35 Burst results for "Digital Technology"

"digital technology" Discussed on UN News

UN News

04:47 min | 3 months ago

"digital technology" Discussed on UN News

"Well, what are we seeing now increasingly is a manipulation of information during war. Now that is not new, what is new is the way in which digital technology and social media have made it possible to escalate and amplify this misinformation disinformation hate speech propaganda and to target civilians to target civilians with hate speech, incitement of violence, attacks on specially vulnerable groups, and that is extremely dangerous because information is a valuable asset during war. You use information to save your life. But when that information is turned against you, it puts civilians in a very vulnerable and dangerous situation. We're talking about similarities now I want to talk about differences. We have now a major war going on in Europe, of course. The first one in the era of digital assets and all this kind of social media. Do you see something unique to this world to this situation? Well, what we see in this war is a manipulation of information and an information blackout that is absolutely never been seen before and I am talking about what is happening inside Russia where through various means independent media has been totally wiped out and there is no news but news produced by the state. And that is very, very rare. And secondly, the propaganda that was used to incite people's feelings before the war propaganda about Ukrainian Ukrainian regime being Nazi and so on, that then allowed to create a narrative within which the invasion then took place. So on both sides, first you shut off all the taps of the news and secondly, you create only one narrative. A false narrative to provoke war. That has been incredibly rare. And very, very dangerous because it sends a message across the world to others. Who can also manipulate the system into that extent. In your report, you mentioned that propaganda is not prohibited by international law. But we see the role of radar plate in genocide in juana, for example. How do you see these subtle lines between two? Well, you know, every government creates propaganda, whether it's the western democratic government, a developing country, or others, propaganda itself, governments live to sell the news. They have to market themselves. What is prohibited under international law is propaganda for war.

Europe Russia western democratic government
Tech Writer Joe Allen Describes Transhumanism and Its Implications

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:43 min | 5 months ago

Tech Writer Joe Allen Describes Transhumanism and Its Implications

"Joe Allen joins us right now. Joe, welcome to the program. Charlie, thank you very much. Good to be here. So Joe, let's make it, let's somewhat simple for some listeners that have no idea what we're talking about and then we'll go a little deeper as we progress. What is transhumanism? Well, the simplest definition of transhumanism is the goal to merge human beings with machines. Both mechanical technology but particularly digital technology. So the two sides of that biology and technology and trying to find the middle ground not only conceptually, but in practice. So people talk about transhumanism, oftentimes they're talking about everything from brain chips to fully conscious artificial intelligence to genetic engineering in particular the desire to create superhumans and kind of eugenic program where instead of selective breeding being employed alone, you're talking about genetic editing. Now, one really important aspect of transhumanism as a movement is the religious connotations of all of this, not just opposition to traditional religion, but transhumanism is a fully expressed techno religion. It has a creation narrative. It has a Salvation narrative and in particular, the more importantly it has an apocalyptic narrative. So the creation story is human evolution by way of natural selection, which leads flawed genes, and then the Salvation story lies in correcting these flaws and perfecting humanity through technology.

Joe Allen JOE Charlie
Boredom, loneliness plague Ukrainian youth near front line

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 6 months ago

Boredom, loneliness plague Ukrainian youth near front line

"Boredom and loneliness are plaguing Ukrainian children near the front lines of the war 12 year old Anastasia alexandrova clutches her phone barely noticing the sound of distant shelling She says all my Friends already left and my own life was changed School is online She's living with her grandparents in eastern Ukraine the teens and children remaining in that part of the country like Anastasia are retreating into social media video games and other digital technology to cope with the isolation and stress of Russia's war that rages on Cities have largely emptied after hundreds of thousands of evacuated from the embattled Donetsk region I'm Julie Walker

Anastasia Alexandrova Russia Anastasia Donetsk Julie Walker
ON24 Chief Marketing Officer Steve Daheb Describes The Hybrid Future Of Marketing

MarTech Podcast

02:41 min | 1 year ago

ON24 Chief Marketing Officer Steve Daheb Describes The Hybrid Future Of Marketing

"Yesterday we talked about basically the transition. We've all gone through not just for marketers. Where probably relatively familiar with webinars and digital events but there are other industries that were forced to go digital. And now we're sort of faced with this new normal of we've all understood the power of digital technology and digital events but we kind of are used to going to in-person events so we're facing this hybrid future of marketing. Talk me a little bit about what that means. What is the hybrid future of marketing to you. When sort of interesting thing to think of his since we have gone through this change in cheer point we've experienced these benefits of digital engagement. It's like as we move to including physical events in our marketing in our engagement. How do we make sure that we still retain those benefits that we've all enjoy going to digital i whether it's extended reach or his idea continuous engagement for the first person data or even were able to get a lot of this data on the integrated into our ecosystems. And so i think what we found was a lot of us just sort of had to move to digital first and then i think like so many things. Maybe you're forced to do that. I don't know my dad or mom amy. Do you realize there's actually worse in. It's sort of a better way. But i do think for many less. We do want to get back to more of a hybrid type rudge so blending that digital engagement with physical and one of the things that we're looking at doing hopkin to our customers about is actually how to trade a single integrated call it simultaneous experience for both in person and virtual attendance because that gives you the benefits of maybe not. Everybody's gonna comment verse or a lot of companies. Ray able to broaden their reach instead of getting people at a particular location that they have a flyer to disengagement web in our. Let's use sort of anybody at ten wherever they want. And you can rerun it or have it on demand so one of the things that were focused on is providing what we're calling hybrid audience engagement. There were audiences whether they're physical or virtual. They can do the same presentations they can interact with the same digital content. They can participate in the same polls and surveys request trials or demos in. Even we'd have this idea of breakout rooms. Were once a presentation. Estan bunch of those to jump out into breakout rooms in network. Imagine you can do. Hybrid breakout rooms. Where those who might be in person as well as those who might be attending remotely can still network together so we think it's interesting how it's gonna

Hopkin AMY RAY
Interview With Dr. Joanna Bryson of the Hertie School

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

01:53 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Dr. Joanna Bryson of the Hertie School

"John able to catch up today. And i know we're going to be speaking about the future of human experience when it comes to the evolution of ai. I've liked to win this series. Start with where things are starting to roll forward already today. In different experts have different opinions. You have very unique of your own. I know you can think longer term but when you think about a as of now in terms of how it's altering how we live. What normal is what do you think of the most significant bits. They're already i'm first of all. I'm really glad that you asked that a lot of people. Think of as something. That's a future thing that might or might not happen whereas artificial intelligence of software techniques that we've had for decades and so it really is important but we're talking about the distant future to think about while japan what you mean Passed so we really do have to look at the last fifty years on how we've been altered already by digital technology. Now one of the tricks you may have noticed just slide. It sideways into digital technology from a and that's because a lot of the conversations that definitions the arguments people get into around the term. Ai so if what you mean by a i is something. That's exactly like a person than i would. Basically argued at length with us that you will never have that exactly traduced but something. That isn't a person you know a lot of what it is to be. Human is the set of constraints that we have as apes right. And that alters how can learn what we can proceed what actions were capable of some time rate at which able to respond since like that. Okay so you're not gonna get that something that you On is just not like that. But if what you mean what i mean when i talk about artificial intelligence as the subset of all intelligent things which somebody's made intentionally right. It's an artifact so talents modified artifacts not not not rocket science. But you'd be surprised. How much will argue with that.

John Japan
"digital technology" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

"Would be the ideal scenario. You're absolutely and if people are really struck by what you've had to say Kennedy what should they do. Give us a call to action. Where do they head. How did they get involved. How do they support. These kind of initiatives simply find out more go to devolve dot art and all the information is they. I think our website is incredibly accessible and really takes you away you want to go. There's a lot of on demand content. So there's no more such thing as oh i've missed. I've missed that talk. There are some incredibly interesting and insightful tours of the galleries by the directors of institution to creators and creators the artist interviews at things that coming back to that idea of the patronage are often only reserved for those who are in very privileged groups. So we've opened up sort of incredible experience when you hear. The artists speak about their works of art and the institutions was so generous to give us so much collateral interesting content so once on devolve there are lots of donate buttons which i think are very attractive to kind of pulsating heart and. I hope that everybody will really engage with us. Answer our questionnaires which are on social media. We're everywhere all the social media outlets and on our website candida gertler. We've discussed today. Technology can enable access to when it cannot currently be physically experienced alongside many other public art institutions and spaces do ubs gallery in new york has launched a virtual exhibition the art of one's own era featuring more than thirty works from the ubs collection that explore. Its unique heritage. The exhibition includes core works from the former painewebber collection which were integrated throughout the firms history of mergers and acquisitions and became an important part of today's ubs collection. These works present a time capsule revealing. who's who of artists of the downtown new york art scene. They recall a period when it was possible to have an overview of the market a time when the business of collecting contemporary art was a straightforward as regular such often in trips to the galleries and artist studios in soho. You can explore the exhibition at ubs dot com forward slash art until the sixth of september. And that brings us to the end of this. Very special.

ubs candida gertler Kennedy painewebber new york soho
"digital technology" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

