35 Burst results for "Digital Technology"

The Digital Revolution Has Only Just Begun

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

01:29 min | 3 weeks ago

The Digital Revolution Has Only Just Begun

"So. John way back at the start of the pandemic when i was asking people about how this might change aerospace. You were the first person to boldly predict the to me that this is probably going to speed up. The digitalization of the industry accenture does the tech vision report every year. And to be honest with you often focuses on trends that are coming but this year's report felt just really different to me because of how much of the digital change that occurred. Can you take a step back for a moment and talk to me about the rise of digital transformation during the recent crisis. I mean were you surprised by just how much change happened. And how important digital became michael. It is true the pandemic acted as a catalyst for many companies around the digital agenda's. And no. I'm not surprised as i told you when this was starting. I could see it happening almost immediately when when. Kobe was impacting companies. What we saw was increased attention on move to cloud which is the foundation for so much of the valley to gain from digital transformation and then a range of other digital technologies a in l. a. r. vr digital twin thread data analytics. You know even an upgrade to platforms for supply chain manufacturing in the commercial segment those companies. Who have used seven three seven code to invest in digital are poised to outside rewards as the rates. Start coming back

John Kobe Michael
Covid & Digital Transformation: Too Much, Too Soon?

Technology Untangled

02:07 min | Last month

Covid & Digital Transformation: Too Much, Too Soon?

"Distort transmission is the conscious integration of digital technology into all areas of a business and buzzwords aside. Most organizations have been talking about it for ages. We've gone digital transformation strategies and chief digital officers coming out of our as bump the stats. Say that seventy percent of all digital transformation initiatives fail to find out why i could dave strong u. k. pre sales director for h. p. e. the three areas. That really caused this to happen. One is around complexity to many organizations. Take on too much. They tried to bring together thought him any digital technologies to try and deliver society. Come the end up. Filing then this the couch apiece and the whole point around the digital ambition is to do it quickly is to take a business problem translate a business problem and executes it with technology that can really make a difference organization. Two three four year programs that too long. You missed the boat if you're trying to compete against monza as a retail bank and taking three full years to get to where they were three years ago he kind of lost your business. You know that culture piece of being able to deliver things in bite size. Incremental trunks isn't organization is very alien to established businesses. you look at some banks being around fatigue. Three hundred years right imagine that trading history and the processes that they've built up that time. It's very cumbersome netflix. It is being cumbersome the it processes being cumbersome so it has really made it extremely difficult and then the final based fatigue and we guys right back to taking too long to do things. But you're relying on a very small skills pool around dishes so we know that it's recognized. Uk level the digital skills are in great demand but it's not enough of them and focusing all of that delivery and change on a very small pool of people that overwhelmed overworked and therefore the in fatigue. And that's why you see that stat. Seventy percent fail

Dave Netflix UK
1.4 million TB sufferers lost out on treatment during first year of COVID-19

UN News

01:10 min | 2 months ago

1.4 million TB sufferers lost out on treatment during first year of COVID-19

"An estimated one point four million fewer people received care. Forty back uses or tb in two thousand and twenty than usual because of covid. Nineteen the un health agency on monday latest data from the world health organization. Who from more than eighty countries showed a reduction in treatment of twenty one percent in the first year of the pandemic compared with two thousand nineteen. The biggest differences were in indonesia down forty two percent south africa down forty-one percent the philippines thirty seven percent and india twenty five percent the disruption to essential services for people with tb is just one tragic example of the ways. The pandemic is disproportionately affecting some of the world's poorest people who were already at high risk for tb said tedros adhanom ghebreyesus w. h. o. Director general ahead of wealthy. Be day on wednesday. The twenty fourth of march the us agency pointed out that some countries have already taken steps to sidestep the impact of the new corona virus. On the delivery of tb services. Successful policies have included expanding the use of digital technologies such as computer aided diagnosis and chest xrays. Which is particularly beneficial in countries lacking sufficient numbers of trained radiographer

TB World Health Organization UN Indonesia Philippines South Africa India United States
Rodeo Houston 2021 has officially been canceled because of COVID

Houston Matters

01:01 min | 4 months ago

Rodeo Houston 2021 has officially been canceled because of COVID

"Organizers announced the cancellation of the twenty twenty. One houston rodeo. It's the second straight year. The signature houston event has had to shut down due to the pandemic rodeo houston had pushed the event back two months in the hopes of pulling it off in may but ultimately as rodeo ceo chris bowman explained the current health situation had not improved to the degree necessary to host the event no rodeo again due to the pandemic again. Is this good bad or ugly. Natalie arsenault start us off so i think it's bad and sad at the same time. Not because they've shut it down that good because we haven't improved i numbers necessarily and we have new strains out there and things of that nature but i'm just wondering if they're away like the nba is figuring out how to do things virtually of these. Can't we like set up a baby. Lamb ham or something and people can pay and then we can still scholarships and it would be great. I just think we need to find a happy middle ground somewhere using digital technology.

Houston Chris Bowman Natalie Arsenault NBA
Interview With Lisa DeLuca, IBM

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

04:34 min | 6 months ago

Interview With Lisa DeLuca, IBM

"I'd like you to meet lisa. Seacat deluca director of emerging solutions. In a i in a distinguished engineer at ibm if she has a way long title. But i'm not even gonna try to wait through but maybe show tell us. Basically she's innovating ibm's digital technologies but we're gonna find out exactly how she's doing this. Here's the insane part. Lisa holds five hundred patents have been issued and has another two hundred or so patent pending coma. God they even include patents related to electric vehicle charging in tracking the amount of time spent on your mobile phone. I don't know if. I wanna know that information but anyway. She's a proud member of the ibm women. Inventors community act. As i said the most prolific female inventor in ibm history with four children. I don't know we'll be here all day if i read all her credentials. So you'll just read about it. The show notes and we're gonna go on welcome. Greek cactus radio. we saw. thank you for joining us. Thanks for having me it welcome. You're welcome so i'm gonna jump right in. How do you come up with your ideas. Take us a little bit into your thinking process. All great ideas stem from a really good problem right. There's problems all around us. Beer people complaining all the time but the really good problems are the ones that you're hearing consistently especially when it's related or coming from a client need those problems in starting to think. How can i solve this in a way. That nobody else has thought of before removes. They've thought of it a little bit but we can take it a step further. That's where great ideas come from. So is it like you are wrestling with the client problem in you. Come up with another way to do it. Or is it like the proverbial woman who can't find the kind of baby food that she wants for her kids so she decides to try to make it in your kitchen and all of her friends ask for because they like it you know fell because we all definitely both the a little bit of both. I hear you right. It's i definitely have a lot of inventions. That are just my own personal needs as a mom as a human being as a consumer. That's playing with products and then also from my day job right. So you gave me a great introduction. But i oversee our weather business which includes aviation so. There's a lot of problems that are coming up from general business users and what we're doing so it's been really fun to have a little bit of both wow weather climate. Oh my god. There's so much we need. So i bet you are working with noah ash lab ozanich and atmospheric administration of the us government. I am sure our weather businesses somewhere they have the national weather service national weather service sends their data to the weather. Humans we see on tv and get mad out when they're wrong and it's your point about. Climate change is really hard nowadays to predict the weather. And that's one of the things that we're facing as you know you're you've seen so many times during the news just this year. How many hurricanes are coming through. And it's it's definitely been a fun challenge to think through how we can position our solution than our technologies to do better prediction. You know it's interesting Before we move on there's two interviews i did. You might wanna listen to allow. I've interviewed three hundred people's. Nah i think they're cool. They're all inventor. Type created the mentors but two of them are women who just won the macarthur genius award for coming up with cool new ways to measure climate impact. One was a different way to measure sea level rise and the other was scientific way to help leverage culture to change people's behavior so they take better care of their land for climate mitigation but getting to the human behavior part and leveraging culture to do it. She's in micronesia. She's an american. She's on assignment. Micronesia's really it's really great andrea dutton and stacey jupiter. Okay really cool. You just want macarthur. Genius mice search for your finance. So you're an inventor to me you're innovate right. So having defined innovation disruptive there's incremental juba definition. What he work from. Yes so for me. I get most excited about the idea of contributing to a larger society right and so all of our ideas when one person comes up with a great idea it allows all of us as humans to build off of it and come up with the next great thing so for me. It doesn't matter how small it is right. It doesn't all have to be life changing ideas. Small little things can eventually lead to those big

IBM Seacat Deluca Noah Ash Coma National Weather Service Natio Lisa Wrestling Macarthur Genius Award Us Government Andrea Dutton Stacey Jupiter Micronesia
"It could have been worse": GroupM's Brian Wieser explains their US ads forecast report

The Big Story

02:42 min | 6 months ago

"It could have been worse": GroupM's Brian Wieser explains their US ads forecast report

"All right so turning to your Your group project. The group on projections up in summary seems group am expects total media growth down eight point eight percent in twenty twenty two two hundred and fifteen billion it will grow again by eleven point eight percent twenty twenty one and those projections include digital excludes political digital speaking of which will grow by five percent in two thousand twenty next year expected to grow around eighteen percent and by two thousand twenty one digital will be fifty five percent of all advertising by two thousand twenty one so that prediction not as dire as group initially projected in june when you guys anticipated thirteen percent decline It's certainly not as bad as the two thousand and eight recession and as you just said earlier it could be a lot worse so you know why did things start to look was it strictly because of the growth in digital i think first of all that was a great summary of everything but i think that it is it to say that the resilience of businesses small and large and the use of digital technology. Any commerce more generally really helped make this. Your are better than it should have been as if advertising were solely responsible economic signals. Because let's remember that in the. Us is the worst economy since the nineteen thirties and You know part of the issue is that yes. Marketers were able to do things ever benefit from advertising Even if their own businesses were in some cases struggling as case Small businesses But at the same time it's also worth noting that this in the case shaped recovery Was maybe under appreciated. The degree to which Most of us are doing fine in some of us are doing terribly minded impacted advertising. So you know spare thought for your local weekly because if they were dependent on In restaurants in bars for advertising. They're probably in a pretty terrible state but most media owners are not dependent on that cigna. The popular of of the market cutie of the relatively few me are dependent on travel somali Those are the two sectors which have been just just crushed and It may have a disproportionate impact on the economy. But it's not gonna have a disproportionate impact on the advertising economy

United States Cigna
"digital technology" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

03:08 min | 6 months ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Don't help each other out. We just don't support each other. And i would just say that. That's completely false. I mean we need with women in silicon valley once a month. We now do zoom calls. Were all talking about areas that we can help each other personally and professionally rollicking at some is looking for a different job or someone needs to move or we have a role that we get filled. It's like an incredible incredibly strong network. Were all really super supportive of each other again personally professionally and i just deeply value cherish that so it really is fun to watch. It's fun to be a part of. It's fun to coach the new. Cio's new Could find a coach number bit. So it's just been. It's been super personally rewarding to see that explosion. That's wonderful yeah. What great progress. That is I wanted to also ask you as you look to the future. We've talked about a number of trends and number trends that have become central to some of the offering. You you you you've been talking talking about within honeywell. What other trends particularly to you as you look to the future. Well i actually think that biggest one is. I actually think a machine learning really ready for it and i now. That's been out there for while. I know we talk about it and i know we've got some companies have really advanced. They're thinking we have a lot of that built our products but i need e is specifically in running. It you know there's a whole notion of a ox almost best contradictory or you know not the same sentence but when you think about where. Ai is good. It's we have this plethora of data in lots and lots of data that you want to you. Want to extract insights from it so an renamed. Ai artificial intelligence like what does that really mean to actionable. Insights is delay. Because i really think that when you look at operations for example running. It or anything. The has plethora of data any want to extract those things that make a difference slows things. That are actionable those things. Wow i didn't know that server over there is really affecting those applications by. Didn't know we made this one tweak here. It would have a massive effect on the overall experience for our for our employees customers partners. So i think that's becoming very very very real. In fact we're getting ready to launch what we're calling a smart virtual assistant inside the organization that is going to help solve all the demands and requests employees will start with it. I but the reality is going to be able to introduce a am machine learning a smart virtual assisted. That were really enable us to give a different. It'll change the game. And how employees operate within the within honeywell in actually provide those a more efficient and highly value added service. It's really done with a bot or using automation very interesting exciting things to come to say the least shooting worden for joining me today. It's been great seeing you as usual and thank you for the great insights from your current your current position during these most unusual times. It's been a great conversation. It's my pleasure peter. It's great to see you as well. Thank you thanks for tuning in. Please join me on monday. When my guess will be peter while the executive director of mit's scissor..

