12 Burst results for "Dilling Fagin"

"dilling fagin" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

06:51 min | 3 years ago

"dilling fagin" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Hello. I'm Anna REEs, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these islands history and culture food drink is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like. And how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot com. And from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the podcast, I'm Tracy v Wilson and it's November twelfth. But how LA the founder of the Baha'i faith was born on this day in eighteen seventeen. I've also heard his name pronounced slightly differently. Among adherents, he was born in Tehran, Iran and from birth. His name was Missouri Hussein Ali he was born into a noble family, and he was known for his skill as a horseman at a poet. He also was an excellent calligrapher he had very little formal education as we might think of it though. And that was really typical for a young man of his station at the same time. He was known to be very bright and very intelligent and knowledgeable about all kinds of subjects including having an extensive knowledge of Islam. He was also known for being very compassionate, especially when it came to matters of injustice, he got married at the age of eighteen and he would take other wives as well later. On his life. He was expected to be a civil servant like his father was and after his father's death. He was offered a position. But he turned it down. He really thought there was too much corruption and materialism and the civil service he preferred to try to make a modest living managing the property that he had inherited when his father died, and he also wanted to use what he did have to help other people as much as he could he became known as the father of the poor by the time. He was in his early twenties when he was twenty seven he learned of a young man who was known as the bub, which is Arabic for the gate or the gateway people believed that the Bob was a messianic figure a figure who was intimidated among Shia Muslims and the Bob also heard of Baha and sent him a scroll. We don't know. Exactly what this scroll said. But whatever it did say it had a dramatic effect on him. And he became one of the Bob's followers who call themselves bobby's in eighteen. Nine forty eight Bala who hadn't yet taken. This name was arrested and punished for following the Bob then the Bob was executed in eighteen fifty for treason. A lot of his followers are also killed at this time and Baha became his successor. The two of them had never met in person, but they had corresponded extensively and before his execution. The Bob had sent beheld all of his papers two years later, though, the how was falsely charged in a plot to kill the Shah of Iran, and after that he was imprisoned in Tehran and a police called the black pit while he was imprisoned. He had divine revelation that he was the prophet that the Bob had been foretelling after his imprisonment how low was banished. It was the first of a series of banishments. He started out going to Baghdad and then to Constantinople then Adrian OPEL where he survived an attempted poisoning at the hands of his half-brother after about ten. Ten years in Baghdad in eighteen sixty three beheld the publicly declared himself to be the divinely chosen leader. The Bob had previously for told. It was coming says first public declaration of this. He was a messenger from God and a manifestation of God and this led to sectarian violence. He was banished once again from the Ottoman empire. And he was sent to Aker in what's now, the north west of Israel, which was at the time a prison city of the Ottoman empire. Imprisoned to there though, he started expanding his teachings and those the Bob into the religion. That is now known as behi- he wrote religious texts there and developed a following as he was gradually allowed more freedom and more people were allowed to come into Acker and see him a core. Part of the behi- faith is that God has revealed himself to humanity throughout history through a series of messengers. And each of these messengers has. Founded a religion these messengers include Abraham Krishna Zoro, Astor Moses, Buddha Jesus and Mohammed so Bhave, which means glory of God in Arabic, and is the name that he took for himself is the most recent in these series of holy messengers that are central to the behi- faith, but Howlett lived in Aker for the rest of his life. And today that is the behi- holy land. He died in eighteen ninety two and his eldest son became his successor in his work and his teachings. Thanks to Eve's Jeffcoat for her research work on today's podcast, and thanks to Casey, p Graham and Chandler maze. For their audio work on the show. You can subscribe to this day in history class on apple podcasts, Google podcasts and wherever else to get your podcasts, and you can tune in tomorrow for one of history's many bloody days. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and evolutionary biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter in my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in men from a new perspective each episode Eskin comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology. You'll find blood bents and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb show for babies. Join this every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you podcasts.

Bob apple Baghdad Iran Baha Asheville North Carolina Tehran Hussein Ali Anna REEs Dilling Fagin Laurin Vogel Harvard LA producer Twitter Katie golden iheartradio Aker
"dilling fagin" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

03:40 min | 3 years ago

"dilling fagin" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"Run by the VA if that is not your. Cam. Or you haven't had the best experience with the VA or don't want to go through that vehicle. There are also some fantastic nonprofits out there that are doing incredible work and one that I found really helpful in in compiling many different resources and methods for rehabilitation for veterans who are struggling with adjusting to civilian life or struggling with PTSD and depression, or suicidal thoughts is called mission. Twenty two mission twenty two the number twenty two here is somewhat dated now. But it used to be true that every day we lost twenty two veterans to suicide staggering awful now that number is is twenty but still far too high and acceptable and mission. Twenty two really focuses on understanding the nuance behind the underlying causes behind veteran suicide and has a bunch of different solutions and creative ways that they approach providing services to veterans if you got a mission twenty two dot com. Slash vet Intel. You'll find all of the ways that you can join forces with many, different, nonprofits, and advocacy organizations who have your back. I just want. Our veterans listening to know that we have your back. We have your backs like everyone should have their backs. Our country should have their backs individuals have their about everybody should be supporting service people. The only folks missing that mammoth seems to be congress. But that puts you in a long line of people that congressman failing lately, so I hope that you know, that we here at stuff. I'm never told you want to see more veterans continue to thrive and strive in our society together and to feel not alone. Especially women veterans who we know experience significantly higher rates of suicide than compared to our non military our civilian women population. So if you know a veteran, and you haven't talked to her in a while get out there reach out her life might not be that different from. Mm yours after all. So being the kind of person who facilitates connection can be a life saver. And honestly, you never know what someone's going through you never know who's putting on a brave face because they feel like that's what they have to do because they need to be a strong person or a tough person. Honestly, just check on our folks, I think is the most important thing and -solutely. So as many listeners we want to hear from you. We know that this is a big burly complicated. Subject matter that we tried to put together in a pretty concise podcast for you. And I know their stuff we missed. I know they're appoints that we want to add to the conversation. And that's why it's so critical that we keep this conversation going online in our inbox. You can tweet at us at mom stuff podcast. Find us on Instagram at stuff mom, never told you. And as always we love getting your emails at mom stuff at how stuff works dot com. Hello. I'm Anna Marie, and I'm Laurin vocal bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these science history and culture of food and drink is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like. And how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts.