"I have to say have made certain. Decisions and certain sources for funding are not any more acceptable to many people. Because they just don't tach everybody's lethem's whilst before we maybe didn't ask so many questions or we had maybe less information about the origin of the funding or even the production way of which companies are producing the items that are leading to their ability to fund the arts. We as a society are rejecting a lot because it just doesn't suit everybody. Therefore a lot of the sources have dried up. We know from the past and fossil fuel sponsors have been rejected. Certain pharmaceutical companies have been rejected so the funding arena is getting smaller and smaller therefore also democratizing funding models is to me the only way forward if we want a really well functional and really resilient art world look at the crisis that we have just gone through if there's a subscription model for example like with the on demand film industry or on demand music industry the crisis if something happens to the businesses and so on and so on is not really that important because hundreds of thousands millions of people are paying their subscriptions or making donations. I feel that a lot of the patronage model that to me is going back to machiavellian times almost is always celebrating those who have a lot of money to give away into very noble. Cause i know that this is really fueling the odds industry until many other leisure industries and what makes life really livable but if we could shift is to the many it becomes more resilient and i think everyone feels part of a bigger picture so giving you a ten pounds or one pound makes you feel. I have supported this big institution. It becomes part of what i own part of what i'm part of and i think creates a completely different relationship between the odds institution or if you feel well somebody else has built this this somebody else's and we're talking about national collections. We're talking about national heritage. And i think this shift to the democratization of funding is very very important. Let's look a little bit further ahead candidate. Perhaps just finally. We did talk about future. Plans and ambitions. You've already mentioned a couple of things. Give us a bit more. Put some more flesh on those bones if if you will. Is there any insight into what the future plans and ambitions are for devolve for future seasons. I guess more broadly how much more impact there is still to make in this digital rome. I really believe we have only to start or journey and we have made the first baby steps towards the potential that can actually reach when fully developed first of all as you know we have worked fifteen uk institutions but the ambition is really to be a platform for international organizations and public institutions. All over the world so season two will hopefully see a much more international array of institutions showing their works and they're artists and showcasing beautiful galleries and we're also evaluating at the moment everything that we have learned an art learning still in the last few weeks of the season. One on the volve. The ball will not go dark. We will continue featuring interesting content even between season one and season two which hopefully will happen sometimes at the end of the year and we absolutely are listening. Also we put out a lot of surveys. We want everybody's opinion We are encouraging people to write to and to answer all the surveys and we want to be responsive we want to really create something that people want we can imagine it to a certain degree but i think that the we have touched on something that the artists institutions and the public are really very happy with and the idea is really to perfect it to grow and to really as i said raise as much money for the institutions and the arts as possible so we really counting on the generosity of people now making donations and hopefully one day transitioning to a subscription model..

lethem rome uk
"digital technology" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

"Broadly if we think of things that demand innovative solutions access artists representation sustainability of course. Very much a watchword. Have you seen evidence now. In the past months that technology can offer solutions even to some of those problems which have seemed intractable so far absolutely. I'm a big believer. That what we have created. In general technology is a real force for good although it has its challenges and maybe it was so it's kind of pitfalls but in general the democratization that is happening through what we have created other people have put online is tremendous and there are a lot of people who are challenged be because of their abilities be because of their financial situation that are not able to visit the institutions and even if institutions like in the uk are for free. It's still requires you coming down to london. And it is sometimes for many people and unsurmountable obstacle on the other side also for institutions that are placed in smaller cities and towns. They often really create for the audiences that are by the hundreds of thousands and millions really flocking to the likes of tade or into hayward gallery and and sometimes these little exhibition spaces or even big exhibition spaces which are more into regional areas. Have fantastic exhibitions world. Class artists were showing their this very very ambitious outreach programs and now through the digital real we are able to share these and it means also that people on the other side of the world can actually enjoy what is being created in the uk or anywhere else and just to add to this devolve. Hopefully in the next season's will absolutely aim to showcase international institutions. So that we in the uk could enjoy institutional exhibitions from australia vice versa from all continents and really create this diversity that we're talking about so much but sometimes really still in its infancy of development because there are geographical and also ecological challenges. Dent make travel. Sometimes almost an ethical to this broader point about the reopening that we're already seeing and you spoke actually come to the right at the start about sort of the inevitability of the the growth of technology..

uk hayward gallery london australia Dent
"digital technology" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

"That are unique to each organization which are fifteen of them joining forces so that these beautiful exhibitions that they revived from their archives. We're able to be experienced on the desktop or a mobile phone. In his first season. We brought together fifteen of the leading public arts institutions in the uk. And what's wonderful about initiatives that each exhibition is free to experience and we also have an amazing program of collateral material. That really is embracing each exhibition. So that when as you're you are sitting at home and watching you can go far the deep into anything that has to do with the artist. The exhibition spaces that you are. Maybe seeing even for the first time and the ultimate goal was really to collect as many funds as possible to support the participating institutions all funds raised on a donation basis would at the end and will at the end of the season one which ends mid july be distributed in equal manner to each participating institutions with the hope that this model will grow and micro philanthropy will be able to support institutions pine to the future. What's the theme then candidate. What some highlights of the season one program. what have you learned. I guess about the potential of the platform so when we approached to fifteen some of the fifteen leading institutions in the uk. You can imagine the only really questions we had to them was. What would you like to show on the of we gave them absolute freedom within the realm of the possible. Because some of the exhibits would have been too intricate. Maybe with the technology that is already available to render but within those technological boundaries we gave them absolute carte blanche and i have to say the zoological team and the outset team work tirelessly together with our tech host which is war. Take to absolutely satisfied. A very high standards of these institutions. There was no curatorial theme. There was no actually lives of the variety. Diversity of artists genders background. Some solo exhibitions with just one sculpture in yorkshire sculpture park in the outdoors and others have brought together something like seven or eight female artists. Were all talking about the body..

uk blanche yorkshire sculpture park
"digital technology" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

"Plow with greater confidence because it's kind of validated a lot of things you've been talking about for the preceding year two year three excellent question and actually is a mixture of both. So what we're working on at the moment is we are releasing a report called feature because systems are in the metaverse on the sixth of july. And this is looking at exactly this sort of emergent field again. not new. But shifting evolving and shifting. It's definitely true that the pandemic and the shifts and evolution of the way that we need work has sort of encouraged us to sort of consolidate our efforts and to focus in on certain areas. And i think that through the work that we've been doing for feature ecosystems on on the metaverse and and really sort of taking a look taking stock of what's been taking place not just in art but also in adjacent field so looking at architecture looking at the games industry looking at film and seeing how those infrastructures have have shifted not in the last eighteen months. We're talking about in the last ten. Twenty thirty s and understanding that there is a certain amount of like infrastructural work to be done to enable us to be able to continue to have an impact in this area. I'm personally extremely interested in this reemergence of the metaverse and the way that how this is going to shift the way that the internet functions obviously on a really basic level also the way that other technologies or other of ideas coming together. So this is the bringing together. A video games and blockchain What that means for different forms of governance what that means for different forms of experience what that means for different kinds of uses in that sort of broader cultural sphere. So i think it's definitely. I would say that it's definitely created a sense of urgency to think about what role the cultural sector compla- in in how these how this is developing because it is really feels to me. It's really picking up speed there. There is this like real drive in the in the tech industry around what this metaverse suit of can be an i mean. Obviously the metaverse is highly automatic. And i could call it the spatial web or spatial computing or the massive internet or d. web. Or all of these things. But i think that to me this is something that we really should be considering. And because i work in the field i really think the artists and i mean in the broadest sense should have should have a role in should have a stake in how these develop k watson.

watson
"digital technology" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

"A specific part of the ecosystem he will spend time with an expert in the area. Getting to understand like its functionality. But then what he's also doing is is recording and creating these digital textures with which he builds these worlds. And then there's sort of this sort of something on the side which is like what if there is a point where the only way that you're accessing all exploring. The natural world is through these sorts of recordings of the natural world. That is the kind of slight warning on the side as well something else. That yaqoob is something we've been talking about for a long time because we've we've collaborated with him on three projects now which have been a great experience. Is this idea of slow media. Which is the technology could also potentially be something that is used to foster attention to the world around. You rather than distraction and so thinking about mike you know heads up experiences you know with the with mobile mrs. Why when we worked with him on the listener his focus was very much. It's an audiovisual work but thinking about the role of the audio in these immersive storytelling. Experiences is is a really important part of that. So i think this idea of a slow media is a very interesting one when it comes to like thinking about the world around you not just the device and obviously it's also important to remember that these devices are made of materials that need to be extracted from and that also is is a huge legacy of that kind of those kinds of extractive processes. What the artists specifically not yacob but just artists more broadly. What are the benefits as you say to. These technologies these tools and this conversation this interest in this space. What else does that change. Does it change market dynamics. Does it change. Does it change the nature of the relationship with their with their audience. And there's lots of other things we talk about. Artists representation again access sustainability..

yaqoob yacob mike
"digital technology" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

"I have a couple of different views on that. And maybe they're contradictory views. I think there is an issue that particularly talking about digital strategies in the past that that has become like that has meant accessibility. And i think that we know that something being digital does not mean necessarily mean that that means it's more accessible but on the other hand the tools that are coming out of the games industry and i think game engines are a really very very important example of this which are these development environments which you can do in number of different things and you can plug in lots of different other kinds of software to create these virtual spaces and environments on worlds. The other thing about that is that those. Those engines are generally free to access because of the way that companies such as unity unreal have developed these flexible licensing agreements. So it is possible to access. These are quite complex tools to develop these kinds of worlds and spaces. So i do think that's really interesting but not only that there's like things like free tutorials online. You can learn about how to do these kinds of things as well as the publishing platforms as well that come with it so you have steam and all the other platforms so there are these accessible tools like relatively accessible tools for building these kinds of projects in spaces as well as the kind of distribution mechanisms enable you to basically go direct to audiences and also in that. I mean we've been looking at. We've been looking adjacent fields to the to the architect of for our next report feature ecosystems to see how these sorts of fields are supporting artistic experimentation. And i think it's interesting when you look at the games industry in particular the games industry like any industry. It's not perfect. But it has these mechanisms that support of the development of these kinds of books and that is not just. It's about the whole sort of infrastructure and way of working and that also includes the fact that you have discord in you have twitch that enables you to have these conversations with your with your community and with your with your audience which i think is also really valuable..

