35 Burst results for "Digital Advertising"

Technology stocks drag Wall Street lower to end volatile week

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 3 weeks ago

Technology stocks drag Wall Street lower to end volatile week

"Are down premarket after the company reported iPhone sales that missed Wall Street estimates and said revenue in China slumped. And then there's Amazon shares also lower. Despite projecting a steep jump in sales in the current quarter. It's also warning of greater spending due to covert 19 and that could continue to weigh on its profitability and Twitter user growth missed the estimates. Now there's better news from Google parent alphabet. It returned to growth in the last quarter, fueled by a rebound and digital advertising. That ad revival also helped Facebook post of sales jump, but its warning of uncertainty ahead. Then there's Starbucks comparable store sales down 9% of the latest quarter. But that was better than forecast that zippy

Starbucks Twitter Facebook Amazon China Google
Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Alphabet, Twitter, Facebook, Apple, and Amazon

Bloomberg Daybreak

01:39 min | 3 weeks ago

Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Alphabet, Twitter, Facebook, Apple, and Amazon

"Here's a Facebook are down two and a third percent. The social media company warns of significant uncertainty next year, citing unpredictable online spending trends and regulatory challenges. That's over shadowing third quarter results, which blew past estimates. Debra Aho Williamson is principal analyst Edie Marketer Facebook's audience and then the number of users is substantial. It's ad targeting is incredible advertisers at the same time they tell me that they are concerned about the atmosphere of Facebook. They also say pretty much in the same breath that they can't live without Facebook. Facebook said it saw an unusual decline in U. S and Canadian users in the quarter, though it did see growth overseas Shares of Twitter or down more than 16% in early trading. The company says it added a million new daily users in the third quarter. That was fewer than forecast dashing optimism that Twitter would reap benefits from a return of live sports and the coming election. On the flip side Shares of alphabet around more than 5.5% in the premarket. The parent company, a. Google returned to strong growth in the third quarter after a decline in the fryer period and here with more on the results, Bloomberg's Charlie Pellet, the quarter was fuelled by digital advertising that has rebounded along with the U. S economy. The Google parents reported third quarter revenue minus the cost of distribution deals for its search engine was up 15% to $38 billion. While that was slower than the pace of growth a year ago, it marked a turnaround from the previous quarters drop. YouTube, the fastest growing part of Google's at business brought in $5 billion.32 percent more than

Edie Marketer Facebook Debra Aho Williamson Twitter Google Youtube Charlie Pellet Bloomberg Principal U. S Analyst
A Big Day For Tech Earnings

WSJ Tech News Briefing

03:44 min | 3 weeks ago

A Big Day For Tech Earnings

"Yesterday was a big day for tech earnings. We got quarterly reports from Apple, Alphabet Amazon facebook and twitter like most tech companies. These five have done well throughout the pandemic. So the results were expected to be good but for the most part, all companies exceeded analysts, expectations, apple posted strong results, but took a hit to iphone sales after supply chain disruptions delayed the release of its own twelve models. Meanwhile, Google's parent company alphabet that it saw growth in its add revenue coming back from its first ever decline in the figure last quarter. Amazon brought in a record ninety, six point, two billion dollars in sales last quarter, even without its annual Prime Day shopping event, which usually holds in July but had to delay this year and CEO Jeff Bezos. said the company's already seeing a surge in early holiday shopping and Q. Four. FACEBOOK's at twelve percent uptick in daily active users from the same period. Last year with more than one point, eight billion people logging in every day. And even though analysts had expected a loss loss twitter surprised by posting a profit but the company saw its smallest increase in daily users since it began reporting the figure. All right I just threw a lot of information. You don't put it in perspective. Here's global checkout are decent dean I'd say the biggest takeaway is that in this pandemic era tech just keeps getting more important. Bigger since stronger, you know there are some exceptions to that but when you look at. How we live and how we work now everything from online sales Amazon to use social media and digital advertising in use of cloud computing, my corporations. It's all become more important at exactly the same time when the fears are at their highest among some people that tech is already too powerful despite the strong results several companies saw some volatility in after hours trading and Jason says, there's still a lot of uncertainty part of it is just how far the stocks have risen already, I mean there have been among the best performers across the market, the big tech stocks for the most part. Again, they're exceptions and so there's I think a lot of questions about how much of her the past present and future performance is. Built into the price already. So I think that's part of it but on the whole, the trend is is has been largely. Up into the right? By the way getting all these earnings reports all at once is typical, but there've been a few factors that play recently. Here's Jason Again. The past two quarters we've had these mega earnings Palooza days with four or five companies all reporting at once I think that's partly a function of the fact that there have been hearings pre the day before in both cases, and so that affects the ability of companies to schedule because obviously their CEO's have to prepare for the hearings and have to prepare for earnings and they don't want to have them same day. It's probably preferable for the companies also that they. ANNOUNCE THEIR Big. Numbers the day after they go in front of. Congressional hearings where the subject has been there outside power, and then of course you might have had some companies would typically report next week but we've got the election. They're concentrated by. Monday of next week. You know all eyes will be on on the election, and clearly there's a lot of questions about how that's going to go and when we'll get the results as well as obviously what the results would be, what that will mean for. The company's broadly speaking the tech sector specifically. So I, think they just would prefer to avoid

Amazon Jason Again Facebook Apple Twitter Google Ceo Jeff Bezos. CEO Palooza
Interview With TripleLift Founder And CSO Ari Lewine

AdExchanger Talks

05:28 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With TripleLift Founder And CSO Ari Lewine

"Our Hawaiian is chief strategy officer and CO founder triple lift. An eight year old programmatic advertising technology company triple lift has developed at products that have a closer match to the look feel and voice. But. Wide Range of media types and environments sounds like native. That's what they do They also support video in ot advertising and have other initiatives as well. Excited to have Arianna talk about some of that I reached out to our because I think he has a unique. Perspective on. Programmatic advertising at the current state of digital advertising overall that sometimes runs against the the larger narrative which is, which can be a negative narrative at times. So I'm looking forward to chatting him with him about that as well. Ari Welcome. Thank you so much act I'm delighted and honored to be here. Great to have you here Let's have a minute on you I. You got into start up stuff like right out of college. Is that right? Yeah. Even actually in college I. Ran My first startup analysis seventeen years old where I was really fortunate to be at a school that took entrepreneurship really seriously in fact, I I majored in entrepreneurship which is hard to believe as even a thing. And there were local businesses on my campus. I was able to as able to buy one into one of them. That did local shipping and storage, and so I got sort of taste in above that is still with me to this day building businesses from the ground up and just trying to make customer super happy. And we're your parents entrepreneurs have how did you get this bug? Yeah. So my parents are also entrepreneurs preneurs They started something on the order a dozen different companies. Many of them, not successful. And so I got to sort of see that growing up what I think is really important. It's like being around that failure from a young age and not having any stigma towards it was really impactful for me because. It shows that it's okay. As long as You keep trying my parents certainly keep trying in in some of them. Worked out okay and so I was fortunate to be in the sort of like environment where starting businesses was normal and expected in my parents very much supported me even at very young age when I tell them, this is what I want to do with my life I want to be an entrepreneur. And did they. Actively, encourage you was a kind of A. Son You're going to be startup founder. Yeah. It wasn't like you know. Jewish boy, and so the first inclination was to be neurosurgeon button when I got a D. on my first bio exam I think entrepreneurship became the clear path and it's funny because I was just going through things of my childhood from home and apparently when I was four years old, we went to FAO Schwarz he'll toy store and they printed. Out A car said Arlo an entrepreneur and so I think clearly there was there was maybe some program going on from a young age that that this was a path that they would like to see me go down and I've been very fortunate to be able to do it. I think it's like one of the most wonderful things that's happened because Entrepreneurship for many isn't considered a path at all like when you go to college or when you're young that isn't a thing that you think about you often think about professions that have a very clear path. And Entrepreneurship is not a clear path. So I would I try and do now in my clinical free time is I'm help other spying entrepreneurs. With their path towards entrepreneurship because I think, it's one of the most wonderful fans. That's Kinda funny. Hey honey sign's kind of a poor student. Push them towards the Internet. Yeah. That's where he belongs. No, that's great and Tacos through these couple of jobs you had before founding triple, you were head of business, development, oyster dot, com what was that all about? So Dot Com was a hotel review site that was subsequently acquired by trip advisor and a really beautiful idea which is people spend a lot of money on vacations and the worst thing that can happen is you get there and the hotel is not what you expected or paid for. And so the idea was to send a undercover reporters to full real expose on what the hotel is actually like with real unadulterated unedited photos and Iran monetization there. So this was a really crazy experience where they were publisher and I was twenty years old. They brought me on to make money from ads and I didn't know anything about online advertising. I just graduated college. And it was still the middle of the recession. and. So what I what I did is basically called up at that time it was ad networks. And I asked to speak with the product folks and I would just pepper them with hours of questions about how their technology worked, how the relationships of publishers and advertisers work. Essentially, I was able to learn from them how the industry worked at that time. There wasn't the wealth of knowledge of the sort of add exchanger dot com, a publications that we have today, and so one of the only way to learn about it was from other people and I was able to learn basically from the partnerships in vendors use are the publisher side and so. I started on the publisher cited from there I went to APP nexus. which became clear because when I was at one of the things I was doing all the time was you know in my lunch breaks I would log into DSP and start changing the line nine of prioritization across the different campaigns and ad networks I was working with. So I, was looking at who is paying me the that day and I would tweak the waterfall

Publisher Advertising Technology Dot Com Arianna Chief Strategy Officer Co Founder Fao Schwarz Founder Arlo Iran Advisor
What happens if online advertising is just a big, fat bubble?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:26 min | Last month

What happens if online advertising is just a big, fat bubble?

"So. Big Tech monopolies are in the news this week the Department of Justice sued Google over how it maintains its search dominance and it search dominance is the key to its business model, which is that it makes eighty percent of its revenue from digital advertising facebook by the makes ninety, nine percent of its revenue from advertising and the profitability of targeted ads is also a big reason why tech companies are constantly collecting so much data about us and there's a multibillion dollar ad tech industry that exists because all of this makes so much money. But what these ads didn't actually work all that. Well, Tim Wong is a former public policy executive Google where he worked on artificial intelligence and machine learning and he's of the new book subprime attention crisis I. Think this is an interesting important distinction right? which is it's not necessarily to make the argument that advertising never works categorically right? We have examples of it working. The question is whether or not the market as a whole really lives up to the promises that it's made and the promises made is that data driven. Automated form of what's known as programmatic advertising is a kind of advertising that's way better than billboards or magazines or the kind of madman style of advertising and I think ultimately, it may be that we are exactly where we were decades ago. Right? which is we actually don't know which half of the money spent advertising works in which one is wasted. We just very difficult to tell. Is, there an awareness of this? I mean I know that you know after for example, Cambridge Politica, there was a lot of conversation about how there are lots of promises related to micro targeting and that it just might not be. Realistic. Like do advertisers are they starting to understand this? Well, I, think there's a lot of willful blindness in the Advertising Space you know so this book that I just wrote, it opens on a really strange experience that I had going to a marketing conference where a professor laid out all of the evidence right? You know sixty percent of people never see ads ad blocking up all around the world it was just dead space the. Advertisers kind of refuse to engage with it, and you know it's one of the things I've been thinking a lot about because it's similar to patterns that we see and other market bubbles right where there's these deep structural problems with the industry. But a lot of the people involved either don't want to hear it or they don't believe it I mean listen I'm very familiar with the idea of the belief that technology must be working even. All. Evidence to the contrary. But I do want to ask you about targeting specifically because it seems like there's a lot of technical reasons it doesn't work. But what about this idea that there's a massive amount of data collection that ads can be so specific and personalized that you literally cannot resist them are you saying that's also not true Yeah I. Mean You brought up Cambridge Analytical earlier? I mean there's a fascinating report that just came out from the UK privacy regulator that was basically their research to say look there's all of this kind of. Metric advertising does it make a difference and the conclusion? There was no there actually was not any significant difference and there's two reasons for that. One of them is a lot of researchers find that a lot of the data being used as faulty and messy and doesn't work and I think the other one is whether or not. This data actually helps you to target a message better is really unclear. There's a great researcher by the name of Allesandro. Who's been doing some work on if you have targeted ads versus non targeted ads, does it actually make a difference and conclusion is it does but really only by a small margin, much less than you think. Could it also expose the fact that a lot of these companies no longer want the data for advertising like they want it for machine learning. Yeah I. think that's ultimately you know I think one of the great questions and responses I've had to the book is people say so why have we built this enormous surveillance infrastructure? This thing just doesn't work I. Think people have traditionally thought. Oh, well, it's because Mark Zuckerberg wants to build a mind control ray that's his advertising system. You know the reality is that it has been collected for other reasons and for sure I think things like the promise of machine learning is is one of the reasons that people collect this data. What Can. Be Done. Do you think I mean? This is a big complicated technology question. You've got companies spending a ton of money and companies that rely on this for their whole business model. Like what could solutions even look like? One of my worries about this is that again, if you study the history of market bubbles, a lot of what we see is very reminiscent right to the say the subprime mortgage crisis of two, thousand, seven, two, thousand, eight, and there is a momentum here in the problem with bubbles is that. While, it may look great in two, thousand, seven, I think we were saying how great economy is doing. At some point they pop and I think the human costs will be great. It's really not just a matter of whether or not you know Mark Zuckerberg has less. Fewer billion dollars right I think you gotta think about all the media that's relying on this ecosystem that journalism that relies on it and many other places that advertising touches online, and so I I tend to believe in the idea that we have to find ways of deflating this bubble and so I'm really interested in kind of the ability to both spread the public word about some of the problems in this marketplace. But also I think there's room for regulation I. think There's room to enforce transparency in the marketplace to try to make sure that you know expectations about this match up with reality. There's been just as a regulatory matter there been a lot of questions about banning targeted advertising. Should that happen? Yeah I I do think. So and I think in some ways you know in may be the thing that pops the bubble right because for the longest time, advertisers have been basically holding to the position that we need all this data order to do our business to target our ads and what we're seeing as things. GDP are the European privacy law and CPA to California privacy law rollout is in many cases the market just keep chugging along even though our advertisers have a lot less access to data and I do think that that kind of realization that all this data might actually not have been very. Meaningful might actually 'cause you know sort of expectations or perceptions about how great this stuff is to kind of crash to Earth, and so you think these privacy laws have these two effects. One of them is to protect privacy, which of course is important but I think the other side of it is actually in May of like you know strip the veil off this market that I think has been kinda shrouded for so long Tim. Wong is the author of the new book subprime attention crisis. How big a bubble are we talking here? Digital advertisers will spend over one hundred and forty billion dollars in the US in twenty twenty.