VA PTSD Intel Asheville depression Dilling Fagin congressman Anna Marie North Carolina apple Laurin producer seventy year
"dilling fagin" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"dilling fagin" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Hello. I'm Anna Faris, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these ci- history and culture food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like. And how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts. Welcome to bring stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff. I'm more in vocal bomb, and you've likely heard of Palio diet, the trendy regimens name is short for paleolithic and supposedly mimics the nutrition of ancient humans who lived about ten thousand years ago, cave, people eight meats, seafoods nuts and a few fruits and vegetables. Oh, and one other food source that doesn't show up on today's protein focused food, blogs other people archaeologists in western Europe have evidence that the precursors to modern humans eight their neighbors during the paleo ethic era. Most experts though have debated whether cannibalism was essential for the survival of these hominids, or whether it was part of ritualistic ceremonies to be classified as nutritional cannibalism, the people that paleolithic clans eight needed to be well nutritious. So just how many calories are in thi- or an ear. Archaeologist James Cole of the university of Brighton in England decided to find out Bing of the diagrams of cattle and pigs that illustrate. Different cuts of meat Cole mapped out the human body, then determined caloric count within each segment showing how much energy they would transfer. If consumed the results were published in the journal scientific reports a thi-, for instance, contains a hefty thirteen thousand three hundred fifty calories while the spleen is a modest one hundred and thirty overall the average human body has anywhere from one hundred twenty five thousand to one hundred and forty four thousand consumable calories. Some parts may take longer to digest you'll rack up ten thousand two hundred eighty calories from humans going alone. While others are snack size like the kidneys and contain about three hundred and eighty calories. The brain spinal cord and nerves were thinking Stu would be the most appropriate cooking method. Here will provide you with two thousand seven hundred calories and the bones contain about twenty five thousand bone. Broth is so untrendy right now after all despite all this talk of ancient eating habits coal concluded that other humans were probably not a nutritive meal of choice compared to competing. Available food sources one single willy mammoth, for example, containing a whopping three point six million calories would have given an entire tribe food for about eight weeks a human on the other hand would have provided enough calories for tribe to subside for only half a day, leaving everyone to wonder what's for dinner after just a few hours. Cole concludes that because of the relatively meagre calorie counts of the human body people. Eight other people for social or cultural reasons not for their health. So modern paleo dieters can breathe a sigh of relief there. Recipe. Books should continue to skip this particular ingredient. Stays episode was written by Lori L dove and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other food for thought topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hello. I'm Anna, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these signs history and culture food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer, dealing Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we liked and how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts.

James Cole Laurin Vogel Dilling Fagin Anna Faris Asheville North Carolina apple producer Europe Stu university of Brighton England Lori L Tyler clang seventy year thirteen thousand three hundre ten thousand two hundred eight two thousand seven hundred cal
Would Cannibalism Have Been Calorically Worthwhile?

BrainStuff

04:15 min | 3 years ago

Would Cannibalism Have Been Calorically Worthwhile?

"Hello. I'm Anna Faris, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these ci- history and culture food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like. And how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts. Welcome to bring stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff. I'm more in vocal bomb, and you've likely heard of Palio diet, the trendy regimens name is short for paleolithic and supposedly mimics the nutrition of ancient humans who lived about ten thousand years ago, cave, people eight meats, seafoods nuts and a few fruits and vegetables. Oh, and one other food source that doesn't show up on today's protein focused food, blogs other people archaeologists in western Europe have evidence that the precursors to modern humans eight their neighbors during the paleo ethic era. Most experts though have debated whether cannibalism was essential for the survival of these hominids, or whether it was part of ritualistic ceremonies to be classified as nutritional cannibalism, the people that paleolithic clans eight needed to be well nutritious. So just how many calories are in thi- or an ear. Archaeologist James Cole of the university of Brighton in England decided to find out Bing of the diagrams of cattle and pigs that illustrate. Different cuts of meat Cole mapped out the human body, then determined caloric count within each segment showing how much energy they would transfer. If consumed the results were published in the journal scientific reports a thi-, for instance, contains a hefty thirteen thousand three hundred fifty calories while the spleen is a modest one hundred and thirty overall the average human body has anywhere from one hundred twenty five thousand to one hundred and forty four thousand consumable calories. Some parts may take longer to digest you'll rack up ten thousand two hundred eighty calories from humans going alone. While others are snack size like the kidneys and contain about three hundred and eighty calories. The brain spinal cord and nerves were thinking Stu would be the most appropriate cooking method. Here will provide you with two thousand seven hundred calories and the bones contain about twenty five thousand bone. Broth is so untrendy right now after all despite all this talk of ancient eating habits coal concluded that other humans were probably not a nutritive meal of choice compared to competing. Available food sources one single willy mammoth, for example, containing a whopping three point six million calories would have given an entire tribe food for about eight weeks a human on the other hand would have provided enough calories for tribe to subside for only half a day, leaving everyone to wonder what's for dinner after just a few hours. Cole concludes that because of the relatively meagre calorie counts of the human body people. Eight other people for social or cultural reasons not for their health. So modern paleo dieters can breathe a sigh of relief there. Recipe. Books should continue to skip this particular ingredient. Stays episode was written by Lori L dove and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other food for thought topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hello. I'm Anna, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these signs history and culture food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer, dealing Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we liked and how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts.