"digital technology" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

"In their fields. he'll share two examples of projects. Where technology served as to to expand the availability of art to broader audiences and where it became the core component of autistic manifestation. K watson is head of arts technologies at serpentine a researcher producer and curator working with art and advanced technologies photography and feminist curatorial and institutional histories of ours artists worlds is series of commissions and events that support artistic practices that engage with simulated realities immersive storytelling and virtual world building that invites audiences into these worlds to explore offer insights into these advancing technologies and associated practices processes and ideas in february ups and serpentine co presented. Live conversation with the artist. Yaacob cooks stinson. who's simulated realities explore the fragility of our environment and ecosystems at risk. I'm delighted to say. Kay watson joins me now k. Welcome to the program. Let's talk about the potential of technology and the digital in all and perhaps we can look through. The prism of jacob cooks stevenson's work which develops within an interesting intersection between art and technology. What is you see..

watson Yaacob Kay watson stinson jacob cooks stevenson
"digital technology" Discussed on Noble Warrior with CK Lin

Noble Warrior with CK Lin

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Noble Warrior with CK Lin

"Of focused on. And i look at all these things. I could be focused on. And i'm doing this. Well wait a minute. This is not very important persons. As i where it's important they're saying it's important. It's not so focused me to prioritize to so prioritisation isn't like just a method. It's a method that it's forced by saying i'm working on this one thing. Is this the mo. If i checked out right after this task if i basically died right after this have i done when i needed to get done four. Did i just basically do this. Because it was easy it was uh i was avoiding this other stuff. you're right so that's a great method for that and and i would. I would swear by every human being on earth should have that training white one of the nonprofits. I'm part of is the five saturdays program. We go into schools or eight year old nine year older high school kids and we teach them project management skills. Because we know it's going to last them so their entire lives how they collaborate with each other get things done to getting things done key getting the right things done is key understand how the system works together like how one thing impacts another like your time. You don't get it back some money you can make that back you can make it time you will not get back so how you look at your system needs to take in consideration that whatever you spent like we spent this last two hours it better than worth it. We better have gone through a journey together. We'd better be sitting turning on lights together in some ways that other people can turn lights on together those type of things. So there's lots of methods the other method i think is very important as check ins. Not just with yourself. That's easy to do. I like feeling. I'm feeling okay. It's when you're with a group of people that are that matter to you and do that regularly where you check in like a circle and you say it's different rounds so the first round is one of my feeling so each person. Just that's it. They don't go into story man. Sad fear glad. Shame some feeling feeling this overwhelmed gotta judgment be let it happen let it slide. But everybody checks in. So now you've got the real feelings out. Now what's up for you yesterday. This person did this or we did this. We argue here whatever and it allows a person to it out. Process it with a long time. You go round circle again. The third circle is checkout. I'm checking out now with. I'm still angry or happy or whatever and so those methods as symbols they sound they can save relationships families communities societies. If you do this correctly it doesn't take a lot of time and it allows people to speak their truth for people that wanted to follow up with you and you work. We should they go Well i'm on lincoln and sees a senior keith. Montgomery and the company siboro i. It's a transformation company was talking about. And yeah you google me. There's a lot of things involve with you'll see. My name is attached to different projects. That are out there. Some the blockchain space that we're talking about some artificial intelligence. I would go to mostly lincoln all right beautiful so let me take a moment to acknowledge you keith. We went to a lot of different spaces. Thank you so much for being here so generously and spend two hour with me and my audience so we started from your love language. We start from that language..

yesterday Montgomery two hour third circle first round each person eight year old siboro four keith nine year older two hours one thing one lincoln each five
"digital technology" Discussed on Noble Warrior with CK Lin

Noble Warrior with CK Lin

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Noble Warrior with CK Lin

"To sleep at night. I have a dream. And i dream about amazing things and things that i'm able to acquire a million dollars in a bag and and i swear it's real. I swear it's real. And i wake up and i look for. I look for the bag in my on my pillow on my bed. And there's no back because the dream wasn't real it was this esoteric world. the digital world is like that. can you grab ones and zeroes. That are on your your g mail account do you. Can you grab a bitcoin now. You can't really that whole world can disappear just like a dream and you don't necessarily have capacity to do that now. I can go in depth about that. Bitcoin's a little stronger in some ways about that but the digital transformation. This is why it's easy to get lost along the way in the dream or the dream state That's why cults that. That's why i brought that up you you you drop a lot of gyms. Actually underline a few things so you talked about in my mathematicians mirer looking. I think systematically really trace every step of the way the logic on the way then linguists strategies keeping an open mind without superimpose your existing mindset of framework around. So that way you can learn the hidden rules the grammars on the app so let's start there and then you talked about the powerful vision that people said you were cautious. Really just buying to drinking the kool aid on leaving something. That's more ready than than actually is. That's roughly you just cover. Roughly we can make the assumption that we will get the upside from everybody out there in the system. It's our job to start to actually get to. Why did they sulfur x and is to solve for x. And the best way okay. Perfect great so looking at a new problem again. We gonna get a little meta you. And i were one of them excited to talk to you because you and i were systems thinkers so we can speak more meta terms but also please remind me to bring it back so that way. We don't get so so so look it and you problem go about identified the eighty twenty the twenty percent of the concept or the tool on the understanding such that we basically grasped crock eighty personnel. What's happening how do you go about really just like me. Jumping into crypto fintech. Or you go ahead and identify here are the twenty person is gonna make eight eighty percent of the the concept.

eight twenty percent twenty person one million dollars eighty twenty eighty percent eighty personnel bitcoin
"digital technology" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"You know the likes of all the time signed and hang on where they have these Say less respectful banks than the bank lay banks cast women other things in the social e e commerce in a gaming in you know so the Really we we see a convergence of many as gordon. Call is playing one super. If that's it's important that you can use so we wanted to understand the implications of those business models and how does that translate to the western culture to israel deep-rooted and the british bank. But how do we. How do we really adapt to the new world. Where consumers declines to expecting. You know you're so accessibility of the finance weather for consumer and business all in the immersive experience of the point of needs right whether being point of sales at the retail. Either ecommerce or physical store or it's on microsoft's say the point of sale purchasing of the next generation cloud service so we on to be everywhere embedded into the point of need so two. That's right we look at other industry with look at the The east on the we also look out a frankly the isaiah where the fintech relate the particularly attack. Where'd aj is so that. The centers always slow. When i came to see which that person is not just saying ovation's kim stopped innovation. Every single person has a job to asian and innovation. Team also has a job to do you so we got to happen everywhere so we look out where the fintech is. They're they're always faster and agile and we really want to take outside interest to drive whether to seeing into the into the center and really make us better and more fit so don't dimensions by which were looking at the x. profitable is coming from. that's fantasy a fantastic. I appreciate you giving that overview. So we've talked a bit about you've talked about your vision of establishing these ecosystems. My words not yours. But i think that fairly encapsulates this notion that you're describing so eloquently. I wonder if you could talk a little bit of balance your own philosophy about innovation within the enterprise Before your time at. Hsbc again a enroll. Now about two months you're the mvp and head of the consumer bank east west bank your partner at three different major consulting firms before and through that role influenced a great number of organizations around the world There are those who say that innovation should be everyone's responsibility the cynic might say. Well it's everyone's responsibility is really. No one's There are others that say that small cadre of people ought to have that as their sole focus and certainly draw insights from others as well talk a bit about what you've seen work best the extent to which you can pay with a bit of a broad brush stroke so there's really no right answer. I think it's whichever organization find the way that makes make work for them. What i think. I resonate wh one of the speakers You know points in terms of it got so what we're doing that. Hsbc frankly doesn't matter and we don't want to be a police role with. I personally hate that word of governance so governors means you. You don't trust empower the whoever the edge is also i don't think it's it's governance. Its it's more orchestration..

microsoft east west bank isaiah asian israel british Hsbc two months one two Every single person agile fintech three different major consulti kim
"digital technology" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Would they expect. And it's not what were best at to be frank so during this timeframe how do we really think about omni channel. How do we really think about ensuring that we have from a technology perspective the ability to connect all the touch points that a customer may have with us in real time to make a more seamless experience. We're not there yet completely. I don't want to pretend like over the last year or even the great work that was done prior to my joining that were john. I don't actually think anybody is to to be honest. But planting those seeds seeing those use cases that had become very very real. We are understanding that someone who starts a transaction on one of our digital properties may need contextual help and chat in may then needs to move from chat an actual call center interaction. And they don't want to start all over again and explain everything they've been through and of that's new per se but i will tell you that. Given those emerging use cases it's become much more real and as a result. I think we can all put ourselves in the driver's seagate in terms of being able to understand you know what you would most want out of an experience and bill bed into the experiences that that will bring forth for us. I i like. I like that pathetic. Note that you're talking about and almost the golden rule applied to the way in which you think about products and how they would be unrolled Catherine i mentioned that you are the global head of ventures digital innovation and partnerships at hsbc newer to your role even then. Megan is to her as. You're a couple of months into into that post. So i realize there's a great deal dynamism Going on there at the moment. When you and i caught up recently you talked about how you're driving. A group level efforts to uncover.