Tim Wong Mark Zuckerberg Google Department Of Justice Facebook Cambridge Politica California United States Cambridge Analytical Executive Professor Allesandro UK Researcher RAY
Why Rent Your Marketing When You Should Own It?

Duct Tape Marketing

04:57 min | Last month

Why Rent Your Marketing When You Should Own It?

"Hello and welcome to another episode or the duct tape marketing podcast. This is John. Jansen my guest today actually have two guests today, Clem Huffman, and Alexa are Sierra with south. Print in Charlotte North Carolina. So clemen Alexa thanks for joining me. I. Start with do you founded this business in Nineteen Eighty Eight Let's change in the printing business hasn't. John Absolutely. You're making you're making plates and slap an on and everything weren't you? Won't of copies a of plates you're right lot of masking but yeah, it's changed the time. Yeah. So so we're GONNA talk about some of those changes because some of that came about from you. Probably in some ways the reason you brought Alexa on his you guys are doing more than just print. So Alexei your. Did I get this right. You are recent very recent Grad of UNC wars I. Am I graduated from Chapel Hill's media and journalism school this past may yeah. So I get to ask you how is the real word different than what teach you about marketing in school? Is actually kind of funny. I didn't fully study marketing and. Advertising and PR. which as you know is Large branches of marketing. So. It's definitely interesting. It's it's been a great experience working. Here at socity Prenton getting to implement marketing and. Utilize advertising and pr just of those things outside of a school setting. Impact as you say, I think the thing that's so hard to replicate a course in an in an academic setting is that you know that customer that walks in the door You know you're you're you're not just studying. What they care about I mean you're talking in your, you're feeling what they're. You know needing and wanting and and I think that that that's the part that you. You know it's like trying to replicate stuff in a laboratory. You just really again, it's a lot more enjoyable for sure. So. So printing is a very visual business obviously. The. It's amazing how you know ink on paper looks different than on a screen. Looks different than on camera on the phone and whatnot. Has Has. All of the shift to the virtual world made. The case for a printing business harder and I, answer either one of you. Think it's harder. certainly. In the last recession we were. There was a lot of migration to the -Ture. Techniques Communicating I think now there are a lot of there's a lot of data that suggests that tangible. documents a postcard to use. The simplest example. Has a lot more power than it did. It's it does get delivered the post office pretty good at delivering and it it it if it's good, it'll be retained. If it's good, it'll be used. We've kind of connected the tangible direct mail with some some Ma digital advertising. Through a partnership we've joined and we feel pretty good about the ability to multi touch. Selects authority on my chest adore. I'll just let's just savable I walked in the door and I said, you know I'll just text you this stuff I, mean, why would I need I mean what's how do you make the case for? Just what Clem talked about the multi touch the multi. Mediums I mean, how do you make the case for direct mail or for a print brochure these days? Yeah. Little something that Clement I talk about a lot is how I think some people might misunderstand the impact that direct mail and More traditional forms of marketing actually have on business effort. So for example, millennials. Actually are one of the. Biggest I guess demographics that benefit from enjoy receiving direct mail so I think it's the data is behind A. Direct mail and more traditional forms of print marketing. Where it's the data speaks for itself and also I think because more digital were straightforward forms of marketing are popular. Right now is a great way for businesses to stand out by using Prenton.

Alexa Clem Huffman John Socity Prenton Charlotte North Carolina A. Direct Chapel Hill Jansen Alexei Clement
House Democrats say Facebook, Amazon, Alphabet, Apple enjoy 'monopoly power' and recommend big changes

Morning Edition

00:58 sec | Last month

House Democrats say Facebook, Amazon, Alphabet, Apple enjoy 'monopoly power' and recommend big changes

"Apple and Amazon are on the defensive after a report from House Democrats. It accused them of acting like monopolies. NPR's Bobby Allen tells us the report calls for a legal changes that could lead to the break up of the big tech firms. More than 400 Page report says the Silicon Valley Giants abuse their dominant market position by running over their rivals or acquiring them. Bomb makers say that leads to less competition and hurts consumers. The report concluded that big text power hits entire industries. For instance, since Google and Facebook control most digital advertising huge amounts of revenue has been siphoned away from the news industry, the report says. That's contributed to declines in news coverage and layoffs. Lawmakers are calling for antitrust laws to be overhauled to rein in the companies and prevent future mergers. The company's released statements saying the changes proposed in the report would hurt the U. S economy. Bobby Allen. NPR NEWS SAN Francisco The tech companies

Bobby Allen NPR Silicon Valley Giants Apple Amazon San Francisco Facebook Google
CEOs Of 4 Tech Giants To Testify Before House Panel Hearing

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:41 min | 4 months ago

CEOs Of 4 Tech Giants To Testify Before House Panel Hearing

"So, today could go down in history as the tech industries. Big Moment for the first time. The four CEOS of tech giant's Amazon apple, facebook Google will appear together before Congress will not exactly together via digital video, really the sign of our times, right? The big overarching question here. Do the biggest tech companies used their power to hurt competitors and help themselves and Lena. Seljuk is here to cover this and just to disclose that all four of these companies are among NPR's financial supporters okay. Alina. That these companies are really big. So why is Congress doing this hearing now? Right, I think lawmakers are finally considering whether they need to take a more active role in policing these powerful platforms is companies have long been held in high regard as models, of Americans, scrappy ingenuity, but they stopped being scrappy startups. A long time goes you point out and put together. Now they're worth almost five trillion dollars for their entire existence. They faced very little regulation. In recent years, critics have piled on accusations of anti competitive behaviour, the Justice Department state attorneys, General started investigations, and so has the committee that's holding this hearing they've been investigating for over a year, and today is the last stop on that journey. Also is is, is this accusation of anticompetitive behaviors that really the focus here? That's the expectation that competition will be at the center stage The four companies are, of course, very different. Lots of nuance there. Generally, critics have been saying how competing with at least three of them. Amazon apple and Google. Is like playing against a team that also owns the stadium, hires the referees and writes the rules of the game like what don't they do? You said, they're all different I mean, can you talk about what some of the different questions might be for free to the different companies? Sure bit of a dense list, but let me try to hit some of the biggest themes for Amazon's Jeff. bezos. The world's richest person sexually has first appearance before Congress. But if the committee sticks to the topic I'm expecting lots of questions about whether Amazon exploited state ED collects from other sellers on the platform for its own benefit back to this idea of Amazon both running the marketplace and selling it for apple's Tim Cook. Questions are likely to focus on the APP store and whether apple gives itself. itself an unfair advantage and how charges developers for every transaction there for Google's Sundar Pichai. The big themes are Google's dominant search and digital advertising where the company controls almost a third of the market. FACEBOOK's Mark Zuckerberg into the hill a lot. Lately, he'll probably get more questions about disinformation and political speech, but also how the company buys or copies its competitors, all the companies are expected to push back that they face a lot of competition and that they represent a big success story of American innovation. Hearing is the end of a year long investigation. What happens after this? Right. So the committee will finish and publish the results I spoke with Gene Kimmelman former department of Justice antitrust official. Now, consumer group public knowledge, and he sums up the question at the heart of all this beyond a simple antitrust case. What does the law needs to look like to ensure that we have open vibrant competition in digital marketplace? So maybe there will be a pathway to reconsider existing loss. Maybe right. New Ones, which, of course, the companies will fight tooth and nail. If you're Zelina. Cellular. Glean.

Amazon Google Apple Congress Mark Zuckerberg Facebook Sundar Pichai Justice Department Lena NPR Tim Cook Jeff. Bezos Gene Kimmelman Department Of Justice General Official
Mike Zagorsek of SoundHound

The Voicebot Podcast

04:51 min | 5 months ago

Mike Zagorsek of SoundHound

"And maybe just pin little bit of a picture for the audience who haven't known you for twenty years like I have about some of the things you've done, so you would sapient you're you're you're working and user experience and some of those things and then? A Couple you went to the agency world, you worked at apple you worked at square. Thank at one point. Before coming down so if you think about some of the things that you did before sound down. What were some of the formative pieces? Thought were really interesting that you sort when you came to sound and you're like. Oh, here's something I can apply here. Perspective skill something like that. Yeah I reflect on that a lot and. UNRELATED TO APPLE IF YOU'VE listened to Steve. Jobs is I know the jobs get of quote, but. The fact that he said it is secondary to the idea which was you can to better understand where you are today, you can only connect the dots in reverse, and you can say well. How did one decision to another lead to another in how this connecting those dots help me understand it in so doing that in the benefit of this conversation I've always been. been fascinated about how humans interact with technology, what does that relationship between tools and technology and the reciprocal nature of the world that we live it as which is the result of tools and technology so I? I Love sci-fi was always watching Star Trek Star Wars you name it good bad Sifi! Always just take it all in, and because really interested in how? A world that had technology was itself a reflection on society, and I think Especially now with something like voice, that's playing itself out so. In the early days I didn't understand that as well and I don't think the the world of of technology was was. Quite at the sci-fi level yet, just getting a website you know going back twenty years. Getting a website was cool, but it. It wasn't the most exciting thing and. But I was always interested in digital after leaving Sapien I went on the agency side, but it was always very comfortable. Helping clients build websites. And digital advertising. I made the move to Apple. In two thousand seven have the day I joined with the day the iphone launched. And that was a pretty chaotic time. A very different company than it is now, and I spent five years building APPLE DOT COM and A lot of digital communication email worldwide. And but this idea of people in technology it I mean obviously being apple. You learn a lot about that. In Steve himself talks about you know liberal, liberal arts and technology merging so it's not a new concept. After apple I wanted to get a little bit closer. How companies were built so I left to go motion. Recruited by former apple colleague. And for those sites leap motion a real following. It was It was touch lists, but it was gesture based. It was actually hand and finger tracking to really high fidelity. and I learned what it needs to be. An interesting involved will start up. That's its own. PODCAST in and of itself. square for me was an opportunity to really build. A marketing practice within a more established company from scratch although that moving away from the leap motion environment where it was human computer warrant to Fintech. Realize I distance myself. From what I was passionate about so southbound with how to fight the voice platform. Is the culmination of my experience in large companies small companies. Immersed in. A world of Scifi or being more distant from it, and so it really is a combination of a lot of things. I think that's why for me. Personally I feel like we have a lot of momentum. So you Reverend Scifi. SCIFI fancy listed the voice about bad gas, not surprising being the industry, and so, what sei fide did you like to follow? Well I describe myself as a trekkie. I mean I'll. All of it and so that's. Most people. Who are inside I will have an affinity for. It's always a very safe. Safe Choice but but then as things started to diversify, really got into battle star. GALACTICA reboot and I really loved. The expanse is fan, although not everybody follows that in but when it comes to to star Trek I'm very agnostic. I love the old stuff and the new stuff than I know some of that's been poor polarizing, but it's always really just been. How does it does it help? Facilitate A world that allows us to to be more human I mean. That's always been been what Star Trek. Spin about so you can't ignore that and and be in the

Apple Steve Scifi Leap Motion Fintech
"digital advertising" Discussed on The Disruptors

The Disruptors

01:47 min | 6 months ago

"digital advertising" Discussed on The Disruptors

"Much cognitive effort and energy and skill and people and money going into something which is almost sentinels specifically cryptic Chain like the Rick. Some interesting easily Raisins and it's one thing. I've seen the Generation wasted on Jay. That's something I think. If you really WANNA complain than we would say photo sharing APPs. They'll come on. Bring Back old school flicker. I mean seriously back in the day that used to be really you get unlimited photo stores. I using in anybody you got. I think a terabyte a photo stories. And it's it's not like Google facebook Amazon at this point isn't a Yahoo. Yahoo Den has no talent to this most okay. That's very true right. Yeah I mean I wouldn't be putting any of stuff on a yahoo so at some point that y'all he says this life caserne point where they'll forget worries. Something laid off the engineer in overbill. Whatever yeah I mean we just. We do need another. Obviously but I think it's incentive actually in economic impact the thing that really worries me at the moment is the imminent collapse in digital advertising. I think we are very soon to come to a very interesting reckoning around the fact that most digital advertising is based on fraud and any surprises the extreme and this correction in that because obviously this thing is a thing it does does work in Tallahassee data cleansing drive people to buy stuff In general is worthless but the huge proportion and I think a much bigger proportionately currently except shoes portion of the digital advertising marketplace's fraudulent is extraordinarily fraudulent and and so lot.