honeywell peter Cio Ai worden virtual assistant executive director mit
"digital technology" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:09 min | 6 months ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"I thought we would begin our conversation with your role. You the chief digital technology officer at honeywell and talk a bit about that. That's an interesting combination of of areas of responsibility that translates each side of that translates differently in different kinds of organizations and yours is quite a large and complex. One to talk a little bit. If you wouldn't mind about how that translates into your environment. What is your purview. Yes so so. I joined tiny well really because of the mission of the organization. I see iran chairman darius in the management team have a very very aggressive in very exciting digital transformation. We have many almost every function in the organization. So think of your traditional functions. Hr finance legal procurement as well as i'm sorry supply chain as well as our strategic business units all have digital initiatives that they're driving within the organization in the role or. It's it's kind of at the hub of that. We help with the technology we help with. Data in data is so important as we all know is i view jada as the digital currency is the currency of digital transformation to make all this work. You have to make sure that you're extracting data from silos of erp in salesforce and all that in creating it so that it really does create an experience for our customer partners employees. The connects our knowledge about them and gives them this. Frictional seamless experience of how they interact with anyone moving forward. So under the purview. I have on the technology associated with the corporate. It world everything from illegal finance contracts h. Are all the way through the spg technology. The strategic business unit technology as well as making sure that we really do a harmonize. The data across organization in use that data in in building friction lists experience are always offers honors very interesting. And that's that's easier said than done as as large and complex as this organization is can you talk a bit about imprompt some of this predates set as your nine or so months in private. The origins of it may predate your time with the with the company. But can you talk a bit about that process of harmonizing the data. You make a great point that in order to get the full value out of that currency that the currency of digital transformation that you need to make sure that you are governing that appropriately so that you can draw the appropriate insights from that make better decisions and so on talk a little bit about some of the building blocks to get their first thing. Is i think three years ago. They decided to centralize it so the majority incentivized majority of a corporate. It is centralized but simultaneously. The ministry team has done such a great job at creating. i call global design models. So if we're gonna go to a single er he or a single salesforce or it single e commerce and we have to decide what the processes is having a global design model. So the good news is we create these global design models for you know the major major <hes>. Processes in technology across organization in ultimately every strategic business unit will converge on that converge on a global design model. Additionally i'll get a little bit technical magic. Create your customer masters your product masters. You gotta make sure you never materials master so making sure that you have. The data structured in a way that it's holistic and also centralized there were all using inconsistent both data structure as well as the technology so the organizations doesn't amazing job at creating this. We actually have a transformation day once a month. We actually talk about whatever. Projects are inflated. Whenever we're doing so that we can all converge on these <hes>. It s in a streamlined. Consistent standard approach and having said that as you said our business units are very different. We have aerospace oiling. Gas honeywell business technology <hes>. The honeymoon connective rising all had their own nuances. So as you structure design in converge and have standardization <unk>. Eighty percent of it. You have to allow for that. Twenty percent of flexibility that each of the other strategic business units need to run their business.

honeywell iran jada officer chairman
Digital Transformation with Honeywell Chief Digital Technology Officer, Sheila Jordan

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:09 min | 6 months ago

Digital Transformation with Honeywell Chief Digital Technology Officer, Sheila Jordan

"I thought we would begin our conversation with your role. You the chief digital technology officer at honeywell and talk a bit about that. That's an interesting combination of of areas of responsibility that translates each side of that translates differently in different kinds of organizations and yours is quite a large and complex. One to talk a little bit. If you wouldn't mind about how that translates into your environment. What is your purview. Yes so so. I joined tiny well really because of the mission of the organization. I see iran chairman darius in the management team have a very very aggressive in very exciting digital transformation. We have many almost every function in the organization. So think of your traditional functions. Hr finance legal procurement as well as i'm sorry supply chain as well as our strategic business units all have digital initiatives that they're driving within the organization in the role or. It's it's kind of at the hub of that. We help with the technology we help with. Data in data is so important as we all know is i view jada as the digital currency is the currency of digital transformation to make all this work. You have to make sure that you're extracting data from silos of erp in salesforce and all that in creating it so that it really does create an experience for our customer partners employees. The connects our knowledge about them and gives them this. Frictional seamless experience of how they interact with anyone moving forward. So under the purview. I have on the technology associated with the corporate. It world everything from illegal finance contracts h. Are all the way through the spg technology. The strategic business unit technology as well as making sure that we really do a harmonize. The data across organization in use that data in in building friction lists experience are always offers honors very interesting. And that's that's easier said than done as as large and complex as this organization is can you talk a bit about imprompt some of this predates set as your nine or so months in private. The origins of it may predate your time with the with the company. But can you talk a bit about that process of harmonizing the data. You make a great point that in order to get the full value out of that currency that the currency of digital transformation that you need to make sure that you are governing that appropriately so that you can draw the appropriate insights from that make better decisions and so on talk a little bit about some of the building blocks to get their first thing. Is i think three years ago. They decided to centralize it so the majority incentivized majority of a corporate. It is centralized but simultaneously. The ministry team has done such a great job at creating. i call global design models. So if we're gonna go to a single er he or a single salesforce or it single e commerce and we have to decide what the processes is having a global design model. So the good news is we create these global design models for you know the major major Processes in technology across organization in ultimately every strategic business unit will converge on that converge on a global design model. Additionally i'll get a little bit technical magic. Create your customer masters your product masters. You gotta make sure you never materials master so making sure that you have. The data structured in a way that it's holistic and also centralized there were all using inconsistent both data structure as well as the technology so the organizations doesn't amazing job at creating this. We actually have a transformation day once a month. We actually talk about whatever. Projects are inflated. Whenever we're doing so that we can all converge on these It s in a streamlined. Consistent standard approach and having said that as you said our business units are very different. We have aerospace oiling. Gas honeywell business technology The honeymoon connective rising all had their own nuances. So as you structure design in converge and have standardization Eighty percent of it. You have to allow for that. Twenty percent of flexibility that each of the other strategic business units need to run their business.

Honeywell Darius Jada Salesforce Iran
Uber, Lyft and the sharing economy

Future Tense

09:45 min | 7 months ago

Uber, Lyft and the sharing economy

"What used to be referred to as the sharing economy. Let's quickly remind ourselves what sharing actually means if i give you a ride in my car and don't expect anything in return that's sharing if however aguirre rod in my car and you have to pay for the privilege. Well that's cold commerce and that's why when we talk about uber and deliver ruined task. Grab it and even airbnb. These days we now refer to them as gig economy companies. Juliet shore has been researching. Why the sharing ideal ended up as a form of anti regulation capitalism. Her new book is called after the gig. How the sharing economy got hijacked and how to win it back. So the sharing economy launched in the midst of the so-called great recession of two thousand eight nine and it emerged with a series of could've wonderful promises about all the good things it was going to bring an call that the idealist discourse so it promised it was going to give people a whole new way to work without a boss if people independence and flexibility autonomy that it was going to provide income for struggling middle class people and that it was inclusive because it was so easy to join these platforms and it would reduce discrimination and help low income people. It also promised that it was going to create social ties connections. These were what we call appeared appear person to person exchanges. Somebody in their car. Someone who needs a ride someone with a room. Someone who needs a place to stay and that those exchanges would yield truly personal intimate relationships and then finally it claimed that it was going to reduce carbon footprints. Because airbnb would make it. So we didn't have to build hotels and ridesharing would make it so people didn't have to own their own cars anymore so it was a pretty hefty set of claims and sort of idealistic hopes which we heard from ordinary users. And of course from the platforms themselves as well as the many consultants who were touting the benefits of this new way to run an economy. What does it suggest that flexibility is really the only regional virtue of the sharing economy that still touted by the big gig companies today when whenever they come under attack for their methods and actions. Well flexibility is still at least in principle a key part of gig work in the sense that people can choose to go on the app and go off at any time. They can work as many as few hours as they want in practice. What we do find though. Is that for people who are trying to make a full time. Living on these apps they lose almost all the flexibility they lose a great deal of it. Because there's not enough work too many people chasing too little work so they have to pretty much stay on the apps. Whenever there's any work to be had we know that very quickly. The sharing economy co opted by silicon valley venture capitalists. But we're those original ideals. Plausible could have worked. I think some of them weren't some of them weren't so the environmental idea really warrant for much of the sharing economy. That's because the two biggest sectors which are lodging and transportation are both really carbon intensive activities travel and you know both long distance travel and local travel and these sharing platforms made these services available much more cheaply which meant that more people were gonna use them. So more people getting into private cars as a result of ride hailing because there was so much less costly than taxis. Many more people travelling as a result of the fact that airbnb offered cheaper accommodation so environmental claims weren't laws above the social. Claims are a little bit more mixed. We do find people on airbnb if they're staying with someone who's present in the home rather than renting out a whole place. They are making social ties there. Few sharing platforms like blah blah car in europe which is long distance ridesharing where connecting with someone is really relevant but as far as the claims for the labor side of things economic claims. I think they were feasible. Wall if you had a decent business model and you didn't let too many people on the platform but second the companies started out with pretty decent compensation for the workers in the early days people were pretty happy with many of these platforms but over time because the companies weren't making money kept cutting what they were giving to the workers and this was most prevalent in ride help and the bakeries and they weren't making money was they priced the service too low so uber and lift subsidizing the rise by about forty percent. It's the only way they could get such a big market so if they were less greedy. I think the answer to your question is yes. There is a way to do this. That actually takes advantage of the technology is still a reasonable deal for consumers. But isn't you know giving them crazy. Low prices and also is sort of feasible from platform point of view. Your book is called after the gig and the subtitle is how the sharing economy got hijacked. Which is what we've been talking about and how to win it back looking at the how to win it back do see the. The basic model appears structure augmented by digital technology. Do you see that as having potential to expand or to create genuine sharing economy models. I do think that there's tremendous potential here. So there other more out of the box kind of innovative ways that we can think about using this technology and changing the social relations of production basically in ways that would really benefit users and workers in particular so i studied what are called platform cooperatives and these are platforms. They use many of the same technology so they use the matching algorithms. They use the ratings and reputational data. They use the payment systems but instead of being owned by wealthy investors owned by the people who are actually doing the work so i studied an artist's platform of photographers platform that sell stock photography over the web and there are about a thousand artists who are members of this cooperative. They're much much happier when they they used to work for that quote unquote of stock photography. Which is a company named getty images and two longtime industry insiders started. This new company called stocks a united and photographers flocked to it. They're much much happier. They get a much bigger fraction of the sales and they can govern themselves so they have control over what the company does so. I think it's a fantastic model. The reason i have a lot of optimism for it is that the technology obviates a lot of what management does it takes care of the quality control. It does the matching. it does the finance. You know you really don't need much management and you can see that by the fact that many of these companies have very few employees and that means that it's just that much easier for workers actually to own those companies because there's really not so much that management is providing. Can you bring those types of platform co to scale or in trying to grow. Do they risk going down. The path of what we know has happened to some of the big companies. It's an interesting question. Because i think the question of scale is somewhat misunderstood in the gig space many of the areas where you've had rapid growth our in services that are person to person services and are primarily local ride hale and delivery errands and tasks and so forth so these are personal services and people who provide them are locals and they're providing them to local so for those you actually don't want them to get two big. There's no reason that they should all you really need is what we can think of as interoperability in the apps. So let's say. I use a ride hailing app in my city and that's most of the time that's what i'm using it for but occasionally go somewhere else. I wanna be able to open that app and get a ride held. They're all that means. is that those. Local co ops. Have to all be part of a network that platforms where scaling to a large. You know market makes more sense are the online platforms and the accommodations platform. So those make more sense to scale up. We have seen some other kinds of structures at least in nonprofits and so forth not necessarily always a co op structure. But you know something similar where we have some of these platforms that are actually operating more globally and the one i studied stocks is global platform. So yeah they can scale. I think the question is how big do you want them to scale. And i think that really varies by the service. Were talking about

Aguirre Rod Juliet Shore Airbnb Europe Getty
After the Gig: How the Sharing Economy Got Hijacked and How to Win It Back

Future Tense

07:22 min | 7 months ago

After the Gig: How the Sharing Economy Got Hijacked and How to Win It Back

"Juliet shore has been researching. Why the sharing ideal ended up as a form of anti regulation capitalism. Her new book is called after the gig. How the sharing economy got hijacked and how to win it back. So the sharing economy launched in the midst of the so-called great recession of two thousand eight nine and it emerged with a series of could've wonderful promises about all the good things it was going to bring an call that the idealist discourse so it promised it was going to give people a whole new way to work without a boss if people independence and flexibility autonomy that it was going to provide income for struggling middle class people and that it was inclusive because it was so easy to join these platforms and it would reduce discrimination and help low income people. It also promised that it was going to create social ties connections. These were what we call appeared appear person to person exchanges. Somebody in their car. Someone who needs a ride someone with a room. Someone who needs a place to stay and that those exchanges would yield truly personal intimate relationships and then finally it claimed that it was going to reduce carbon footprints. Because airbnb would make it. So we didn't have to build hotels and ridesharing would make it so people didn't have to own their own cars anymore so it was a pretty hefty set of claims and sort of idealistic hopes which we heard from ordinary users. And of course from the platforms themselves as well as the many consultants who were touting the benefits of this new way to run an economy. What does it suggest that flexibility is really the only regional virtue of the sharing economy that still touted by the big gig companies today when whenever they come under attack for their methods and actions. Well flexibility is still at least in principle a key part of gig work in the sense that people can choose to go on the app and go off at any time. They can work as many as few hours as they want in practice. What we do find though. Is that for people who are trying to make a full time. Living on these apps they lose almost all the flexibility they lose a great deal of it. Because there's not enough work too many people chasing too little work so they have to pretty much stay on the apps. Whenever there's any work to be had we know that very quickly. The sharing economy co opted by silicon valley venture capitalists. But we're those original ideals. Plausible could have worked. I think some of them weren't some of them weren't so the environmental idea really warrant for much of the sharing economy. That's because the two biggest sectors which are lodging and transportation are both really carbon intensive activities travel and you know both long distance travel and local travel and these sharing platforms made these services available much more cheaply which meant that more people were gonna use them. So more people getting into private cars as a result of ride hailing because there was so much less costly than taxis. Many more people travelling as a result of the fact that airbnb offered cheaper accommodation so environmental claims weren't laws above the social. Claims are a little bit more mixed. We do find people on airbnb if they're staying with someone who's present in the home rather than renting out a whole place. They are making social ties there. Few sharing platforms like blah blah car in europe which is long distance ridesharing where connecting with someone is really relevant but as far as the claims for the labor side of things economic claims. I think they were feasible. Wall if you had a decent business model and you didn't let too many people on the platform but second the companies started out with pretty decent compensation for the workers in the early days people were pretty happy with many of these platforms but over time because the companies weren't making money kept cutting what they were giving to the workers and this was most prevalent in ride help and the bakeries and they weren't making money was they priced the service too low so uber and lift subsidizing the rise by about forty percent. It's the only way they could get such a big market so if they were less greedy. I think the answer to your question is yes. There is a way to do this. That actually takes advantage of the technology is still a reasonable deal for consumers. But isn't you know giving them crazy. Low prices and also is sort of feasible from platform point of view. Your book is called after the gig and the subtitle is how the sharing economy got hijacked. Which is what we've been talking about and how to win it back looking at the how to win it back do see the. The basic model appears structure augmented by digital technology. Do you see that as having potential to expand or to create genuine sharing economy models. I do think that there's tremendous potential here. So there other more out of the box kind of innovative ways that we can think about using this technology and changing the social relations of production basically in ways that would really benefit users and workers in particular so i studied what are called platform cooperatives and these are platforms. They use many of the same technology so they use the matching algorithms. They use the ratings and reputational data. They use the payment systems but instead of being owned by wealthy investors owned by the people who are actually doing the work so i studied an artist's platform of photographers platform that sell stock photography over the web and there are about a thousand artists who are members of this cooperative. They're much much happier when they they used to work for that quote unquote of stock photography. Which is a company named getty images and two longtime industry insiders started. This new company called stocks a united and photographers flocked to it. They're much much happier. They get a much bigger fraction of the sales and they can govern themselves so they have control over what the company does so. I think it's a fantastic model. The reason i have a lot of optimism for it is that the technology obviates a lot of what management does it takes care of the quality control. It does the matching. it does the finance. You know you really don't need much management and you can see that by the fact that many of these companies have very few employees and that means that it's just that much easier for workers actually to own those companies because there's really not so much that management is providing.