Catherine Megan last year john one hsbc
The Digital Revolution Has Only Just Begun

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

01:29 min | 1 year ago

The Digital Revolution Has Only Just Begun

"So. John way back at the start of the pandemic when i was asking people about how this might change aerospace. You were the first person to boldly predict the to me that this is probably going to speed up. The digitalization of the industry accenture does the tech vision report every year. And to be honest with you often focuses on trends that are coming but this year's report felt just really different to me because of how much of the digital change that occurred. Can you take a step back for a moment and talk to me about the rise of digital transformation during the recent crisis. I mean were you surprised by just how much change happened. And how important digital became michael. It is true the pandemic acted as a catalyst for many companies around the digital agenda's. And no. I'm not surprised as i told you when this was starting. I could see it happening almost immediately when when. Kobe was impacting companies. What we saw was increased attention on move to cloud which is the foundation for so much of the valley to gain from digital transformation and then a range of other digital technologies a in l. a. r. vr digital twin thread data analytics. You know even an upgrade to platforms for supply chain manufacturing in the commercial segment those companies. Who have used seven three seven code to invest in digital are poised to outside rewards as the rates. Start coming back

John Kobe Michael
Covid & Digital Transformation: Too Much, Too Soon?

Technology Untangled

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Covid & Digital Transformation: Too Much, Too Soon?

"Distort transmission is the conscious integration of digital technology into all areas of a business and buzzwords aside. Most organizations have been talking about it for ages. We've gone digital transformation strategies and chief digital officers coming out of our as bump the stats. Say that seventy percent of all digital transformation initiatives fail to find out why i could dave strong u. k. pre sales director for h. p. e. the three areas. That really caused this to happen. One is around complexity to many organizations. Take on too much. They tried to bring together thought him any digital technologies to try and deliver society. Come the end up. Filing then this the couch apiece and the whole point around the digital ambition is to do it quickly is to take a business problem translate a business problem and executes it with technology that can really make a difference organization. Two three four year programs that too long. You missed the boat if you're trying to compete against monza as a retail bank and taking three full years to get to where they were three years ago he kind of lost your business. You know that culture piece of being able to deliver things in bite size. Incremental trunks isn't organization is very alien to established businesses. you look at some banks being around fatigue. Three hundred years right imagine that trading history and the processes that they've built up that time. It's very cumbersome netflix. It is being cumbersome the it processes being cumbersome so it has really made it extremely difficult and then the final based fatigue and we guys right back to taking too long to do things. But you're relying on a very small skills pool around dishes so we know that it's recognized. Uk level the digital skills are in great demand but it's not enough of them and focusing all of that delivery and change on a very small pool of people that overwhelmed overworked and therefore the in fatigue. And that's why you see that stat. Seventy percent fail

Dave Netflix UK
"digital technology" Discussed on The Main Column

The Main Column

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on The Main Column

"Is this question lee. Scale ability i think the gallant with any project execution approach and based on my experience. I think i can come up with at least three. Different types of a project You you you have repeat project which you know very little known repeatable. We we do them every day. And then i would have a kind of frontier or new venture project with a bit complicated their table and linear but there are also unknowns and these kinds of projects we don't do them every day But these are discoverable project. You can still inter inter operate between the projects and these projects and we. Can you know move over practices and methods and and tools that we have used on repeat project to do this frontier new venture projects alaska getting if if gone up in new world project. These are complex emergent. Non-linear project Unknown we have never done them before but on and off we get involved in such kinds of projects and so the idea of having a common framework methodology that can address all these three different types of projects found quite elegant and exciting. But as you can imagine this is not going to work in real life. So the idea with adoptive execution is actively do create. If we kind of lose. Nick appeared but strongly cohesive and modular It reminds me of these. These lego blocks the you know when i was growing up as a kid in india. A friend of mine he brought from denmark. Bunch of these Lego blocks and that was the first time i saw them and i was of quite intrigued by them. Because using these blocks you could create different shapes and different toys and different models. And it's exactly the same approach here. We have these these building blocks which are part of the adaptive execution plan book and we can actually tailor the execution approach to a particular project type using these building blocks and park example. I gave you the this example for simulation though if a particular customer is not interested in having this simulating tool in early in the project we can design and execution approach which is without such simulating banished to engage with the owners contractors much earlier in the project life cycle to set the overall execution up for her actually brought me. You brought me back to my childhood. Good old legos. It got me interested in construction as well as i do. Want to go back to a keyword. That you've mentioned dot net of course that standardization so why is standardization so important standardizing on what we want to do with with execution is reduced complexity..

india Lego Nick first time denmark three different types net least three
"digital technology" Discussed on The Main Column

The Main Column

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on The Main Column

"Money's lee nichols and i'd like to welcome you all to the latest installment of hydrocarbon processing podcast series. The made column. We have a very special guests joining us today. To discuss digital technologies and capital. Construction is sorting sing. Who's vice president at ab process automation energy industries. Now before we welcome in mr seen i would like to remind all the listeners of hydrocarbon processes ir pc operations global virtual conference. We are now accepting abstracts. So iopc operation's going to focus on technologies equipment and services that are optimizing plant operations and maintenance so it you're interested in speaking at this global event. Please visit hydrocarbon processing dot com. Select ira operations under the events tab to learn more about the event you can register or you can submit an abstract so we look forward to see you all there so with that. I like to welcome in our very special guest. Sworn how're you doing today. Thank you anne. i'm doing fine. Big noyau clyde but other than that. Everything else is is Is a i'll so far so good. It's hot here in houston so we got two different extremes on each end so But but i. I really wanna thank you for joining us today. Give us a couple minutes to be on on the main column podcast. I want to go ahead and jump right eight because we got a lot to get to today so to start off with my first question is what are the main challenges around capital projects and the oil and gas and chemical refining industry. Yeah the the if you look at project These are highest endeavors which probably you know enabled Profitable organic growth and they are critical to long term success of any company. And you when you look at projects. They create value when the benefits from the ethics they created or modified by the project exceeds the product and normally such venue is measured Using and being your net present value. And if you look around and if it with various Organizations that have analyzed multitude of projects like ibm for example. They found out that the typical project on an average delivers around twenty two percent less and being than what was core custard when the project was funded. Now discipline is not only to large project but any type of project so you know cost and overruns are usually thought off as a main culprits of valuation. And they do you know make significant contribution to lower and tv but you will be surprised that the largest thought evaluation for these industrial projects has nothing to do on how.

houston today anne first question around twenty two percent Big noyau clyde each end two different extremes ab process eight couple minutes
1.4 million TB sufferers lost out on treatment during first year of COVID-19

UN News

01:10 min | 2 years ago

1.4 million TB sufferers lost out on treatment during first year of COVID-19

"An estimated one point four million fewer people received care. Forty back uses or tb in two thousand and twenty than usual because of covid. Nineteen the un health agency on monday latest data from the world health organization. Who from more than eighty countries showed a reduction in treatment of twenty one percent in the first year of the pandemic compared with two thousand nineteen. The biggest differences were in indonesia down forty two percent south africa down forty-one percent the philippines thirty seven percent and india twenty five percent the disruption to essential services for people with tb is just one tragic example of the ways. The pandemic is disproportionately affecting some of the world's poorest people who were already at high risk for tb said tedros adhanom ghebreyesus w. h. o. Director general ahead of wealthy. Be day on wednesday. The twenty fourth of march the us agency pointed out that some countries have already taken steps to sidestep the impact of the new corona virus. On the delivery of tb services. Successful policies have included expanding the use of digital technologies such as computer aided diagnosis and chest xrays. Which is particularly beneficial in countries lacking sufficient numbers of trained radiographer

TB World Health Organization UN Indonesia Philippines South Africa India United States
"digital technology" Discussed on The Know Show

The Know Show

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"digital technology" Discussed on The Know Show

"Our data one other parts of my deck asking those questions all day to very much trying to find out how migrants who are in different stages of migration we we we do have that how they using the digital technology so in any survey imagine trying to complete a fifteen minutes survey all not. You don't have too many questions. We've had to restrict it to of a key number of question. So that they they don't get to old with answering yet so but we we de disaggregated there for example questioned around there when i decided to migrate do you. How do they use it. Before the author adjoining the migration. Jenny destination location decided to go home. And when you return times we examined all these questions at lowe's different stages and then we cross correlate all of that different dances and and look at the different kinds of jobs one of the great things about doing an online survey like this. Is that You can have a multidimensional analysis of it. of course it only picks up mainly picks those who have digital technology in later. Those who done. We've even now ask those who seems to get a friend to help them with it. So we it's interesting looking at those who don't use digital technologies very much why they think about a more about so And in into of on the on that so of no given a you look at different stages are you looking at so of how The digital so of usage varies according to each stage. 'cause i imagine that at one stage somebody is using digital media for one thing but once they get to the other side they're going to be using it pre predominantly communication to speak back home. Yes no i think we have clear evidence that they use different types of digital technology at different stages or s that varies in the countries. Where we're working. I think there are lots of reasons. Why people use digital tech so for example i was working Fifteen fifty ten fifteen years go when mobile phones will first coming out. I people say the post the wellness walls but it wasn't in europe and whether lots lorry-drivers and other people who who migrating through the country on people sort of said gosh that bus wonderful it enables husbands and wives to communicate with each other when the husband was away working on a naked chat with the family and reassure them all An answer that was seen as very positive then actually those a lot of evidences of the research we revolted that showed well the quad for the men were telling lies to that wives and families on the reason they were contacting them was to pretend to reassure Having an ephemeral or with a second or third wife so i think that the guinea those nuances is very very difficult through an online survey. Which is why..

europe fifteen minutes third Jenny Fifteen fifty ten fifteen year first each stage one thing second one stage one lowe
"digital technology" Discussed on The Know Show

The Know Show

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"digital technology" Discussed on The Know Show

"It health language in all all those things might be much more in intensive early stages of arrival so so there is a temporal aspect of this orientation in access to services and all of that but in degration and much more relaxed ways of using Maybe maybe that's something that we see leads burleson in terms of the adding attempts. One of the things that will be looking for is also out. Migrants are presenting to identity using digital technology On people at all also how they present themselves in the local context live so so in terms of integrating with the local community maybe so in migration literature others this debate about whether migrants. Are you know they integrate all as a result technologies. That are actually more connected with riddick. I'm from you know what i mean. So it costs technology. You have a tendency to be in your own little bubbles in your own groups in your own cultural. you know sort of blue interact broadly. So that know there's obviously research suggests that migration tech resources moved on. You know there's a lot more evidence that migrants can be both here and there in a sense you know they're embedded in both contexts the bad of course. It isn't the same for everyone right because talking. About the many structural reasons why different migrants will use different types of technology in different ways in assam enabling some not so nibbling some definitely constraining so there aren't inequalities even but I lost my train of thought. There i mean you kinda done a good job of prompting my of line of thinking on this because to me my mind there's a lot of facets to this sort of migration in the digital context and one comes to mind is well is the first one that comes to mind rather is can you tell From the data also from the The communication that you've had with migrants in general at what stage in this migration cycle therein and also. Can you tell what the the main reasons for their migration. Aw is like of course. Economic would be a very big one but is it exclusively economic or is it some time of.