Yahoo Jay Google engineer fraud Tallahassee overbill Amazon
Cuomo: 102 New York Children Have Inflammatory Disease Possibly Linked To Coronavirus, A ‘Parent’s Worst Nightmare’

WBBM Early Afternoon News

01:52 min | 7 months ago

Cuomo: 102 New York Children Have Inflammatory Disease Possibly Linked To Coronavirus, A ‘Parent’s Worst Nightmare’

"A mysterious illness possibly linked to corona virus is affecting children across New York state the disease is called pediatric multi system inflammatory syndrome today governor Cuomo announced the department of health is investigating one hundred and two cases across the state he says three children have died from the illness ranging from ages five to eighteen he also said sixty percent of the cases tested positive for the corona virus and forty percent tested positive for corona virus antibodies it may not have been initially diagnosed as a covert case cover cases are normally respiratory this is not predominantly respiratory it's an inflammation of the blood vessels which could affect the heart so it's more of a cardiac case than a respiratory case which is a new manifestation of the covert virus now as a parent I can tell you this is a parent's worst nightmare right to have a child we thought the children were not specially affected by the virus I did not find out that they might be and it might be several weeks later this is truly disturbing Lazio says of those one hundred in two cases eighty two are in New York City he says will help professionals learn more about the illness the city is working to raise awareness we have to rapidly inform families all over the city so a digital advertising campaign will begin today and then over the next week or two you'll see a growing effort to inform people to let them know what to look out for to let them know how to act TV and radio ads ads in community an ethnic newspapers bus shelters newsstands you name it you're going to see these all over New York

Lazio New York City New York Governor Cuomo Department Of Health
Political advertising during COVID-19 is the calm before the storm

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:33 min | 7 months ago

Political advertising during COVID-19 is the calm before the storm

"The Kobe. Nineteen pandemic has decimated digital advertising. But that may actually be good. I political campaigns online is way cheaper right now and that makes it easier for candidates to get in front of voters many of whom are a captive audience. While working from home that could give a boost to independent candidates but it could also mean that online ads are way more accessible to bad actors looking to spread misinformation for right. Now though according to marketplace's Kimberly Adams our political reporter in Washington. No one's really running any ads at all. It is usual at this time in a campaign for political ads to kind of drop off but almost no one has been running any ads. Everyone's worried that because all anyone wants to consume online is either things that make you happy or things related to Co vid. There's not really much return on investment. Even if you do take advantage of these cheaper ad prices to run a political ad. Who does that end up benefiting if anybody in the short term? I mean it sounds like that could be a big boost to incumbents absolutely because fundraising is so hard in this environment. Anybody who's trying to sort of get into a race or maybe relatively unknown or is God. Help them trying to get in media attention environment. This makes it really really challenging so their campaigns and even advocacy groups that maybe wanted to do a ballot initiative are having to balance out whether or not they want to take advantage of these cheap digital ad prices or if they want to just wait and hope that things open back up again and then maybe try to run ads later. That said I was speaking with Tim. Lamb of limb consulting services. He's a works with a lot of Democratic candidates in groups here in DC and he was saying well if there ends up being a second wave of infections as many are predicting in the fall. That's sort of at the peak of when you would have those ads. So what do we do then But even though candidates might not be buying a lot of digital advertising right now for the moment is in digital kind of the only game in town right and in many ways. The lockdown is freeing up more resources for these campaigns to spend on digital and so instead they're investing that money in digital outreach whether that be online phone banking or doing polls because people are stuck at home and they're going to answer the phone or developing new digital ads and working on their targeting strategies. So that money is going to be spent. It just won't be spent in the ways that it usually is right and so we may find that what we end up with is a supernatural campaign right if you got tired of seeing political ads during the primary if this really gets going and there is an opening for political advertising. It's GonNa be a lot and then there is also this question of digital advertising and its effect on misinformation and so. I wonder if it's cheaper. A lot of people are online consuming information. Does that make us more susceptible to messaging meant to polarize us? Does it make disinformation that much more accessible to parties? Who would want to do harm in any case if you make it cheaper for bad actors to get their message in front of people of course it increases the risk that that misinformation is going to spread further and faster and I think that's why you're seeing sort of an increase crackdown by these social media sites and People who are really active in this area about consumer awareness of this issue and so as we get further along into the campaign you can absolutely imagine that people are going to exploit the strain that all of these systems are under to get messages out there that are either untrue or at least stretching the truth quite a bit. That's marketplace's Kimberly Adams in Washington. Dc Forbes has a piece this week noting that this had already been kind of strange year for political advertising since the winter saw huge amounts of spending especially by Michael Bloomberg so between the pandemic and expected spring drop spending overall not just online peaked at twenty one point five million dollars a week just before Super Tuesday and then dropped to around five million dollars a week by the end of April. You can find a link to that story at our website. Marketplace Tech Dot

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How the Crisis Could Embolden Big Tech

Slate's If Then

08:40 min | 7 months ago

How the Crisis Could Embolden Big Tech

"This week. Microsoft Apple Amazon Alphabet and facebook all reported their quarterly earnings typically investors view. These numbers as a way to measure how companies doing and the prospect of money to be made in the future but with the economy in disarray. These numbers tell pretty singular story yes things have slowed but they're nowhere near as dire as what other industries are seeing. Do you think these tech companies view earnings right now as as a one off you know just sort of a singular news event or are they something that can tell a broader story about where the companies are now in time. I think they're probably not beating their chests from what I've talked to people inside the companies. There is caution because nobody knows when the bottom is gonNA fall out. No one knows what's going to happen to the economy in on that creates anxiety for companies like Google and facebook that make all their money from advertising and the big advertisers are the brick and mortar world. You know the department stores. Even though they're failing the travel industry will there? That's tanking but at the same time like I'm unlinked in job alerts for Google and they're adding thirty jobs a day and facebook saying it's GonNa hire ten thousand people well if you're working at that kind of company are you gonNa feel versus anywhere else in America right now. Well that's the weird irony and you wrote about this saying that the pandemic is sort of a once in a lifetime opportunity for these companies. What are the I? Guess the specifics of that why they are able to do things like hire ten thousand people if your facebook well for one goes back to the cash reserve that they're sitting on Microsoft alone. I think is worth one point three trillion dollars to give some perspective that is bigger than the economy of forty seven. Us states these companies have just amassed the level at which they have profited since the great recession is just. It's really profound. You Know Amazon. Could buy all boutique retailers in the US right now if they wanted to so they're sitting on all this cash so they have a fallback. I mean look at Boeing. It's a major. Us company they're cutting tens of thousands of jobs. That says that. Tekken away in a class of by itself when you look at other major American companies and how they're faring. It's not just the mom and pop. Businesses that are laying off people. It's major American companies. That don't have the cash runway to withstand a crisis. These enormous cash reserves held by just a few big tech companies are the result of years of growth. Elizabeth says if you trace these reserves back to their source. The story begins during the last economic crisis in two thousand eight during the great recession the whole economy the whole market took its lex but what happened afterwards is very interesting because the great recession also coincided with the advent of the smartphone so just remember like smartphones. Come about people start using their phones for everything. Two Thousand and nine people start developing apps years later. People are using APPS for this and that but no one's really shopping on their phones and this is a big question around. Will people buy things on their smartphone? Well that is something that facebook and Google figured out to great effect and once they solve that question you really see their revenues just start to completely accelerate and kind of just catapult ahead of the rest of the digital advertising industry the tech platforms become the hubs for all of our reading habits and material and also on the back end all of the measurement and delivery of ads. And so people woke up to that. I want to say twenty and fifteen twenty sixteen all of a sudden you have these tech giants and everyone else's failing and the recession. That's Kinda come because of Cova is going to accelerate that so it's a lot of the same industries when we think about you know who was decimated during the great recession brick and mortar retail. Hospitality Media That are laying people off right now and tech is really taking over a lot of those spaces and certainly did back then. Do you think these industries can can weather this or is this. Just a truly transformational moment. Oh I think it's a truly transformational moment. I think I have to paraphrase Professor Scott. Galloway of nyu is so stupid on all these topics and he said you know. It's a tale of two Americas right now. So it's big tacking. It's everyone else. Everyone else includes not just other parts of the economy but smaller companies within the tech industry. Not only the giants have the cash to outlasted economy put on pause but also the ability to work actively to edge out competition for the services that people are still using when we think about other parts of the Silicon Valley ecosystem. That aren't the big four. What happens to these smaller companies? You wrote that you know a bunch of startup jobs. I think thirty thousand have been lost since March eleventh and yet at the same time we've seen companies like zoom. You know really flourish right now. What happens to all of them? So zoom is a great example because right now in this moment everyone's like zooms. The you know the success story of the you know the the the poster child of Success Story. Yeah during Cova. Not that anyone wants to say we're profiting off cove. It and I know they don't feel that way but certainly there's that exhilaration of their business just exploding. I think it exclude ninety percent just during the lockdowns but just look at. What's also happened in the last week that speaks to the power of giants? Google has announced. Hangouts meet they've created their own version of it and facebook is launching their own competitor to zoom into house. Party another APP that has exploded. I think I wrote in the Story House Party. According to APP Annie has grown fifteen hundred percent and so right. Now you're saying well. No one's heard of no one's using hangout. Google hangouts meat and no one's using facebook's thing but just three years from now we'll zoom exist will house party exist. Elizabeth says this moment gives tech giant's both the opportunity to push out smaller competition and capitalize on our new habits and also a chance to deflect or at least delay new regulations that were supposed to take effect this year. One place where you can see this happening is in California. At the end of last year the state passed a new law that would give people control of their data. It's called the California Consumer Privacy Act Law went into effect in January of this year and in California. The law says you can go to any tech company. You can ask them for your data. What data do you have on me? And if you don't like it you can have some to delete it. And so companies have said that there's a lot of cost of compliance with that law and so for a while they've been asking for a delay in the enforcement of the law because if you don't follow the law it comes with big penalties and you see the lobbying groups already for tech saying there's no way that we can comply with this on time. The enforcement goes into effect in July. There's no way we can make it by July. We need an extension and really kind of making that argument and at the same time increasingly on the other end becoming effectively. Essential Services for governments essential because governments are now relying on that same data to track the disease. I used the example in the story of Gavin. Newsom press conferences and he's holding up modeling for the Charting the course of the disease and those models some of them are coming from underlying data from companies like Google and facebook and so especially in California you see it because of the relationship of the tech companies to the state before the state was adversarial with big tax. I mean even when Governor Newsom came on came on board as governor one of the first things he talked about was like data bill of rights for people and it's and yet they're using the data that is collected now to model the course of Corona virus so that minutes office is is a big reversal

Facebook Google United States Microsoft Giants California Elizabeth Governor Newsom Amazon Boeing Story House Party Cova Apple NYU Gavin America
Digital ads are disappearing, seriously denting revenue for Big Tech

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:44 min | 7 months ago

Digital ads are disappearing, seriously denting revenue for Big Tech

"Advertising is the lifeblood of the Internet and it's drying up fast digital media sites are off employees some have closed shop for good twitter and Pinterest have pulled their guidance for the next quarter. Facebook has said that. Although it's traffic is way up it's revenue will not be way up because advertising just isn't happening and even Google is slowing down hiring which for many in silicon valley is a sign that the slump is really real. Sarah Fisher is a media reporter for axios. I asked her how bad the drop off in digital advertising looks for the tech industry so the biggest names in tak would be companies like Google and facebook that make the majority of their money on digital advertising. But they haven't come out and given exact estimates however we've talked to some analysts and they have given US estimates and you're looking at total of roughly forty billion dollars of revenue loss between Google and facebook alone a few more million from some of the smaller tech companies like twitter snapchat and so what are the downstream impacts of that. I mean we know that facebook and Google make up something like two-thirds of the digital advertising landscape. If they are in trouble it must be Armageddon for every other online publisher or website. Right totally will be advertising as an industry tends to grow at the same rate as the GDP and our economy's doing pretty well but now with the corona virus pandemic what analysts are predicting is that digital advertising revenue is still going to grow slightly. This year in total digital advertising was supposed to grow twelve percent this year. Now we're only expecting it to grow about four percent and there are three big categories. That are going to be really hit. One is search the other social media ads which is the way that facebook makes most of its money and those ads tend to be heavily dependent on video. What do you think that that four percent growth spend looks like is it a case where all that money is going to go to the incumbents to facebook and Google for example? Y- probably even though facebook and Google are expected to take the brunt of the losses. They're still gonNA come out far better than a lot of the publisher specific deals if you're a digital website. You're going to be heavily impacted by this downturn for a couple of reasons. One A lot of publishers. Don't just sell ads for things like hey we're a great company. Where a great brand? They sell ads to push products. I think about buzzfeed cells affiliate marketing which are like adds to help. You sell things on Amazon now. Amazon's said that they're cutting all of that spend and so. I would expect any digital publisher whether you're a smaller digital media company or if you are a smaller tech company to be heavily impacted by this yeah. Let's talk about that affiliate program because that is sort of hard to understand but a super big deal for a lot of sites across the Internet. That really have built a business model on the idea that if you send traffic to a retailer whether it's Amazon or even best buy you will get a kickback. And you can build a business that way I mean. Is that like over for the foreseeable future? We've talked to sources who say it's not over for the foreseeable future. That AMAZON IS PULLING BACK TEMPORARILY. And that they do intend to ramp these relationships back up host endemic or later point in the pandemic. The problem here is that no one knows when this thing is going to end and so for publishers that relied on revenue monthly. If you get pulled out from you now you have no idea when it's coming back which is a really scary thing. A Lotta publishers relied on that sort of affiliate ECOMMERCE added revenue for large percentages of their overall revenue. For some up to twenty five percent. How does this compare to advertising writ large the digital drop that still will see growth? Which kinda surprising. How does that compare to the rest of the industry? Oh it's great. I mean if you take a look at what's expected to happen television or Radio. That is going to be devastating. We expected to see a seventeen percent drop in print ads this year. That's down to twenty five percent post pandemic. We were expecting national television to go down around three percent now. We're expecting it to go down. Thirteen percent similar types of things with radio and of course out of home which includes things like billboards and subway posters. Out of home was one of the most fast growing non digital advertising mediums. Billboards were becoming digital more. People are getting out of the house. It was actually a great way to market but now the people are stuck inside. We were expecting billboard industry to grow about four percent. Now we're expecting it to go down about twelve percent by the end of the year. So what does this mean for digital business models like all of the digital media sites that we've seen having layoffs just in the last week or two And even ad-supported APPS or other services like is this a reset. Well say this. There's a difference between what we're seeing now versus what we saw during the last financial crisis in two thousand eight and two thousand nine. The last financial crisis we are recovery was like a very shallow you which meant that we kind of slowly hit it until one day it was really bad and then we slowly recovered. The one upside here is that analysts. Expect this to be a steeper you recovery. Meaning that were expected to pull back pretty quickly. Once things open up again. Remember the difference between this recession. The last one is that we have severe impacts up front. We dropped very quickly because we put everyone in an at home. We didn't do that in house recession. And so we're expecting things to ramp up much more quickly. Once we physically open things up but I think the long term impacts are this. A lot of these companies are going to drop out entirely. You saw the digital website called the outline that just shut down. A lot of these websites aren't going to shut down entirely. But they're not gonNA come back in the same form. They will have already laid off dozens of employees. They're not going to be able to ramp up that quickly. And what you should expect to see. Is that different types of coverage will get cut. Different products will get cut and to the media. Landscape we were used to is not going to be the same when we get back. Sir Fisher is a media reporter for axios companies that rely on digital advertising. Say It's not just the volume of ADS. That's way down. It's also the pricing. There's more inventory. So companies are forced to sell ads for a lot less which also hurts revenue. I The company that owns match group and other ad-supported businesses said earlier this month. That ad rates are down about thirty