James Cole Laurin Vogel Dilling Fagin Anna Faris Asheville North Carolina Apple Producer Europe STU University Of Brighton England Lori L Tyler Clang Seventy Year Thirteen Thousand Three Hundre Ten Thousand Two Hundred Eight Two Thousand Seven Hundred Cal
"dilling fagin" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

07:09 min | 3 years ago

"dilling fagin" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Hello. I'm Anna Faris, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these ci- history and culture food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like. And how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts. Welcome to bring stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Bogle bomb here. Most of us want to get home construction over as soon as possible, we worry about the expense and complained about the inconvenience but four Sarah Winchester construction was a way of life for thirty eight years. She had construction going twenty four hours a day at her home in San Jose, California. This was no ordinary construction job, though, the house is an oddball labyrinth of rooms that at one point reached seven stories. It's filled with weird things like stairs and doors. The go nowhere. Not to mention the ghosts. Sarah Winchester didn't start out looking for this kind of project born Sarah party in eighteen thirty nine. She was one of the social stars of New Haven, Connecticut, although she only stood four feet ten inches. She was known for her beauty and sparkling personality in eighteen sixty two Sarah, married William Winchester, who has the air of the Winchester, repeating arms company, the company had developed the repeating rifle a gun that was easy to reload and fired rapidly at a rate of one shot. Every three seconds. The gun was used by northern troops in the civil war. And it was also known as the gun that won the west the young couples started a family in eighteen sixty six but their daughter any died in infancy and Mr. Winchester died of tuberculosis fifteen years later distraught over these losses, MRs Winchester, visited a medium for spiritual guidance. The medium told her that the Winchester family had been struck by terrible curse and was haunted by the ghosts of all those killed by the Winchester rifle their spirits were seeking vengeance. And the only way to appease them was to build a house for them. But the ghosts had another request that the house never be completed never stopped building. The medium told MRs Winchester, or you will die. We can't know exactly how she interpreted this advice. She might have thought the spirits would get her if she stopped or she might have seen the continuous construction as a path to eternal life. Mrs Winchester, headed west to build a home for herself and her ghosts. She bought a six room farmhouse on one hundred sixty two acres in California and set to work she served as her own architect. But it's possible that some ghosts had a hand in designing the house as well. Every night. Mrs Winchester would retreat to her say aunts room and receive instruction from the spirits on the progress of her house, the next morning should present her construction workers with hand-drawn sketches of what was to be done. Sometimes it seems she didn't care what she built as long as she could hear the hammers of her crew. The crew might spend a month constructing a room only to be ordered to destroy it the next month because MRs Winchester paid well, no one disputed her instructions. A MRs Winchester had inherited twenty million dollars and just less than half the Winchester, repeating arms company stock that left MRs Winchester with a daily income of about a thousand dollars to spend on her house. That's equal to about twenty five thousand dollars a day in today's money. But what if those doors and stairs to nowhere doors may open onto walls or in the case of? Second-story door to the outside resulting in a big fall for anyone who might try to exit that way a closet door on the second floor seance room opens onto a first floor sink several feet below the stairs to nowhere are pretty much. What they sound like stairs. Go up until they reached the ceiling, and then they just stop. These might have a simple explanation. The stairs were likely part of the original house that MRs Winchester bought and when she started adding onto the home she covered up the stairs. Whether it was accident or on purpose. Mrs Winchester, usually covered up her mistakes by just continuing to build around them because she had no master plan for the house. Her architectural ideas didn't always work out since she had no deadline for completion should either. Tear down the mistake or cover it up with something else. But the new stairs. She built also zigzag back and forth going around and around in circles and most are only two inches about five centimeters tall, some people. Think that these touches were designed to confuse the evil spirits that were haunting MRs Winchester, the height of the stairs served a very specific purpose, though, she had very bad arthritis and these. Small stairs allowed her to get around. However, MRs Winchester might have deliberately installed some of the other weird touches believing that ghosts would get lost on stairs. That went nowhere or accidentally step out a door that went outside if the sound strange to you today, you're not alone. Even at the time that MRs Winchester was building the house. She was regarded with suspicion some dot her and eccentric with too much money on her hands and her home took on the nickname mystery house, not long after her death because MRs Winchester left, no, diary or other communication. We honestly have no idea. What might have been going on in her mind? What we do have is her house, which is still open to tourists. Mrs Winchester died in her sleep in nineteen twenty two and the house was sold to a group of investors who wanted to create a tourist attraction to this day. It's hard to know exactly how many rooms are in the house because people keep getting lost when they try to count. But it's estimated that about one hundred sixty rooms are in the home. It had reached seven stories by nineteen o six for the top three floors collapsed after the nineteen o six San Francisco earthquake. Some other famous numbers associated with the house include. It's forty-seven fireplaces seventeen chimneys to basements. Six kitchens ten thousand window panes and four hundred and sixty seven doorways despite these impressive numbers. There are only two mirrors. Mrs Winchester thought ghosts were afraid of their own reflection. Mrs Winchester, also had an obsession with the number thirteen many things installed in the home feature. Thirteen of something a thirteen window panes thirteen wall panels thirteen sections of flooring thirteen stairs in each staircase. Their thirteen bathrooms sinks that have thirteen drain holes and the sales room has thirteen coat hooks and beyond the stairs and windows to nowhere. There are other architectural oddities all over the house stare posts were installed upside down and chimneys served. No, purpose are all over the house. Their cabinets that are less than an inch deep. That's about two and a half centimeters. Mrs Winchester, ordered a beautiful and Atlanta expensive, Tiffany glass window, but after she installed it a wooden wall was built behind it. So that. Sunlight could never shine through the pains. Mrs Winchester was convinced that she lived with spirits. But are they still there today? Does the spirit of MRs Winchester herself walked the halls some psychic say yes that upon visiting the house they sent spirits wandering tour guides and visitors report mysterious footsteps banging, doors and weird moving lights some see doorknobs moved by themselves and feel cold spots. It may be something you'll have to determine for yourself. The Winchester mystery house offers daily tours and for those who want to be particularly spooked flashlight tours are offered on Halloween and all Fridays that fall on the thirteenth of the month.

