with another great nuclear power, which would allow the United States to have a normal dialogue and incidentally to extend the major substantive input. I suggested that Russia should be described more as an adversary that we should focus on continuation of American alliances boss Nate in Europe and US alliances in Asia. So while though I sold that what Trump for saying the mayor respects was refreshing and constructive, but I was simply did not agree entirely with his approach in particular with us rhetoric. I just very quickly. A given the way everything is unfolded over the last couple of years since Donald Trump has become president. Do you? Do you have any qualms or questions, and I'm not talking about Russia because we know that Russia into. Feed in the election. Do you have any qualms about that? You think it was the right strategy of the Russia's sought to help a President Trump in this in this election.

Donald Trump Russia United States Washington Jared Kushner Washington Post president CNI Hillary Clinton advisor director Wolman New York Times Hillary Clinton Wickham LSU Richard Burr Mayflower
"dimitri simes" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"dimitri simes" Discussed on Amanpour

"Hi, everyone. It's poppy Harlow on this week's episode boss files, CARA Swisher. Fearless tech journalist entrepreneur and founder of Recode she presses and she presses the biggest names in tech for answers. And a lot of the time. They hate that. But she still gets the big gets. So where did her unwavering confidence come from? I ask her plus though, she thinks we'd even be in this predicament today, if more of the big tech companies were founded and run by women, it's all on boss files. Subscribe on I tunes today. This CNN podcast is brought to you by American Express, my credit guide a free credit score. And report and other tools to help you take charge of your credit. Your credit score is greater than a number. It's your story. Hi, podcast listeners. It's been a week since the Muller report was released but its impact is far from over. I talk with Dimitri Simes the Russian American CEO of a Washington think-tank about what landed him in the four hundred page report. It's a really rare opportunity to talk to somebody who's actually named in that report with such knowledge of the Russia portfolio. Then the field of twenty twenty democratic presidential candidates is getting full an only expected to grow New Mexico's governor the democrat, Michelle Luhan Grisham joys to break down the current state of the party and the major issues facing her border state, and perhaps people across the country, and Harry has a fascinating and chilling conversation with Jamie mezzo about how DNA can be hacked for design a baby's enjoy the show. Welcome to the program, everyone, I'm Christiane Amanpour in London. President Trump says that he will fight congressional subpoenas to have his officials testify on the hill as House Democrats pledged to carry the mantel of special counsel, Robert Muller's investigation politicians, and lawyers and investigators are still picking over this report. And today, we have the rare opportunity to speak with a man whose interactions with Donald Trump's presidential campaign Jemma spot in that to volume tome Dimitri Simes immigrated to the United States from the Soviet Union in the nineteen seventies. And he would go on to run the center for the national interest. It's a Washington think tank that specializes in Russian affairs in April twenty sixteen months before the election candidate, Donald Trump gave his first major foreign policy address at an event affiliated with signs think tank, according to the special counsel it was at that event that Russian Ambit. The SOGA kissing the ad met, Jared Kushner, the president's son-in-law and told him, quote, we like what your candidate is saying it's refreshing. It's just one of many interactions between signs and the Trump campaign. So to understand more. I'm joined now by Dimitri Simes who's joining me from Washington, welcome to the program. Thank you very much. So look, I mean, it's really interesting to have you to talk to tonight because as I've said, everybody's still poring over this. And we all want to know all the details. So here we have you tell me from your perspective. Just give me an overview short of the investigation itself. Well, this was a very humorous investigation. Clearly, quite deliberate. A lot of people involved who is manufactured sauce CT. I think that from what I understand several conduct people. In Washington alone were interviewed several dozen oil were subpoenaed to appear before the grand jury Newseum. You know, anyone else from the center of the national interest was one of them as the investigation concluded conversation who is special counsel people. And they were very nice saying king me, and my colleagues for our effort and said that they were Saudis that we had to go through this right and the hoped that if we see each other again, it will be under more pleasant circle. Stances tonight told them that while it was not my favorite form of entertainment. I understood that they were doing woodsy was supposed to do in their ear is sought. They were quite professional and responsible, right? So Dmitri, you have a great way with words and the great flourish. And you've given us a very interesting perspective. Were

