19 Burst results for "Difficulty Walking"

"difficulty walking" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:58 min | 1 d ago

"difficulty walking" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Of a puppy mill, Sara Lee Kessler has the details. A hazmat team had to be called to a breakdown ship home Monday to remove the animals found in ill fitting backyard crates. A lot of them were having some difficulty walking. Many of the dogs there are 135, 45 were cats, are at the southern ocean county animal shelter in manahawkin, which says a desperately needs coats and sweaters for the pups, the homeowners, Amy lawn sack and Michelle gneiss, are charged with animal cruelty and endangering the welfare of a child who lived in the house. I'm Sara Lee Kessler. A Colorado grandmother is suing after a botched raid on her home. A S.W.A.T. team swarmed 77 year old ruby Johnson's Denver home in the Montebello neighborhood last January, looking for a stolen truck semi-automatic handguns cash and other items. The suit filed by the ACLU on behalf of Johnson targets the main detective in the raid. I'm Brian shook. And I'm Doug Krishna at Bloomberg world headquarters in New York. Let's check this hour's top business stories and the markets well today, China announced a further relaxation of COVID controls including allowing some infected people to quarantine at home and a short while ago we had trade native for the period from January through November this is Chinese trade data the export side shows a gain of 9.1% in dollar terms imports in that period, January through November were up 2%. Stateside we had economic warnings from two top banking executives Goldman Sachs CEO David Solomon, spoke of some bumpy times ahead. He sees a 35% chance of a soft landing and the head of Bank of America, Brian moynihan was saying B of a is slower hiring as fewer employees leave the company ahead of a possible economic contraction. Apple will build chips in the U.S. for the first time in nearly a decade. This is a key step in reducing the company's reliance on Asian based manufacturing earlier on daybreak Asia we spoke with Debbie Wu, Bloomberg's deputy, chief in Taipei. Here she is in conversation with Bloomberg group. A huge amount of money to build up events making facilities in the U.S. have been previously and I have already had a modest amount in the state of Washington, but there are investment in Arizona is something that Biden characterized as a potential of game changer for the country. It's got a huge political side to it, of course, as you just alluded to. Definitely. So for our Biden, as he assigned the chip other pills that helps create high paying jobs in America. So that would be important to his reelection bid for 2024. And at the same time, over the past few years, we have seen a shortage of chips that has affected the U.S. companies and calls them hundreds of billions in sales. So you've been important for the Biden administration to show that it will be able to ensure that happen again. That is Bloomberg's Debbie Wu, our Taipei bureau chief speaking in conversation earlier on daybreak Asia with Rashad salami Debbie was reporting from the site of this new TSMC plant outside of Phoenix in Arizona. We check markets every 15 minutes here on Bloomberg right now in Hong Kong the hang sang down a tenth of 1% Chung high composite weaker by half of 1% in Tokyo the nikkei off a half of 1% in Seoul the Cosby is down a little more than three tenths of 1% and in Sydney the ASX 200 weaker by 6 tenths of 1%. Global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake, powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries. This is Bloomberg. Is Bloomberg. This is Bloomberg law. A divided Supreme Court rejects a religious challenge. Charles little about the facts of the case. Peter views with prominent attorneys in Bloomberg legal experts. My guest is former federal prosecutor Jimmy garu joining me as Bloomberg law reporter Jordan Rubin. And analysis of important legal issues, cases in headlines. The Supreme Court takes on state secrets multiple lawsuits were filed against the emergency rule. Is this lawsuit for real? Bloomberg law with June Grasso. From Bloomberg radio. Welcome to the Bloomberg launch show, I'm June Grasso, ahead in this hour. The Supreme Court appears ready to side with a Colorado website designer who says she won't design websites for same sex marriages. And what's at stake in the Georgia Senate runoff. In

Sara Lee Kessler southern ocean county animal s manahawkin Amy lawn Debbie Wu Michelle gneiss Bloomberg ruby Johnson Brian shook Doug Krishna Bloomberg world headquarters COVID David Solomon Brian moynihan Bloomberg group America
"difficulty walking" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