William Winchester Mrs Winchester Winchester mystery house Sarah Winchester California Anna Faris Asheville Lauren Bogle apple North Carolina San Jose Dilling Fagin Laurin Vogel New Haven producer Sarah party Connecticut Sarah
"dilling fagin" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:42 min | 3 years ago

"dilling fagin" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Hello. I'm Anna Faris and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb and our show foodstuff all about these ci- history and culture. Food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like and how we can find more of those things. On our first trip, we went to Asheville North Carolina, a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff. I'm Lauren vocal bomb and of all the possible get rich quick schemes you could involve yourself in. I'm betting you would stop short of serial killing. Yes. Even if it meant you'd be aiding the advancement of science, but that's not the case for everybody take William Burke and William hair to Irish immigrants who ran a boarding house and NBA Scotland and killed at least fifteen people during a ten month period across eighteen twenty seven and eighteen twenty eight. And we're not trying to aggrandize serial murders here, but they made a small fortune doing it Burke and hare had no criminal records before they got into the murdering business Burke was a cobbler and hair a laborer who owned a lodging house with his wife when a border who owed the hairs, a good deal of background died one day in November, eighteen twenty-seven hair, complained to his friend Burke. The two decided that the best way to recoup hairs financial loss was to sell the man's corpse to in the Natalie professor at the university of Edinburgh, anatomy. Research was a. Booming business and Edinburgh in the early eighteen hundreds and though many human dissections were conducted every day in the city. Human remains were hard to come by a grave, robbing was frowned upon, but anatomist were only technically allowed to study the bodies of deceased prisoners suicide victims, orphans and abandoned children. So and embarrassed. Underbelly was crawling with body snatchers since the demand was high for good Avs, and these supply relatively low. Many anatomist used the services of so-called resurrection men to fill their human corpse requirements. Resurrection men were folks who made a business of bodysnatching or Clinton Lee, removing a body from a burial site. There was no Loggins digging up dead body and selling it since the dead didn't officially belong to anyone. Oh, what an innocent time. But the general public was perhaps understandably dismayed by this practice. In addition to the living's emotional attachment to loved ones remains at the time. Many Christians were concerned that the dissection of bodies after death would prevent the deceased from. Rising during the final judgment. However, anatomist desperate for cadavers were willing to pay good money for bodies, sometimes terrible condition without asking questions about where those bodies came from. Dr anatomist named Robert Knox was a popular lecturer at the university of Edinburgh. When Burke and hare came to him with that first cadaver from the boardinghouse knocks, pay them seven pounds ten for the body in today's money. That's almost seven hundred and fifty pounds or over nine hundred and fifty American dollars and was almost double with deadman owed hair in background. The body was pretty fresh, which pleased Knox, and he was even more pleased. A few months later with the body of Birkin hairs first murder victim. She was a lodger who fell ill with fever in the boarding house, perhaps worried that her illness would mean bad business for the boarding house or perhaps looking to make a quick buck the two men. Suffocated her knocks, paid them ten pounds. That's thirteen dollars for that cadaver worth over thousand pounds or thirteen hundred dollars today over the course of the next year, Knox bought a total of sixteen bodies from the pair mostly women. Most of their victims were killed likely with the knowledge of the murderers, wives by plying them with whiskey and then suffocating them Burke, and, hey. Preyed on people who are poor and alone or disabled. During the eventual trial. The three victims named in the indictment were a mentally disabled young men, a young woman reputed to be a prostitute and their final victim. The one who got them caught a middle aged Irish woman named Margaret Dougherty reportedly in Edinburgh, searching for her missing son Birkin hair were discovered by a couple of stain hairs boarding house. They saw the two men during game with the woman in the evening. And the next morning she had disappeared. They found her body packed in straw under a bed ready to be taken to Knox after the couple of learned the police, the authorities raided Knox's cadavers and found the woman's body among them in the trial hair testified against Burke, and he and his wife were released. Burks wife was also released, but Burke was executed. Knox was exonerated of all charges because Burke testified that Knox didn't know about the providence of the bodies. He was buying the case was extremely high profile and along with other murder cases, including copycat crimes. It led to the passing of the anatomy act of eighteen thirty two. To this controversial legislation opened up anatomist options. Any donated body could not be dissected, but with dissections still considered a sort of desecration. The only people who considered such donation tended to be those in poverty. The act therefore shifted dissection from being a sort of secondary punishment for criminals after execution, to being a sort of punishment for not having the family or funds to provide for yourself after death and led to riots at the Cambridge medical school, though attitudes and laws have changed since then, the issue of the ownership transfer and treatment of the dead is definitely still under discussion. Today's episode was written by Jesulin shields and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other grave topics visit our home planet, how stuff works dot com. Hello. I'm Anna and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb and our show foodstuff all about these ci- history and culture of food drink is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer, dealing Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like and how we can find more of those things. On our first trip, we went to Asheville North Carolina, a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts.