Dimitri Simes President Trump special counsel Washington Robert Muller poppy Harlow CARA Swisher Christiane Amanpour CNN founder Jared Kushner American Express Soviet Union Michelle Luhan Grisham New Mexico Dmitri Russia Jamie mezzo
"dimitri simes" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"dimitri simes" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Are you ready? President Bill Clinton having phone sex with Monica Lewinsky. But the reference was redacted from the virgin released to the public. The redaction is likely to anger Republicans because the allegation has been known since at least two thousand one the mullahs reports reference to a claim that Trump watched prostitutes urinating in a Moscow hotel room was not struck out. That's the golden showers story. And the golden showers story is that Trump was in Moscow trying to further the building of a Trump hotel there. And that he discovered he was staying in the same hotel room as Michelle my bell Obama and Barack as learned that he called a bunch of prostitutes over and head them urinate on the bed while he watched. That's the golden shower story, and it's all over the Steele dossier, and it made it into the mullahs report. What was redacted was President Clinton having phone sex recorded by the Russians while on the phone with Monica Lewinsky Clinton was recorded by Russia in the nineteen nineties allowing Russia to learn the affair before Americans dead a reference to the Clinton intercept was redacted from the mullahs report to protect personal privacy. But sources told the Washington Examiner that the context makes clear what was blacked out. According to the report center for the national interest, president Dmitri Simes. I remember this guy. Do you? Remember Dimitri, Simes Dimitri Simes looks like his name. He's had he had a short little beard and close cropped hair bald on the top and glasses, and he was forever on the news hour the meal Lara. He was a regular on them macneil Lehrer news hour, and he he I I don't remember. He hated the bushes are, but but he was on during time the bushes were prominent, and you could barely understand what the guy was saying. Except what he said moosh, it'd be. And I remember Jim Lara loved having Dimitri Simes on he was some think tank guy, and the think tank was the the center for the national interest is the president of it. Anyway, according to the report Dimitri Simes center for the national interest president. Sent Trump son-in-law Jared Kushner at twenty sixty and Email with recommended talking points to counter Hillary Clinton's Russia attacks, the Email reference to well-documented story of highly questionable connections between Clinton and Russia. At a meeting in New York. Dimitri Simes told Kushner details Russia recorded, President Clinton on the phone with Lewinsky opening questions of foreign leverage over the ex president turned potential first spouse now during this meeting on August, seventeenth Dimitri, Simes provided Kushner the Clinton related information that he had promised Symes told Kushner that and this is redacted. So we don't know what he said signs claimed that he had received the information for former CIA and Reagan White House official Fritz herbalife who claim to have learned it from US intelligence sources not from the Russian how about that. The Muller report features factor. Russians had Clinton on tape doing phone sex with Lewinsky that gets redacted in buried, but the Trump golden showers story, which is a lie. It was made up. It's part of the Steele dossier is right out there for everybody to see. Classic. This Mullah report should have been no more than two pages. If there was no collusion that what's what are these navy eight pages for folks? And why is there a section to on obstruction? When there wasn't any. When Muller couldn't come to terms with it. There doesn't there the whole purpose. This was defined. What not there was Trump Russia collusion? Of course, there never was this whole thing bogus. But the report should have been no more than two pages. Instead, it is a novel that's filled with innuendo and all of this lion crap from the Steele dossier, and then it recycles media stories that Muller's team leaked to the media in presents these media stories as further evidence, even.

Simes Dimitri Simes Monica Lewinsky Clinton Russia president Trump Dimitri Simes center Jared Kushner Monica Lewinsky mullahs Steele Muller Moscow Washington Examiner Lewinsky Obama macneil Lehrer moosh Fritz herbalife Jim Lara
"dimitri simes" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