Juliet Shore Airbnb Europe Getty
Customer Experience in the Digital Age

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:53 min | 7 months ago

Customer Experience in the Digital Age

"Talk a little bit about this. This idea of towards an ai. I operating model. Obviously a lot of people are familiar with it's on the minds and lips of so many different executives and certainly especially technology executives. But why this topic and why ranted around the operating model aspect of his as well. yes sure. so it's been clear for a while. Now that many organizations are at somewhat of an inflection point in the realm of digital transformation with here are our clients talking about this amongst their leadership teams and we hear captains of industry like tom. Siebel another recent guests on the podcast characterizing the last twenty years as an era of mass corporate extinction for those companies that failed acknowledged that the shifting digital landscape he says something like fifty two percent of companies in the fortune. Five hundred have fallen off the list since two thousand So at the center that's inflection. Point in the surrounding discussions are a lot of digital technologies The one that we've found to be most prominent is artificial intelligence undoubtedly a trend. We've been monitoring and witnessing for some time now however Leading up to our Digital symposium in july. We noticed the the conversation around a it was a evolving Specifically it was shifting from promising use cases in functions and business units to grander scale transformations so companies. Were rethinking as you said. The entire operating model in the name of ai redefining the seems the structure of the organization to break down data silos and standing up in a lot of cases entire Auctions dedicated to identify piloting and scaling. Those use cases that were most promising Symposium in july we survey about one hundred global cio hypothesis and found that. Two-thirds had already spun up dedicated teams or entire functions to focus on identification pilot than scaling of a i use cases and for those who more yet to do so sixty sixty percents that it was actually on the roadmap so this trend originally coined as shifting to a i i buy. Google was getting legs and we wanted to capture some characteristics of organizations that are effectively navigating the shift. You're very interesting. Talk a bit about the two executives that you you interviewed palo arbor from ten healthcare. Chris gates from all states a a leader in the in the health. Space a leader in the insurance space. Talk a bit of balance. Why them and why their stories were compelling sure. While starting in the aggregate healthcare and insurance or two of the most data heavy industries and generally where there's data there's opportunities to make products and experiences more intelligent and more automated in the case of gala the cio tenant healthcare there there's an ocean of clinical and claims data available from speaking with her in the past i know they're laser focused on synthesizing that data combining it with voice of the customer analytics to help improve the patient experience and enduring the panel. She shares some really interesting nuances on how to pursue without undermining the importance of the the human side of the patient physician interaction and then just recently under the pressures of covid nineteen. She has truly demonstrated her ability to lead in a crisis and spin up new data driven solutions in near real time to help manage these most unusual circumstances and then chris gates Chief technology officer at allstate is representing a company. That is no stranger to doing innovative things with data in the space of insurance The drive wise program for example that monitors driver dilemma tree data and offers rebates to those that exhibit behaviors on the road or the similar but different mile wise program that provides a pay as you go metered billing model for auto insurance both truly examples of creating new business models on the platform data in a i and outside allstate Chris just a truly dynamic leader that brings insights and experience colored by his leadership posts at other formidable companies such as a i g under armor and various business units general electric

AI Siebel Palo Arbor Chris Gates TOM Google Allstate Chris General Electric
Digital anthropology with Genevieve Bell

UX Podcast

07:38 min | 7 months ago

Digital anthropology with Genevieve Bell

"I think i think many of us when when we actually think of technical systems we think of the modern digital technologies but technical systems. They've been around weavers an awful long time they have. And it's nice to get to talk to you. And per james and often when i start conversations not usually podcast but other conversations. I'd stop by actually acknowledging. I am and that's partly a story about an older technical system are today. I'm sitting on the lands of the wall and nambi people. I don't want to pay my respects to the eldest pasta present and to acknowledge that this compensation will be listened to on the lands of traditional owners and traditional elders all over the world. I wanna pay my respects to them to and from a pot of acknowledging the place where you're standing with the place where you're starting is whenever i want to think about technical systems or about build a future all telling stories about the future. I like to imagine that most of those stories didn't come out of nowhere right. They start somewhere with someone. And i'm lucky enough to live these days in a country where humans have been building technical systems. Well first closest forever as we can probably get so. There are technical systems in australia. That died back. Forty sixty thousand years. And i was thousand years. Yeah absolutely humans deliberately creating structures that changed the world in order to create different kinds of experiences. I was lucky enough. Two years ago to go visit one. I in a town called warrener was on the new south wales queensland border. So you're thinking of a map of australia. Go two thirds of the way up mostly to the right and the river system and there's a place where a large riba abandons basically and on that band there are a series of stone. Fish whiz archaeologists argue. About how old they are. But the running argument somewhere between four to forty thousand years old in either instance that makes them some of the oldest human built technical structures in the world and these are deliberate right. They extend columbia in distance. Downriver they are a series of stone u-shaped pens that were built to contain the fishes. The water moves up in flows down that river in the fish. Move up that are filters the fish. Basically in flow of their series of fish fish traps all they built like fishnets. That is the origin story of the one of the ancestors decided to build a stone. Fish nets they will lost photographed in use in the nineteen teens So a system that is thousands if not tens of thousands of years in the making it suggests incredibly on robust understanding of hydrology of fish behavior. These have been carefully tended and curated over seasons and he is in decades and they were not built for the sake of them are. They weren't because someone said got some startling lying around. We should do something with that comes from quite some distance. It's dry stone. If you know anything about that. Kind of technology said dry stone walls familiar. I suspect in your part of the world as mine and they were utilized with complicated social patents about who tended them who will job to the fish but ultimately what they was in the service of doing multiple nations to gather on the banks of that river and trade conduct rituals exchange information a human at scale and so he has this system that says the humans that lived in that place on the stood stone but amsterdam hydrology. They understood the behaviors of fish. And i thought about people and human society. And so whenever i think about technical systems in my now life twenty-first-century like to hold that idea in the back of my head that it is possible to build technical systems. That are not just technologies right. They are systems of knowledge. They are ways of understanding the environment ways of making sense all the end supporting human behavior and that those things don't have to be At all to each other they can actually exist as a system of systems. And so it's kind of this powerful image that sits in the back of my head most is not that system if it lasted that long forty thousand plus years then they have been managing it. I guess you mean they're they're also iterating it. Because the absolutely there's evidence of that system evolving and growing over time expanding and contracting in terms of where the storms will being moved. And of course it's also system that existed through a period of european colonization of australia so when europeans i turned up in that set of river valleys in the eighteen eighteen twenties. They sold the ways. They knew that average won't people had fish there by the time. The townships built there later in that century Europeans took some of the rocks out of the river because they were smooth and well shaped and use them to make the foundations of the towns nearby. Thus both changing the way that system work but also taking some of that knowledge and in some ways inserting it into a whole although structure and in the meantime new concrete ways will put on that river to redirect the water so that it could be used for shipping and that sort of changed those systems. but no. you're absolutely right. That's a period of time. So thirty ten thousand years forty thousand years multiple changes in global environment such that people would have had to have thought differently and continued to write and evolved that system and work out what worked and then they were willing to change and how to go about changing it and i think you know for me. I don't know about you to. I've spent a long time silicon valley and it's been a long time around engineers and the notion of site someone right. Here's the thing that system you'll building. I need to get at least ten thousand years out of it. Forty would be excellent but tanzi bottom is other than stewart brands long now foundation. I can't think of that. Many people who are thinking on a ten thousand horizon for a technical system given given that we've we've done those can achieve those kinds of technical systems of those kind of periods of time on scale given the frustrations with with how many the systems we're dealing with the developing six silicon valley valet or in the digital sphere. That feels frustration. Feels were not building stuff with that kind of sam. Not we're not just diligence but thoughtfulness and consideration for how. It's going to do what it wants to should be doing. In the beginning we do. Also i think we have not necessarily thought about technology inside those other relationships and responsibilities. Right when i sort of may one of the things about these fish traps in war and other systems like them is that they want just about starting right. This is not olympics oriented system. We have a phone system. It's not that right. It was designed with the intention of supporting human activity in known human activity and things that mattered and it was designed into the environment rather than pretending that it didn't exist with a blank slate right so there's a. I'm not sure that we miss the ball. I think it's that we allow ourselves to imagine different starting point and we haven't always thought about technologies that way you look back at multiple points in the history of the west in the history of technologies globally. We've often been willing to imagine. That would different starting points and didn't always start with. Oh have this technology. What will we do with it. It often started with this thing. We should look at how to do better. Or i think being trying to think about having a soul or or attention we need to resolve. And we're going to put technology in the middle to resolve it.

Warrener Australia New South Wales Queensland James Columbia Tanzi Stewart Brands Long Now Founda Amsterdam SAM Olympics
"digital technology" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

04:57 min | 8 months ago

"digital technology" Discussed on The Bio Report

"It's. It's great as I'm sure many people who are listening no to work in life sciences and healthcare. But yeah sometimes. It is frustrating I. Give an example in the patient equation of. A friend of mine sent me a paper about a pandemic paper. And it was about social distancing and about how little we know about what really Are the key predictors of WHO's GONNA suffer versus who isn't a how long? It's GONNA take for us to figure out what the long term effects of the pandemic are on People's health and and it wasn't a paper about covid nineteen paper about Spanish flu that was published in. Science. Magazine one hundred years ago, and when I saw that I was like, wow, we've done all this work on digital infrastructure. We've done all this work on collaboration and data sharing, and we're not dealing with the global pandemic any differently than we did in one eighteen. So stuff like that does frustrate me. But I also think of it. You know I'm the kind of person I have to find a silver linings of. At least, it's a call to action that we need to think about how we would pro more prospectively share data and think about things we don't. Let something like Govinda one, thousand nine happened to the scale of did. This time the next time we're dealing with global pandemic. You also talk about the move to mathematical designs of clinical trials. You're talking about adaptive clinical trials or so-called Beijing. Clinical trials can explain for listeners who are not familiar with those how they work in the benefits of that approach. Yeah. I think the easiest way to think about them. Let's start with the experiment with flipping coins If if we want to figure out the percentage of time that when we flip a coin, it comes up head versus Tales Kinda, the way clinical trials work as we say, well, let's let's take a coin and let's flip it a hundred times. Let's not then that's tally up all those flips and we'll look and see how many times it was heads versus tales that the basin approach which is. Based on this Guy Thomas Bayes statistics hundreds of years ago. He said you know every time you flip a coin and you look at whether it came up heads or tails. You've learned something about the nature of coin flipping, and maybe we don't have to flip it one hundred times to know that it's going to be close enough to fifty fifty. So now think about a clinical trial, right we said before you've got got the patients who are getting the control on the patients were getting a potentially new drug and you wait until you traded all those patients and then you tally up the score..

Govinda Guy Thomas Bayes Beijing
"digital technology" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

02:01 min | 8 months ago

"digital technology" Discussed on The Bio Report

"The best possible health if you have a life threatening condition and you're not taking the right medicine or you're somebody who was immuno-compromised who's getting a cancer therapy and didn't want to or couldn't shouldn't have gone to a Medical Center to get their your chemotherapy treatment is an example obviously, you're moving in the wrong direction you want to be moving towards cure not getting sicker and so. I think if we if we think about the clinical trials. We can start to think about fixing that problem again by making sure that were not dependent on the doctor and the patient being in the same room at the same time for every piece of the heck and scientific exercise, which is going to prove out that the way that we use these therapies. In the broader practices round, the world is actually going to work for people. So again, that's something we think that very differently in the world clinical trials. Today's we virtually connect people, etc.. I. Imagine there's a fair bit of inertia within in the industry. There's a lot at stake and it requires a big investment in time and money to validate new end points and convince regulators. How will linger companies to do this? So, there are certainly as a at stake and there is there's definitely risks. But if you think about the potential rewards, boats for the the companies who are investing in these ideas and for the patients that ultimately serve I think the rewards far outweigh the risks I'll give you very practical example. Let's say you have Multiple clinical trials working on the same cancer. Same rare disease. And in that traditional model, everybody does their own independent scientific experiment. You don't have to be a life scientist to do this. If you've taken high school chemistry, you know you have a control group right. So in clinical trial a, you have the patients who were getting great new drug a and you have the patients who are in control..