William Burke Robert Knox Laurin Vogel Dilling Fagin Asheville university of Edinburgh North Carolina Edinburgh apple producer Anna Faris murder hare Cambridge medical school NBA Loggins Clinton Lee fever William hair
"dilling fagin" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

06:23 min | 3 years ago

"dilling fagin" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"It's baritone day, Thurston host of spit iheartradio's newest podcast with twenty three and me that explores how understanding your DNA changes, how we think about ourselves and the world around us. John legend joined us to discuss how are we all related. We're not a nine point, five percent, the same. That point, five percent is an area. We have been eager to explore those small differences, inspired a lot of discrimination. I feel like we're becoming more connected. I feel like we're learning more about how much we have in common, listen to the full episode of spit with twenty three and me. Now in the iheartradio app will wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot com. And from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm Tracy v Wilson. It's October twentieth the Saturday night massacre took place on this day in one thousand nine hundred seventy three. And this goes back to Watergate. Richard Nixon was president and was campaigning for re election and in June of nineteen seventy-two during his reelection campaign five people broke into the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate complex Washington DC. These burglars had all kinds of bugs with them that they were planning supplant around the DNC headquarters. They were caught. They were put on trial. Some of them entered a guilty plea and the rest were convicted in January of nineteen Seventy-three. At first, it wasn't clear that they had any connection to the White House, but that connection was unearthed through reporting in the Washington Post. An investigation of the president's potential involvement in this break in started. In may of nineteen Seventy-three. After Nixon had been reelected. President in a landslide Archibald Cox was leading the investigation. He was a special prosecutor, and this is a position that the Justice department had a very hard time filling. No one really wanted to do it. It was viewed as a no win situation during this investigation. Cox wanted the White House to hand over a set of secret recordings that had been made in the Oval Office. These were evidence that Nixon had been involved. An appeals court had ordered the president turn over along with other documents on October twelfth, and he had done it. Instead, the White House had offered a compromise that one Senator who was hard of hearing and was also heavily Medicated following being shot in a robbery attempt. One Senator was going to listen to the tapes and then confirm whether a White House prepared summary of the tapes was accurate. Cox saw. The many holes in this plan and refused to this compromise. So then on October, twentieth Nixon ordered Elliot Richardson who was the attorney general to fire Cox as special prosecutor, the attorney general was the only person who had the authority to do that, but he refused to do it and resigned. The deputy attorney general William Ruckle house then became the acting attorney general Nixon ordered him to fire Archibald Cox. He also refused to do it and also resigned. Then solicitor general, Robert Bork became the interim attorney general. He was the one who finally carried out Nixon's order to fire Archibald Cox, fearful that the constitutional crisis in play was just going to get worse if he didn't almost immediately after these firings, Nixon ordered the special prosecutor's office to be shut down in the investigation ended. FBI agents were sent to seal off the offices of the attorney general and the deputy. Attorney general and the special prosecutor, Richard Nixon was obviously hoping that this would put an end to the investigation into his activities. It did not. It had the opposite effect before the Saturday night massacre the president had been calling the investigation, a witch hunt. He had claimed the increasingly detailed reporting from the Washington Post that was making a lot of connections between him and the what happened to the Watergate and the cover up of what happened at the Watergate. He was saying that that was all just the work of a liberal newspaper that had a grudge against him a significant portion of the American public also really thought that this was an unfair effort to kind of get the president and people were a lot more worried about the economy than they were worried about Watergate. But the Saturday night massacre really turned all of that around it. Stoked, public and media interest into the incident and into the cover up and into the president's subsequent behavior. The media began issuing increasingly alarming reports. The ongoing constitutional crisis. Congress started calling for impeachment and filing resolutions calling for the president to resign citizens, wrote tens of thousands of telegrams overwhelmingly calling for further investigation. People also phoned their representatives Nixon under all of this pressure finally appointed a new special prosecutor. Finally agreed to release those tapes. The tapes clearly implicated the president, especially a conversation between Nixon and his chief of staff about using the to hamper the FBI investigation into the break. And there's also a very famous eighteen and a half minute gap in their recordings from shortly after the break in Richard Nixon, resigned as president on August eighth nineteen, seventy four rather than be impeached. Thanks to hurry here is in for her audio work on this show. You can subscribe to this day in history class on apple podcast, Google podcasts, and wherever else get your podcasts and you can tune in tomorrow for a new way to see star. Ars. Flu. I'm Anne Marie, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb and our show foodstuff all about these ci- history and culture of food and drink is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like and how we can find more of those things. On our first trip, we went to Asheville North Carolina, a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year economic depression with beer and