08:44 min | 1 year ago

"dimitri simes" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"No graduates are no degrees because the learning never stops. From the Washington Examiner, by the way, you know, just the Washington Examiner has become a recent sponsor of the network. They have a great daily newspaper and a magazine that they are really doing it. It's hard to be unique in trust me. It's hard to be unique in in particular content. Everybody's dealing with the same content. It's how you deal with that content that the determines. What are you stand out? Whether you're unique print. I mean, it's it's really tough. Can how do you differentiate it now with the drive bys it's not it's a little easier because the drive bys do not. Do any stories favorable to Republicans conservatives and that is not an exaggeration. In fact, the new rule in drive by media. Yeah. The story. That is bad for Republicans van for conservatives. You reported you reported with glee you keep reporting it yet pound people with it. If you have a story that's bad for the left. If you have a story that's bad for the Democrats. You don't report that you report the rights reaction to it. And you use terms like Republicans seize on or Republicans pound. But if there is a story that's banned for the whiffed. They never report that they report on the Republican reaction to it and rip Republicans to pieces for the way, they react to a story that's bad for the left. So in trying to come up with unique content. It's it's it's not hard for conservative publications because the drive bys ignore all of it other than to criticize it, but they really have at the examiner. They've got Myron York is over. They've got some great people that make it stand out. And they have uncovered something that was redacted in the Muller report. Special counsel. Robert Muller's report mentions a claim that the Russians recorded. Are you ready? President Bill Clinton having phone sex with Monica Lewinsky. But the reference was redacted from the virgin released to the public. The redaction is likely to anger Republicans because the allegation has been known since at least two thousand one the Muller reports reference to claim that Trump watched prostitutes urinating in a Moscow hotel room was not struck out. That's the golden showers story. And the golden showers story is that Trump was in Moscow trying to further the building of a Trump hotel there. And that he discovered he was staying in the same hotel room as Michelle my bell Obama and Barack as what he's learned that he called a bunch of prostitutes over and had them urinate on the bed while he watched. That's the golden shower story, and it's all over the Steele dossier, and it made it into the Muller report. What was redacted was President Clinton having phone sex recorded by the Russians while on the phone with Monica Lewinsky Clinton was recorded by Russia in the nineteen nineties allowing Russia to learn of the affair before Americans did a reference to the Clinton intercept was redacted from the mullahs report to protect personal privacy. But sources told the Washington Examiner that the context makes clear what was blacked out. According to the report center for the national interest, president Dmitri Simes, why remember this guy you remember Dimitri Simes Dimitri Simes looks like his name. He's had he had a short little beard and the close cropped hair bald on top and glasses, and he was forever on the news hour the meal Larra he was a regular on them. Neil Larra news hour, and he he I I don't remember. He hated the bushes are, but but he was on during a time. The bushes were prominent, and you could barely understand what the guy was saying, except when he said Bush, it'd be do boost. And I remember Jim Lara loved having Dimitri Simes on he was some think tank guy, and the think tank was the the center for the national interest the president of anyway, according to the report. Dimitri Simes center for the national interest. President. Sent Trump son-in-law Jared Kushner at twenty sixty an Email with recommended talking points to counter Hillary Clinton's Russia attacks, the Email reference to well-documented story of highly questionable connections between Clinton and Russia. At a meeting in New York. Dimitri Simes told Kushner details Russia recorded, President Clinton on the phone with Lewinsky opening questions of foreign leverage over the president turned potential first spouse during this meeting on August, seventeenth Dmitri Simes provided Kushner the Clinton related information that he had promised Symes told Kushner that and this is redacted. So we don't know what you said Symes claimed that he had received the information for former CIA and Reagan White House official Fritz ERM arth who claim to have learned it from US intelligence sources not from the Russian how about that. The Muller report features the fact that Russians had Clinton on tape doing phone sex with Lewinsky that gets redacted and buried, but the Trump golden shower story, which is a lie. It was made up. It's part of the Steele dossier is right out there for everybody to see. Classic. This Mullah report should have been no more than two pages. If there was no collusion that they could what's what are these navy eight pages for folks? And why is there a section to on obstruction? When there wasn't any. When Muller couldn't come to terms with it. There doesn't the whole purpose. This was defined. What are not there was Trump? Russia, collusion course, there never was this whole thing to bogus. But the report should have been no more than two pages. Instead, it is a novel that's filled with innuendo and all of this lion crap from the steel dusty. And then it recycles media stories that Muller's team leaked to the media in presents these media stories as further evidence, even though they found no evidence is despicable piece of work. It's a stain on this country. If you ask me this entire Mullah report in the whole thing. Now, let's move on to FOCA hana's. The contest is on the democrat presidential nomination sweepstakes. And they're trying to out liberally each other and focus is not faring. Well in any of the polls crazy Bernie is lapping the field. Crazy Bernie in New Hampshire. Latest police thirty percent voter preference. Joe Biden is next step fifty percent. And then what's his face eighteen Buddha? Judges that fifteen percent third third place at the rest of them are in single digits Phocas at seventy five percent. So she and I've been waiting for this. You know, how long have we been talking here about the fact that it's just a matter of time before the Democrats propose forgiving student loans as a way of solidifying the millennial vote. How many millennials are out? The college grads that are buried in student loan debt. That would just love it if some government officials from president came along is just waved off the debt. Well, that's what focal hottest proposes. And here's how she proposes to pay off American student.