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39 states investigating Juul's marketing of vaping products

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:34 sec | 9 months ago

39 states investigating Juul's marketing of vaping products

"Investigators from thirty nine states will look into the marketing and sales of vaping products by San Francisco based Juul labs including whether the company targeted young people and made misleading claims about nicotine content in its products attorneys general from Connecticut Florida Nevada Oregon Texas say they'll be leading the multistate investigation into Joel which is also facing numerous lawsuits by users who say they became addicted to the company's products Joe released a statement saying it has halted television print and digital advertising and eliminated most flavors in response to the

San Francisco Juul Labs Texas Joel JOE Marketing And Sales Nicotine Connecticut Nevada Oregon
Democratic debate: Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren

Bloomberg Law

10:09 min | 10 months ago

Democratic debate: Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren

"Craig Gordon runs our political coverage based in DC's up here in Manchester with us as as we watch and wait it gets closer as the vote goes up Greg anybody like you has I know you have a list of stories in your head right now that you want your team to get out there and and right tomorrow the days ahead give us a sense of that what do you what what intrigues you which is yeah I mean I think for the Bloomberg news audience a story that we're going to have tomorrow morning is about the flow of the class of lives with Warren I mean again if we've been sitting here a year ago having this conversation we would have probably been talking about her as a potential front runner actually in this state done well here a nationally had done well so the polls had a little bit of a moment there Wall Street obviously not the biggest fans of Elizabeth Warren and so her classes been quite spectacular the and I think for our customers in particular our listeners and readers that's a good that's a person they want to know more about it seemed like she I think what our story kind of tries to get at is you know I have a plan for that well we have a plan for everything it's very easy to start poking holes and she made some real missteps on Medicare for all where you know Bernie Sanders I was gonna cost would cost and I can worry about and she had to go over the number and never was very good and she's a little bit evasive and I think they were like wait a minute I thought you were like the one with the plan I think you're the one with all the all the tease cross and I's dotted and when that fell away she just didn't have a lot to kind of fall back on she also spent a lot of money and digital advertising less on TV advertising that's you know a surprising to me a little bit twenty twenty the TV advertising still move the needle was a quite a lot I don't think she ever quite did that as much as she should how many governing centers there is there's just like only so much oxygen in the race for two very liberal candidates who you know if you put their positions on paper there the pretty much identical in they're very different personally in the different people and and their approach to politics but you know if you have the Sir two choices it made it hard for a warm to find the oxygen to kind of take kind of co exist with when Sanders and then in that race you know earlier tonight I think it was Kevin who said Kevin so really who said he thought that were worn started we were talking about you know policies but he said he thought it was wind Bernie and she team you know to blows on stage and one went up and one went down yeah I it was it was one of the first and most ugliest kind of interactions where she basically said the Bernie Sanders and told her to private mean that women can't win the presidency Bernie said of course the night that we all got to listen to that hot Mike moment where you kind of challenge them for any kind of pushed back and it was kind of it was like to just like her to watch you know it's sort of a I don't know who said what I could imagine pretty my system like that or criticism misinterpreted to be like that but yeah I think there was there's so many supporters it could go either way that I do think that my turns people off to to warn yet to your point and and you've just you know he here Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren have basically the the the same position when it comes to Medicare for all and it you know burning a test the question because you have going to cost you know thirty trillion dollars in Elizabeth Warren basically cover the same answer yet she tanks and he searches I'm Bernie is that I think burning the problem for war as you try to get a little bit to the left of Bernie Sanders there's no room to the left Bernie Sanders again here there's no room there yeah and so when she sort of tried out Medicare for all him when his answer is essentially up thirty four trillion of breaking taxes and that's what's going to happen for a lot of people wild maybe some people don't want to have the taxes raises a very clear answers seem like he understood his position and he was a little bit like take it or leave it like that I think this will we need to for the country Medicare for all I think give raise taxes to pay for it and I think it's an important thing to raise the taxes I think warrant kind of try to dance around it a little bit you took a little while even come up with a number of was I was about the same thirty four trillion as you say but in that sort of sense of like I I I was use the word evasiveness like wait a minute like I thought again if I knew what the plans at that you're the one that was the truth teller here and I mean I feel like he's being very clear and you're being very evasive in our like that and I just think that when you run against your own narrative that's right exactly so most interesting into politics he had built a whole narrative of being the person with all the answers the most important question I would argue which is Medicare for all health care's thirty some percent since the one topic your New Hampshire tonight what is it I suppose if you don't have your answer straight on that that's that could be for you know you know listen and we were going to refresh these numbers sixty three percent now reporting of the eight PM organ using a P. numbers as Craig says that's what bloomer goes with here some of the networks maybe calling this but it's tightening of sixty four percent now Bernie Sanders has twenty five point nine percent of the of the vote the judge has twenty four percent that's what that's one point nine percent difference in culture in a twenty point one so here's the big what if Craig what if Pete booted judge wins the New Hampshire primary have we put to rest some of the murky miss that we've been muddling through tonight not one bit yeah I mean I sent out one yeah I mean look you could make an argument that if if it works are worn surging magenta repeating Sanders so now you have you know again we have like thirty two lanes left not a part of the parties burning kind of come to be there and you've got to eventually three cameras in the other they're going to get out and that's nobody should feel they should feel good about her win tonight her third place finish right that's structuring for more surprising to us but it just means you know on to the bat on the South Carolina the races the marking the race of fluid and anybody hoping for answers you into this a moment ago you you want your kids go to a store and lives with one let me re site this Elizabeth Warren no sixty four percent of the vote in nine point four percent Biden eight point four I mean the threshold here's fifteen in they were hovering in the you know the low teens now they drop below ten is this is got to be even more surprising than one would imagine yeah I mean the Biden collapses been kind of a parent since I was a very poorly there came here it is you know a lot of energy as events and they their whole you know vine campaign says it's you know the classic marathon not a sprint the first concerts reporting South Carolina matters we can't decide the nominee and those of African American Hispanic or get a chance to have their say all fine points but if your entire calling cars let's ability I'm the one that could be done trump and you're getting not even ten percent in the state that you should do fine in that that's just that's just crushing crushing move or is there anything Sanders can do to broaden his appeal to the the moderates the Democratic Party I mean he's been really leaning hard lately on this electability argument that goes back to what I said like I'm electable because not because I'm the moderate you know the kind of the middle of the road person but I'm the person that can inspire the energy in the youth and other kind of in the laughs and again I've you could buy that he could not buy it but it's the case in these kind of sticking to it so that is his case I think he needs to go beyond being just the guy with the crazy hair and he's a socialist and get all of to being a person like no no I can actually beat down from like Joe Biden thought told he could he's couldn't clearly warned that chance rejects Chrysler seven years only ran a small town in Indiana for a few years I'm the guy on the person can do and again he he started to give his argument that direction slightly and I think he the more he leans into that if you get people to buy it that we you can't just state he's got a movement going he's got he's got to have a why just like any of these things that I was saying when something I have to win something right so you know and second tonight after blue judges are like wait a minute I thought you were the guy yeah trump so you know that that doesn't exactly hold that argument but he has tried to broaden his hit the case it is making the voters and I think it was some over by you is there any measure other than these primaries are these caucuses where we can see that Bernie or anybody for that matter is picking up support yeah the one place is money and he's he's always fundraise always man's very strong twenty three seven million I think in the last quarter he does it again it's a small donors people and write a little check drop an envelope whatever that is a real again coming to rally signs support writing a check men's real so warm and I was the need money could be in politics but also as a way to show people like yes I have the sort of army of grassroots folks that are willing to spend their hard earned money to help me get elected president that's a big deal yeah you you said something that was interesting a few moments ago you said if Amy coe charges so we don't have her supporters be project has his supporters and you said you know Amy Klobuchar hadn't done so well and Pete had picked up a few more of Amy's of voters you know Pete could have check could be the one winning tonight are those the supporters of Bridget clover charm of supporters are they one of the same I mean is not exactly but I do think they're looking for I mean in some ways they're looking for who is the anti Bernie a lot you know we've we've all watch the debates we're judging call which are muted first more vociferously in the later debates of said Medicare fraud be a disaster take away feels private health insurance you know maybe when I was love our health insurance but I mean a lot of people are pretty calm for that program to get for the employer the idea that I was going to take it over so I think for a lot of voters Bernie just seems I use the word like radical you know just sort of seems like a little bit out there on the left in the whole thing the insurance thing is a very clear differentiator between us canceling as if you have private insurance I'm not sure ready to throw that over for a government plan where you know you're coming up prisoners to be able to work that out so they're not identical I mean I'm sure we know in these covers Gessle this form for women obviously people to jazz for something he gave you know presidents can get this far as certain as for those camps others there are variations within their base but a lot of it is I don't like the direction Bernie says we take this country and I get by some of the can first stop Bernie and then the truck Greg we it's been great conversation but we know you have things to do we're gonna let you go as much as I hate to

Craig Gordon Manchester Greg Bloomberg
Facebook hits 2.5B users in Q4 but shares sink from slow profits