10:29 min | 3 months ago

"difficulty walking" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Experience overcoming multiple sclerosis symptoms by increasing her vegetable intake with doctor Todd lapine about a case study of a patient who healed her gut and changed her life and again with doctor Terry wahls and taking a holistic approach to healing that includes cold water therapy and meditation. Let's jump in. In 2000, I was diagnosed with MS and 18 years ago. 18 years ago, but you know in retrospect, my symptoms began during medical school in 1980 with episodes of electrical face pain, which I stoically put up with. I could figure out that they were worse with stress. And gradually, more frequent, more severe. In 2000, I had a weakness in my left leg, got a big workup, including MRIs, and my brain spinal cord. Spinal tap, and they said, well, this is relapsing remedy in MS. And being like a very bad diagnosis. A bad diagnosis and I looked at the literature and saw that within ten years, half have difficulty walking in a cane, walker or wheelchair. And half won't be able to work through the severe fatigue. So I wanted to treat my disease aggressively. I sought out the best center doing research here in the Midwest. That was the Cleveland clinic. Saw the best people took the newest drugs. And within three years, I needed silicon wheelchair. Oh, that's a good progress. Yeah, so I definitely was not going the right direction. And that's when I started researching, I started reading PubMed. I would begin experimenting myself. I adopted the paleo diet. On the recommendation of my Cleveland clinic physicians. Really? So that was pretty interesting. I continued to go downhill. I took ty's Arbery and continued to go downhill. I switched to cellcept. I continued to go downhill. These are powerful immune suppressors. Very powerful. But I was happy to take them because I knew I was headed towards becoming bedridden. Possibly demented. I was having more and more trouble with severe pain that was very difficult to control. So I was thrilled to take these drugs and attempt to stave all of that off. As I read PubMed, I started experimenting with supplements and would eventually figure out that supplements targeting my mitochondria helped my fatigue somewhat. Although, and I was slowing the speed of my decline. So I'm thrilled. I'm grateful. And I'm really excited about reading PubMed. Grateful from a wheelchair. Very grateful from a wheelchair. Very, very grateful. And then by the summer of O 7 the last half full person, clearly. Clearly. You know, by the summer of O 7, I was so weak, I could not set up on a regular chair. I had a zero gravity chair. I'm fully reclined. Or I'm in bed, I'm struggling to walk ten feet using two walking sticks. My boss caused me, calls me and tells me he's assigned me to the traumatic brain injury clinic. In 6 months, I'll be seeing patients without residents. And I know that, of course, that means what he's really saying is Terry, we are done, redesigning your job for you. And I'll be forced to take medical disability. Finally, at that time. Yeah. So that's a difficult summer, but too much later I discover on one of my Google searches, the institute for functional medicine, and I took the course on neuroprotection in the midst of my brain fog, so this was a bit challenging, but I got through. It had a longer list of supplements, a little deeper understanding of the things I could be doing for my mitochondria. And for my brain, and I added that, and then I had another really, really big aha moment. I should take this list of supplements and redesign my paleo diet to maximize the nutritional intake. So I redesigned my diet. You're gonna be eating paleo cookies all day and that's not exactly true. And that's not the right thing. So I restructured my diet and within a month, my fatigue was markedly reduced my mental clarity was clearly improving in three months. I get up and I'm walking with the cane. You got out of your wheelchair. Out of my wheelchair. Walking around with a cane. And in 9 months, I'm on my bike and I pedal around the block for the first time and 6 years. And in 12 months, I do a 20 mile bike ride with my family. Unbelievable. So it was a year. A year. Now, take us a little bit slower through what you did because you I did a lot. The paleo diet, then you did the drugs, but then you went to this neural protection plan. And you learned from what you could do to optimize your systems. So optimized by system are also add in there, I added in electrical stimulation of my muscles. That was a technique that athletes have been doing for decades to speed the recovery from athletic injuries. So my physical therapist had agreed to let me add that. So I was doing that. I had gone back to adding meditation at night. So I added that back. And then I had this very intensive nutrition. So I had ramped up my vegetables to 9 cups of vegetables a day. Which was 18. 18 servings. Not the 5 to 9. 18 servings. And so a small amount of meat, lots and lots of vegetables. And it's very specific groups of vegetables. Very specific groups. Very specific medicinal. Vaccine you talked about. Exactly. Is all designed very intentionally around my mitochondria around detox around myelin production. Around brain structures, neurotransmitters, based on science in a very methodical way. And I did all this, Mark, not to get better because I had completely accepted what my neurologist primary care docs had told me for years. So one way street functions once lost with progressive MS are permanently gone. So I was doing all this so I could have the limited function that I had a little bit longer. And not get worse. And so I was thrilled to do all of that to not get worse. But and then the other thing that's really interesting is, as I was getting remarkably better, as part of having a progressive neurodegenerative disease, you get to point where you take every day as it comes one day at a time, no expectations about what it means. So I'm remarkably better. I'm thinking more clearly, my pain is gone, which is a huge deal for me. As a big symptom in MS. A pain is a huge symptom. It was a huge problem for me as well. So my pain is gone, I'm walking, I'm thinking, I'm biking. It actually wasn't until I bike that I realized like, you know, I think I'm getting better. Because until then, I was just taking it one day at a time. Yeah. Amazing. You know, the day that I biked, it was on Mother's Day. And I'm crying. My wife's crying, my kids are crying. And that's when I understood that who knew what the future would hold. That clearly neurology has it wrong? Yeah. Clearly neurology hasn't wrong. And who knew how much recovery might be possible? It's a very hopeful story. And I think I'd love to know what exactly you were eating. People are probably listening, but what are the 19 or 18 servings of vegetables you ate? And what groups were they? And what do they do? Okay, so first, and I think the most powerful one is all these greens. So I was having tons and tons of green leafy vegetables. So that's probably having 6 to actually 6 to 9 cups measured raw. Collars, kale. Collards, kale, a little bit of spinach. I really craved kale in a huge way, but have collared. It would have a Swiss chard. Lots and lots of salads would have some cooked greens. I was very big into cabbage family vegetables. So cabbage, broccoli, turnips, rutabagas, lots of it raw. Some cooked, but it's also very, very big into raw. Garlic, lots of garlic, shallots, onions. Sulfur. Boost the detox, boost your blood to get my meat to be cheering acid, intracellular glutathione. And then very much into mushrooms. Mushrooms stimulate and prime adaptive and innate immune cells. They also stimulate your ability to make nerve growth factors. So yeah, additional mushrooms are powerful. Very powerful. All kinds of amazing ingredients that other foods. And garlic and mushrooms are medicinal foods across many, many cultures across all the continents. So these are medicinal foods with a lot of ancient culture wisdom for greens, brassicas and onions and color. And then collar. So the polyphenols are a marker for color. And the polyphenols get it. And study after study, the more color you have, the lower the rates of heart disease, diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease. What color? And furthermore, blue purple black, a lot of studies showing you can have measurable improvement in cognition. And this little as 16 weeks using just a cup of blueberries as in placebo double blind crossover trials. That's hardly