Dimitri Simes Dimitri Simes Robert Muller Monica Lewinsky Clinton president Trump President Clinton Russia Washington Examiner Dmitri Simes Dimitri Simes center Monica Lewinsky Steele Jared Kushner Moscow Clinton Joe Biden Phocas Neil Larra
"dimitri simes" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

09:03 min | 1 year ago

"dimitri simes" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"If I just learned something that was rigged acted in the Muller report when you're gonna love this. Ravens and welcome back, folks. Rush Limbaugh serving humanity simply by showing up here at the Limbaugh institute for advanced studies. No graduates are no degrees because the learning never stops. From the Washington Examiner, by the way, the Washington Examiner has become a recent sponsor of the network. They have a great daily newspaper and a magazine that they are really doing. It's hard to be unique in trust me. It's hard to be unique in particularly with content. Everybody's dealing with the same content. It's how you deal with that content that the determines. Whether you stand out, whether you're unique imprint I mean, it's it's really tough. I mean, how do you differentiate it now with the drive bys it's not it's a little easier because the drive bys do not. Do any stories favorable to Republicans conservatives and that is not an exaggeration. In fact, the new rule in drive by media yet a story. That is bad for Republicans bad for conservatives. You reported reported with glee you keep reporting your pound people with it. If you have a story that's bad for the left. If you have a story that's bad for the Democrats. You don't report that you report the rights reaction to it. And you use terms like Republicans seize on or Republicans pound. But if there is a story that's banned for the lift they never report that they report on the Republican reaction to it and rip the Republicans to pieces for the wave airy act to a story that's bad for the left. So in trying to come up with unique content. It's it's it's not hard for conservative publications because the drive bys ignore all of it other than to criticize it, but they really have at the examiner. They've they've got Byron York is over. They've got some great people that make it stand out. And they have uncovered something that was redacted in the Muller report. Special counsel. Robert Muller's report mentions a claim that the Russians recorded. Are you ready? President Bill Clinton having phone sex with Monica Lewinsky. But the reference was redacted from the virgin released to the public. The redaction is likely to anger Republicans because the allegation has been known since at least two thousand one the Muller reports reference to a claim that Trump watched prostitutes urinating in a Moscow hotel room was not struck out. That's the golden showers story. And the golden showers story is that Trump was in Moscow trying to further the building of a Trump hotel there. And that he discovered he was staying in the same hotel room as Michelle my bell Obama and Barack as what he's learned that he called a bunch of prostitutes over and head I'm urinate on the bed while he watched. That's the golden shower story, and it's all over the Steele dossier, and it made it into the Muller report. What was redacted was President Clinton having phone sex recorded by the Russians? While on the phone with Monica Lewinsky Clinton was recorded by Russia in the nineteen nineties allowing Russia to learn of the affair before Americans did a reference to the Clinton intercept was redacted from the mullahs report to protect personal privacy. But sources told the Washington Examiner that the context makes clear what was blacked out. According to the report center for the national interest, president Dmitri Simes. Oh, I remember this guy. You remember Dimitri Simes Dimitri Simes looks like his name. He's had he had a short little beard and close cropped hair bald on the top and glasses, and he was forever on the news hour the meal Lara. He was a regular on them macneil Lehrer news hour, and he he I I don't remember if he hated the bushes are, but but he was on during a time. The bushes were prominent, and you could barely understand what the guy was saying, except when he said Bush. Boo. Boo. And I remember Jim Lara loved having Dimitri Simes on he was some think tank guy, and the think tank was the the center for the national interest. He was the president of it. Anyway, according to the report. Dimitri Simes center for the national interest. President. Since Trump son-in-law Jared Kushner at twenty sixty and Email with recommended talking points to counter Hillary Clinton's Russia attacks, the Email reference to well-documented story of highly questionable connections between Clinton and Russia. At a meeting in New York. Dimitri Simes told Kushner details Russia recorded, President Clinton on the phone with Lewinsky opening questions of foreign leverage over the ex president turned potential first spouse now during this meeting on August, seventeenth Dimitri, Simes provided Kushner the Clinton related information that he had promised Symes told Kushner that and this is redacted. So we don't know what you said science claimed that he had received the information for former CIA and Reagan White House official Fritz ERM arth who claim to have learned it from US intelligence sources not from the Russian how about that. The Muller report features the fact that Russians had Clinton on tape doing phone sex with Lewinsky that gets redacted and buried, but the Trump golden showers story, which is why it was made up. It's part of the Steele dossier is right out there for everybody to see. Classic. This Muller report should have been no more than two pages. If there was no collusion that they can what's what what are these navy eight pages for folks? And why is there a section to on obstruction? When there wasn't any. When Muller couldn't come to terms with it. There doesn't the whole purpose. This was defined whether or not there was Trump Russia collusion. Of course, there never was this whole thing to bogus. But the report should have been no more than two pages. Instead, it is a novel that's filled with innuendo and all of this lion crap from the Steele dossier, and then it recycles media stories that Muller's team leaked to the media in presents these media stories as further evidence, even though they found no evidence. This is despicable piece of work. It's a stain on this country. If you ask me this entire Mullah report in the whole thing. Now, let's move on to FOCA hana's. The contest is on the democratic presidential nomination sweepstakes. And they're trying to out liberally each other. And folk hana's is not faring. Well in any of the polls crazy Bernie is lapping the field. Crazy Bernie in New Hampshire way. This police at thirty percent voter preference. Joe Biden is next at fifteen percent. And then what's his face eighteen Buddha? Judges that fifteen percent third third place. And then the rest of them are in single digits Phocas at seventy five percent. So she and I've been waiting for this. You know, how long have we been talking here about the fact that it's just a matter of time before the Democrats propose forgiving student loans as a way of solidifying the millennial vote. How many millennials are out? The college grads that are buried in student loan debt. That would just love it if some government officials from president came along just waved off the debt. Well, that's what FOCA hottest proposes. And here's how she proposes to pay off American student.