One both first one both contexts burleson
Rodeo Houston 2021 has officially been canceled because of COVID

Houston Matters

01:01 min | 2 years ago

Rodeo Houston 2021 has officially been canceled because of COVID

"Organizers announced the cancellation of the twenty twenty. One houston rodeo. It's the second straight year. The signature houston event has had to shut down due to the pandemic rodeo houston had pushed the event back two months in the hopes of pulling it off in may but ultimately as rodeo ceo chris bowman explained the current health situation had not improved to the degree necessary to host the event no rodeo again due to the pandemic again. Is this good bad or ugly. Natalie arsenault start us off so i think it's bad and sad at the same time. Not because they've shut it down that good because we haven't improved i numbers necessarily and we have new strains out there and things of that nature but i'm just wondering if they're away like the nba is figuring out how to do things virtually of these. Can't we like set up a baby. Lamb ham or something and people can pay and then we can still scholarships and it would be great. I just think we need to find a happy middle ground somewhere using digital technology.

Houston Chris Bowman Natalie Arsenault NBA
Interview With Lisa DeLuca, IBM

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

04:34 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Lisa DeLuca, IBM

"I'd like you to meet lisa. Seacat deluca director of emerging solutions. In a i in a distinguished engineer at ibm if she has a way long title. But i'm not even gonna try to wait through but maybe show tell us. Basically she's innovating ibm's digital technologies but we're gonna find out exactly how she's doing this. Here's the insane part. Lisa holds five hundred patents have been issued and has another two hundred or so patent pending coma. God they even include patents related to electric vehicle charging in tracking the amount of time spent on your mobile phone. I don't know if. I wanna know that information but anyway. She's a proud member of the ibm women. Inventors community act. As i said the most prolific female inventor in ibm history with four children. I don't know we'll be here all day if i read all her credentials. So you'll just read about it. The show notes and we're gonna go on welcome. Greek cactus radio. we saw. thank you for joining us. Thanks for having me it welcome. You're welcome so i'm gonna jump right in. How do you come up with your ideas. Take us a little bit into your thinking process. All great ideas stem from a really good problem right. There's problems all around us. Beer people complaining all the time but the really good problems are the ones that you're hearing consistently especially when it's related or coming from a client need those problems in starting to think. How can i solve this in a way. That nobody else has thought of before removes. They've thought of it a little bit but we can take it a step further. That's where great ideas come from. So is it like you are wrestling with the client problem in you. Come up with another way to do it. Or is it like the proverbial woman who can't find the kind of baby food that she wants for her kids so she decides to try to make it in your kitchen and all of her friends ask for because they like it you know fell because we all definitely both the a little bit of both. I hear you right. It's i definitely have a lot of inventions. That are just my own personal needs as a mom as a human being as a consumer. That's playing with products and then also from my day job right. So you gave me a great introduction. But i oversee our weather business which includes aviation so. There's a lot of problems that are coming up from general business users and what we're doing so it's been really fun to have a little bit of both wow weather climate. Oh my god. There's so much we need. So i bet you are working with noah ash lab ozanich and atmospheric administration of the us government. I am sure our weather businesses somewhere they have the national weather service national weather service sends their data to the weather. Humans we see on tv and get mad out when they're wrong and it's your point about. Climate change is really hard nowadays to predict the weather. And that's one of the things that we're facing as you know you're you've seen so many times during the news just this year. How many hurricanes are coming through. And it's it's definitely been a fun challenge to think through how we can position our solution than our technologies to do better prediction. You know it's interesting Before we move on there's two interviews i did. You might wanna listen to allow. I've interviewed three hundred people's. Nah i think they're cool. They're all inventor. Type created the mentors but two of them are women who just won the macarthur genius award for coming up with cool new ways to measure climate impact. One was a different way to measure sea level rise and the other was scientific way to help leverage culture to change people's behavior so they take better care of their land for climate mitigation but getting to the human behavior part and leveraging culture to do it. She's in micronesia. She's an american. She's on assignment. Micronesia's really it's really great andrea dutton and stacey jupiter. Okay really cool. You just want macarthur. Genius mice search for your finance. So you're an inventor to me you're innovate right. So having defined innovation disruptive there's incremental juba definition. What he work from. Yes so for me. I get most excited about the idea of contributing to a larger society right and so all of our ideas when one person comes up with a great idea it allows all of us as humans to build off of it and come up with the next great thing so for me. It doesn't matter how small it is right. It doesn't all have to be life changing ideas. Small little things can eventually lead to those big

IBM Seacat Deluca Noah Ash Coma National Weather Service Natio Lisa Wrestling Macarthur Genius Award Us Government Andrea Dutton Stacey Jupiter Micronesia
"It could have been worse": GroupM's Brian Wieser explains their US ads forecast report

The Big Story

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"It could have been worse": GroupM's Brian Wieser explains their US ads forecast report

"All right so turning to your Your group project. The group on projections up in summary seems group am expects total media growth down eight point eight percent in twenty twenty two two hundred and fifteen billion it will grow again by eleven point eight percent twenty twenty one and those projections include digital excludes political digital speaking of which will grow by five percent in two thousand twenty next year expected to grow around eighteen percent and by two thousand twenty one digital will be fifty five percent of all advertising by two thousand twenty one so that prediction not as dire as group initially projected in june when you guys anticipated thirteen percent decline It's certainly not as bad as the two thousand and eight recession and as you just said earlier it could be a lot worse so you know why did things start to look was it strictly because of the growth in digital i think first of all that was a great summary of everything but i think that it is it to say that the resilience of businesses small and large and the use of digital technology. Any commerce more generally really helped make this. Your are better than it should have been as if advertising were solely responsible economic signals. Because let's remember that in the. Us is the worst economy since the nineteen thirties and You know part of the issue is that yes. Marketers were able to do things ever benefit from advertising Even if their own businesses were in some cases struggling as case Small businesses But at the same time it's also worth noting that this in the case shaped recovery Was maybe under appreciated. The degree to which Most of us are doing fine in some of us are doing terribly minded impacted advertising. So you know spare thought for your local weekly because if they were dependent on In restaurants in bars for advertising. They're probably in a pretty terrible state but most media owners are not dependent on that cigna. The popular of of the market cutie of the relatively few me are dependent on travel somali Those are the two sectors which have been just just crushed and It may have a disproportionate impact on the economy. But it's not gonna have a disproportionate impact on the advertising economy

United States Cigna
Digital Transformation with Honeywell Chief Digital Technology Officer, Sheila Jordan

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:09 min | 2 years ago

Digital Transformation with Honeywell Chief Digital Technology Officer, Sheila Jordan

"I thought we would begin our conversation with your role. You the chief digital technology officer at honeywell and talk a bit about that. That's an interesting combination of of areas of responsibility that translates each side of that translates differently in different kinds of organizations and yours is quite a large and complex. One to talk a little bit. If you wouldn't mind about how that translates into your environment. What is your purview. Yes so so. I joined tiny well really because of the mission of the organization. I see iran chairman darius in the management team have a very very aggressive in very exciting digital transformation. We have many almost every function in the organization. So think of your traditional functions. Hr finance legal procurement as well as i'm sorry supply chain as well as our strategic business units all have digital initiatives that they're driving within the organization in the role or. It's it's kind of at the hub of that. We help with the technology we help with. Data in data is so important as we all know is i view jada as the digital currency is the currency of digital transformation to make all this work. You have to make sure that you're extracting data from silos of erp in salesforce and all that in creating it so that it really does create an experience for our customer partners employees. The connects our knowledge about them and gives them this. Frictional seamless experience of how they interact with anyone moving forward. So under the purview. I have on the technology associated with the corporate. It world everything from illegal finance contracts h. Are all the way through the spg technology. The strategic business unit technology as well as making sure that we really do a harmonize. The data across organization in use that data in in building friction lists experience are always offers honors very interesting. And that's that's easier said than done as as large and complex as this organization is can you talk a bit about imprompt some of this predates set as your nine or so months in private. The origins of it may predate your time with the with the company. But can you talk a bit about that process of harmonizing the data. You make a great point that in order to get the full value out of that currency that the currency of digital transformation that you need to make sure that you are governing that appropriately so that you can draw the appropriate insights from that make better decisions and so on talk a little bit about some of the building blocks to get their first thing. Is i think three years ago. They decided to centralize it so the majority incentivized majority of a corporate. It is centralized but simultaneously. The ministry team has done such a great job at creating. i call global design models. So if we're gonna go to a single er he or a single salesforce or it single e commerce and we have to decide what the processes is having a global design model. So the good news is we create these global design models for you know the major major Processes in technology across organization in ultimately every strategic business unit will converge on that converge on a global design model. Additionally i'll get a little bit technical magic. Create your customer masters your product masters. You gotta make sure you never materials master so making sure that you have. The data structured in a way that it's holistic and also centralized there were all using inconsistent both data structure as well as the technology so the organizations doesn't amazing job at creating this. We actually have a transformation day once a month. We actually talk about whatever. Projects are inflated. Whenever we're doing so that we can all converge on these It s in a streamlined. Consistent standard approach and having said that as you said our business units are very different. We have aerospace oiling. Gas honeywell business technology The honeymoon connective rising all had their own nuances. So as you structure design in converge and have standardization Eighty percent of it. You have to allow for that. Twenty percent of flexibility that each of the other strategic business units need to run their business.