CNBC's Fast Money

07:57 min | 10 months ago

Facebook hits 2.5B users in Q4 but shares sink from slow profits

"It is all about earnings to tech names on our radar. This our facebook and Microsoft are both on the move after reporting results. In fact we have full team coverage tonight standing by to break down. Those names tmz Josh Lipton in San Francisco watching Microsoft Week. Kick things off though with Julia abortion and the big move lower for facebook Julia. Well Scott facebook retreating from its record high shares down over six percent so why is the stock declining. It's due to dramatically decelerating in growth. This is the fourth straight quarter. Companies Revenue Growth was less than thirty percent and its earnings per share growth eight percent. The better than expected is down from the sixty sixty five percent growth facebook reported in that metric in the year ago. Quarter showing pressure on the companies operating margins forty two percent operating margins the quarter that is down from forty six percent a year ago and down from fifty seven percent in the fourth quarter of twenty seventeen now total user numbers came amen hair ahead of expectations. Two and a half billion monthly active users user growth in the US and Canada slowed company adding just one million new monthly active users in the quarter. And that's the region with the highest revenue per user beards con Sebastian saying quote the modifies the revenue and. EPS beat may disappoint some some investors accustomed to bigger out performance and RBC's Mark Mahayni saying quote. This is an expectations. Correction the recent rally in the stock suggested that the market was looking for material upside and didn't get it with a call just now getting underway. We're going to be listening in particularly for what. CFO David wayner leaner says about expectations for twenty twenty performance and twenty twenty costs now. Last quarter he said that Revenue Growth Deceleration in twenty twenty would be less pronounced than it would be in the fourth quarter so certainly a lot to listen for a Scott back over to you. We'll unpack right now. Julia thanks so much all right. So so I I just so you can take the view and say well this is. This was an expectations issue. Or you can simply say you got decelerating growth and you also have a stock that was up fifty percent over the last year and these results. Just don't cut it. It's the ladder because you still have twenty seven percent revenue growth. Yes below thirty percent but their expenses sir up I mean profit. Profit is now only up sixteen percent. Because they're spending more. Tim Talks about this all the time. But let's just quickly look at where the stock has put it in context. The old high that July two thousand eighteen high basically was two and nine and a half to ten. That's where we are now for the first time in a while we're revisiting those levels. I'm going to be fascinated to see tomorrow if it holds and bounces for trades through. I think tomorrow we'll tell you all you need to know about the stock for the next ten to fifteen percent and quite frankly actually right now. I think it all hangs in the balance. Just do think it is a matter of those operating expenses. They talked about when you think about this and a lot of people are focused on that earnings number this year. Twenty twenty five percent. EPS growth. That seems fairly dramatic. I think you can go back and look at Google over the last ten years. When you saw periods where revenue growth was still amazing if you think about revenue growth is expected to be over twenty percent this year? That's big number seventy billion dollars in sales last year. We know why they're spending here and those issues are in front of this election year. That's they can't really get that wrong. I expect twenty twenty. EPS growth to be higher than what consensus. Settles Out Tomorrow when we get at some point the back half of the year. So if you're thinking about it at twenty times it's probably pretty reasonable given that revenue growth and I'm not a facebook trades at a discount not only to the certainly the the appeared group. Whatever you WANNA call it the social media but certainly within the fan but it trades at a discount? Because not only did I I. I think that Revenue Growth First of all twenty five percent was below street expectations. I think industry was closer to twenty-seven FX neutral twenty eight percent. So when you're not growing on the top line and everything we can all talk about optics because I think it is the existential issue for the company but bottom line line management gets they get a discount they get a discount in this valuation. They still can't tell you how they're going to get control of their business. And that's something that I think. The market is punishing them for fourth straight great quarter of revenue growth issues. Right is that the biggest takeaway that's the biggest takeaway because the market environment win. Investors are paying up for growth in a relatively low growth. GDP environment you look at the stocks that are performing their names that are growing fast so when that decelerate S- and you have a relative to the market market high pe ratio. Your stock gets crossed down seven percent. It's GonNa take some time for me. FACEBOOK is likely dead money for another quarter until they turn turn out until you turn over some turn over some of the investors that were in for that high growth as well as get a little bit more clarity and maybe we get some more on the call about the expenses and how they're going to resume Gr- other side of that as well. Okay that's fine. Do -opoly is. It's a two person game and they're in the game and the best player in the biggest player within that game so one the stock why not take advantage of this because the stocks underperformance peer-group. It's under from the triple Q.. Fifty percent force because I mean. Think about where we. We're on cinnamon. After after again that first revenue miss you just talked about three or four successive quarters of revenue. So that fifty percent move and it's thirty percents since October on some levels handicapping capping the stock here. But but to be clear if you own this stock relative to its Peer Group you've underperformed for the last two and a half years. That's the reason you don't own the stock to his appointed duopoly. Do you want to own one of one of those two for the next ten years or whatever I mean. Here's a point. I played in devil's advocate a little bit here. They're still growing users. I mean on a so quenching chill basis if your users grew nine percent so users haven't left a platform for all the reasons that people are unhappy with this company about advertisers. Certainly have not either. So that's really the the bull case on a longer term basis and we're talking about the multiple relative to the market. It's actually pretty fair. And I think there's a lot of people would be willing to kinda discount. The reasons why earnings growth with has decelerated so much. Listen law large numbers when you're growing sales the way this company has okay two thousand seventeen. They grew sales at forty seven percent. Eighteen thirty seven percent last year. Twenty any seven percent expected to be twenty two percent this year. Still pretty good when you're expected to eighty five billion so I think there's a reason why people who want to be exposed to this massive at digital advertising retiring Pi. It's one of the only places where she got to go. You WANNA buy Avenue Amazon for their five billion dollars in advertising sales twitter for the three points Dow Jack Investor. That's in here though. So the long term investor. You're going to own this for the next ten years. It's down seven percent knock yourself out go and buy it. But there's this period of time where you have investors in there that had been in it only because it's a gross stock. They could care about the digital ad team. They don't care about any of that to say. Where do I get? The most growth growth stock breaks like this. When that breaks it takes some time so it really depends on what you are? Are you a traitor. If your trade stay away from this for a couple months if you're an investor and you're saying you know what I want to be in this space between Google and facebook for the next five years down some of your knock yourself out you're saying the growth is so great. Where else can you get? This kind of growth. I mean where else can you get this kind of growth this kind of valuation well. That's not a lot of people sheet. They're not expensive stocks right. That's the point but this cheaper than most of the fangs. Look it's in is the cheapest. Let's be clear it's twenty times. Four reasons and the closest period has google and Google certainly rated a couple of turns on the multiple. But I still Jill thank you have a case where everything we said. The most important thing is right now. Advertisers haven't left the advertiser. Roi Is very impressive on facebook Except for the fact that the and the AD growth at around twenty four twenty five percent is something. That's kind of. It's going sideways here. I don't know I think this may be kind of the peak of some of that. All right let's look at the other a big tech mover after the bell. It is Microsoft trading at all time highs after its own earnings beat. Let's

Facebook Revenue Growth Google Julia Microsoft Scott Twenty Twenty San Francisco Josh Lipton United States Sebastian RBC Canada CFO TIM David Wayner Mark Mahayni Jill ROI
Traditional and Social Media: Trump's Key to Success

The Wilderness

11:20 min | 10 months ago

Traditional and Social Media: Trump's Key to Success

"What is keeping you up at night? The most when you think about twenty twenty. What keeps me up at night is that trump has a massive structural media advantage? He has a massive state adjacent propaganda machine that pumps his message out to his voters with tremendous discipline support and Democrats have not yet figure how to counter that. This primary season is not lending itself to to our party getting out a clear alternative to Donald Trump. He's an uncanny message person every time I think he's really off on something. Then we go and test it and we find out how strong it is. I wish we had some place that was able to get out consistent message against him. Two of the most important things that Democrats can control role in this campaign are what to say and how to say it. In other words our message and the strategies we use to communicate that message is Dan Pfeiffer and Celinda Lake just mentioned the Party starts twenty twenty at a disadvantage in both of these areas along. Crowded primary. Hasn't allowed us to coalesce around a single message about what we stand for. Or how we govern and aside from your friends at crooked media a few other outlets like us there's just no progressive equivalent to Fox News and the massive propaganda machine that Donald Trump and the Republicans rely on to deliver their message overcoming. This challenge might be the most critical step on the path to victory. Sorry in November. Because as we've now learned from the organizers on the ground and the voters in our focus groups it's crucial to breakthrough all the noise and nastiness cynicism to actually reach people where they are and persuade them that it's possible for us to get to a better place. So how do we do that. We'll talk to people who have some smart ideas on media and message in our final episode of the Wilderness. It's very hard for Democrats. Even the current contract with the media to put the conversation on the things that matter to voters healthcare where the economy those sorts of issues. They don't get clicks. Try Social Media Traffic. There's no algorithm benefit to them so they might as well be trees falling in the forest at times. That's Dan pfeiffer. Lifer Co host to Pod Save America and author of un-trumpian America pointing out. How difficult it is for Democrats to break through with messages policies that the voters we've heard from actually actually care about Donald Trump on the other hand doesn't have this problem? He has a tremendous advantage because of social media so the Algorithms reward outrage and outrage as the coin of the Roman conservative politics but it's not just social media where trump has an advantage. He also has tremendous Mendes influence over. What the traditional media covers the traditional media is forced by the perverse economics of digital advertising icing to cover trump? He is the nation's assignment editor. which is something one of us wants called him? We start with the president's public meltdown on twitter pushing the trade war between the world's economic superpowers into a dangerous new fe day. Nine I think of the president continuing to go. After this group of women he calls them a UC seve plus three. That's the new nickname that he unveiled for them today. The way in which media outlets have to pay their bills in a world in which you are getting paid paid by the click forces you into covering and writing about content that gets clicks. Because you're getting your traffic from facebook and Google right right in facebook. It's rewarding trump content because trump content makes people so he has that advantage tear McGowan a democratic strategist and CEO. Joe Of digital advertising firm acronym expands on Dan's notion of trump. As the nation's assignment editor the mainstream media are only covering what what gets the most noise which is actually really seeded by the Republicans and trump specifically because trump will tweet something out and then the media picks up on it because they have to exceed the president. It started when he tweeted on Sunday. That Alabama would quote most likely be hit much harder than anticipated painted. The National Weather Service then tweeted. Alabama will not see any impacts from Roy in the trump era a lot of media criticism is about whether journalists I do enough to fact check. Trump's lies or even call them lies at all but what may be even more helpful to trump is that the media has allowed him to become as Dan says says the nation's assignment editor. They let him drive the conversation. They let him pick the issues. They let him set the terms of the debate. Even when he's not talking about about governing or policy-making which usually isn't these bad incentives or why as Dan points out the overall effect of media criticism about trump trump will always be limited. I mean there is definitely some benefit to working there but we are not like seven tweets. Maggie Haberman away from solving this problem like we also have to be clear we as progressives have the wrong view of the media. We had this vision of the media as this set set of referees and fact checkers who bring order to our messy politics and so in doing so we think they think it's their job. takedown trump that is not their job so if we continue to mythology is the media. We're never going to succeed. The communication strategy because it lends us to believe leave that the best way to communicate is talk to the media supposed to talk to people. What's even more unfortunate is that Republicans realized long ago that they needed to go around the traditional channel media and build their own channels of communication trump has a massive state adjacent propaganda machine that pumps his message out to his voters with tremendous disciplined? Frankly was not just Fox. It's the entire right-wing talk radio sphere. Beer it's Owen. It's Breitbart. It is like this. Plethora of online very sketchy digital outlets that are pumping trump propaganda into the ecosystem. Is Dan says right. Wing media goes well beyond Fox News and Breitbart to random corners of the Internet. You've probably never heard of Tair. McGowan knows these online worlds all too well and takes us down the rabbit hole. There's also publications that popped up like the big league. The Big League was started by twenty seven year old man who left Breitbart because he felt it had gone soft after trump was elected in the big league is notorious yes because they were the publication that released the north black face. Photo did participate in a dance contest. In which darken my face as part of a Michael Jackson Costume the yearbook photo was broken. Not by the New York Times but by big league politics a right wing media outlet run by a former BREITBART writer. This the new normal these strategically pushed it out and got the national media to cover it win. You know I was in a very politically vulnerable moment. Coming to the defense of a late abortion bill in the State House in Virginia this revenge politics media is being being used as a weapon to deploy this type of revenge politics after the election. So there are these all over the Internet and they're not just the ones that are so explicitly unapologetic about their political agenda. Like Breitbart and Fox. There's also sinclair a hundred and ninety three local television affiliates. Let's sinclair is a pro-trump Corporation. Why our cable news channels airing so much coverage of the trump Russia story so here are the options? It's bias against the president for higher ratings or it's a really important story and now these trusted local news. Brands friends are putting money behind facebook. Ads to their viewers endorsing and marketing trump Maga- hats the daily beast reports sports at least twenty-seven clear broadcasters posted items on their website starting on Thursday hyping a new keep America great had for sale and the trump campaign's website. The right right has built this infrastructure and now is pushing millions and millions of dollars a month behind the content and the messengers that have influence on their side. How on channels like facebook and Google? And we're not spending any money we're just relying on the mainstream media to do our job which they're not gonNa do do because they live in fear of being called the liberal fake news media that that if we're not spending at the same clip that trump and the Republicans are just to drive our offensive. Message were losing the information war. The good news is Tara. Has Some ideas about how the Democrats can catch up. I believe the only solution antidote to this challenge is to have our own communication like our own owned channels to communicate to people directly and that does not mean in. NFL areas ways does not mean spread liser misinformation. It's the opposite but we have to do. Is We actually have to compete tears. Right it's one of the reasons we started crooked crooked media and now terror is actually building another one of those channels herself after working as a digital producer for Obama in twenty twelve and is the director of digital strategy. See for priorities. USA In two thousand Sixteen Terrace started acronym her nonprofit digital firm that's creating progressive ads in content for twenty twenty acronym. mm-hmm isn't making these ads the same way it's always been done but the same old democratic ad firms. They're using an approach. That's both more creative. And more data driven we'll look at a very very large audience of people And take you know ten different messages. Around how trump has been really bad for the economy. So those messages could be you know the impact of offshoring jobs the tax cuts for the rich and squeezing the middle class further. The trade war. What have you and then for each of those messages will develop tons of content memes gifts videos etc then our creative director will go to the team and be like okay? What are all of the different visceral values driven identity driven ways? We can express this message. And they'll build out all this content and then what we do is we push it out to a broader audience. Audience of voters in say Michigan Pennsylvania Wisconsin. And then what we're doing is we are actually surveying groups of these voters who are getting all of this content Dan and learning on a biweekly basis. What of these messages? And what of the actual pieces of content were delivering is having the most impact impact at chipping away at trump's approval rating among those voters. In real time

Donald Trump Dan Pfeiffer Breitbart Facebook Assignment Editor. President Trump America Mcgowan FOX Celinda Lake Google Big League Fox News Alabama Twitter
Voice Education with VoiceMasters - Kickstarting Careers in Voice

Inside VOICE

03:45 min | 11 months ago

Voice Education with VoiceMasters - Kickstarting Careers in Voice

"Hello and welcome back to end sideways. podcasts I am Kerrie Roberts the CO host actually one of my co host is also here. So we're here today. With James Poulter her aunt's gotten Susan Westwater with a big announcement about voice masters. That's right so I'd love for you to start with telling us how you guys decided to all work together. Gather in the first place before you decide to tell us what it is so we have been talking to these guys for a long time now friends through the community over the past a couple of years voice summit and in both of our businesses respectively affects lives in that pragmatic. We've seen that. There's a real need over the past really over the past year if People who are maybe smaller medium sized businesses all the people that are pivoting that career invoice all for people are starting out a small team but they need to build the use case voice in their business really upscale and so with these guys walking on their fabulous voice strategy book which has just come out which is really exciting and the work that we have been doing really focusing on strategy work with clients in the UK. We thought that we could offer something. That is much more powerful bringing everybody together to work on something like voice masters which ages I online tool but in live and in person mastermind program and the other and it all came up with twitter. The J. J. P. had a tweet responded next week we had a conversation. So and what did the tweet say. I think we were looking for people to help the hell in the spirit of the voice community it was. We can do this so much better together trying to compete separately and so it makes so much sense to take experiences of JP Jen Susan Cain and combined with hours to come up with something even more powerful so the program itself is going to run over six weeks lodging the end of February. I'm will give people the opportunity to essentially get one. She served as well as well. So Group calls and I like engagement sessions with all of us plus the rest of our team and also some special guests long. Why importance as well? So we're we're really excited for what this could mean essentially people that was starting the through invoice. So it's more people want to start their career voice or for brand a smaller company. That wants to start a voice skill for themselves. It's actually both and so really what we're trying to do is activate the business community and help them understand what the opportunity to voice represents what the value is why they need to start busing now which is really a lot out of the conversations. We've all been having over the past year with right so if we can go through and almost productized that and actually create a place they can go to learn all this then they actually can the the internal champions and actually talking to their CEO's or CMO's and everyone else to make that actually happen. So I like to think of this as some way that we can actually help the entire community deep benefit. Because it's going to help the platform people. It's GONNA help Amazon and Google. Let's get help. Everyone copywriters and so by activating the business community. We're hoping that we can actually shortcut what and get happening happening faster versus waiting on it just kind of naturally I mean I like to think of is the fact that if we will starting out moving ourselves my previous this job roles into voice. Now what would I want to get started. And that's what the solution should hopefully be Kevin. So this is your shortcut. We spent two years. There's after spending twenty plus years in digital advertising marketing and all of that. Well if someone comes in today. They're going to feel like they're left behind. We're willing to help share that knowledge college to bring you up to speed so that then that whole time of where have play. CATCHUP is alleviates. You can start getting. I'm making better experiences and stop just checking a box of creating something that's actually GonNa show the viability of voice as a proper business channel.