sclerosis symptoms Todd lapine Terry wahls institute for functional medic Cleveland clinic ty Midwest walker progressive neurodegenerative Cleveland Terry Google Mark cardiovascular disease obesity diabetes
Some Ukrainians won't flee areas caught in crosshairs of war

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 5 months ago

Some Ukrainians won't flee areas caught in crosshairs of war

"Despite fears of missile strikes in crema tosk Ukraine some residents prefer to stay put Across the beleaguered city Valerie is shanko sits under the shade of trees working on a crossword puzzle the 70 year old widower has difficulty walking and this daily ritual gets him through the day Now the governor of Donetsk province wants its three 50,000 remaining residents to move to safer places in western Ukraine but like many other civilians who have come under fire in the nearly 5 month old war he'll shanko has no intention of leaving no matter how close the fighting gets he tells the AP I don't have anywhere to go and don't want to either What would I do there I'm Charles De

Ukraine Crema Valerie Donetsk Shanko Charles De
"difficulty walking" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"difficulty walking" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Laura nicholls vice president of the long covert support group body politic a national organization that claims some eleven thousand members says her group. Here's from about five fully vaccinated perspective members each week and occuren- thirty-three-year-old from the detroit area is one. She called cove in nineteen and april twenty twenty one after being vaccinated months prior and still fatigue difficulty walking or standing and racing heart rate. When i got coverted there were very few people who had gotten long-coveted from breakthrough infection. She says there are more of us now. Just by sheer numbers in time having passed groups like body politic are fighting for their recognition cove. It isn't just about. The mortality rate. Says nichols aged thirty. Three who developed a case of long covert after catching the virus in march twenty twenty and is still sick it's also about the disability and chronic illness that occurs from it nichols says that aspect of the pandemic is often ignored by public health authorities who tend to talk about cova nineteen is a binary. Either you develop a severe case that can be fatal or you get a mild case and you're fine long cove. It doesn't fit neatly into either box. But that doesn't mean it should be ignored. Nicholas argues deaths and severe disease and hospitalization are understandably. What we are focused on but long cove. It is an absolutely debilitating disease. Ila sake agrees. It's really been ignored to a large extent. And i really don't understand why she says. Better tracking of breakthrough infections as roma's follow up surveys. That track patients symptoms over time. Like those used in the recent lancet study could help increase understanding of long-coveted and the risk it poses to us public health without that understanding people who develop chronic issues after a breakthrough infection like zeleski and kern maybe overlooked and left out of crucial efforts to develop treatments the national institutes of health has earmarked more than a billion dollars for long cove at research but for it to be most effective it needs to include a diverse representative group of people nichols also says health officials should look to the past jawing on the lived experience of people who developed other post infectious chronic. Illnesses like myalgia encephalomyopathy myositis slash chronic fatigue syndrome and chronic lyme disease to understand how to support long cova patients better access to.

Laura nicholls long covert support group body nichols severe disease detroit zeleski Nicholas national institutes of health chronic lyme disease fatigue syndrome
"difficulty walking" Discussed on Casefile True Crime

Casefile True Crime

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"difficulty walking" Discussed on Casefile True Crime