Medical Center scientist
"digital technology" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

05:41 min | 8 months ago

"digital technology" Discussed on The Bio Report

"As I said getting very lucky and now I get to look at what's happening in oncology and cardiology rare diseases and Calvin nineteen. Because many data's powering. More than half the research that's going on around the world is happening in that day to continue in one way or another, and so I not only have my dream job and then they get to work and all these different aspects of healthcare. But we really have a very interesting chair if you will by which. To we can spectate the life sciences world academic and industry alike, and so what we see. Are. People starting to take advantage of not just this continue of connectivity. That I was just talking about but what we first started talking about kind of looking at a patient journey. In a much richer way than you might in typical clinical trial to see them you know day Zero Day, thirty on day sixty on day one, hundred twenty but actually start to to connect these patients to clinical trials through APPS through sensors. Not that we're not going to collect all the traditional medical data as well. It's incredibly important. Sometimes you the most important we're trying to cure somebody's cancer. We need to measure their tumor volume and we can't do that with a sensor in home right now. But we can also look at things like their behavior and as a input to the overall view of their health and actually mench book. That's why it's called the patient equation. The equation is how you put all these different inputs in that we're talking about, and actually the output is figuring out what the best therapy is any given patient to give it time like precision medicine. That's that's the that's the product of equation people. We've seen an amazing evolution of technology. One of the things you note though is that by and large, the way clinical trials are conducted. Today hasn't changed significantly in decades. Why is that? So some of it is is for good reason I mean when when you're in a clinical trial for vaccine. Literally billions of people are going to be affected by whether or not the conclusions are correct. So you need to do things in a responsible way scientifically, you need to do things ethically need to do things in a way that will pass the regulatory scrutiny of the appropriate regulatory scrutiny to make sure that safe and effective products are given to the public. So the conservatism doing things differently. That makes sense I think that. There's the. We did a bad job in a pass. There's this this unfortunate. Lack of places where we could break down those barriers between people between silos of data. And it's one of the reasons that it's such an exciting time in life sciences for companies like many data. Four organizations like rare exit dumb. We were talking about before the podcast like people who are in the business of breaking down those barriers. Are Now going to see the ability to really accelerate how the innovation is delivered to patients. It's so good. It's not that we were doing a bad job before it's just that we can work different ways because we're connected differently..

Calvin
"digital technology" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

05:19 min | 8 months ago

"digital technology" Discussed on The Bio Report

". First. . Let me congratulate you on the publication of your new book. . The patient equation. . Thank you like it was pretty exciting to see it in print. . We're GONNA talk about clinical trials, , your company Meta data, , and the opportunities to capture data differently and reshape the way clinical trials are conducted. . We're in this time where virtually everything we do is generating data. . There's a proliferation of new means of capturing data in real time from a healthcare perspective. . What's the opportunity before us to improve health and particularly the diagnosis and treatment of disease So I think that we've and somebody's Kobe nineteen is putting a magnifying glass on top of this but we've we practiced medicine pretty much since its inception by looking at data in very short little staccato timeframes. . So you go to your doctor and you have your blood drawn on that particular day at that particular time <hes>. . You tell somebody how you were feeling that particular day at that particular time or at least try to recall how you were feeling for a period of time. . But certainly wasn't something it was proactively measured. . We we we get our gene sequenced and we find out what what actually happened at the moment of conception in terms of setting up our genetic future. . Yes. . Yes. . In some diseases, , obviously cancers <hes> is a perfect example, , your genes. . Do Mutate individual cells, , but we're we're pretty much dealing with the same genes that we had over all our forty eight, forty, , , eight years ago. . I've got today. . So that is the context of thinking about what ails me, , what is the right treatment for me and it's these little moments in time and I think your point about data Zuri will put its discount streaming around us everywhere, , and whether it's the technology that's in our pocket or on a wrist or. . Maybe things that are biologically more feasible to do not just from my know iphone perspective but can we start to monitor with medical grade sensors overtime or even just expand the dialogue with our doctors? ? So those conversations can happen anytime I think the big difference is that we're gonNA start to see these continuous where we actually see rate of change not just these single moments as part of how we think about diagnosing disease managing disease making sure people are getting the right treatments. . That's a giant paradigm shift. . That again, , we've probably been waiting for literal millennia to have happened but I think we're about to to really live through that scales pretty exciting. . You speak broadly in the book about the potential for data to transform healthcare I wanted to focus on clinical trials specifically. . But before we do that, , perhaps you can explain what metadata solutions does and as a way for listeners to understand your visibility into this world short I actually got extremely lucky in my career. . If you go back twenty five years ago I thought I'd be researching one kind of cancer probably looking at maybe one gene in it. . For the rest of my life and <hes> actually frustrated by the infrastructure that was available to run the research that I was doing. . So how I would connect what we were doing in the laboratory with the records for patients who were volunteering to be in studies that we're working on a how he took that and turn it into something that we could publish from an academic perspective all that was very slow and cumbersome, , and so with a few friends. . Gins. . Now, , twenty five years goes when I was doing research about. . Twenty years ago, , twenty one years ago with friends we started what is now data and it really had the the mission of trying to help us get things from that laboratory stage into the hands of patients who are waiting for them by trying to connect all the people and all that data in a much more seamless way in a way that would allow us to accelerate the biological the medical revolutions that we were trying to power and terms of something that would really generate patient you simply put. . We started connecting everybody over the Internet and we we started by connecting the professional. So . people who were working scientists physicians. . Statisticians that people in the life sciences, , world and medical centers. . Professionals Online. . And this was back in the day when the only thing you could buy on Amazon Dot Com was a book. . So kinda dates us a little bit but really if we can buy a book online, , why can't we run our clinical trials online and and basically that's what we did fast forward twenty years and we realized a of course over the course of time that not only could be connected professionals, , but we could connect the patients, , and now I could we connect the patients who were volunteering to being these research projects, but , we can actually connect the research projects. . To each other as well. . So everywhere there was a time barrier everywhere there was a systems barrier. . We realized we could overcome that and create this kind of. . Continuum, , of data across everybody who had the same mission of getting new therapies into the marketplace, , and that really has resulted instead of me being in the lab. . Looking at one gene one cancer for the rest of my life. . As I said getting very lucky and now I get to look at what's happening

Grun Kobe
Transforming Clinical Trials with Digital Technology

The Bio Report

05:19 min | 8 months ago

Transforming Clinical Trials with Digital Technology

"First. Let me congratulate you on the publication of your new book. The patient equation. Thank you like it was pretty exciting to see it in print. We're GONNA talk about clinical trials, your company Meta data, and the opportunities to capture data differently and reshape the way clinical trials are conducted. We're in this time where virtually everything we do is generating data. There's a proliferation of new means of capturing data in real time from a healthcare perspective. What's the opportunity before us to improve health and particularly the diagnosis and treatment of disease So I think that we've and somebody's Kobe nineteen is putting a magnifying glass on top of this but we've we practiced medicine pretty much since its inception by looking at data in very short little staccato timeframes. So you go to your doctor and you have your blood drawn on that particular day at that particular time You tell somebody how you were feeling that particular day at that particular time or at least try to recall how you were feeling for a period of time. But certainly wasn't something it was proactively measured. We we we get our gene sequenced and we find out what what actually happened at the moment of conception in terms of setting up our genetic future. Yes. Yes. In some diseases, obviously cancers is a perfect example, your genes. Do Mutate individual cells, but we're we're pretty much dealing with the same genes that we had over all our forty eight, forty, eight years ago. I've got today. So that is the context of thinking about what ails me, what is the right treatment for me and it's these little moments in time and I think your point about data Zuri will put its discount streaming around us everywhere, and whether it's the technology that's in our pocket or on a wrist or. Maybe things that are biologically more feasible to do not just from my know iphone perspective but can we start to monitor with medical grade sensors overtime or even just expand the dialogue with our doctors? So those conversations can happen anytime I think the big difference is that we're gonNA start to see these continuous where we actually see rate of change not just these single moments as part of how we think about diagnosing disease managing disease making sure people are getting the right treatments. That's a giant paradigm shift. That again, we've probably been waiting for literal millennia to have happened but I think we're about to to really live through that scales pretty exciting. You speak broadly in the book about the potential for data to transform healthcare I wanted to focus on clinical trials specifically. But before we do that, perhaps you can explain what metadata solutions does and as a way for listeners to understand your visibility into this world short I actually got extremely lucky in my career. If you go back twenty five years ago I thought I'd be researching one kind of cancer probably looking at maybe one gene in it. For the rest of my life and actually frustrated by the infrastructure that was available to run the research that I was doing. So how I would connect what we were doing in the laboratory with the records for patients who were volunteering to be in studies that we're working on a how he took that and turn it into something that we could publish from an academic perspective all that was very slow and cumbersome, and so with a few friends. Gins. Now, twenty five years goes when I was doing research about. Twenty years ago, twenty one years ago with friends we started what is now data and it really had the the mission of trying to help us get things from that laboratory stage into the hands of patients who are waiting for them by trying to connect all the people and all that data in a much more seamless way in a way that would allow us to accelerate the biological the medical revolutions that we were trying to power and terms of something that would really generate patient you simply put. We started connecting everybody over the Internet and we we started by connecting the professional. So people who were working scientists physicians. Statisticians that people in the life sciences, world and medical centers. Professionals Online. And this was back in the day when the only thing you could buy on Amazon Dot Com was a book. So kinda dates us a little bit but really if we can buy a book online, why can't we run our clinical trials online and and basically that's what we did fast forward twenty years and we realized a of course over the course of time that not only could be connected professionals, but we could connect the patients, and now I could we connect the patients who were volunteering to being these research projects, but we can actually connect the research projects. To each other as well. So everywhere there was a time barrier everywhere there was a systems barrier. We realized we could overcome that and create this kind of. Continuum, of data across everybody who had the same mission of getting new therapies into the marketplace, and that really has resulted instead of me being in the lab. Looking at one gene one cancer for the rest of my life. As I said getting very lucky and now I get to look at what's happening

Kobe
"digital technology" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

05:32 min | 8 months ago

"digital technology" Discussed on The Bio Report

"Capture new types of data to better answer questions about the safety and efficacy of therapies. Grun thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. Daddy. Delighted to be here. First. Let me congratulate you on the publication of your new book. The patient equation. Thank you like it was pretty exciting to see it in print. We're GONNA talk about clinical trials, your company Meta data, and the opportunities to capture data differently and reshape the way clinical trials are conducted. We're in this time where virtually everything we do is generating data. There's a proliferation of new means of capturing data in real time from a healthcare perspective. What's the opportunity before us to improve health and particularly the diagnosis and treatment of disease So I think that we've and somebody's Kobe nineteen is putting a magnifying glass on top of this but we've we practiced medicine pretty much since its inception by looking at data in very short little staccato timeframes. So you go to your doctor and you have your blood drawn on that particular day at that particular time You tell somebody how you were feeling that particular day at that particular time or at least try to recall how you were feeling for a period of time. But certainly wasn't something it was proactively measured. We we we get our gene sequenced and we find out what what actually happened at the moment of conception in terms of setting up our genetic future. Yes. Yes. In some diseases, obviously cancers is a perfect example, your genes. Do Mutate individual cells, but we're we're pretty much dealing with the same genes that we had over all our forty eight, forty, eight years ago. I've got today. So that is the context of thinking about what ails me, what is the right treatment for me and it's these little moments in time and I think your point about data Zuri will put its discount streaming around us everywhere, and whether it's the technology that's in our pocket or on a wrist or. Maybe things that are biologically more feasible to do not just from my know iphone perspective but can we start to monitor with medical grade sensors overtime or even just expand the dialogue with our doctors? So those conversations can happen anytime I think the big difference is that we're gonNA start to see these continuous where we actually see rate of change not just these single moments as part of how we think about diagnosing disease managing disease making sure people are getting the right treatments. That's a giant paradigm shift..