Jp Jen Susan Cain Kerrie Roberts Susan Westwater James Poulter Kevin Twitter UK CEO Amazon J. J. P. Google
"digital advertising" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"digital advertising" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"WVU dot e. d.`you okay as we get passed a bunch of letters and back to the meat of the matter here. Let's pick it up right. Hey Justin before I ask you another question. I came out the gate pretty fast. Would you take a minute and give us. Your background is a little bit. You clearly know what you're talking about. So what are you doing on the day to day. That makes you an expert expert in this. The thank you background is. I started doing this type of work in California in two thousand and one when I was living Los Angeles was working for a company that sold gold and silver and the the shortest version of it is at the time I started working for them. They were twenty five million dollars a year company and when I left in two thousand and six. They're doing thirty five million dollars a year directly attributable to to paid search and I'm not taking credit for that amazing Najma team amazing sales team but at that time people are still kind of reeling off the DOT com bubble. Not Not really sure. If digital was something that was going to continue to exist or not and I was able to see firsthand it really would so when I moved back east for family reasons with my wife and and Virginia and family was Kinda prepare for the started in my agency. It's direct online marketing On the Web Direct O.. M. Dot COM We started back in two thousand six and we specialized in driving leads and sales to our clients Over talk to the point that now we're one of the top two percent of all agencies. They work with around the globe. So that's really what we have on his providing those results to -gratulations relations. That's a that's a neat store success so I'm with real the heavy on. Let me jump into this next question. And so there's lots of things happening in the space and end with campaigns. How can you track or leverage? What the competition is doing? I know that's something that work constantly trying to figure out. What are the other guys doing just to just to know maybe even build off of some of that? So how are you leveraging. Competitive Information.

WVU Justin Los Angeles Virginia California
"digital advertising" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"digital advertising" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"And and Winston Salem and Charlotte is from your perspective as Lincoln. A great tool to do that based on what you just described so question it depends on on a couple of factors so with social media one of the first things. You're going to look at is. What is the demographic that you can reach and specifically within a geography so? There's two things John. Lincoln side one is that it's geographic. Options are a little bit more limiting than they are with facebook. Certainly or with Google or some of these other platforms. That are out there so when you want to get as specific as that into Winston Salem. I'm very familiar with that area. Brother went to wake forest. I had By my grand- manacle grew up in Greensboro early Greensboro. You might have to extend a little bit beyond just specifically those areas into a little bit of a larger Metro area or North Carolina As a whole so that'd be one limiting factor the second factor you would look at would be. Is that industry or those owners. Going to be using Lincoln as money as maybe some of the other there verticals are and I think that if you would pull up their data within Within Lincoln you would find them on Lincoln but I'm not sure how active they would be so Those will be my the first concerns but in terms of reaching exactly what you're looking for. There's no doubt it'd be worth exploring to see. Are you going to be able to reach a large enough audience that it that it makes sense. They're interesting you know you've talked about. Lincoln blinked in there for a second how Google evolved beyond just search. Transformation has been really fascinating to watch which Innocence really two thousand two thousand one and the first thing. They kind of open up their display network and being able to Offer people ways to reach people with banner advertising on on the Internet in essence. It's like a modern day form of remnant advertising for magazines so that you don't have to advertise directly with publication. You can reach people kind of back during warning them on on these various sites then they bought Youtube in two thousand six so they've had these things around for awhile. He's different vehicles if had gino advertising around for a while the biggest change. That's come in has been. They've been building up their knowledge and their data capabilities. Over all of these years. That now you you don't have to use those specific tactics just for wrench. Just from Brent awareness which is what they were primarily good for with the possible exception of retargeting remarketing. Hurry call that cyber stalking form of advertising. But you're now able to use it in a way to actually drive leaves as well and on the BBC side to drive sales. So that's something that really outside of the last six twelve eighteen months. They said they offered but it wasn't that good. And now it's coming to the point where you can actually get you that return on ad spend. That wasn't there before from a direct standpoint and it sounds Complex not complex loaded. Maybe is a better word. So we're in the we're in the restaurant. Space were also in the the delivery space ubereats ubereats and door dash and using very competitive keywords.

Lincoln Winston Salem Google Greensboro facebook Charlotte North Carolina Youtube John stalking Brent BBC
"digital advertising" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"digital advertising" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"West Virginia University Dot Edu DMC dot WVU dot e. d.`you okay as we get passed a bunch of letters and back to the meat of the matter here. Let's pick it up right. Hey Justin before I ask you another question. I came out the gate pretty fast. Would you take a minute and give us. Your background is a little bit. You clearly know what you're talking about. So what are you doing on the day to day. That makes you an expert expert in this. The thank you background is. I started doing this type of work in California in two thousand and one when I was living Los Angeles was working for a company that sold gold and silver and the the shortest version of it is at the time I started working for them. They were twenty five million dollars a year company and when I left in two thousand and six. They're doing thirty five million dollars a year directly attributable to to paid search and I'm not taking credit for that amazing Najma team amazing sales team but at that time people are still kind of reeling off the DOT com bubble. Not Not really sure. If digital was something that was going to continue to exist or not and I was able to see firsthand it really would so when I moved back east for family reasons with my wife and and Virginia and family was Kinda prepare for the started in my agency. It's direct online marketing On the Web Direct O.. M. Dot COM We started back in two thousand six and we specialized in driving leads and sales to our clients Over talk to the point that now we're one of the top two percent of all agencies. They work with around the globe. So that's really what we have on his providing those results to -gratulations relations. That's a that's a neat store success so I'm with real the heavy on. Let me jump into this next question. And so there's lots of things happening in the space and end with campaigns. How can you track or leverage? What the competition is doing? I know that's something that work constantly trying to figure out. What are the other guys doing just to just to know maybe even build off of some of that? So how are you leveraging. Competitive Information to two. There were three tools that we like more than others. That will that will share. And I'll talk about some other ways as well. One of my favorite we're talking about display. is moat. And that way if your competition is advertising any kind of banner ads on the Web. I don't know how they do it on a crawl. They have this amazing database of showing you a wide variety of ads that they're using I love mode and there's a lot of information you get for free from that particular company. I'm a big Fan When we get into search details a little the more? I'm a big fan of spy. Do and some rush and watch Sawyer pond that you live on might call it. Sem Rush or some rush Those are both both premium models. Read a little bit of information for free more when you sign up for the service but they have a pretty decent set of competitive data that we use. I would just you say that anyplace that's crawling the web for competitive data and this would certainly include companies compete They're basing it on their own cookies and they're spiders and what they can find find and I would say that. They're good estimator tools. I would think of them more from the perspective of using them to compare sites relatively and directionally one thing that we rely heavily on is our relationship with Google. And so one of the things that we're able to get. Ah depending on your status. Google your agency status. You may or may not be able to get as well that you can actually get competitor. Peer Review Sets where they won't tell you what a specific competitor is spending. You know they don't WanNA trade that information to other advertisers. But they can't tell you what a group of them are spending on average and that's real data coming straight from Google so we find that information along with just industry benchmarks they can provide around click through rates and cost per clicks and all although spun kind of metrics being released. Well that's quite the the perkin being the top. Two percent of you know in their in their inner circle all I suppose that data would be really valuable to some of your clients. What about forecasting tips tools? If I'm at trying to you lock down the forecasting for my strategy. I'm a big fan of back of the Napkin and I do it. You know. Really an excel file now l.. But really looking at a few different things starting. With what do you think the cost per click or the cost per unit estimated cost per click is going to be getting a person. Listen to your site. Then what do you think. The estimated conversion rate to lead is going to be from there and then beyond that. What do you think? The estimated cost proved a conversion from lead to sale is going to be and then building out kind of a a formula where you have a lot of different ranges you can use tools to figure out. What do I think the cost per click is going to be and then based on my own history and and what the sites done previously? What do I think that? Click to lead conversion rate can can be and then. Hopefully you have some sort of an idea that you can start putting some numbers for lead to sales as well and that's going to provide you a pretty big range but at least give you an idea of what to budget for and what you should ask for from your company and then from there as you start to run campaigns and see what the numbers are then you can start. Start tightening down okay. So we're down to the last minute. Justin what piece of advice would you give to our current student body. That's listening to this graduate. Students students in terms of beater beat Demand Gen. And how. How can they get a hold of you if they want to reach out asking some some more questions if they're interested in working thank you? Yeah absolutely so I think for me the biggest thing is getting in there and testing. And what data can you find. And if you're not doing this already currently you're trying to build up resume I'd highly look at some of Google's tested it has to offer. Will the information be a little biased towards Google and you know raw you know that kind of stuff it will. But there's really good data in there and I think it's going to help make you a little bit more marketable when you're going out there there if you're looking for a job or if it's just rising within your own company you're going to get that knowledge to be able to test some things out so I guess that'd be the the main thing I would offer a very quickly. Here's the connecting. I'd love to talk with anybody. Happy to help out or just have a chat and and talk digital marketing and the best way would probably be on Lincoln if you look up. Justin Justin. Cyber last name is S. E. I. B. RT Or follow me on twitter Love to connect there too as well really horrible twitter handle dom J. CBS so direct online marketing Dom Jay Justin Brunettes with with cyber deal. I'm Jay thank you so much for your time and all of your insights very interesting information and hopefully while. I'm sure you'll be a great resource to those who reach out so really appreciate your time. Thank you all have a great Thanksgiving we do even listen to. Wvu Marketing Communications today. Rachi live from West Virginia University for Biweekly Program that sits at the intersection of data driven decision making and marketing practice only on the.

Google Justin Justin West Virginia University Dot E twitter Dom Jay Justin Brunettes Wvu Marketing Communications Los Angeles WVU Sawyer pond Virginia West Virginia University California Lincoln J. CBS
"digital advertising" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"digital advertising" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"But were excited to hear. Your insights is on this Justin. So let me start with the first question that introduction. We're talking about how Google and link dinner. Become the biggest players in demand Gen Our demand generation space from your point of view. Why is that? I think it's because of what they were uniquely offering. That's different than really any forms that are are out there other than some competitors trying to catch up and if you start on Google side of things at least where it's been historically and we can talk about how it's how it's kind of up case itself oft it's modernized itself for today but Google benefits searches. Benefit is all about intent so there's tons of ways to reach people as we all know. Many different forms of advertising ties get marketing but Google and search offer that way of reaching a person right when they're most interested in what you're selling you're able able to get them in front of them. Have your offer. And then make a compelling case to try to convert them into raising their hand and talking with you on the flip side of things with linked in. You're able able to all this great professional data that they've already shared directly with the platform. So you can reach people. Based on what company they work for or company size or their industry and then you can layer in their company title did a professional title their seniority level. Maybe what groups they belong to. You're able to reach people based on exactly who they are professionally choice and those are two things that are just the the best ways to be able to reach people rugby perspective and why they're taking the majority of the the advertising budgets offer demanded Banja interesting. Let me ask you. I'm in the restaurant space. And we're looking into targets small restaurants and and Winston Salem and Charlotte is from your perspective as Lincoln. A great tool to do that based on what you just described so question it depends on on a couple of factors so with social media one of the first things. You're going to look at is. What is the demographic that you can reach and specifically within a geography so? There's two things John. Lincoln side one is that it's geographic. Options are a little bit more limiting than they are with facebook. Certainly or with Google or some of these other the platforms. That are out there so when you want to get as specific as that into Winston Salem. I'm very familiar with that area. Brother went to wake forest. I had By my grand- manacle grew up in Greensboro early Greensboro. You might have to extend a little bit beyond just specifically those areas into a little bit of a larger Metro area or North Carolina As a whole so that'd be one limiting factor the second factor you would look at would be. Is that industry or those owners. Going to be using Lincoln as money as maybe some of the other there verticals are and I think that if you would pull up their data within Within Lincoln you would find them on Lincoln but I'm not sure how active they would be so Those will be my the first concerns but in terms of reaching exactly what you're looking for. There's no doubt it'd be worth exploring to see. Are you going to be able to reach a large enough audience that it that it makes sense. They're interesting you know you've talked about. Lincoln blinked in there for a second how Google evolved beyond just search. Transformation has been really fascinating to watch which Innocence really two thousand two thousand one and the first thing. They kind of open up their display network and being able to Offer people ways to reach people with banner advertising on on the Internet in essence. It's like a modern day form of remnant advertising for magazines so that you don't have to advertise directly with publication. You can reach people kind of back during warning them on on these various sites then they bought Youtube in two thousand six so they've had these things around for awhile. He's different vehicles if had gino advertising around for a while the biggest change. That's come in has been. They've been building up their knowledge and their data capabilities over all of these years. That now you don't have to use those specific tactics just for wrench just from Brent Awareness. which is what they were primarily? Good for with the possible exception of retargeting remarketing..