Richard Nixon president Archibald Cox prosecutor White House Watergate Attorney Washington Post spit iheartradio John legend deputy attorney general FBI iheartradio Thurston Democratic National Committee Senator Anne Marie Flu
"dilling fagin" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

04:25 min | 3 years ago

"dilling fagin" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"Listen. My father is Keith hunter, Jespersen. He's known as the happy face, serial killer. The moment I walked in that house, I felt like I wasn't alone and I was being watched in every room just Persson says he left the body in the Columbia, gorge then cleaned up his house, wash the carpet, washed the blood off wall. What I could eventually painted the walls of the house owes in. And I said, I was being touched dad. Something was touching me. And he said, oh, don't pay any attention to them. They bother me all the time that night. Happy face a new series from house to forks, new episodes out every Friday on apple podcasts or wherever you get podcasts. Liz. Here is a letter from Robert about our Pinterest episode. Christie has a little shoutout for you. He says, I would like to nominate one of Kristen's blind from the show as the funniest line I have ever heard on your podcast quote, I went to mantra stink to see what men are nailing in. Oh, I did say that. I did say that I know that was my junior high self coming out and not my mature forty eight year old self, but it was funny. I checked out mantra thing. I would just like to say that as a manly, man, if a dude has to go to a quote Manley pinning sites, and he is overcompensating I am secure enough in my manhood to not only need a Pinterest account, and I will pin anything there that I like. So thank you. Robert, keep pinning. Keep on pinning. Is it just small, little plug. You can visit our little. Our little pin board pin bought over Pinterest, search stuff. Mom never told you. I've got an Email here from Jolie about our episode on food expiration dates, and she says, I get made fun of constantly at work for eating expired products. Nothing too crazy. Oh, although I will drink my milk up to ten days after the cell by Dave, my manager thinks I'm nuts. She's more extreme though. I offered her an expired outwit and she refused it, but to me, candy, never expires. Chocolate is good for years, even if it star. To get a little white. I might try it if I'm desperate. In the case of the outweighed though my boss was right. I found in my desk over a year old and didn't taste like anything like sugar, but no meant I didn't get sick, but it was just the flavor thing that you mentioned. So I thought I would share l. towards or no good after a while. Also one time I misread the date on my milk, imported into my cereal. It came out normal looking. The cat wasn't interested in that should have been tip off, but I got a spoonful in my mouth and then ran to the scene. I double check my carton expiration dates now expired milk. Hey, let's in this podcast on a soured milk. Note, thanks to everyone for writing in two moms, seven discovery dot com where you can send your letters, you can also hit us up on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter at mom, stuff podcast and follow us on tumbler as well. We are at stuff. Mom never told you tumbler dot com. And if you. Want to learn more about how to stay fit and healthy and very, very happy. You should head over to our website. It's how stuff works dot com. For more on this and winds of other topics visit how stuff works dot com. Hello. I'm Anna Marie, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb and our show foodstuff all about these ci- history and culture. Food drink is relaunching as saver re along with ours to producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like and how we can find more of those things. On our first trip, we went to Asheville North Carolina, a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts.

Pinterest Keith hunter Robert apple Persson Manley Jolie Jespersen Dave Facebook Kristen Christie Liz Dilling Fagin Laurin Vogel Asheville Twitter Anna Marie North Carolina
"dilling fagin" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