Grun Kobe
The Great Remittance Mystery

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:55 min | 8 months ago

The Great Remittance Mystery

"Remittances the money that migrants people living and working abroad sent to their countries of origin, and there are as many as two hundred and seventy million people around the world in that situation, sending money to their families because of that remittances have become a vital source of financing for many developing countries the sums of money are huge. In fact, the amount of money sent in remittances is greater than the sum of all investments made by foreign companies in developing countries combined, and it is more than tripled the amount of aid that governments provide those. Countries. So when the coronavirus pandemic took hold on economies went into lockdown, no one was surprised when the World Bank predicted a twenty percent drop in remittances for this year, the lines after woman massive layoffs particularly in the US has the largest number of migrants and the World Bank warned of dire consequences for some developing economies that rely heavily on the cash that those workers send back home but nearly eight months in that correction has not happened remittances. This year have been steady, and in some cases, they have actually risen remittances to Mexico for example, jumped nine point four percent in the first eight months of the year it is. A mystery. Mystery, we love mysteries at the indicator. So. The break hired is that remittances are flying high even luke global growth circling the drain Hattie Hirsch cracks the case with a little help. Support for this podcast and the following message come from each trade you want to invest your money, but there's one problem you're not sure where to begin. Luckily, there's e-trade who offers more than just trading each rates simplifies investing without the financial jargon and has the people to offer guidance and support to make your money work hard for you. For more information visit each trae dot com slash NPR, e-trade securities see member Finra SIPC. Laura Karen is a specialist in development economics and a consultant at the World Bank. She's also reading for Doctor Economics at Columbia University. Welcome Laura. Thank you so much for having me a pleasure and I should say that I came across your research in a story and one of my favorite daily emails the conversation and you cited this staggering number in twenty nineteen migrants sent a record five, hundred, fifty, four, billion dollars back to their countries of origin, and that's up twenty percent in three years compared to two, thousand sixteen. So what's behind that jump? There's a couple of factors that are behind that. So one of them is in the last few years, we've seen healthy growth in popular destination countries. So part of it can be attributed to growth in the United States and also increasing flows coming from the Gulf Cooperation, Council countries and from Russia as well. So what you're saying is that because these economies are doing very well or happened how did you very well? During that periods, it means that there's more money being paid to these migrant workers, more migrant workers earning money, which means they're able to send more money home exactly and another big push that's causing this increase in remittances and I'm speculating a little bit here but let me draw from some of my other research, which is highlighted the boom in the use of mobile money and online or digital finance providers. So it's getting easier and easier to. Send money home digitally in one of the reasons for this is the penetration of smartphones right about that exactly right smartphones or even you know feature phones are getting more and more common around the world and our unlocking these digital and online finance solutions which are making it cheaper and easier than ever before to send money across countries and back home to migrant worker families. How would families have done that I would migrant workers have got that money? Back in the past then before we had digital technology, there's a lot of different ways traditional wire transfers but as well informal channels. So for example, a migrant worker might take cash home when they visit home for a holiday or to see their family and those are really hard to measure. So it's not until recently that we've gotten a good idea of how big these floods really are as some of these things are starting to come to light. So it it it may be. That's. The data is just skewed by the fact that there wasn't so much transparency in the past because of the informality of these transfers whereas now there's much more transparency because it's so digital and therefore easy to track. It's still something that is notoriously difficult to measure, but it's getting easier and easier as things move into the digital world. So, fast forward to earlier this year the global reaction to the spread of, Covid, nineteen, we had lockdown social distancing layoffs, plummeting growth numbers, bankruptcies, more layoffs, massive declines in household income from many workers, and yet remittances stay steady and in some cases even rise I mean, that's kind of mystery. How is that? Right? So the first reason is that migrant workers are often essential workers in their destination countries. So they're not necessarily losing their jobs as much as we might expect, and in some countries like in France in Spain and Germany qualified migrants who were not allowed to work in certain. Sectors before especially essential sectors like doctors or nurses are now being allowed to work in those sectors as part of the pandemic response use mentioned in the story that altruism on behalf of my coworkers might have something to do with this. Can you talk a bit about that? So a lot of migration research in the past has pointed out that one of the main reasons migrants move to another country to work is in search of better opportunities for themselves but also for their families and to be able to provide for their families and it's been established in the kind of migration literature that. Remittances tend to rise when things are bad at home. So you would expect remittances to fall when things go badly but instead they rise and that really gets to the heart of what migration is about. It's about providing for their families as best as possible even though they're struggling in their destination, countries are presumed that. The government stimulus right where people got in some cases more money than they would otherwise earns ripe especially in the United States with the unemployment benefit supplements I'm assuming that that stimulus would have had some effect on this. Is that correct? Exactly. So some migrants have been benefiting from these government stimulus for one example in California even. Migrants were allowed to receive stimulus checks and some researchers have linked to an increase in remittances especially to their families in. Mexico. So this extra stimulus spending is also being translated back home

United States World Bank Mexico Laura Karen Hattie Hirsch California E-Trade NPR Doctor Economics Consultant Columbia University France Russia Council Gulf Cooperation Germany Spain
"Clunky" in the COVID Era: How Podcasts Are Persevering Through the Pandemic

Audioburst Creators

03:15 min | 8 months ago

"Clunky" in the COVID Era: How Podcasts Are Persevering Through the Pandemic

"Are the challenges that? You've seen with podcast production during the pandemic. All of us had do step change we're all. This is. My Office now that my crew in my house. And we realized we couldn't go out and in fact we admit production. And at one point I had to drive down to the present house. I. Live in North London in. South. West London. And I had to leave disinfected because we were in the early days the pandemic disinfected tape. Recorder. With Mike and Headphones outside his house he went into his house. He got the script I. Sat in my car listening to Him Right At. What he recorded this on zoom recorder I then got tape. He left put the tape recorder outside his house gate I picked it up and took it home to the sound card. Now, that was in the very early days because. You know we would have gone studio we would have gone somewhere. Instructed him on how to pad his his office pillows and whatever and towels. So we've moved on from there, and now of course, we location stuff is really harder range. But we in fact the set but I'm talking to you on today's et Cetera. We often have we we tried all sorts of things out so What I have here. Is the. Recorder I have two sets of headphones? One is linked to my computer. One is linked to the zoom recorder because if you leave on the speakers on the computer cuts in. And what we do is I have a stack of smaller versions of this recorder which about eighty quit each that I post out people and sometimes they post on but also that's quite. We also found that using mobile phones and we have an APP. Download we information sheet and they can sit there do this while talking to them about phones. So we become very adaptable in that way we found other people have other things they use. Zen Castor oil or clean feed we try them out and we decided to this method, which is slightly more clunky offers the best. Option and you know it's It would be much easier in certain respects. A nicer to sit opposite someone and go out with them, and if I've got a report a currently I've just bought a boom. So she can work with a presenter and guests outside it's the first time again record outside. And along with recording instructions and what she needs to do. I, have to give her you know his his the rules you need to observe kind of social distancing. It's all possible. It's a bit more clunky. But we can do it. We have done it. And I think that is one of the marvels about. Thank. Thank goodness for the Internet digital technology because if we have been confronted by the situation. Fifteen years ago I think that. My business would have completed ground to a halt had been very hard to continue it and. A little bit of innovation and broadband has made all this stuff. Possible.

Mike West London North London
What's the Most Expensive Book in the World?

BrainStuff

03:51 min | 1 year ago

What's the Most Expensive Book in the World?

"These days with printing and digital technologies being. What they are books can be very affordable. But when you get into collector territory prices can be astounding. Today's question is what is the most expensive book in the World Abraham Stuff? It's me person Sagar. Sometimes I like to imagine that long after I'm dead. A wealthy philanthropist is going to buy my diary for millions of dollars in lend it to museums across the planet. Then everyone would finally know the answer to today's question. What is the most expensive book in the world? Something by William Shakespeare the Neck Renamo con twilight new moon. Well it all depends on if the book is printed or if it's handwritten if we're talking books that have had multiple copies printed and the answer is the Bay Psalm. Book which sold for more than fourteen million dollars in November of two thousand thirteen it was originally printed by Puritans in Cambridge Massachusetts in sixteen forty seeking religious freedom. These settlers wanted their own translation of the Old Testament. Today there are only eleven copies remaining and it is considered the first book printed in America but if we include one of a kind handwritten texts than the Bay Psalm. Book isn't even worth half the value of the most expensive book ever sold. That title goes to Leonardo DAVINCI'S CODEX Leicester which sold for thirty point. Eight million dollars in nineteen ninety four to a little known computer programmer by the name of Bill Gates. Adjust that amount for inflation and today the Codex is almost worth fifty million dollars. In fact. That's forty nine million. Five Hundred Twenty eight thousand five hundred. Sixty one dollars and forty cents. If you WANNA be technical it's an unbound seventy two page notebook filled with Davinci's drawings and thoughts mainly about how to move water yet. The most expensive book in the world is basically a plumbing manual more on that in a minute. A lot of DAVINCI's writing was lost to history. Almost half of it. In fact so the Codex. Leicester is mainly important because it's a single collection of his focused ideas. The Codex is written like many of Davinci's works in something called mirror hand. All the letters are reversed and it's written from right to left so the only way you can read it when it's held up to a mirror and you probably need a fluency in antiquated Italian as well. So it's a book about water that's written backwards to be fair. That's oversimplifying things a bit. It's primarily about how astronomy and geology relate to water. Considering the functionality of tides eddies and dams really Davinci was trying to figure out how to harness the power of moving water he demonstrates how pressure increases with theft in a fluid and the Codex examines configurations of siphons and differently shaped pipes. He's particularly interested in the fluid mechanics of how water moves around obstacles. This manuscript was first purchased in seventeen. Seventeen by a guy named Thomas Coke who later became the earl of Leicester Hence the title Codex Leicester But in one thousand nine hundred eighty an art collector named Armand Hammer bought it changing. Its name to the more bad ass Codex Hammer. This only lasted fourteen years. Though intil gates bought it and changed back then he made it into a screensaver for windows. Ninety five actually gate seems genuinely inspired by Davinci's example of pushing themselves to find more knowledge. He's even loaned the book to a number of museums years so it be viewed and studied by the public. So that's the most expensive book

Leonardo Davinci Leicester Armand Hammer Sagar Bill Gates Cambridge Massachusetts William Shakespeare America Thomas Coke Theft
R/x for Healthcare: Better UX Through Measurement and Deeper Engagement with Jay Erickson, Chief Innovation Officer at Modus

Outcomes Rocket

06:44 min | 1 year ago

R/x for Healthcare: Better UX Through Measurement and Deeper Engagement with Jay Erickson, Chief Innovation Officer at Modus

"Just got back from Argentina year over there Yeah that's right. We have an office down there and I was doing some work down there and Yet we just moved back last week. Interesting time to move back of course to be traveling around but love Argentina. Wow well welcome back to the States. And you are also very focused on the digital aspects within healthcare so tell us what inspires your work in the healthcare vertical In the core of my inspiration is a very personal so seven years ago. I was diagnosed with advanced metastatic to sicker cancer. I spent about a year and treatment at Sloan. Kettering forty five days in patient. Three months of Chemo for big surgery. So I was sort of a professional patient for a year and I learned law things. I'm six years. No evidence of disease now so I feel very much. Thank you thank you and as you can imagine I learned a lot of things and a lot of different levels but one thing I I learned in observed in that role was just in my opinion. How poorly a digital was being deployed in space for patients and for clinicians and this is not a knock on Sloan. They're amazing they saved my life. But it's something that's across the industry. As as soon as I came back and so before that I was the chief operating officer is really just focusing on running the business and when I came back I said this is something I really want to dive back into. Working more directly with clients focusing on as a problem to be solved doing what I can to put my shoulder to the wheel of making better more effective experiences for patients and for clinician. So that's my My touchstone of the passion that I bring to it. Well I think it's A powerful story Jay and I appreciate sharing that and congratulate you for for beating cancer and so great that you have taken this upon yourself. Having been there done that as a patient better and more efficient are two things that we could definitely get from from digital technologies. Tell us a little bit more about how you guys are. Adding value to the ecosystem through digital so our focus is really on creating experiences that are engaging in effective and this mostly for patients but also for clinicians and sometimes caregivers and bringing best practices to the industry that hasn't really been woven into the to the way that the digital products have been built outside. The industry and healthcare has has been data centric and rightfully so right. The legislation was passed. You know twenty plus years ago saying you need to get everything into the data and and that's been journey and now that we have all the data in we're starting to figure out ways to unlock the data and share the data and do more with the data. We need to stop being so data centric and start being more human centric and understanding that people are complex and their situations are often very unique and we need to build experiences that meet them where they are and make things easy for them and drives towards the outcomes that we want for them. So that's a long answer and I can be unpacked. Non Thought of different ways but how we sort of more tactically are coming into his kind of doing really running more design thinking processes That haven't been lacking so picking up on sort of clinical insight or a market research research site in farm industry for instance and building on that doing ethnographic research actually talking to patients in really understanding their sort of holistic view. Their Longitudinal journey that might touch a bunch of different things. A bunch of different providers a bunch of different mediums a bunch of different co morbidity or products understanding those longitudinal journeys doing rapid prototyping and. Co Design and collaboration ways. And then putting those back for early prototype validation before anything gets actually develop so that process of design thinking is something that has been lacking in the industry and has led to a lot of digital experiences that are either painful or hard to navigate or create unnecessary cognitive. Load especially in the case of clinicians. It's interesting you know. And I'm glad you mentioned clinicians as well because bad experience exists on on the patient side and on the clinician side. As well and to your point there's a lot that's going on that's great but there's an opportunity to do so much better and saw I'd love to hear from. Uja On on what your team has done. That's made either outcomes better or business models better within healthcare. Yeah so I think it's. It's applying that process that I described by lake. You know it's all in. The end is about outcomes right so you really are trying to make better Clinton experiences. They can spend more time to medicine less time on data entry or so. They're less burnt out. Say let's make less mistakes and in the patient case you're trying to keep them engaged. You're trying to get data to flow and to have the outcome of their experience in their disease journey or or or health journey. Have a better outcome. So it's not just about great experiences to create great experiences. I WanNa make that clear to but specifically applying those cases. I mean. We've done everything from working with. Pharmaceutical companies to develop a digital prototypes around using stress managed using behavioral change techniques around social support for stress management or behavioral scientists at pharmaceutical companies or working with healthcare providers to provide better pathways for patients to navigate their journeys. So it's a lot of simple stuff and it can be starting with schedule. An appointment and navigating to the in helping with with with transport access to the site of care. Just that doesn't require blockchain or a I or anything fancy but doing that in a way that is easy in as easy as Uber or another experience that we're used to in our normal life bringing that level of ease and utility to those experience that's table stakes right and then it's going from. They're moving more into actual medicine side of things and we do a lot of stuff around adherence and getting people know we know that that forty percent of outcomes is driven by behavior. And there's really nothing better at a scalable in evaluating level to help with behavior change them and digital devices mean there's a there's a shadow side to that too also right. Mike. We're all addicted to these things. But that same power can be used to drive behavior change whether it's adherence to medication or physical therapy or just a care plan so creating experiences for patients that help them with that. So that's we start to get into the closer to the medical side of things so that's some of the ways that we are bringing our skills that we've owned also in other industries like you've working in hospitality and retail and e commerce and all these other industries that have more are more mature digitally especially from human centric perspective bringing all those practices and tools to the space