Google Lincoln Winston Salem Justin Youtube Greensboro facebook North Carolina rugby Charlotte Brent Awareness. John
"digital advertising" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"digital advertising" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"We're back in. I think they're so a lot of people even though they're listening. They're hearing step by step process. They're saying but i get started and facebook ads i mean i don't really have a budget. I don't have any significant revenue right now. What would you say to them. Can anybody get started in this facebook adding no matter where they're at revenue wise budget wise absolutely and a lot of the clients that i've worked with that have had had some of the biggest successes we've had they started out with miniscule budgets things like five to ten dollars a day and even with clients that are major businesses that are generating significant revenue. You almost always follow that same procedure of starting campaign small at just ten dollars a day just because i follow the rationale that if something's not working and throwing throwing more money at it isn't going to magically fix it. There's no reason that you can't get started small scale it up from there so if your fear is that you need like some massive marketing marketing budget of like tech of thousands of dollars to get started and facebook ads that really <hes> it's really unfounded that even big businesses that are generating millions of dollars a year. They're also getting we started with just ten dollars a day and on the topic of a lot of businesses that thinks like oh like we're gonna put this money into facebook ads. In what are we gonna get back from it. I bet also has to do a large part in the mindset from that a lot of people they go into facebook ads without a clear goal. They kind of think like owed be nice for us to get more traffic to our website or get more likes on our fan page. All of those things are nice but at the end of the day if you're spending money on advertising your number one goal should be getting a profitable that you want to know exactly. They were putting this many dollars into our ads. We're getting this many dollars back from once. You found those profitable campaigns once you've found a campaign that's getting you ideally two dollars back act for every dollar you put in there. That's when you can start doing some seriously cool stuff swing can start scaling up the budgets and really growing your business and meaningful way okay so now that we broken down some barriers that you really can start small and you can fire nation. Let's talk about some elements. You say you have three key elements for both the creation and for the scaling of of profitable facebook ad campaigns so these come down to the three campaigns that we set up on every client account we work with regardless of their current business is how much money they're making what they're advertising budget is or what business model they're operating under these three campaigns they rain true for every sort of business and the first one is perhaps the most important just because it can be applied even if you don't even have your first customer your first client and that's the idea of a remarketing or a re targeting campaign showing ads to people that have already interacted with you your website your your brand in some way but then ultimately haven't gone over the fence. They haven't given you money in some way so an easy example of this is in ecommerce store. You can show ads to the people that added an item to their cart. Then didn't end up purchasing the item those people obviously have a very high level of interest product or whatever you're offering if they added to get him to their a card but they kind of just need that little extra reminder that little extra push to get them over the finish line and like i said that works businesses that don't even have their first customer because if you have absolutely adding an items at a cart you can target them with a facebook ad and they just distracted they might be like honey exactly and that's honestly something we see a lot especially especially with social media advertising people. They're on their phones. They're on instagram. They're on facebook while they're on the commute to work or just on their board at work and they might like see something that interests them but then ultimately they don't go through with it because they're busy. They have to go back to their day but if you can target those people later in the day back when they're on their laptops or on the computers theaters from there more in a position to actually buy something they have a much higher chance of targeting <hes> of getting them to purchase rather than someone who's never heard about your never interacted with you in any way fire nation those three key elements. We're gonna be talking about our so keefer. You go step by step. We just talked about the remarketing campaign. These people that have already interacted with you what is number two number. Two is what i like to call loyalty so this is targeting people that have already engaged in those revenue generating activities heavy sphere business so going along with that <unk> example. This would be advertising campaigns to people that already have purchased from you or of already liked or follow you on instagram. These again are a super hot audience that even massive businesses. They're not utilizing. There's so many businesses that i see that are doing hundreds of thousands of dollars of revenue each month but then then there are only targeting adds to people that are brand new that have never heard about them completely under utilizing people that have already purchased from them and these people have already shown that they love you. They love your products. They love the idea story behind them so much that they're willing to pull out their credit card and actually buy from you and that if you have other products and services that are highly related. It's them they would probably be willing to do it again. And i've kind of been going along with this idea of e commerce for a while but all of these strategies they don't only apply.

facebook keefer ten dollars two dollars
"digital advertising" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

11:26 min | 1 year ago

"digital advertising" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Click lucas say what's up to fire nation and shearson the inner city by yourself that most people don't know awesome awesome hey john thanks for having me on the show <hes> interesting thing about me. When i was in middle school i was super interested in rubik's cubes and i got down to solving that the three by three standard rubik's cube in under thirty seconds which is pretty happy with <hes> and now makes for a great party trick is pretty cool it when you walk because you apart interest. There's happens to be a rubik's cube there. You just silently walk up to it do it. In under thirty seconds put it down and then just walk away without saying a word exactly. That's the move exactly exactly. You can't be too much of a jerk about it just like trying to call attention to yourself. It's all about the subtle we'll fire nation. I know you got a little fired up from the intro today because because lucas is on fire. He's doing some really cool things. We're gonna talk about all that something i mentioned in the intro. We're gonna start with how lucas got started in digital marketing so breakdown for his brother definitely so kind of going along with that rubik's cube idea. I've always been like this nerdy and techy kid and in high the school. I wasn't doing after school sports. I wasn't in any clubs. Usually i would just go home and spend time on my computer just kind of waste time on all these sites and after a while i kinda got bored of just doing random things and i stumbled on this youtube video of people that were doing these photoshop. Tutorials would make like tutorials on how to make like a desktop top background or how to design this flier all these random things and i thought this was the coolest thing ever downloaded photoshop and i started following along with all of these different tutorials just making all this random stuff and after a few months of doing that i'd gotten pretty good <hes> and after a while i kinda got bored of just doing it on my own and i thought to myself. Why can't i make some of these video. Why can't i do what these people are doing recording their screen showing other people how to make these things in soda shop so i made this youtube channel and i started posting all these videos and of course like a lot of people i was getting like no views my views. My videos are probably getting like five or ten views each and all of those were just made refreshing them so i started googling all of these things like how to get more views on youtube or how to grow youtube channel and this was the introduction to this whole underground world of entrepreneurship digital marketing and i stumbled on a lot of these different internet marketing forms of people just trying to start and grow businesses in that to me was how i first got started now. You're still a college student right correct so i'm in the summer summer of my junior year going into my senior. Do you think you can graduate. I think so to me. It seems kind of pointless to stop this late. I i think it's better just to finish off strong and as my parents know i've had a lot of discussions with them just on the value of a college education on whether whether it's worthwhile to go to college whether it's worthwhile to finish a college education <hes> but at this point my mind is kind of set on just finishing it out <hes> and then hopefully diving living in a world of entrepreneurship immediately after that well. I disagree with your premise. I do think that if you want in think you should finish college. You should should finish college but the way that you described it. I call the sunk cost fallacy and so many people have this issue what they do is they spend one year two years in law school so and now they have to spend three years and get that law degree and spent forty years being miserable lawyer. You have people in mexico same people in every area this thing hey because invested this money or time or energy orban with i have to just see it through just for that reason now. That's the only reason fire nation. You're seeing something through. I say you're wasting wasting your time. You should stop doing something that you love and that's working right now and do it but you lucas. If you say you know what i actually really want my college degree i really wanna finish the senior because i have friends that it only be excited about going back and having a good time then that's a reason to do it was not an option to do it is because you're three quarters of the way there or you've already already invested this much money like that's not the reason i just wanted to point that out not specifically for you lucas but for people in my audience fire nation who are in this this sunk cost fallacy in any area of their life just because they've gone so far down this path or a certain way down this path. You don't need to keep going every single. Day is a brand new day that you can wake up and start going in the exact direction. You want to go so let's get into the facebook ads side of things. How did you get into facebook. Ads specifically actually teach yourself which to me is such a cool life lesson definitely so yeah last summer. I was working a job standard nine to five live at this tech company that was spending a massive amount of paid advertising. They're spending money on facebook ads google ad words twitter lincoln pretty much every platform imaginable. They're putting a ton the money into that and specifically they're spending around a quarter of a million dollars each month on facebook ads alone and manage that adspend they were paying an agency eight percent of of their ads bent and if you do the math on that at works around to twenty thousand dollars a month to this agency and while working there i got the chance to sit in on all like the checking calls the company did did with the agency and just saw how they worked and having been in digital marketing for awhile. I just kinda thought to myself like is that it like. This doesn't seem that impressive especially like given how much they're getting paid to do this. So that was kind of the inspiration. I needed that may be this was a viable business model and that exact same day when i realized that i went at home and started reading about freelance online starting a digital marketing agency on yourself and after doing a research i realized that really you don't need all of this fancy stuff if you don't need an office or employees or even a website all you need is a skill inclines paying you for that skill so i started reading up a bit more on facebook ads specifically. I started reading. These blog posts watching youtube videos but i think the biggest indicator of learning for me was just kind of learning what the agency agency was doing internally. I was taking a look at how they were managing our company as a client what kind of work they were doing and like i said it was. It was decent work. I'm not gonna say it was bad but it definitely did not command twenty thousand dollar price point in my maybe i'm biased. Let's get a little more specific though so what was unimpressive about these check in calls like what we dislike really like. That's it like what was unimpressive about it definitely so i guess the big thing was just how unin- unin- passionate they were like they would get on these calls and they would radloff these marketing metrics like saying like oh our cost per click. Was this weekend like we're getting leads like five dollars each in all these different things and when i thought about the money when i thought about twenty thousand dollars a month that's around two hundred forty k. a year. The company could have literally hired to amazing using internal media buyers for one hundred twenty thousand dollars each and i know for a fact that those two people would be bringing a lot more energy and a lot more passions this job given that it's their sole job shopped. This is their nine to five basically their career versus agency. That's working with dozens of different clients. That is only really working with you for a couple of hours each day. I didn't think the value was there in what they were commanding. How were they tracking yara while they really should get down to the numbers lake where they ju- sharing costs per click and impressions and blah blah blah or were they really showing the client like your company how they were getting money back into the business for this two hundred fifty k. at spent the that was another thing thing that the fact that pretty much my manager. I was working in the marketing team. Manager was the head of marketing <hes> he was doing still a lot of work with the facebook ads that he was doing all of analytics doing all of this data mining basically just figuring out data to bring to the agency and tell them the r. y. And like you said the agency z. was mainly only focused on the marketing metric side of things they didn't know how many people actually ended up purchasing our end product because we had a fairly long sales cycle they were only concerned with the the cost per lead and the different audiences so that was another thing just the fact that we my manager and the as an intern <hes> we had to do a lot of work when if we're paying this as much money to an agency. Shouldn't they be more involved. In this process. That was just kind of what i thought wow love that perspective and there is something that lucas said fire nation that i want to double back doc on because you can literally build a lifestyle career offer this all you need is a skill and a client to pay you for or that. Skill luga said that phrase. I want to say it one more time. All you need is a skill and a client to pay you for that skill. Why do we try to make things so complicated. Fire nation because that phrase is something you can hang your hat on and go get paid so speaking about getting paid lucas. You had to actually find your first client somehow somewhere and this is something that terrifies so many solo preneurs entrepreneurs on that first half talk to us. How get your first client cool so i initially thought i was going to go the standard freelancer agency route whereas basically reach out to my existing network just email everyone i knew and say like hey do need any digital marketing helper anything to do with facebook ads and i was pretty close to doing that until i realized that even after i had done this that i might have a few clients under my belt but that sort of strategy wasn't sustainable that once i had done than i had made maybe a couple of hundred bucks but then i was back to square one so my thinking from the start was i really wanted to build something that was sustainable and quote unquote real something that would make me a real business not just someone that was selling to people. I knew so uh one of the ways that i got started getting started on this website called up or you've probably heard of it. I'm sure a lot of people do by now. It's basically like a site where he can hire freelancers and contractors actors for <hes> mostly small-time work. I know there's a lot of graphic designers on there are a lot of content writers and based on the things that i had read a lot of people were bashing it as a way to get started marketing or anyone that was trying to build a real business at the people said that oh the clients. They're going to under- charge for you that they're rude in that upwards going a scam you but really that wasn't my experience at all. I got started on the platform and my rationale was basically that this is kind of a website like amazon where it's the market place in the people that have the most trust the most reviews in ultimately the most legitimacy on their profile. Those are the people that are going to get the best results so i started bidding on all of these different jobs severely underpricing myself like i was betting ten to twenty dollars for like jobs. That were honestly like five hundred thousand dollars when i knew do that if i could get these first few jobs could get that good review on my profile nine. I could leverage that into a ton of other different clients and that actually ended up working. I got some of those super cheap jobs. I did at a really great job on them and then in turn they gave me a great testimony on my profile and a great review fire nation. This is the process i've had so many people come to me and they you say john lewis do x y and z for you. It's gonna cost you ten thousand dollars like we'll make it happen and i'm like listen. That's probably a valuable offer but i'm having a lot of people offer me the same dollar amounts in frankly like you haven't proven yourself yet on the flip side that people that have convened said y'all just do this to you for free for a month for three months for six six months. I had my c._p._a. Worked for me for free for three years. Why because he saw.