Honeywell Darius Jada Salesforce Iran
Uber, Lyft and the sharing economy

Future Tense

09:45 min | 2 years ago

Uber, Lyft and the sharing economy

"What used to be referred to as the sharing economy. Let's quickly remind ourselves what sharing actually means if i give you a ride in my car and don't expect anything in return that's sharing if however aguirre rod in my car and you have to pay for the privilege. Well that's cold commerce and that's why when we talk about uber and deliver ruined task. Grab it and even airbnb. These days we now refer to them as gig economy companies. Juliet shore has been researching. Why the sharing ideal ended up as a form of anti regulation capitalism. Her new book is called after the gig. How the sharing economy got hijacked and how to win it back. So the sharing economy launched in the midst of the so-called great recession of two thousand eight nine and it emerged with a series of could've wonderful promises about all the good things it was going to bring an call that the idealist discourse so it promised it was going to give people a whole new way to work without a boss if people independence and flexibility autonomy that it was going to provide income for struggling middle class people and that it was inclusive because it was so easy to join these platforms and it would reduce discrimination and help low income people. It also promised that it was going to create social ties connections. These were what we call appeared appear person to person exchanges. Somebody in their car. Someone who needs a ride someone with a room. Someone who needs a place to stay and that those exchanges would yield truly personal intimate relationships and then finally it claimed that it was going to reduce carbon footprints. Because airbnb would make it. So we didn't have to build hotels and ridesharing would make it so people didn't have to own their own cars anymore so it was a pretty hefty set of claims and sort of idealistic hopes which we heard from ordinary users. And of course from the platforms themselves as well as the many consultants who were touting the benefits of this new way to run an economy. What does it suggest that flexibility is really the only regional virtue of the sharing economy that still touted by the big gig companies today when whenever they come under attack for their methods and actions. Well flexibility is still at least in principle a key part of gig work in the sense that people can choose to go on the app and go off at any time. They can work as many as few hours as they want in practice. What we do find though. Is that for people who are trying to make a full time. Living on these apps they lose almost all the flexibility they lose a great deal of it. Because there's not enough work too many people chasing too little work so they have to pretty much stay on the apps. Whenever there's any work to be had we know that very quickly. The sharing economy co opted by silicon valley venture capitalists. But we're those original ideals. Plausible could have worked. I think some of them weren't some of them weren't so the environmental idea really warrant for much of the sharing economy. That's because the two biggest sectors which are lodging and transportation are both really carbon intensive activities travel and you know both long distance travel and local travel and these sharing platforms made these services available much more cheaply which meant that more people were gonna use them. So more people getting into private cars as a result of ride hailing because there was so much less costly than taxis. Many more people travelling as a result of the fact that airbnb offered cheaper accommodation so environmental claims weren't laws above the social. Claims are a little bit more mixed. We do find people on airbnb if they're staying with someone who's present in the home rather than renting out a whole place. They are making social ties there. Few sharing platforms like blah blah car in europe which is long distance ridesharing where connecting with someone is really relevant but as far as the claims for the labor side of things economic claims. I think they were feasible. Wall if you had a decent business model and you didn't let too many people on the platform but second the companies started out with pretty decent compensation for the workers in the early days people were pretty happy with many of these platforms but over time because the companies weren't making money kept cutting what they were giving to the workers and this was most prevalent in ride help and the bakeries and they weren't making money was they priced the service too low so uber and lift subsidizing the rise by about forty percent. It's the only way they could get such a big market so if they were less greedy. I think the answer to your question is yes. There is a way to do this. That actually takes advantage of the technology is still a reasonable deal for consumers. But isn't you know giving them crazy. Low prices and also is sort of feasible from platform point of view. Your book is called after the gig and the subtitle is how the sharing economy got hijacked. Which is what we've been talking about and how to win it back looking at the how to win it back do see the. The basic model appears structure augmented by digital technology. Do you see that as having potential to expand or to create genuine sharing economy models. I do think that there's tremendous potential here. So there other more out of the box kind of innovative ways that we can think about using this technology and changing the social relations of production basically in ways that would really benefit users and workers in particular so i studied what are called platform cooperatives and these are platforms. They use many of the same technology so they use the matching algorithms. They use the ratings and reputational data. They use the payment systems but instead of being owned by wealthy investors owned by the people who are actually doing the work so i studied an artist's platform of photographers platform that sell stock photography over the web and there are about a thousand artists who are members of this cooperative. They're much much happier when they they used to work for that quote unquote of stock photography. Which is a company named getty images and two longtime industry insiders started. This new company called stocks a united and photographers flocked to it. They're much much happier. They get a much bigger fraction of the sales and they can govern themselves so they have control over what the company does so. I think it's a fantastic model. The reason i have a lot of optimism for it is that the technology obviates a lot of what management does it takes care of the quality control. It does the matching. it does the finance. You know you really don't need much management and you can see that by the fact that many of these companies have very few employees and that means that it's just that much easier for workers actually to own those companies because there's really not so much that management is providing. Can you bring those types of platform co to scale or in trying to grow. Do they risk going down. The path of what we know has happened to some of the big companies. It's an interesting question. Because i think the question of scale is somewhat misunderstood in the gig space many of the areas where you've had rapid growth our in services that are person to person services and are primarily local ride hale and delivery errands and tasks and so forth so these are personal services and people who provide them are locals and they're providing them to local so for those you actually don't want them to get two big. There's no reason that they should all you really need is what we can think of as interoperability in the apps. So let's say. I use a ride hailing app in my city and that's most of the time that's what i'm using it for but occasionally go somewhere else. I wanna be able to open that app and get a ride held. They're all that means. is that those. Local co ops. Have to all be part of a network that platforms where scaling to a large. You know market makes more sense are the online platforms and the accommodations platform. So those make more sense to scale up. We have seen some other kinds of structures at least in nonprofits and so forth not necessarily always a co op structure. But you know something similar where we have some of these platforms that are actually operating more globally and the one i studied stocks is global platform. So yeah they can scale. I think the question is how big do you want them to scale. And i think that really varies by the service. Were talking about

Aguirre Rod Juliet Shore Airbnb Europe Getty
After the Gig: How the Sharing Economy Got Hijacked and How to Win It Back

Future Tense

07:22 min | 2 years ago

After the Gig: How the Sharing Economy Got Hijacked and How to Win It Back

"Juliet shore has been researching. Why the sharing ideal ended up as a form of anti regulation capitalism. Her new book is called after the gig. How the sharing economy got hijacked and how to win it back. So the sharing economy launched in the midst of the so-called great recession of two thousand eight nine and it emerged with a series of could've wonderful promises about all the good things it was going to bring an call that the idealist discourse so it promised it was going to give people a whole new way to work without a boss if people independence and flexibility autonomy that it was going to provide income for struggling middle class people and that it was inclusive because it was so easy to join these platforms and it would reduce discrimination and help low income people. It also promised that it was going to create social ties connections. These were what we call appeared appear person to person exchanges. Somebody in their car. Someone who needs a ride someone with a room. Someone who needs a place to stay and that those exchanges would yield truly personal intimate relationships and then finally it claimed that it was going to reduce carbon footprints. Because airbnb would make it. So we didn't have to build hotels and ridesharing would make it so people didn't have to own their own cars anymore so it was a pretty hefty set of claims and sort of idealistic hopes which we heard from ordinary users. And of course from the platforms themselves as well as the many consultants who were touting the benefits of this new way to run an economy. What does it suggest that flexibility is really the only regional virtue of the sharing economy that still touted by the big gig companies today when whenever they come under attack for their methods and actions. Well flexibility is still at least in principle a key part of gig work in the sense that people can choose to go on the app and go off at any time. They can work as many as few hours as they want in practice. What we do find though. Is that for people who are trying to make a full time. Living on these apps they lose almost all the flexibility they lose a great deal of it. Because there's not enough work too many people chasing too little work so they have to pretty much stay on the apps. Whenever there's any work to be had we know that very quickly. The sharing economy co opted by silicon valley venture capitalists. But we're those original ideals. Plausible could have worked. I think some of them weren't some of them weren't so the environmental idea really warrant for much of the sharing economy. That's because the two biggest sectors which are lodging and transportation are both really carbon intensive activities travel and you know both long distance travel and local travel and these sharing platforms made these services available much more cheaply which meant that more people were gonna use them. So more people getting into private cars as a result of ride hailing because there was so much less costly than taxis. Many more people travelling as a result of the fact that airbnb offered cheaper accommodation so environmental claims weren't laws above the social. Claims are a little bit more mixed. We do find people on airbnb if they're staying with someone who's present in the home rather than renting out a whole place. They are making social ties there. Few sharing platforms like blah blah car in europe which is long distance ridesharing where connecting with someone is really relevant but as far as the claims for the labor side of things economic claims. I think they were feasible. Wall if you had a decent business model and you didn't let too many people on the platform but second the companies started out with pretty decent compensation for the workers in the early days people were pretty happy with many of these platforms but over time because the companies weren't making money kept cutting what they were giving to the workers and this was most prevalent in ride help and the bakeries and they weren't making money was they priced the service too low so uber and lift subsidizing the rise by about forty percent. It's the only way they could get such a big market so if they were less greedy. I think the answer to your question is yes. There is a way to do this. That actually takes advantage of the technology is still a reasonable deal for consumers. But isn't you know giving them crazy. Low prices and also is sort of feasible from platform point of view. Your book is called after the gig and the subtitle is how the sharing economy got hijacked. Which is what we've been talking about and how to win it back looking at the how to win it back do see the. The basic model appears structure augmented by digital technology. Do you see that as having potential to expand or to create genuine sharing economy models. I do think that there's tremendous potential here. So there other more out of the box kind of innovative ways that we can think about using this technology and changing the social relations of production basically in ways that would really benefit users and workers in particular so i studied what are called platform cooperatives and these are platforms. They use many of the same technology so they use the matching algorithms. They use the ratings and reputational data. They use the payment systems but instead of being owned by wealthy investors owned by the people who are actually doing the work so i studied an artist's platform of photographers platform that sell stock photography over the web and there are about a thousand artists who are members of this cooperative. They're much much happier when they they used to work for that quote unquote of stock photography. Which is a company named getty images and two longtime industry insiders started. This new company called stocks a united and photographers flocked to it. They're much much happier. They get a much bigger fraction of the sales and they can govern themselves so they have control over what the company does so. I think it's a fantastic model. The reason i have a lot of optimism for it is that the technology obviates a lot of what management does it takes care of the quality control. It does the matching. it does the finance. You know you really don't need much management and you can see that by the fact that many of these companies have very few employees and that means that it's just that much easier for workers actually to own those companies because there's really not so much that management is providing.