Sloan Argentina Chemo Chief Operating Officer Kettering JAY Co Design Mike Clinton
The Digital Transformation Journey: Challenges & Considerations

CCC Talks

01:52 min | 1 year ago

The Digital Transformation Journey: Challenges & Considerations

"Name is Ken. Wilson I've been in it for over twenty years and really cut my teeth and the client server world. So I've been around quite a long time since really the late nineties and I've been working at hospitality technology for really over fifteen years with a particular focus on systems over the last several years. I've really been helping Amadeus hospitality sunset. A lot of the legacy products yet really move those customers off of about thirty nine of them to our newer cloud based products and really mark. I can assure you that is quite an undertaking There's a lot going on there and it's hand not. I've also been running. Our property management systems operations team from topic so great wealth of experience. There you've seen from the traditional side of it now into digital and cloud and everything in between as you said moving a lot of systems from the older what we now call legacy into. This new cloud world is as well now. I'm looking at the Amadeus. It group You know in its own words helping to connect over one point. Five billion people year to local traveler providers in over one hundred ninety countries. That's a lot of people. A lot of countries on a lot of travel trips was interested in the industry that you're in how important now is cloud and digital technologies in sustaining this type and level of business today and enter the future all mark. I. I work with our hospitality business unit which really focuses on hospitality technology with some of the largest hotel companies in the world. We're offering technology services to assist hoteliers in all areas of Patel operations

Amadeus KEN Wilson Patel
World Fuel Services COO Jeff Smith

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

08:55 min | 1 year ago

World Fuel Services COO Jeff Smith

"Terms of operations where we're global And so for me. You know a good chunk of what I do is related to technology because technology has a place you know from the initial customer experience ordered a cache procure to pay record to report so that plays a big piece and that's the the people and the process and the tech strategy goes with that but then there's overall financial operations and shared services for. How do we support our line of business segments when when they conduct their business and and how can we run those kind of back office functions a lot more efficiently and in the right locations with the right skills and it's really you know the the guts it's the engine room You know that enabled us to go out and attract business and and you know executed efficiently. That's really my my core role and can you talk a bit about the form that digital transformation takes an organization like yours. I mentioned a moment ago. That said clearly part of what excited the executive team about your abilities in in bringing you on board talk a bit about the formats taken across the now as I say to. Nearly two and a half years so that you've been enroll it's quite pervasive because the digital transformation is everything from the systems and technology that allow you from the very beginning of you know just doing looking at the opportunity. So that's in your your crm systems. It's in your data systems that allow you to you. Know Ingest customer and supplier information that's in portal strategies its self service increasingly because a lot of our supply base is third party it's creating API's and more of an ecosystem to allow different participants to play without having to make it so complex and and build Point to point integrations or do it manually. So in one sense that's one piece of the digital transformation on the other it really is around the efficiency and and in using robotics Cr and different Technologies so that every piece of data that comes and hopefully we can bring in digitally. We could process it. Digitally we can analyze it did Chile and make more sense out of all the data that we're collecting. You know to make better business decisions and and that can be in in pricing. We buy an awful lot. You know we're buying and selling you know. Forty billion dollars worth of energy in one way shape or form and it doesn't take you know a you know a bit of an intelligence we can use that data you know. Apply some a and machine learning to a can. We actually improved you know our operating margins but also improve the experience back to the customer so that it really it entails everything from the very very beginning from opportunity all the way back to you know how we close the books and do our our analytics on the back yet. No doubt a lot of what you just described Were things that either were in nascent forms or perhaps in some cases were were already up and running. I'm curious when you join the organization. How much change was necessary. wraps the changes continuing in order to realize the vision of what you just described. I think one thing I learned Who wore wounds pass rules and stuff as well as your strategy and tactics have to manage the town? That's you have on the pitch so if you WanNa you know you want to move to the cloud aggressively and use and use digital technologies You know you have to have the skills to do that. So a good chunk of my very first year was really taking a look. You know from the bottom up you know what our core skills. We need. How those roll up into roles? How do we create an Agile Organization? We did something quite different that I experienced And my last couple jobs as well as rather than doing an orange strategy top down. Go from the bottom up. Look at what work needs to be done. What's do that? Well and apply more of spotify model of grouping people into small self directed teams that are kind of loosely coupled tightly aligned into tribes tribes into a domain so that you run a leaner management structure unless levels. But in order to do that. You've gotTa have the talent to bring that in so we went on. You know you know really strong. Assessment training bringing new skills in and I would say over the last two years. We've turned over You know about a third of our workforce you know you needed that amount of replenishment to bring the skill base up because there is no You know there's no compression algorithm for experience. You need to have done it before so we needed to bring people in that. Could you know others could could learn from at an accelerated pace and pick the right partners and ride their way? And so I think that's the other key strategy of being ready as you know you're only as good as the people you surround yourself with sweets that you have ever principles. It's pick our partners based on the company I product second. Because your company's you leading indicator your product features you're lagging we spent. The first year was an awful lot from you. Know who we need at the executive level. What kind of practitioners do we need? What kind of special skills and analytics and digital and cloud and and replenishing to the point that we could execute strategy that we really want to really like that pick people based on company I products second for the reasons you articulated as you thought about the people that were the worst of this replenishment the replacement of the third. Or so of folks who changed over. How important was experiencing the type of work that you foresaw as important or more or less important than experience in the industry. You need that you need experience in the industry and we had a a decent amount of that but it variance in the the technologies and how to solve problems in different ways. You need a mesh need this kind of diversity of thought in any great organization and and that's in addition to gender and race so you need the industry piece but my piece my history experience would tell me that attitude is is more important than an aptitudes you need to create the right culture and and people have a much larger capacity to learn then they get themselves credit for but you have to have the right people to create the right environment and then set high expectations and the better people will come up to speed more quickly that we have a capacity to learn whether it's a business domain or technology domain far greater than we think and but you have to have enough congestion of talent and leadership. You know just to enable that to happen they have very interesting indeed. I'm also curious. You talked about the need to build a better set of partners a broader ecosystem. My Word Not Yours but how on translating what you were describing who curious what sorts of changes you made from that perspective as well. Clearly you've been thinking about the mix of people the internal as well as extra. What sorts of changes did you make as a result of that analysis? Why think on the on the partner side we had a few business objectives and I think this is probably the other thing at least good advice for. Cio's that went to you. Know take on other broader business roles look at it in terms of what's the business objectives and the business outcome. You Really WanNa get in one of the things that we needed to do. To connect people across the world in a more effective way was to create a strong productive environment for them so that they could collaborate and learn from each other at a faster pace so we looked at. Who are the best companies in collaboration? And we're GonNa make you know hard. I would call student body right. Turns and get on those companies because we knew that in addition to the products they sold we could learn different things from them so three companies. We used in what I would call. The employee. Collaboration environment were box. Zoom in slack and their three. You know great run companies. They've got they've run it's interesting. They run similar management systems with okay ours which are from John. Dora and how you do a objectives and key results and you know box for content management zoom or video and PBX and communications And then slack for collaboration and all three of those companies have helped us Outside yes their technology is in use utilize them for the problems they've solved we've looked at their leadership techniques If you take a look at zoom one of the top rated companies to work for actually all three of them are looked at their leadership techniques. We looked at their engineering practices at at box. We sit on their advisory boards to to you know. I think one of our other key principles. Both parties should benefit outside the commercial relationship. And so we use those which. Reiki changes. I'd say in the collaboration environment and the we had a very big goal to Closed down our data centers and Migrate Everything to the Cloud. So we partnered with. Aws than they try. They train onsite even help us recruit at universities. When we're looking at undergraduate hires and really help us become better company. By looking at some of the things that they do in their leadership system and And even how? The recruiting practices things like that. So those are four partners that we have gotten measurably better at a faster taste because we were relying on your good skills internally but also hiring what's needed but also partnering with the People that are measurably better than the ones we

Cloud Executive Chile Spotify AWS CIO Partner Dora John
"digital technology" Discussed on Paul Sutton's Digital Download Podcast

Paul Sutton's Digital Download Podcast

11:51 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Paul Sutton's Digital Download Podcast

"One Important Element in transformations collaboration. When I was at IBM Iran? Global Collaboration team we would go into big banks airlines and we would look at what they're doing today and I may have a to like Yamashiro slack chatter advise and often they have sided. Andrew just doesn't work we've been using it for a few months now it just doesn't work It's broken. I'd say no it's not broken. It's the culture what's broken you'll value to an organization is not what you know. It's what you share but the sharing part is very hard to because culturally where program not to share we program indicate things to Sol's Andrew Grill is a futurist who specializes in the impact of technology on business and on digital transformation as well as looking at the the culture of organizations he folks on the transformation of processes and business models in today's show. I talked to Andrew about the importance of digital curiosity curiosity about technological adoption. And what we can expect to see in the next year I think twenty twenty could be a turning point for some of these technologies because because we've had three or four years of laid up and then four more companies are investing. I think people will say we have to invest to grow and I think some of these prices can be the more efficient by technology this is digital download the podcast that explores the latest thinking in digital communications. Pr On social media. Is your host pull sutton.

Andrew Grill IBM Iran sutton Sol twenty twenty
"digital technology" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Future Tense

"Something that could've otherwise been done in government way it definitely saying a high level of understanding those risks. They're looking for help in understanding that. These risks Dr Paul Tyler from Donald Sixty one. Thank you very much for joining us future tense. Thank you Anthony with pleasure early. This year we looked at the race to build satellite networks in low-earth orbit the Space Wide Web was the way our guest the time Mark Harris. Describe it the promise is the ability to cover of a large areas of the earth not currently said this by conventional satellite technology. If you miss that interview you'll find a link on our website. The problem to date date has been developing a cost-effective craft that can stay able for extended periods of time. Well scientists at the University of the highlands and islands highlands in Scotland. Have come up with a breathing balloon across between anti-ship and a plane that's powered by a process known as variable buoyancy propulsion propulsion. Professor Andrew. Ri- just talk back off as a big balloon fused law which contains a forty of helium. Enough tomake the whole vehicle just about blend and that fuselage's kept rigid but the internal pressure is a bit of makes heavy than areas in internal bag. which has pumps attached to it? which bring it from outside compress it into the bag not compressed a inside the fuselage as white not makes it heavier tonight so from the outside it? Looks like a big drop fuselage but we have wings in a title like an airplane to be able to control it and those wings entails have soda cells that can recharged tree the power the pumps in the flight controls about fifteen meters long wingspan of just over ten and a half meters. And it doesn't have an engine. Is that correct correct. Not only propulsion is variable buoyancy price. And just explain. That process too was. How does that work? There are currently underwater vehicles that use exactly the same proposing consistent but they changed their displacement to change the survey increased volume tomat- himself Surrounding more on these things to us from double survey breath I companies which is thousand times less dense. In Warsaw to do a change in volume would be much more difficult the volume changes necessary. It would be massive so he chose to keep volume constant but changed the mass so that compressed data that we bring in from outside and enough white to make the the vehicle. Heavier only descends glider. We've ain't get rid of that era through a valve on that makes you return to life than an F.. Sentence like like an internship. By doing that repeatedly it goes up and down like a pool. Place the full on Mexico sold a so in a sense. It's almost breathing. Is that correct yes it it's coming. Analogy analogy actually so it. It sucks seren. Press it and it goes down in a breeze out becomes less than goes up again which is a pretty clever trick. But what exactly makes this type of craft potentially better than the drones and other machines that have Sipho being tested in love with orbit demand vouchers. You need conventional engines. And because of that don't need conventional power systems item so for an equivalent vehicle. Does our other things to do the same job but they have electric motors. Lots of batteries and a lot of solar cells and that makes much heavier and far more expensive so by comparison this vehicles almost disposable and also it's much simpler employees. We didn't have many moving parts during talks reality compresses unavowed Saudis mechanically and electrically simpler. which for a long endurance vehicle banks a- An elegant solution and long endurance? What are we talking about at the moment? The only glimmer on its operation is to use the resistance of materials to fabric fabric that futurologists made out of wood crap eventually under usually so notionally. We're talking about months at a time. Dill Mission for this type of Achraf would be to sit to twenty thousand meters with communications in telecoms and other things like satellite obviously being lowered down. It doesn't have the same coverage which is why its cheapness comes in because because you can put more up to cover the area of one satellite but it'd be a very small fraction of the price and you can use them just when you want to use providing telecoms for disaster relief and that sort of things that much more deployable incense you you can adjust them in different places. Depending on the requirement Andrew a professor professor of engineering at the University of the highlands and islands in Scotland. And that brings another addition of future tends to an end my thanks as always to co-producer Carson Arnovitz. I'm Antony Fano until next time cheese. You've been listening to an ABC podcast. Discover more great. ABC You say podcasts. Live radio and exclusives on the A._B._C.. Listen APP..