"As a freelance journalist. I've written about a wide variety of subjects. But i've always had a particular interest in unsolved disappearances. I made my first podcast in two thousand seventeen then in early two thousand eighteen. I came face to face with another story that i just couldn't ignore. It was father's day weekend of two thousand fifteen forty four year old genetic history on was on a camping trip with her parents. The three of them had driven from las cruces new mexico all the way to the chiro cow mountains in arizona. They arrived in the early afternoon. Set up camp at rustler park a remote campground at eight thousand feet of altitude and had a picnic. One of the couples other children their son oscar. His wife and their two kids were supposed to join later that evening. The following day many of their friends and members of their church were supposed to join them for the weekend too but around six thirty pm while genetic mother is using the restroom and her father's on his phone janette disappears. The timeframe given is one to two minutes. Nobody ever thought annette alive again. What's particularly puzzling. Is that genet- could move fast on her own due to severe car accident when she was seventeen years old. She was almost entirely blind severely overweight and had difficulty walking. The area was searched inch-by-inch for at least three days search and rescue brought train dogs to assist. But there's no trace of her. According to dog handlers. The behavior of the dog seemed to indicate that genet- got into a vehicle and was removed from the area. This story didn't make any headlines its little known to the public. The only reason i know about it is purely coincidental. I only learned about it because two years ago. The editor of a german travel magazine sent me to a remote town in southeast arizona to write a story about. It's beautiful starry skies portal. That's the name of the town is located in an uncontaminated stretch of the sonoran desert arguably the most beautiful desert in the world. People come to porto from all over the world to look at birds and watch the stars only about one hundred people actually live there year round. The others have second homes there. Many of them are retired. Winter birds suspend part of the year in arizona to escape the harsh winters of the midwest and canada. We came here on our honeymoon than nineteen sixty seven and said this is it. We're gonna come back here someday. That was helen snyder. A successful real estate agent that has lived in portal for thirty three years. But it used to be that we had our own three pages of the phone book so people would say how big is portal and say. Oh it's three pages in the phone book there's one restaurant a lodge a post office and a tiny library. Portal is a stone's throw from new mexico and not far from old mexico. Either like i was saying the circumstances that led me to find out about this. Disappearance are just as unlikely as to nest disappearance itself. I was staying with a couple jack analysis. Jack newton is one of the astronomers. I was interviewing for the story. They invited me to stay. Overnight because portal is almost a five hour drive from phoenix. The day after the interview. Allison invited me to come to the towns writer meet up. That's a group of people who come together once a month to share their common interests and creative writing and allison vited me because as reporter writing is part of my work there are a lot of retired writers researchers scientists and astronomers living in this town many of the people living in and around portal or highly educated in various fields. So i tagged along and got to talking to some of the other guests there as often happens some of the more intrigued when they heard i focus on solve disappearances a handful of people gathered around me to know more. Someone asked if. I was aware that a woman went missing from their town. I told him that. No i hadn't heard of it d'alene a frail little old lady with a cracked voice stood up and looked me straight in the eye. She said the family did her. In d'alene shook her head with a disapproving expression on her face. She sat back down. Someone else chimed in a handful of them concurred. That woman isn't missing. She was murdered. I didn't think much of it. But when i returned home to phoenix i did a quick google search. I realized this was no ordinary disappearance. It's the type of mystery that has grabbed my attention since i was a small child. The kind where a person disappears inexplicably one moment. They're they're seen by someone and then the next they're gone. It's the kind of case where it seems like. No solution really fits. And where. I wish i could have just been a fly on the wall. At the precise moment where that person left their ordinary life and cross into the land of the missing to see what truly happened. I called elaine back. She seemed to have forgotten about the case. Who i was or having ever spoken to me. You have to keep in mind. She's probably in her nineties. It struck me as odd however because she seemed to remember the case with an awful lot of details just one month prior. I wrapped up the conversation and wished her a good day. I gave her my number. But i didn't expect to be hearing from her again but twenty minutes later. My phone rang. It was delaying her memories. Flooded back.