Dimitri Simes Dimitri Simes Robert Muller Monica Lewinsky Clinton president President Clinton Russia Trump Washington Examiner Dimitri Simes center Steele Monica Lewinsky Dmitri Simes Rush Limbaugh Moscow Jared Kushner FOCA Ravens Limbaugh institute
"dimitri simes" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"dimitri simes" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The summit they've done a very, self defeating job of keeping that information. So closely held the people in congress allies around the world they're all effectively in the dark including big parts of our own, government so basically there's a message going out which is there's going to be this great new, relationship between. The United States and Russia but no real acknowledgement that the differences and, the problems in what is an adversarial relationship run very deep they're going to give. They were, they easy quick solutions unless of course Donald Trump basically sells? Out, on key aspects, of US foreign policy US foreign policy Dimitri Simes what do you say tangible progress or something less than that. Well what Benjamin progresses things this summit was about specific agreements don't think is aside Prepare to sign or Sheet specific agreements that was about dynamics of the relationship that was about the chemistry between the two presidents and then feel a little better about each other without. Surrendering any single importance I don't think. It's necessarily so bad it would be bad if, the basis of general. But somewhat hopeful conversation annual one would conclude that our relationship fundamentally change Russia's innate state remain and like in the case of US, relationship with North Korea Thrive was the best but Bill will difficulties and settling to you'll the niche before the. Real agreement well if if they? If there were no agreements at all that? We may be asking for asking about more than than exists but but Andrew Weiss let's talk about some of this I mean tensions between President Trump and NATO in the face. Of that we heard President Putin speak. And people who've talked to President Putin say he's, talking about a proposal. That he made the President Trump about a referendum in Ukraine what do you make of that does that sound like something that's realistic It's completely realistic I think it's a byproduct of the folly of. Basically only meeting with Putin one on one President. Trump basically insisted that this had to be a one, on one? Meeting and went more than two hours and he was dealing with a foreign counterpart who's been at this for twenty years who. Basically knows, where all, the Barrett all the bodies are buried literally and figuratively and can, really make ideas sound convincing for four years so Donald Trump seems to have. Stepped, into a variety of self made problems for himself it would have been a lot easier if he had had a couple, of senior advisors, along. With him for the ride a. Lot of, this could have been easily avoided Dimitri Simes whether there was, progress made on any, specifics, do you is it your sense that, that the US comes out of this that NATO comes out of these meetings stronger or not. Given I mean for example what? The conversation may have been about Ukraine Briefings That if it end them with self is not the. Problem in, Ukraine in, Ukraine it would be a problem if the would be referendum about independence for benefits and Lugansk very specifically denied the executive. Room they're talking about would be about independence like several years ago in the case of. Crimea so apparently they're talking about autonomy inside, Ukraine my, point this is, David, listen detail The Russians Ukrainians are talking about. Peacekeepers, but a very different idea about peacekeeper. Would be located in what they will be doing what we have accomplished, I hope in, Helsinki. That we have, started initiating process. But President Trump, by his very nature is not equipped to negotiate. Detailed agreements and that is why secretary pump and his. Colleagues and obviously the. Nation Security Council now hopefully will be in the driver's seat well let's let's turn where we're not gonna we're. Not going, to understand, have full answers here clearly because we don't as you said Andrew at the outset there's a lot we don't know but. Just quickly let me touch onto other things the start the so called new start nuclear. Weapons agreement I is it possible there was, some progress, made in discussing. Extending that Well Judy I think before we turn it out on the. Ukraine piece just so everyone knows there is no provision in the Minsk agreement which is the guiding document that. Will hopefully provide some help for lasting peace in Ukraine about a referendum and it's it's. Simply ludicrous to imagine holding, a referendum an area held by force of arms by neighboring country which is engaged in such an awful campaign..