Professor Andrew Mark Harris University of Scotland ABC Dr Paul Tyler Anthony Warsaw Donald Sixty Ri Antony Fano Carson Arnovitz Sipho Mexico
"digital technology" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

09:42 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Future Tense

"Great demand in the modern world data comparisons of large amounts of data can help us understand the way people think and what they do. It's invaluable for research. But as we know they're often privacy she's involved in its usage usage so data is often de identified made anonymous in theory but one of the risks of re identification. Well then much much higher than one might imagine according to the poll tyler the data privacy team leader at the Csiro's Dr Sixty one so those processes of Dana vacation could be simply removing. Someone's name and address from the data can go through to actually modifying the daughter and the amount of de identification occasion where that needs to be done is really dependent on what kind of situation the daughter is going to end up in. So if I providing the data to a colleague who has security clearance of the amount of data edification that might be applied in that situation would be less than if I'm releasing the data as a public late resource the reason for the identification of data. It's it's different. Though isn't between government and private companies yes it is governed attains to have a wish to use what they call Public Dada for the public good and so often daughter is made available for research research or even as open data and we can see that around the country for example in transport. Many of your listeners will have been using transport apps and that's data that's being provided by governments for the good of people. Hey travel on public transport on the other hand Companies more likely to be looking for the competitive advantage or productivity improvements. And so they reasons for wanting to share data Often different to that of government. Now the the assumption is I guess that when dot is de identified. It's safe that there's anonymity but your research suggests that that's not always the case. Yeah that's right. The turnkey identification is actually a little bit confusing. Because as I talked about the mandate application you might do is dependent on what access to data people might have and there's always a risk some risk that people might be our identity. I'd in the data. The data itself often can be unique or particular to an individual so for example he thought Sora Datta said which included a hundred and two year old based in Matt is then even the name and address is not there. I'm pretty sure that hundred and two year old is unique in the daughter and so I learned everything else about individual and this goes to the use of a term the arithmetic of uniqueness. That's what you're talking about. Their uniqueness is one of the ways we can measure risk-averse identification and more broadly. We can measure risk in terms of what size screws people sit in so they might be two three hundred two year olds in Mad Iza And so they've got some level of protection there perhaps not a great deal of protection side. They're the kinds of things that you should be looking for when you're looking for identification risk risk. Why would someone want to re identify data? In what instances would that be valuable they could be competitive advantage but for someone on to use data every identify people so for example while this may not be considered ethical an insurance company could have used his data to be able to adjust the risk on particular individuals and say more competitively price their product. But but there's also a recent times what criminals might do the data sensitive. There's the risk that they could use it to do. Things like black mailing people. Aw otherwise extract fans from people your organization data sixty one was recently consulted in an investigation into a data released incident with public transport. Victoria can I get to tell us about that. Yeah so we were called in after some data had been provided to Dada Thon in Melbourne Open by Public Transport Victoria and we actually did some work for the Office of the Victorian Information Commissioner. So the aim there were there was to help them understand. End The risk in star that had been provided to the data thon and to quantify that risk and so to give you an example of the kind of risks that that way fanned in that data if somebody knows to tap on a scans of a Mikey cod in Melbourne knowing the stop location and and the time that they did the scan to within ten minutes then there sixty percent of those pair scans are actually unique and that means that you could identify people based on sixty percent of those scans and the ones that aren't in that sixty cents it in very small groups say there are still still risks to those people as well so how do companies or government departments then ensure that when they de identified data that it stays that way that account be identified identified. There are two methods that we encourage organizations to. You is the first is that if you're using techniques like suppressing Dada or perhaps what we call beginnings we change in age to an age range. Then it's still necessary to assess the risk at the end of that process says say putting the data through a risk assessment that looks at things like uniqueness or group sizes but there's a second approach to which is What we call provable? Privacy rather than applying some of the techniques of talked about there are other techniques which when you apply them the data comes out with a now in level of risk and that risk essentially protects the privacy of the people whose daughter has contributed in the first place is is it the case that if a psych criminal ease interested in re identifying data and they have the the money and the resources is it the case that they can eventually do it. Is it really just about reducing the risk of that happening rather than being able to absolutely prevent it from happening so a rare identifying a particular individual you can get to the point where you can be split and that one individual cannot be identified in that data uh-huh but they might be in groups and say there's always some kind of risk that residual in there but the criminals all say need to now a fair amount of information about you in the first place to be able to target you. Career identification risk arises. Not just from the daughter itself but also from the information that people might name one of the tools that you've developed to hoping this area is called a rare identification risk ready reckoner just explain what baddies and how it functions so we call it a four because Riyadh indication risk. Ready Regna is a bit of a tongue twister. So are for looks at the data Oughta by looking at the attributes in the data and combinations of the attributes in the data and looking for this uniqueness and group size and having don that it's I will give a risk on every line in the data and in average risk across the data set for each of those different combinations of data. It's worst case analysis of the data and say gives the data custodian an idea of how in the worst case what's the worst that Someone could do in terms of dedication in this status it as it stands Alpha also allows for the user to treat the data in some of the more traditional ways and then to reassess the risk after having traded the data it occurs to me that trust is very much issue here. Isn't it that Ensuring that that people people know that their data when it is de identified that it is going to stay that way. All you know that if it's going to be made to make sure that it stays that way so yeah there and trust our onto sides this trust of those who are supplying the data and there's the trust in the people that might begin granted access assist that data. We've seen that in cases where trust breaks down that can actually change people's behavior and sometimes in not good ways I if there's a breach Health Dada people may avoid going to the doctor or will start driving car instead of catching public transport. Say They can be Changes in behavior. It's very important to manage these risks and I understand risks in Dada Dada custody and told and in the rush to to extract data and to use dotty in all sorts of wise. He's governments and also private organizations. Are they as a tune to this issue as they have should be from your perspective. If you'd asked me that a number of years ago I'd say that people still had quite a bit to land but the situation is definitely improved quite a low and so we get consulted quite a bit on these kind of issues in terms of business business. Businesses are more likely to not do something they understand as a risk there they just don't know how to quantify it in some cases so they don't do re-something so the cost is actually not to privacy but rather cost to not doing.

Dada Dada Dada Thon Melbourne Health Dada Dada Csiro Dana Sora Datta hand Companies Mad Iza Riyadh Victoria Matt Regna Alpha
"digital technology" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Future Tense

"I think it's really important that we engage people in conversations about technology that we include clued older people when we think about the different ways that technology can be designed and used one of the things that I think. It's forgotten when we talk about all the people and Technology Liam we do rely on those stereotypes about older people. Is that people who are in their eighties nineties. They have a rich life history to draw. Oh from the have seen technologies come and go over the course of their live in the future. As Tech Savvy younger people get older. Do you think that difficulties or challenges with technology will become less of a problem. My argument is the technology is always changing and people are always going to Phil left behind. If the technology moves rapidly and they haven't been able to keep pace with already feel quite left behind with some of the technologies that the younger the members of my family are using. Make it easier. But the issue of digital literacy digital exclusion is never going to be completely eradicated because technology changes his rapidly. Dr Jenny Way caught from the University of Melbourne ending. That report from Barbara Bosa Navy. One Radio National's twenty-nine Teen Top five researches his in humanities and social sciences loneliness emerge as a major concern in the ABC's stranded talks National Survey. A survey I aiming to find out how you feel on a range of topics to find out more just head to ABC dot needs dot edu slash. Australia talks You're listening to future tense. Exploring the world around US looking for the pathways ahead and signposting the future. I'm Antony.

ABC dot Barbara Bosa Navy US ABC Dr Jenny Way Australia Phil University of Melbourne
"digital technology" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Future Tense

"So improving APPS and social media. Technology for older people is important. There is more in the emerging technology pipeline. I'm really intrigued. By the fact at that age care organizations starting to use virtual reality in aged care homes and this is because it's such an immersive experience it provides people with an opportunity it kind of escape the physical environment that they're in and experience worlds and activities that they wouldn't otherwise be able to experience. These can be designed to be social experiences but they can also be individual experiences but they still give that sense of connection to the world all the people might have particular experiences and needs with technology's could offer great benefits and there's also potential in robotic companions augmented reality and even whereab- all technology Dr Jenny Way Kat from the University of Melbourne some people want to be connected to family habits use existing social media tools to keep in touch with the children and grandchildren for others. New Technologies offer great opportunity to be creative and to share information that can help them to meet new people with similar interests in in other words to expand their social world's so we had a wave of that when social media became quite prevalent a few years ago. And now we're sort of on the verge of another new wave of exploring opportunities. That new technologies provide my work is currently looking at virtual reality and I do think that promising but I do think it's also got a lot of challenges. There's quite a number of things that need to be overcome. I guess it's not so much the technology itself but the way it's used I could be beneficial in future and one of the things that I would. Emphasize is that technology can be used to enable people to be creative. You've and to share information about themselves to share things that they're interested in to explore their interests to find others who have similar interests can enable Mabel people to transcend the limitations of their physical environmental geographic limitation. So you can expand your social world so it's more bad how it's used rather than the specific kinds of technologies that are used. We'd social technology. What are the challenges for older people? Technologies Allergies. Don't always behave in the way people expect them to. So you might press the wrong button accidentally or touch an icon for too long and the function changes or you might have trouble. Finding the right buttons is on the hand controller. That comes with the via headset. And it's difficult to see what your hands are doing because you'll feel division is covered by that headset and these are challenges that everybody everybody faces when they're using new technology but I found that often auto people blame themselves when things go wrong when the technology doesn't work as expected it's not normally the uses fault when something goes wrong. It's usually the way the equipment has been designed. There are some things we can do to make digital lives easier for older people such as larger buttons less clutter on the screen but I think we should be making sure that all new technologies are accessible to as many people as possible if troy functions to make things simple for older people to use as we risk over simplifying the experience. I think it's important to acknowledge that other people have a lot of life. Experience to draw farm and many of them are very interested in using new technology and don't don't necessarily want to use a stripped down version of that technology. We tend to see older people as non adopters or non users of Digital Technology Asia. Is this the case. I think that that is a stereotype that does need to be challenged. There are some people who haven't had opportunities to use computers before Oh and might feel uncertain and I'm confident about using technology and who do need support when using new applications and software but there are plenty of older people who absolutely lately embraced digital technologies. They use facebook. They play online games. They use youtube and so on and often. They volunteer in helping the appears to learn how to use digital technologies.

New Technologies facebook youtube University of Melbourne troy
"digital technology" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Future Tense

"According to relationships Australia one in five other. Australians is lonely only loneliness is not the same as being alone says sociologist. Dr Roger Tony from the University of Woolen Gong. Loneliness is primarily an emotion. It's a feeling that we have of lacking the quality relationships that we want without the people that we feel we need and give us the support that we want in our life and gives us a feeling of belonging an is it an increasing problem with an aging population. That's definitely going to be any more important issue. So yes I'd say it is and in addition we live in times where the way in which we live in connect to each other's changing marriage rights are on the decline declined for example to factor it big rise in single person households around the world for example. A number of older people end up with the death at a spouse or partner or of over. Close friend that can definitely increase loneliness and all the people living alone is substantially older. All the men who live alone particularly emotional experience parents live this more like thirty percent of them. In addition to that all the people have other issues such as filing or poor health changing health behaviors. Poor sleep leap particularly vital exhaustion which open linked to Londoners more limited mobility which prevents the ability to exercise. And also get out and meet other people and also Malacca the living in residential aged care which is going to impact as well and what are the effects of loneliness in later life some of the big health impacts of Loneliness Depression so oh civility cardiovascular disease premature mortality reduced sense of self worth and subjective wellbeing these factors dementia as well but there's also to societal consequences of loneliness in light a life for example. We not only get those economic issues and costs so rising healthcare healthcare costs of dealing with the issues of London's old alive but also the exclusion of all the people from economic and social activities than Longo or less involved in work. Doc they less involved in neighborhood volunteering for example. An informal kit grandparent carries enormous instructor. And if you're experiencing depression you might not be doing that sort of thing so we've got issues of all the peoples contributions being missed in later life if that is subject to London's and this represents a sort of a more inclusive to society and it also I think catches the significant social stigma that applies to linus people. Just don't WanNa talk about feeling lonely and I think I'd rather often pretend the not lonely and they'll stay in rather than necessarily talked to someone else and go out to very important issue. Why do you think it's so stigmatizing to fill? Only I would suspect that an society the norm is to be social to be healthy and well connected and active to admit to being lonely imply some sort of sensitive personal failure. One isn't able to make the connections other people are one might feel that. There's something wrong with oneself. Which is why people don't necessarily Israeli even want to hang out with you at night? These are kind of internal things that people feel but more importantly they get transmitted to the broader social saying as well as society could do a lot more to really understand or engage with Leninist and trying to figure out why interventions to help with research shows that technology analogy has the potential to alleviate loneliness e creates opportunities for communication when face to face connection is not an option and the key here is not replacing but enhancing social contact the really two kinds synchronous technologies are typically chat or conferencing technologies a synchronous in his technologies are typically email or messaging technologies. Seniors are no different than other people in that. Almost all of us have a need to communicate the needs for seniors for connection and communication are in a sense greater because of phenomena sets is the fact that they've moved away. Their kids are incredibly really busy as well as the accelerating deaths of their peers. Professor Ron Becker. From the University of Toronto in Canada has been looking at aging technology for decades. It is easy to think that we need new devices or new gadgets but the first step is to make sure that the technology we already have works for diverse groups of older people one bikers recent project is accumulation APP developed with and for older people. Well it shows on the screen your primary contacts family and friends and all you have to do is click on that person's image in order to communicate with them and it's very easy to type a message recorded voice or music take a picture or video or send an Internet link. It's also just as easy to send a message to your entire entire family that work as it is to send to one person occasionally seniors would become confused. Wave work very hard to improve the user interface sub seniors with poor vision had issues and so we've prided text to speech so oh that messages could be heard as well as seen some people with motor challenges had difficulties typing and so we've allowed messages is to be spoken than then turned into text. Some people with poor hearing had difficulties hearing voice messages and so we provided the ability to have those messages transcribed into text and finally there were numerous cases where there were language. Mismatches between between grandchildren grandparents and so we provided automatic translation between languages and what that means is explaining cleaning technology based terms like swiping or calling or tapping the degree to which their family friends caregivers and in fact their entire cultural surround supports the need and the desire for communication and participation. The patient in the world. Do we have any evidence that that kind of social technology actually works perhaps the biggest evidences from the marketplace. He said that there are even existing says shield technologies which have not been designed for seniors are heavily used by I senior is including email including certain kinds of messaging. Both kinds of technologies synchronous asynchronous have their own afford ince's it's an advantages.