05:09 min | 3 years ago

"dilling fagin" Discussed on BrainStuff

"If you're going to build something from nothing, you've got to know what really works. I took a thousand dollar loan built a five billion dollar business, and now I make smart investments, new businesses on shark tank. I'm Barbara Corcoran. Now I'm sharing my secrets on might podcast called business unusual. You might think that looking at someone's resume and asking them a lot of questions are the key to finding the right person for a position you dead wrong, follow business unusual on iheartradio or subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to bring stuff from how stuff works. Hey, Brian stuff, Lauren Vogel bomb here as far as get rich quick schemes go stumbling upon gold. The end for rainbow sounds pretty delightful, but is it actually possible to get to the end of a rainbow? And if so, what would you find when you got there? Let's start with the bad news. Leprechauns are liars. You cannot reach the end of a rainbow that appears in the sky. If you were to Mark on a map, the place where the rainbow seems to beat the land and then travelled to that location, you would not be standing inside a glorious pillar of colors. There would be nothing there except probably the fresh smell of a recent rain shower to understand why this is. We need to look at how rainbows form rainbows are created when sunlight reflects and refracted through water droplets suspended in the air in front of you while the sun is behind you, those water droplets act like both mirror and prism like a mirror they reflect the sunlight back toward you, but like a prison. They also. Oh, bend and dispersed. That light, this is because rays of light shining through the air change speed when they enter a different medium, for example, droplets of water. This sudden change in speed Benz, the trajectory of the light and disperses white light into the whole ROY g bibs spectrum. The reason you see a nice ordered gradient of color within a rainbow going from red to violet is because this refraction Benz each of the different colors of light at a slightly different angle. So for example, red light Benz at forty two degrees. Violet light bends at forty degrees and all the other colors are somewhere in between. So, okay, let's find a rainbow to do this. You need to locate your anti-seoul or point. You're anti-seoul or point is the point in space. That's a hundred and eighty degrees or exactly opposite from sun a simple way to find this is to go outside and look for the shadow of your own head. That's your anti solar point. Now, imagine drawing a line straight from the sun through your head to the shadow. Oh, of your head. Now, look up if there is a rainbow to be seen, you will find it by facing away from the sun and looking forty two degrees above your anti soldier. Point. Notice that the apparent location of your rainbow depends on three things where the sun is where the water droplets are and where your eyes are. Change. Any one of those variables and you'll see a different rainbow or not at all. So no matter where you see your rainbow. If you try to walk out to meet it, you'll be changing the variable of your own position and you could be walking forever or at least until your rainbow disappears. Trying to find the end of a rainbow is sort of like trying to walk to the end of your own shadow. Somebody else could stand at the apparent end of your shadow or rainbow, but you will never ever reach this location yourself. You can, of course, find earthly rainbows and a waterfall or these spray sprinkler hose. You might even perceive yourself to be standing right next to one depending on the angle of light coming into the water. But here's one more thing. Those rainbows you see in the sky aren't actually Bose rainbows are circular. Usually when you're standing on the ground, most of the rainbow is blocked by the horizon in rare cases. Like if you're in an airplane, you'll be able to see the entire rainbow brain hoop rain loop, rain hole. It's around spectacular beauty, but there's an obvious. Take away from this. It doesn't ever actually meet the ground anywhere. Today's episode was written by John McCormick and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other light topics visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hello. I'm Anna and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb and our show foodstuff all about these signs. History and culture of food drink is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like and how we can find more of those things. On our first trip, we went to Asheville North Carolina, a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts.

Barbara Corcoran Laurin Vogel Asheville Lauren Vogel Dilling Fagin North Carolina Mark ROY g producer Brian apple John McCormick Tyler clang forty two degrees five billion dollar thousand dollar eighty degrees forty degrees seventy year
"dilling fagin" Discussed on Couples Therapy

Couples Therapy

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"dilling fagin" Discussed on Couples Therapy

"On your app or if you're on your desktop opened up, I tunes really helps us number two. We were just recently on, maybe it's you. As a wonderful cast hosted by couple and writers in hellacious gifted people, Greg Behrendt, and a mirror tola and we had a wonderful time. So download that. Listen to that quite wonderful. Last thing, this is like all the. I mean, we've joked we've been, we're mostly sincere, but a one sincere thing. I, we try not to mention politics on this. If you go out and vote though. Oh, yeah, voting would be tied vote. Look, I don't personally have a lot of stock in electoral politics in this country, but there's such a stark difference at this point. Even if like, yes, centrist Democrats are pretty shitty, but they're not fascist monsters. Please vote joint like volunteer donate joined good organizations. DASA our revolution, places like that. But at the very least please vote vote these fucking monsters out of office that. That's my sincere. I just wanted one thing at the end. I'm like, I feel like if there's one if we can do anything besides volunteer and donate its use a platform to. Yeah, Bank beg. Vote out the socio sociopaths. Yeah. Yeah, don't be hopeless. Yeah. Okay. So thanks for listening and catching that time. They only I love you. I I love you. you Andy. All right. See guys. Hello. I'm Anna REEs and I'm Laurin vocal bomb and our show foodstuff all about these ci- history and culture. Food instinct is relaunching as saver re along with ours super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like and how we can find more of those things. On our first trip, we went to Asheville North Carolina, a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year ecconomic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts..

Greg Behrendt Dilling Fagin Anna REEs hellacious Asheville North Carolina apple producer Laurin seventy year
"dilling fagin" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:44 min | 3 years ago