Juliet Shore Airbnb Europe Getty
Customer Experience in the Digital Age

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:53 min | 2 years ago

Customer Experience in the Digital Age

"Talk a little bit about this. This idea of towards an ai. I operating model. Obviously a lot of people are familiar with it's on the minds and lips of so many different executives and certainly especially technology executives. But why this topic and why ranted around the operating model aspect of his as well. yes sure. so it's been clear for a while. Now that many organizations are at somewhat of an inflection point in the realm of digital transformation with here are our clients talking about this amongst their leadership teams and we hear captains of industry like tom. Siebel another recent guests on the podcast characterizing the last twenty years as an era of mass corporate extinction for those companies that failed acknowledged that the shifting digital landscape he says something like fifty two percent of companies in the fortune. Five hundred have fallen off the list since two thousand So at the center that's inflection. Point in the surrounding discussions are a lot of digital technologies The one that we've found to be most prominent is artificial intelligence undoubtedly a trend. We've been monitoring and witnessing for some time now however Leading up to our Digital symposium in july. We noticed the the conversation around a it was a evolving Specifically it was shifting from promising use cases in functions and business units to grander scale transformations so companies. Were rethinking as you said. The entire operating model in the name of ai redefining the seems the structure of the organization to break down data silos and standing up in a lot of cases entire Auctions dedicated to identify piloting and scaling. Those use cases that were most promising Symposium in july we survey about one hundred global cio hypothesis and found that. Two-thirds had already spun up dedicated teams or entire functions to focus on identification pilot than scaling of a i use cases and for those who more yet to do so sixty sixty percents that it was actually on the roadmap so this trend originally coined as shifting to a i i buy. Google was getting legs and we wanted to capture some characteristics of organizations that are effectively navigating the shift. You're very interesting. Talk a bit about the two executives that you you interviewed palo arbor from ten healthcare. Chris gates from all states a a leader in the in the health. Space a leader in the insurance space. Talk a bit of balance. Why them and why their stories were compelling sure. While starting in the aggregate healthcare and insurance or two of the most data heavy industries and generally where there's data there's opportunities to make products and experiences more intelligent and more automated in the case of gala the cio tenant healthcare there there's an ocean of clinical and claims data available from speaking with her in the past i know they're laser focused on synthesizing that data combining it with voice of the customer analytics to help improve the patient experience and enduring the panel. She shares some really interesting nuances on how to pursue without undermining the importance of the the human side of the patient physician interaction and then just recently under the pressures of covid nineteen. She has truly demonstrated her ability to lead in a crisis and spin up new data driven solutions in near real time to help manage these most unusual circumstances and then chris gates Chief technology officer at allstate is representing a company. That is no stranger to doing innovative things with data in the space of insurance The drive wise program for example that monitors driver dilemma tree data and offers rebates to those that exhibit behaviors on the road or the similar but different mile wise program that provides a pay as you go metered billing model for auto insurance both truly examples of creating new business models on the platform data in a i and outside allstate Chris just a truly dynamic leader that brings insights and experience colored by his leadership posts at other formidable companies such as a i g under armor and various business units general electric

AI Siebel Palo Arbor Chris Gates TOM Google Allstate Chris General Electric
Transforming Clinical Trials with Digital Technology

The Bio Report

05:19 min | 2 years ago

Transforming Clinical Trials with Digital Technology

"First. Let me congratulate you on the publication of your new book. The patient equation. Thank you like it was pretty exciting to see it in print. We're GONNA talk about clinical trials, your company Meta data, and the opportunities to capture data differently and reshape the way clinical trials are conducted. We're in this time where virtually everything we do is generating data. There's a proliferation of new means of capturing data in real time from a healthcare perspective. What's the opportunity before us to improve health and particularly the diagnosis and treatment of disease So I think that we've and somebody's Kobe nineteen is putting a magnifying glass on top of this but we've we practiced medicine pretty much since its inception by looking at data in very short little staccato timeframes. So you go to your doctor and you have your blood drawn on that particular day at that particular time You tell somebody how you were feeling that particular day at that particular time or at least try to recall how you were feeling for a period of time. But certainly wasn't something it was proactively measured. We we we get our gene sequenced and we find out what what actually happened at the moment of conception in terms of setting up our genetic future. Yes. Yes. In some diseases, obviously cancers is a perfect example, your genes. Do Mutate individual cells, but we're we're pretty much dealing with the same genes that we had over all our forty eight, forty, eight years ago. I've got today. So that is the context of thinking about what ails me, what is the right treatment for me and it's these little moments in time and I think your point about data Zuri will put its discount streaming around us everywhere, and whether it's the technology that's in our pocket or on a wrist or. Maybe things that are biologically more feasible to do not just from my know iphone perspective but can we start to monitor with medical grade sensors overtime or even just expand the dialogue with our doctors? So those conversations can happen anytime I think the big difference is that we're gonNA start to see these continuous where we actually see rate of change not just these single moments as part of how we think about diagnosing disease managing disease making sure people are getting the right treatments. That's a giant paradigm shift. That again, we've probably been waiting for literal millennia to have happened but I think we're about to to really live through that scales pretty exciting. You speak broadly in the book about the potential for data to transform healthcare I wanted to focus on clinical trials specifically. But before we do that, perhaps you can explain what metadata solutions does and as a way for listeners to understand your visibility into this world short I actually got extremely lucky in my career. If you go back twenty five years ago I thought I'd be researching one kind of cancer probably looking at maybe one gene in it. For the rest of my life and actually frustrated by the infrastructure that was available to run the research that I was doing. So how I would connect what we were doing in the laboratory with the records for patients who were volunteering to be in studies that we're working on a how he took that and turn it into something that we could publish from an academic perspective all that was very slow and cumbersome, and so with a few friends. Gins. Now, twenty five years goes when I was doing research about. Twenty years ago, twenty one years ago with friends we started what is now data and it really had the the mission of trying to help us get things from that laboratory stage into the hands of patients who are waiting for them by trying to connect all the people and all that data in a much more seamless way in a way that would allow us to accelerate the biological the medical revolutions that we were trying to power and terms of something that would really generate patient you simply put. We started connecting everybody over the Internet and we we started by connecting the professional. So people who were working scientists physicians. Statisticians that people in the life sciences, world and medical centers. Professionals Online. And this was back in the day when the only thing you could buy on Amazon Dot Com was a book. So kinda dates us a little bit but really if we can buy a book online, why can't we run our clinical trials online and and basically that's what we did fast forward twenty years and we realized a of course over the course of time that not only could be connected professionals, but we could connect the patients, and now I could we connect the patients who were volunteering to being these research projects, but we can actually connect the research projects. To each other as well. So everywhere there was a time barrier everywhere there was a systems barrier. We realized we could overcome that and create this kind of. Continuum, of data across everybody who had the same mission of getting new therapies into the marketplace, and that really has resulted instead of me being in the lab. Looking at one gene one cancer for the rest of my life. As I said getting very lucky and now I get to look at what's happening