President Trump Ukraine President Putin United States Dimitri Simes Russia Andrew Weiss NATO congress President Benjamin North Korea Crimea Barrett Lugansk Bill Minsk Nation Security Council Helsinki
"dimitri simes" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"dimitri simes" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You're listening to off things considered from npr news one of the topics up for discussion when president trump and president putin meet tomorrow in helsinki will be nuclear proliferation the us and russia possess more than thirteen thousand nuclear weapons and with an uncertain fate for two existing arms control treaties both have begun building more npr's david welna looked into whether this summit might change that the us and russia on ninety two percent of the world's nuclear weapons almost equally divided and tensions once again running high between them dimitri simes is a russian native was president of the center for the national interests in washington russia he says is an existential threat to the us it's very good is having nuclear discussion so he's not career but there's a kind of roenick talk of nuclear discussions with far more powerful russian on friday president trump announced such discussions will be on tomorrow's agenda in helsinki i will be talking about nuclear proliferation because we are massively you know you know what we've been doing we've been modernizing and fixing and buying and it's just a devastating technology and they likewise are doing a lot trump's intention to talk nukes fits a pattern richard burke was the chief negotiator of the nineteen ninetyone strategic arms reduction treaty with the former soviet union when the us russian relationship gets bad and it's certainly bad now often the both countries turned to arms control and nuclear disarmament as a good topic for beginning to rebuild trust russia's annexation of crimea for years ago halted almost all military cooperation between the us and russia says lynn rushton who was the national security council's senior director for arms control and nonproliferation in the obama white house they were supposed to be kind of a carve out for nuclear matters that was certainly the.

president obama washington president putin senior director lynn rushton soviet union richard burke trump helsinki dimitri simes david welna npr russia us ninety two percent
"dimitri simes" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"dimitri simes" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Anybody else have those are very very old things i say all the way back when submarines were playing games with each other or movement of missile systems that is indeed a constant and it's been around for a long time but i think that the package as a whole probably represents something new is what you're getting and i'm not sure even at the height of the cold war we're still having strategic arms control agree negotiations and agreements struck that is not happening anymore but we were still developing new systems on both sides george said didn't happen overnight let's meals 'cause simplistic but important a book with the title enemy you wrote i wrote it for a number of fears most of us would not consider new russia is the main intimate things that many i would disagree whole we came doa cutting predicament dimitri simes as the president of the center for the national interest she span radio was responsible what were russian intentions what were misjudgements but i'm am i correct for better wes will now should consider ashes a main enemy and then not asking whether this is yours i made it can mainstream i'm asking what is the view of his penalty well let me let me i incorporate into this any closing thoughts you have and then okay since i did with my different jim rising right that book the main enemy it's sort of the which was an excellent book characterization of who we were we were the main enemy the main enemy is that i had disagreements with people when i was at cia some people sort of hated the soviet union because they were comedies and i thought well they've also got thirty thousand warheads and it'll go more or less down range so that's that's immortal logical way to approach that today where are we does anybody post that type of threat i don't think we'd ever look at china right in with what we know now they've got enough warheads so i answer your question i think i could probably say well the main enemy thing is is is not a bad characterization because who's second place.

russia dimitri simes president wes jim cia china george soviet union