"dilling fagin" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Hello. I'm Anna Faris and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb and our show foodstuff all about these ci- history and culture. Food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like and how we can find more of those things. On our first trip, we went to Asheville North Carolina, a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts from UFO's to psychic powers into government conspiracies. History is riddled with unexplained events. You can turn back now or learn the stuff. They don't want you to know. Hello, welcome back to the show. My name is Matt and my name is known. They call me Ben. We're joined with our returning guests super producer, Casey pepper. Most importantly, you are you. You are here that makes this stuff. They don't want you to know today. We are diving into something that many of you and your fellow conspiracy realists have asked us to do for a number of years. We're touching on the concepts of conspiracy and music as correct, and music industry is cutthroat. It's brutal. It's often described as a zero sum game, but wait, Matt knoll. Ben, you might be saying, none of you are kings of a music empire in Desario is if you will, we're not even really that cultured, right? So as you know, on this show the best way to get closest to the truth is to go to a primary source. And luckily with a three see happening this weekend, we were able to get one of the primary sources for the music industry as a whole, yeah, somebody who has been at the top of his game for a long long time within this industry and it gets the best way to introduce the person were interviewing today would be through just a little bit of background Norwood ju- do the honors? Yes. Today we interview a guy who I was not intensely familiar with by name alone. Name is James prince or j. prince. But when you start digging into his legacy and his his past as a music mogul and trendsetter and just all around forward thinking guy, you realize that he laid some of the groundwork for many of the hip hop record labels that we know today, especially from the nineties in early two thousand cash money records, no limit records these kind of singular forces of owned and op. Rated independent hip hop record labels that then we're able to connect up with majors or at least major distribution companies in a way that they were still able to set the tone in the rules. But they used the parts that they needed from the bigger players without totally kowtowing to their every women desire, like we know can be such a problem with big record labels. And we talk a lot about that with Mr. prince, but he founded a label called rap. A lot records in nineteen hundred five. And the first album was dropped in eighty seven. That's right. And he did this when he was at the time working at a used car lot that he owned and operated and he did it to get his brother who was rapper, went by the name rap a lot to get into keep him from becoming a victim of the situation that they lived in Houston, Texas in a neighborhood called the fifth ward. Yes, he talks a lot about that. And so he kind of assembled a group called the ghetto boys. The most famous of their tracks that I'm aware of. I showing my age and my squareness, but is is damn, it feels good to be a gangster with prominently saw huge song, but also prominently featured an amazing scene in the movie office space. He also he also managed Devin. The dude, yeah. If you're if you're a fan of that, he is a great song called, then I got high, actually, Devin. The dude has a bunch of Tra. I go listen to him after this interview. I think that's an excellent way to show the context because one of the most important things is he did this by himself. Yeah, right. He did his by himself. He was always kind of hustling in investing and looking for ways to make a buck and in doing that, and then all of these various endeavors throughout his life, not to mention the fact that he was a very successful and continues.

Ben Mr. prince James prince Matt knoll producer Anna Faris apple Dilling Fagin Asheville Devin North Carolina Laurin Vogel Matt Casey pepper Norwood Desario Houston Texas
"dilling fagin" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

04:35 min | 3 years ago

"dilling fagin" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Hello. I'm Anna Faris and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb and our show foodstuff all about these ci- history and culture. Food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like and how we can find more of those things. On our first trip, we went to Asheville North Carolina, a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vocal bomb here. William Shakespeare mentioned diseases often in his place probably because he was literally surrounded by them. I mean, aren't we all? But during his London-based lifetime in the fifteen and sixteen hundreds such notorious illnesses as the plague typhus and malaria, ravaged, citizens all made more potent and deadly by rodents overcrowding, and virtually nonexistent sanitation systems also striking fear into the hearts of just about everyone were smallpox and the great pox known today as syphilis. The two conditions actually present similar rashes despite being different in terms of type of infection and transmission smallpox is a virus spread by breathing. Syphilis is bacterial and almost always sexually transmitted. The hallmark of both diseases was a body riddled with pustules, also known as pucks fell to the people to distinguish between these horrors. Thus civilised became known as the great. FOX, not because the pockmarks of civilised were larger than those of smallpox, but rather because in the fifteenth to seventeenth centuries, it was the greater fear. Syphilis was likely introduced to Europe when Christopher Columbus go that guy and his crew brought it back from the new world in fourteen ninety three. Although there are other theories, the timing is definitely suspect. The pandemic began in Europe pretty much right after they returned killing many. Even those we're lucky enough to survive where typically covered in scars and went blind. Of course, the Europeans for their part left behind smallpox and other diseases in the new world sometimes intentionally which along with slavery would wipe out millions of native Americans. Fortunately, smallpox has now been ratified by vaccine and we have penicillin to treat syphilis. Shakespeare's writings indicate an interest in syphilis, such as in the play, Tim Nevada things where he references the use of inhaled vaporized mercury salts, a common treatment for the disease at the time. In fact, one of his best known quotes was originally a reference to Cecil. A plague on both your houses from Romeo and Juliet was first Apotex on both your houses. Thanks to multiple references of civilization has works. Historians have wondered whether Shakespeare himself was infected known for being a little bit of a hustler. His signature during the last years of his life indicates that he experienced a tremor, which is a common side effect of mercury poisoning, which as we said was the treatment of choice for syphilis. Of course, any number of physical illness can cause a tremor. So it's unlikely that this posthumous diagnosis will ever be confirmed. Today's episode was written by Elliott Hoyt and produced by Tyler claim. You can find brain stuff, phone cases and other rain stuff in our shop at t public dot com slash grainstuff. And of course, for more on this and lots of other poxy topics, visit our home planet, how stuff works dot com. So what do you turn when it's a y. oh, you turn. It's a moment of life transformations that happens whether you're ready or not. No matter the change. The questions of the same. How do we get fearless when we feel uncertain? We switch directions without getting totally lost and Huckabee actually enjoy the ride. We get honest, and we talk about it and we definitely laugh our way through it. 'cause shift happens, I'm Lisa is Joel Herzog join us as we navigate our own big life challenges on a new podcast, you terms be sure to subscribe on apple podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.

Syphilis William Shakespeare Europe smallpox apple Anna Faris Asheville Dilling Fagin North Carolina producer Laurin Vogel Apotex Huckabee penicillin FOX Christopher Columbus typhus malaria Elliott Hoyt