facebook lucas youtube unin- unin orban mexico head of marketing numbers lake john lewis intern luga amazon twitter lincoln google
"digital advertising" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"digital advertising" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Digital advertising data and highly targeted advertising also how an american energy startup suffered when it tried to do business in china they're there to bring you in be able to figure a way to harvest whatever they can from you and then spit you out when you're no longer useful and why i knew horror movie out in theaters is causing problems for popcorn eaters i these headlines live from npr news in washington i'm jack speer president donald trump blasted federal investigators this evening after learning they had raided the office of one of his attorneys and byard scott horsely reports investigators seized a number of documents from the office of trump's attorney michael cohen cohen has worked as an attorney and fixer for trump for many years and is closely connected with the president's personal and business dealings it was not immediately clear why investigators searched his office but trump denounced the move calling it an attack on the country it's disgraceful situation it's a total witch hunt i've been saying it for a long time coens attorney says the search was carried out at least in part in response to a referral from special counsel robert muller the attorney criticized the search has inappropriate and unnecessary cohen has already turned over thousands of documents unanswered investigators questions under oath scott horsely npr news washington the russian military says more than three thousand rebels and their relatives have now fled the town of duma outside the syrian capital a russian officer saying some rebels and their families were driven in the northern province of aleppo while others have left since sunday washington leaders also said they've inspected the area to check activists claims of chemical weapons and found no traces in the area and they also say they inspected hospitals there were that flies in the face of claims by opposition activists in first responders who say more than forty people were killed suspected chemical weapons attack over the weekend the nonpartisan congressional budget office is out with a new ten year budget forecast and includes the return of a trillion dollar annual deficit by twenty twenty with no end in sight here's npr's susan davis the latest cbo forecast is the first to take into account the republicans 2017 tax cuts as well as a two year budget deal that included a one point three trillion dollar spending bill for two thousand eighteen.

npr susan davis twenty twenty washington special counsel coens scott horsely donald trump jack speer republicans china aleppo officer robert muller attorney michael cohen cohen trump president
"digital advertising" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"digital advertising" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The advertising market they get pretty much all of the digital advertising revenue these days leaving not much to organizations that actually hire professionals on put money into producing content so this is a case of a pretty clearcut case of unfair competition leslie from where i think regulators should deal with this problem is not too long i don't think censorship is the way to deal with us but they're certainly needs to lee cloud measure of responsibility for these companies four the compton them to the big public even vase or the people who post on these networks should be liable for defamation and any other dealing a legal violations hate speech has low in countries where they so we'll for that it's necessary that's lee companies cut down on a moment misuse there won't be harder for trolls and boss to spread all sorts of uh misleading information hate speech uh basically to bully people there must be some regulation to address the uh the anonymity and the freedom that these that axes enjoy on the platform lenient thank you so much that was leadership a columnist for bloomberg view coming up on bloomberg view why the palestinians should renounce violence and embrace peace i'm june also and this is bloomberg what makes this confer unique dynamic in observed around the world he doesn't feel like he can come to a meeting of the minds what's at and t's defence what do we expect the senators to ask you about politics policy power and law how has the court been responding to patent cases lately hear us just as we are let's go back to quantitative easing but they really do that that seems political suicide weekdays at noon eastern on.

advertising market bloomberg digital advertising t
"digital advertising" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"digital advertising" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Where good taste never goes out of fashion this is a bloomberg market minute technology stocks are the best performing in the global market in 2017 and activate chief executive michael wolff says he's looking for that to continue this year part of it is that you're dealing with companies that are so dominant in these businesses so of between gugel and facebook they totally dominate all digital advertising their 75 percent of digital advertising if you look at apple we can look at all the super cycles from apple but the reality is apple delivers the highest price phones and the entire ecosystem are at at so in a lot of ways these companies are unassailable their growth is going to continue wolf still has concerns when it comes to the longterm outlook at the face stocks which include facebook amazoncom apple met lakes and gugel owner alphabet inc biggest weakness is going to be as these companies are moving in turn international markets they're facing some very very tough competition and he points out of much of that competition could come from chinese companies like alibaba karen moskow bloomberg radio thanks for dinner alex this place is really grace it was the least i can do i wanted to congratulate you on the merger if you don't mind me asking how'd you managed to get the deal done so quickly honestly i couldn't have done it without mark span of marks panic to that your accounting firm right yes they help us manage the entire transaction and developed a crossborder tax strategy that was aligned with our objectives we considered acquiring an overseas company but there are so many complexities in regulations marks panama canel all of that force and more they really are the best we've partnered with them for years you know i think marks panos can help us to i'm going to have to take you out to dinner more often it can say that again whether you're.

technology stocks global market michael wolff digital advertising apple alex the deal bloomberg chief executive facebook 75 percent
"digital advertising" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"digital advertising" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"The continuing our series on the media in transition now and we're off to france some of the country's biggest publications the doing what was once unthinkable teaming up with former competitors to fight off the threat posed by facebook and google so how does it work monaco's reese james has been speaking to a paris correspondent tom badghis will soon okay thank you joining this tom so france's biggest meteorite lisa making something of a stand against can gugel and facebook's digital advertising jewell play how are they doing well as as people know facebook and gugel all within the reach of billions of people and they've got a huge wealth of data and these two big john's the titans of digital advertising basically take around half of all the revenues worldwide now what's left off to those two is an extremely fragmented market in france is a good example of that because after facebook and gugel you've got dozens of much smaller players but no one even comes close to google facebook when it comes the digital advertising but that's until now and so what the what various a publishing outlets have decided to do is the joint forces of they have something that resembles of comparable size of of machine to compete against those two when it comes to the digital advertising proposition and telling clients that we have a reach not far off the reach of of the likes of and facebook and why they doing this but it is the only way that they can compete with them it says we here with highly visible we know the french market so advertise with us that's the message if you could tell us a little bit more about who's in these new light is to reach you'll have once they join forces.

facebook monaco reese james tom badghis france digital advertising google paris correspondent
"digital advertising" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"digital advertising" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"He's or five thousand companies you can buy what happens next so i think i think the first thing for us is throughout all the stuff that we're not interested in it and so these would be you know commodity chemicals levinger's businesses that just have structurally awful economics and those tendered comprise a higher proportion the equity universe outside the us than in so day gene kind of narrows the world pretty fast and then you start fishing in the pond so that's that's step one right fish where the fish are dunc'd on fish for their knowledge and then the next step is really thinking about businesses just sitting down thinking about businesses that have structural tailwinds behind them in the case of facebook digital advertising going from auckland online ecommerce in the case of them was on what you know because things when when companies had the wind at their back in their market and market is growing quickly coconut hours a coverup while sentence would surely sure makes our life easier but so thing one find businesses with gertraut structural economics which tend to as we said earlier cluster in specific industries could you list maybe i dunno five examples of industries like that okay means hutu that have payment networks right obviously it's an easy one mastercard visa the processors that's i wouldn't say commodity industry but there's not a the differentiates one merchant acquire front of the merchant acquirer aside from from scale to some extent but they all kinda do the same thing if similar tech's sex i would argue vertical markets offer of you know software that becomes kind of the language the the plumbing you might say of an industry exchanges exchanges be beautiful businesses futures exchanges ten had much better margins and cash egg equitychanges because users a non fungible you have to open and close position as interchange opposed to can buy the nyse celadon arca those and have very good structural economics obviously as we've talked about the the positional goods luxury brands consumer products those tend to have very good economics but have challenges when it comes reinvestment and that's where you want you know really method capital allocation becomes more of a jim use the term good economics can you be a little more specific on what that means.

us facebook digital advertising nyse consumer products
"digital advertising" Discussed on Suiting Up with Paul Rabil

Suiting Up with Paul Rabil

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"digital advertising" Discussed on Suiting Up with Paul Rabil

"A now it abroad digital advertising network but originally in mci end so focus specifically on like youtube and facebook in through partnerships and channel partners created basically modern media in figure out ways the mata ties off of that of across network was acquired by whistle sports now you're running t ellen ops but it took you about a year or in some changed to decide okay i'm i'll take this risk new york and basically become a hail a content man yet this was a quick upturn cause for while it was i was just to ensure tougher soldiers had this podcast kind of like the side hustle deby energy and then i i faure and the contents little bit i took the job at whistle sports it was obvious than i was doing content every day and doing ensure died than the podcast all of a sudden was lightning audio that was so new to me as well net the compare that in hell videos produced which is your ten people oftentimes your lighting and colour and so much more and at pushed ruptured an audio is very agile it's very slim like yeah he voters have set up these two mike's like this record in so for me i have a lot of energy round that too because i think that it's fair authentic conversation that there's not eat you'll cameras all around us you know can filming that and so i had averaging to learn very content game but we research the two of us audio from i to august to march relentlessly you rightly picked through the podcast that would light to productions dallas relate people were doing it right different companies they're out there that wasn't the net.

youtube new york mike dallas digital advertising facebook
"digital advertising" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"digital advertising" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Advertisement advertise ecc on digital advertising as becoming is beginning to flatten night on the does not surprising when in a ninety five two hundred percent of the growth is going to to vare largest friends out of your part of the world he what it would i second rally is as far away from from us as london on in many ways i i sometimes think it's barter under the same flag yes yes but walking up here walk by a sign gigantic signed that that said quality quality media matters it it's kind of sad that we actually have to we are going to gets its goodness but like that you need that sign now you know so i think the the best way to describe of a look at the times and in particular with regard to this the have they have increased their ceo in the last twelve months so the more papers more sign times is being sold the war twelve months ago the same is true for another daily paper called the i know small which is a much smaller circulation but it is also increased circulation ostro months then we have to big free papers in the uk the metro on the london evening standard they have also both increase volumes all four for those titles if they're not a enduring double digit advertising declines it will be near is dominant double digit advertising declines so the connection between their their audience he's a growing but the advertising revenues are falling announced the first time in history aca that has ever happened so you've got this situation where the customer is going i really like this and i wanna read more or less on the advertisers saying the customers relied this but on okinawa for ties against right said the good news is you give never had an e even never had an audience this big know exactly an uninspiring land where it said in a we were were free digital audience we've good twenty eight twenty nine million in qom school in the uk were the largest mobile news provider a i with the bbc but the bbc's a right a separate matter.

digital advertising ceo uk advertising revenues okinawa bbc london qom twelve months ninety five two hundred percen
"digital advertising" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"digital advertising" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Worse was not watt rid of it we got rid of it already on our most premium parts of our network where we see the most demand for highquality brand advertising and now were zeroing it out across the rest of the network as well yeah and also with like header dating and stuff there's there's ways around that that a letter getting more control to two publishers and that's a great time for us actually to take a little break for our sponsor putt matic pay the bills as brand spend shifts to programmatic channels perceptions of a lack of transparency around fees supply and quality now threaten the scale and pattern of future digital growth join putt manic at www dot let's be clear dot com and together let's be clear okay jim so yesterday i was i went to my first powell was actually good because mark thompson the ceo of the new york times is very fortuitous he said some really interesting things he said and go into quote right now the world of digital advertising is a nightmarish choke mark zuckerberg first post about fake news facebook managed to serve an ad for fake news next to it it's a joke it's out of control there are all sorts of creepy borderline fraudulent middlemen this thicket of strange companies tracking pixels on everything you can think of a more dangerous environment for a brand what's your what's your tags that a fair assessment i do i think it's fair it's it's nice that people were talking about this now i know having said that i'm optimistic arm among other the first step is admitting you have a problem um and it sounds as though the industry is talking about batons year and what it all comes down to weather mark pressured it will be preaching this all week.

brand advertising jim powell ceo new york times digital advertising mark zuckerberg facebook highquality mark thompson
"digital advertising" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"digital advertising" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Of the new york times and he he had called the current state of digital advertising some like nightmarish hideous and i understand i mean they are not you know fully in the advertising peseta more mean they're they're they're focused on on subs but basically what he was saying i think really resonated because it's that the the pendulum swung so much to audience and to targeting and away from contacts and it seems like and not on a maybe i am actually being pollyannaish now it seems like it should swing back towards contacts i mean i hope you like you would i'm sure hope yet i would i would hope that and i would but i think the pendulums always swinging so it swung too far one one direction it will it will start to swing back in and i do think context is is key in both advertising content being created how how we put that contin front of audience to make it the context key is is paramount so i would say it swinging back our chips were back so one of disney's early big debts and digital was maker how is maker evolving we've written by colleagues to patel has written a few stories about maker the mc model i think was fairly challenged yeah so for us maker maker created a number of opportunities tied to the influence our space and and the influence has bases is a clear opportunity clear space and the role of influencers in marketing and advertising in content is not shrinking it's it's actually growing now the role of the m c n in that we've viewed needed to evolve like the maker business had to evolve and i think a lot of it was tied to.

new york times digital advertising disney patel
"digital advertising" Discussed on Deal of the Week

Deal of the Week

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"digital advertising" Discussed on Deal of the Week

"Doubled down on the you know a bicycling magazines the something that's naturally very vertical but look at time make they own they own fortune and they own money for example so business and finance is perennially a big category raid and so bulking together those brands those assets those audiences but looking to seek marketplace extensions and business extensions more aggressively around those businesses to diversify round see pm base media is the only path forward as far as i can say the internet is sort of developed on its own with a very lighttouch at this stage from regulators in what has happened over the last twenty years or so is that we've seen to enormous players in digital advertising facebook and gugel then everyone else that sort of at the bottom is that a healthy marketplace should should regulator step in and say this is bordering on a monopoly at this point in the marketplace i think it's more of an issue with google certainly given how extensive googles tentacles are their position from a search perspective with publishers their control of um the primary add serving vehicle uh their control the large addicks changed their control of ads since there's a lot of conflicts within that the pool of assets their strength is is it it is very analogous to me of microsoft in some respects in the old days i i see that less so in the case of facebook facebook seems like the all dominant player today but you know it there was a point in time when who seem like the all dominant player and things change things evolve and consumer tastes change of all the one thing i would say about facebook that so interesting.

facebook microsoft digital advertising google googles twenty years