London Australia Dr Roger Tony University of Woolen Gong vital exhaustion ince Longo Canada Ron Becker University of Toronto
"digital technology" Discussed on FT Tech Tonic

FT Tech Tonic

14:29 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on FT Tech Tonic

"That made it possible. And that's a good example because there's much more to do like that so on the banking side the digital side. Getting to sophistication on that I I would say globally now. There's a fascinating things happening in India in terms of innovations that they can do if we think that in our system digital payments is still a little bit. It's complicated systems are not necessarily interoperable in India. They've now setup standards that are fully interoperable that actually shuts down the transactions coaster Matichon and. That's definitely another part of it. So yes there's an opportunity to leapfrog in all kinds of ways in these things. It's interesting that each country needs to think about what what's attitude is going to be in the governor's for example to competition and there are trade-offs. You could get one single player to emerge very quickly. That's actually happened in Kenya. SAFARICOM SAFARICOM or you could do a bit more Tanzania that you said story Galatian a bit more for the long term. So that from the beginning you really encouraged competition in digital payment systems in interoperable way and could get it so competition. Also you need to think about. Do you need to think of something to do with your the data governance. You know. You can't ignore it. You have to have a view you can't seem to. It's too difficult. You have Tom View on your tax. You have to do it. So that's the governance. The two others are essentially getting the underlying digital systems in place for example. Of how you what do e-governance or how would you actually get an economy to interact and then you need to. Of course that kind of building blocks to help you to have a business environment that can actually flourish and finally people. I mean you need to really think from the beginning that digital skills are important. Shouldn't overstate not. Everybody needs to be Koto but it still needs to be skills to work in this kind of more service based economy in short it's something to visit environments something to do with your governance something to do with infrastructure infrastructure and something to do with your skills you need to have these foreign place. I would love to hear more specific examples of this because as you were saying. The beginning of the commission team visited a lot of countries around the world. Who is doing good interesting? Things that other people can emulate so I would say is that in terms of the kind of soft infrastructure part. India is fascinating thing. Of course it took the lead with attire with an identification system. But it didn't do just only that. It actually develops also universal Russell payment interface. We actually allow that interoperability but he started developing a whole series of other things that they liked to call. India sack firms can take up and start using it but what is an interesting because it can potentially be linked to the task system to the UPS system and you start getting some kind of soft infrastructure. This really effective effective on top of that even though the businesses didn't totally like it they thought about the governor's at least Supreme Court thought about governance and the Supreme Court came aiming golf and said well actually will need to think carefully. About what protection is that you have to give to consumers. What does it mean to be a safe use of the outer and and so on and so it could boundaries and in the end we know in general that certainty helps businesses very well so actually constrained to bit relative to the design as intentions instance? But he's created clarity and these are the kinds of things. India does good things on that there are other countries unlikely countries. I was struck in terms off the way. Businesses have responded to the opportunities and then you go to a place like Mongolia if you look at the map. It's in the middle of nowhere. I mean it's very acute place. Three three million people occupying. I think it's twice the UK land size and three million people of which one million or so is in the city and then otherwise deeply dispersed. Now it's an obvious obvious. Plays that you'd say digital should be a good thing here because cost of infrastructure of connecting people. This is a real chance of leapfrogging. So they actually have done owned remarkably well in digital connectivity. I so actually you get all these nomads that pretty well connected and get their weather forecasts and someone in their case. It's the temperature. How low temperature will be they get? That's quite well. A vast parts of the country but on top of that day have started managing to develop an export services industry. You haven't Mongolian Golian firm. That is actually providing coding services to Japan but is also another Mongolian firm that does on geospatial mapping activities in Gorey's a country entre with lots of experience on mining. It's reminding but I do have an Australian Australia so they can actually do this over huge system so you see starting pockets emerging or fascinating knitting bits. That definitely have a lot of future. Okay I guess. Part of the narrative is being Thomas. Friedman wrote his book. The world is flat. Technology was going to be this great democratizing force force in the world. And then you had a kickback. Against that and people are Rishard Florida arguing. The world is in fact spiky that more economic activity is going to be concentrated in and fewer and fewer places that the San Francisco's Shanghai's the Shenzhen's London's maybe the Tokyo's these we're going to be the places that we're going to dominate the world. And everyone when else is not really going to get much of a look in. which school are you in? Do you think the world is becoming more flat or more spiky. I think it's hilly so there's almost treatment force also of course it's well understood and there is tendency that makes geography less important and of course in his book he did allude a lot to what happening Banglore and indeed some of the characters that were involved in India's people manily canceled because Banglore is a prime example that it's definitely flattered than we thought it is because these are people that left. US They left telecom value in other parts and actually managed to get an innovation center so the decentralization of innovation becomes possible possible with these things. But why would say it's hilly. Is that you still have concentrations and you know it's not as if suddenly geography will not matter of in fact we sit together in a room and can talk to each other. It's at the moment still better than if we were to do as a remote link but it becomes more likely that in five years time I'm most of your podcast will be recorded remotely that actually five G. will create the possibility that I can see that I should hurry up with my answer or not in the kind of conversation we having doing. So that's actually means the hill spill becoming Loa and more hills possible and I'll give you couple of examples of things I've seen. Banglore is the obvious one in a big way in a small alway I was travelling in northern Nigeria. Some years ago and I was visiting a food processing factory actually supplier of the bottom of the pyramid making food packaging in small sizes. Four people could be. There's a big factory and it was a pure private enterpreneur. This is carnal. If you look at the map this is essentially book around territory. You know no no west. Now these days would go there with massive security but he was happily doing it used to be the case that I will travel to Germany and it would make friends with the God so food processing factories to learn about how we're doing things because then it would take pictures. I can't do it anymore now. I watch commercials from food processing companies. That film I'm on the factory floor and I look over the shoulder of the message and I see what companies are doing. I can use youtube actually learn in a decentralized way so that's the kind the thing you know and at the same time this is where Banglore issue no yes there is a force here that we'd Ip and the way. I feel all works that there is a concentration wants. Someone has captured something but the you know vicious more decentralized and the fact that China is doing some of these things India's doing these things I seen it in the Philippines. I bet this smaller cases of Africa's swell it becomes more decentralized and it links back to a bit of the discourse we have why we emphasize so much countries should take part of their destiny. Is that this is the moment in this kind of technology development is that those countries that will actually build it up properly if we go back to the one thousand nine hundred ninety S. That's when it happened with global value chains. That's about a dozen countries took advantage of that phase of globalization enormously largely the East Asian countries. At this moment the Dick is again put together and now again a couple of countries that can take advantage. And maybe we'll talk about the tour river valley in Mongolia as actually dynamic value. I don't know but this is why this is the moment to take advantage now. You're a former chief economist. At the Department of International all development in the UK. What help can organizations such as that provide in helping to accelerate this technological revolution? So there's a couple of things that they definitely can't do one of the things is that you know if you really read even our work in our report we have to be honest and saying many of the countries we try to appeal to. They missed the boat last last time they didn't do some of the essential bits of the ninety s to take advantage. Mombassa didn't do what both cities achievements city or. Whatever did in other parts of the wealth so this is first of all talking and working with countries to make sure that they asked are thinking about? You don't try to recreate the past and just just try to get only the next garment factory in but actually start thinking about okay. What could that look like so helping to? Lengthen Horizons thinking about long-term mm-hmm provide funding for some of these countries may be to fail to provide ways of de risking investors. That for example say why not go to Ethiopia to do the next. PPO investment maybe not work but actually we can the risk it. So I think that's the kind of thing you know. Make sure that some of these transitions can be fine. China's going to be the risks that they get access to the information the opportunities to match it with some of these firms that will create these opportunities and so on and as I understand the pathways to Prosperity Commission is winding up. But it will live on in the form of Digital Economy Kit yet. You've put together. Can you tell us about that. And how developing countries going to benefit from. Yes so this really as you love sitting in your ivory tower and I remember one of the meetings of our commission that Melinda Gates set. You know look this will only have traction if you go to the country so there were certainly saying we need to find countries that are willing to work with us to actually make some of this happened and so we said let's try to develop a toolkit and let's go out. We were amazed by the reception. We got just a suggestion to countries. Look we work with you around trying to think through festival the diagnostic Astakhov where you are then some kind of draft strategic prime for your country and some kind of stakeholder engagements you know basically discussions the private sector civil society international investors and saw bringing up together day just left it and in a sense it was really striking. Because you know you talk to Prime Minister's imprisoned and say look. This is actually something we need to do. We need to start thinking and preparing for the future so we ended up working intensively with South Africa. Mongolia and with Yo Pia all in different ways do some of their diagnostic and that engaged with private sector public sector civil society and help to make the connection stools investors and that helping them. I'm to frame. Look this is the kind of thing we would like. You know maybe international support from and to actually say look we. We start getting what we want to do. This is the kind of things that we could commit Mitsu. Can we help doing it. So we have still at least six other countries that.

India Mongolia UK Kenya China SAFARICOM Matichon Banglore Tanzania Supreme Court Africa golf Japan Galatian Tom View Mongolian Golian Germany Prime Minister youtube
"digital technology" Discussed on FT Tech Tonic

FT Tech Tonic

11:36 min | 1 year ago

"digital technology" Discussed on FT Tech Tonic

"In this episode we speak to economist who has studied how technology can best be. I used promote development in poor countries. So actually you get all these nomads. The pretty well connected and get their weather forecasts and so on in decades. It's the temperature. How the temperature but you will be they get? That's quite well. A vast parts of the country but on top of that they have started managing to develop an export services industry. That was Stephan Durkan talking about digital connectivity in Mongolia he contributed to a joint report by the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the bullivant Nick School of Government in Oxford on the impact of rapid technological change in developing countries and he came into the F. T. to discuss the reports finding Stephon. I'd like to talk to.

Stephan Durkan Melinda Gates Foundation bullivant Nick School of Gover Mongolia Stephon Oxford
"digital technology" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"digital technology" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"So I would be much more likely to think in those lines than to look at the ramifications of too early uses of of of digital technology. My friend and colleague, Katherine Steiner dare has also written a book that you might find a great interest called the big disconnect in which she talks about children who in fact have had adverse affects of of digital technology leading not so much to fail you to learn to read, but to attention issues that then 'cause of struggles with learning or even so far as diction. So that might be good for you. I mean, I take your here. You about the. Specifics of of Liza's grandson, but but also thinking about the age that he's in. Right. She said he was about eight now and they're, they're, you know, millions of kids across the country who are right in that age range. We were talking about. We were talking about zero through five beforehand on what to do then in those years in order to sort of help create a the bright pathways so that they can later on become deep readers, but one about between the ages of five to ten. I mean, these are times of in modern life pretty heavy screen usage for kids. Exactly. N Magna, I'm so glad you brought us back because I, I tended to go into the world of dyslexia just to help, but three -ality is that I believe what we should be thinking about is not a binary plan, but in fact, a parallel plan of helping our children learn to read most of them. Now there are individual differences, but for most of them, I would lie. Most of our children to learn to read on the kinesthetic tactile of print so that they would be learning these deep reading skills using what I consider a almost a full flush of that circuitry from the start because print does slow us down and I don't want our children sped up in the beginning with their reading. But I do with their programming skills. They're coding skills on digital screen media. So with my colleagues, Cynthia, Brazilian MIT were always thinking of of the best ways of using a digital technology. Certainly, there is like with scratch, junior, the people like Mitch Resnick are marina bears at toss..

Liza Katherine Steiner Mitch Resnick
"digital technology" Discussed on Socially Supportive: Customer Care the Social Way

Socially Supportive: Customer Care the Social Way

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"digital technology" Discussed on Socially Supportive: Customer Care the Social Way

"Old all stakeholders impacted before any changes are made and all refer you to episode twelve strategic internal alliances so that that'll jump start your thoughts on which departments might be impacted in which ways that i would say it just initially off the top of my head leadership you wanna ask your leadership about it before you make any tax changes direct reports find out maybe they're using something in a way you are unaware of and you don't want to take it away because then you're going to hamstring them the analytics team if you're taking away a piece of technology or analytics team might be pulling in data from that piece of technology and using it in a way that's irreplaceable or at least they need to be made aware so that they can change were there pointing to to get their data also make sure that you're checking in with legal and regulatory because depending on whatever the legal situation as for your vertical or whatever regulations you might have it's possible that removing a piece of technology where somebody needs to offer then to cater do something like that maybe you're not even aware of what it's used for you could get yourself in a little bit of of a sticky situation there so make sure you fully understand what it is you wanna change before you go about changing so there you have it simple things to consider regarding streamlining your digital technology i think that now is a great time for you to have a look at it like i said especially because you already just went through last tuesday to look at all of your reports and do that review it's already fresh in your mind and we will talk more about things being brushing in your mind on fridays episode ninety two i'm not gonna take zach lou what it is yet but we'll get deeper into a little of that dan.

zach lou