Kobe
The Great Remittance Mystery

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:55 min | 2 years ago

The Great Remittance Mystery

"Remittances the money that migrants people living and working abroad sent to their countries of origin, and there are as many as two hundred and seventy million people around the world in that situation, sending money to their families because of that remittances have become a vital source of financing for many developing countries the sums of money are huge. In fact, the amount of money sent in remittances is greater than the sum of all investments made by foreign companies in developing countries combined, and it is more than tripled the amount of aid that governments provide those. Countries. So when the coronavirus pandemic took hold on economies went into lockdown, no one was surprised when the World Bank predicted a twenty percent drop in remittances for this year, the lines after woman massive layoffs particularly in the US has the largest number of migrants and the World Bank warned of dire consequences for some developing economies that rely heavily on the cash that those workers send back home but nearly eight months in that correction has not happened remittances. This year have been steady, and in some cases, they have actually risen remittances to Mexico for example, jumped nine point four percent in the first eight months of the year it is. A mystery. Mystery, we love mysteries at the indicator. So. The break hired is that remittances are flying high even luke global growth circling the drain Hattie Hirsch cracks the case with a little help. Support for this podcast and the following message come from each trade you want to invest your money, but there's one problem you're not sure where to begin. Luckily, there's e-trade who offers more than just trading each rates simplifies investing without the financial jargon and has the people to offer guidance and support to make your money work hard for you. For more information visit each trae dot com slash NPR, e-trade securities see member Finra SIPC. Laura Karen is a specialist in development economics and a consultant at the World Bank. She's also reading for Doctor Economics at Columbia University. Welcome Laura. Thank you so much for having me a pleasure and I should say that I came across your research in a story and one of my favorite daily emails the conversation and you cited this staggering number in twenty nineteen migrants sent a record five, hundred, fifty, four, billion dollars back to their countries of origin, and that's up twenty percent in three years compared to two, thousand sixteen. So what's behind that jump? There's a couple of factors that are behind that. So one of them is in the last few years, we've seen healthy growth in popular destination countries. So part of it can be attributed to growth in the United States and also increasing flows coming from the Gulf Cooperation, Council countries and from Russia as well. So what you're saying is that because these economies are doing very well or happened how did you very well? During that periods, it means that there's more money being paid to these migrant workers, more migrant workers earning money, which means they're able to send more money home exactly and another big push that's causing this increase in remittances and I'm speculating a little bit here but let me draw from some of my other research, which is highlighted the boom in the use of mobile money and online or digital finance providers. So it's getting easier and easier to. Send money home digitally in one of the reasons for this is the penetration of smartphones right about that exactly right smartphones or even you know feature phones are getting more and more common around the world and our unlocking these digital and online finance solutions which are making it cheaper and easier than ever before to send money across countries and back home to migrant worker families. How would families have done that I would migrant workers have got that money? Back in the past then before we had digital technology, there's a lot of different ways traditional wire transfers but as well informal channels. So for example, a migrant worker might take cash home when they visit home for a holiday or to see their family and those are really hard to measure. So it's not until recently that we've gotten a good idea of how big these floods really are as some of these things are starting to come to light. So it it it may be. That's. The data is just skewed by the fact that there wasn't so much transparency in the past because of the informality of these transfers whereas now there's much more transparency because it's so digital and therefore easy to track. It's still something that is notoriously difficult to measure, but it's getting easier and easier as things move into the digital world. So, fast forward to earlier this year the global reaction to the spread of, Covid, nineteen, we had lockdown social distancing layoffs, plummeting growth numbers, bankruptcies, more layoffs, massive declines in household income from many workers, and yet remittances stay steady and in some cases even rise I mean, that's kind of mystery. How is that? Right? So the first reason is that migrant workers are often essential workers in their destination countries. So they're not necessarily losing their jobs as much as we might expect, and in some countries like in France in Spain and Germany qualified migrants who were not allowed to work in certain. Sectors before especially essential sectors like doctors or nurses are now being allowed to work in those sectors as part of the pandemic response use mentioned in the story that altruism on behalf of my coworkers might have something to do with this. Can you talk a bit about that? So a lot of migration research in the past has pointed out that one of the main reasons migrants move to another country to work is in search of better opportunities for themselves but also for their families and to be able to provide for their families and it's been established in the kind of migration literature that. Remittances tend to rise when things are bad at home. So you would expect remittances to fall when things go badly but instead they rise and that really gets to the heart of what migration is about. It's about providing for their families as best as possible even though they're struggling in their destination, countries are presumed that. The government stimulus right where people got in some cases more money than they would otherwise earns ripe especially in the United States with the unemployment benefit supplements I'm assuming that that stimulus would have had some effect on this. Is that correct? Exactly. So some migrants have been benefiting from these government stimulus for one example in California even. Migrants were allowed to receive stimulus checks and some researchers have linked to an increase in remittances especially to their families in. Mexico. So this extra stimulus spending is also being translated back home

United States World Bank Mexico Laura Karen Hattie Hirsch California E-Trade NPR Doctor Economics Consultant Columbia University France Russia Council Gulf Cooperation Germany Spain
"Clunky" in the COVID Era: How Podcasts Are Persevering Through the Pandemic

Audioburst Creators

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"Clunky" in the COVID Era: How Podcasts Are Persevering Through the Pandemic

"Are the challenges that? You've seen with podcast production during the pandemic. All of us had do step change we're all. This is. My Office now that my crew in my house. And we realized we couldn't go out and in fact we admit production. And at one point I had to drive down to the present house. I. Live in North London in. South. West London. And I had to leave disinfected because we were in the early days the pandemic disinfected tape. Recorder. With Mike and Headphones outside his house he went into his house. He got the script I. Sat in my car listening to Him Right At. What he recorded this on zoom recorder I then got tape. He left put the tape recorder outside his house gate I picked it up and took it home to the sound card. Now, that was in the very early days because. You know we would have gone studio we would have gone somewhere. Instructed him on how to pad his his office pillows and whatever and towels. So we've moved on from there, and now of course, we location stuff is really harder range. But we in fact the set but I'm talking to you on today's et Cetera. We often have we we tried all sorts of things out so What I have here. Is the. Recorder I have two sets of headphones? One is linked to my computer. One is linked to the zoom recorder because if you leave on the speakers on the computer cuts in. And what we do is I have a stack of smaller versions of this recorder which about eighty quit each that I post out people and sometimes they post on but also that's quite. We also found that using mobile phones and we have an APP. Download we information sheet and they can sit there do this while talking to them about phones. So we become very adaptable in that way we found other people have other things they use. Zen Castor oil or clean feed we try them out and we decided to this method, which is slightly more clunky offers the best. Option and you know it's It would be much easier in certain respects. A nicer to sit opposite someone and go out with them, and if I've got a report a currently I've just bought a boom. So she can work with a presenter and guests outside it's the first time again record outside. And along with recording instructions and what she needs to do. I, have to give her you know his his the rules you need to observe kind of social distancing. It's all possible. It's a bit more clunky. But we can do it. We have done it. And I think that is one of the marvels about. Thank. Thank goodness for the Internet digital technology because if we have been confronted by the situation. Fifteen years ago I think that. My business would have completed ground to a halt had been very hard to continue it and. A little bit of innovation and broadband has made all this stuff. Possible.

Mike West London North London
What's the Most Expensive Book in the World?

BrainStuff

03:51 min | 2 years ago

What's the Most Expensive Book in the World?

"These days with printing and digital technologies being. What they are books can be very affordable. But when you get into collector territory prices can be astounding. Today's question is what is the most expensive book in the World Abraham Stuff? It's me person Sagar. Sometimes I like to imagine that long after I'm dead. A wealthy philanthropist is going to buy my diary for millions of dollars in lend it to museums across the planet. Then everyone would finally know the answer to today's question. What is the most expensive book in the world? Something by William Shakespeare the Neck Renamo con twilight new moon. Well it all depends on if the book is printed or if it's handwritten if we're talking books that have had multiple copies printed and the answer is the Bay Psalm. Book which sold for more than fourteen million dollars in November of two thousand thirteen it was originally printed by Puritans in Cambridge Massachusetts in sixteen forty seeking religious freedom. These settlers wanted their own translation of the Old Testament. Today there are only eleven copies remaining and it is considered the first book printed in America but if we include one of a kind handwritten texts than the Bay Psalm. Book isn't even worth half the value of the most expensive book ever sold. That title goes to Leonardo DAVINCI'S CODEX Leicester which sold for thirty point. Eight million dollars in nineteen ninety four to a little known computer programmer by the name of Bill Gates. Adjust that amount for inflation and today the Codex is almost worth fifty million dollars. In fact. That's forty nine million. Five Hundred Twenty eight thousand five hundred. Sixty one dollars and forty cents. If you WANNA be technical it's an unbound seventy two page notebook filled with Davinci's drawings and thoughts mainly about how to move water yet. The most expensive book in the world is basically a plumbing manual more on that in a minute. A lot of DAVINCI's writing was lost to history. Almost half of it. In fact so the Codex. Leicester is mainly important because it's a single collection of his focused ideas. The Codex is written like many of Davinci's works in something called mirror hand. All the letters are reversed and it's written from right to left so the only way you can read it when it's held up to a mirror and you probably need a fluency in antiquated Italian as well. So it's a book about water that's written backwards to be fair. That's oversimplifying things a bit. It's primarily about how astronomy and geology relate to water. Considering the functionality of tides eddies and dams really Davinci was trying to figure out how to harness the power of moving water he demonstrates how pressure increases with theft in a fluid and the Codex examines configurations of siphons and differently shaped pipes. He's particularly interested in the fluid mechanics of how water moves around obstacles. This manuscript was first purchased in seventeen. Seventeen by a guy named Thomas Coke who later became the earl of Leicester Hence the title Codex Leicester But in one thousand nine hundred eighty an art collector named Armand Hammer bought it changing. Its name to the more bad ass Codex Hammer. This only lasted fourteen years. Though intil gates bought it and changed back then he made it into a screensaver for windows. Ninety five actually gate seems genuinely inspired by Davinci's example of pushing themselves to find more knowledge. He's even loaned the book to a number of museums years so it be viewed and studied by the public. So that's the most expensive book

Leonardo Davinci Leicester Armand Hammer Sagar Bill Gates Cambridge Massachusetts William Shakespeare America Thomas Coke Theft