chiro cow mountains genet rustler park arizona new mexico helen snyder las cruces janette Jack newton annette sonoran desert oscar porto midwest phoenix Allison canada allison mexico
"difficulty walking" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"difficulty walking" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Hi Paul Stevens. Fox News Authorities say they have likely found the body of 22 year old Gabby Petito, near the Wyoming state language Search was underway. Potato went missing back in August during a cross country road trip into converted van with her fiance. We continue to seek information from anyone who utilized the spread Creek dispersed camping area between the dates of August 27th and August 30th. From anyone that may have had contact with Gabby or her boyfriend, or who may have seen their vehicle in that area. FBI agent Charles Jones on Sunday no cause of death yet determined. Authorities are still looking for potatoes fiance Brian Laundry after visiting his Florida home on Friday, laundries family saying he's not been seen since Tuesday. The U. S is flying Haitians camped in the Texas border town. Back to their homeland and trying to block others from crossing the border from Mexico. Beginning what experts say could be one of America's fastest expulsions of migrants or refugees in decades, a close call after a military plane on a training mission crashes into Texas neighborhood, the Navy plane from the Kingsville Texas Naval Air Station crashed in Lake Worth, Texas Sunday morning. Ryan Arthur is the fire chief in Lake Worth. There are three homes involved. Um, Fortunately, nobody was injured on board. The plane and instructor and a student like Worth police Chief J team manage Shake in one pilot had ejected and was caught in power lines. In another pilot had ejected and was found in the neighborhood. Both were taken to the hospital for treatment. The Navy says the instructor is in stable condition. The cause of the crash remains under investigation. Kevin Yulieski Fox News today. Monday is Election Day. In Canada. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is facing a challenge from conservative leader Erin O'Toole. Polls say the race is closed, and Trudeau was unlikely to get an outright majority. America is listening to Fox News. With Afghanistan now under Taliban rule, many vulnerable Afghans are living in fear. People are extremely worried about what comes next for the country of Afghanistan. So this is a familiar scene across the capital of Kabul. People going to banks and withdrawing as much money as they can You ever worried We are not having access to your money will run out of money and cash. So it's very bad here is very uncertain here. The situation. It's not just banks that are having difficulties walking through the Bush bazaar in Kabul. You see very few people. Shopping life is different under Taliban control, and many are simply trying to save what money they have left. This means stores have barely any income and those that remain open are struggling Foxes Trey Yingst in Kabul. The extremist Islamic state group is claiming responsibility for a series of deadly bombings targeting Taliban vehicles in eastern Afghanistan. That Claim published late Sunday on the militant group's media arm, the Amaq news agency. Marvel's latest superhero flick, topping the weekend movie box office for the third straight week, Shanxi and the Legend of the 10 rings collecting 21.7 million in ticket sales. The Disney release holding better in theaters than most films during the pandemic, a disappointing debut for Warner Brothers Cry Macho. Keyser..

Erin O'Toole Brian Laundry Ryan Arthur Kevin Yulieski Paul Stevens Mexico Lake Worth Florida Friday Sunday Texas August 27th Canada Gabby Petito Monday Charles Jones 21.7 million Amaq FBI Foxes
"difficulty walking" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"difficulty walking" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Com slash now. With Afghanistan now under Taliban rule, vulnerable Afghans are living in fear. People are extremely worried about what comes next for the country of Afghanistan. So this is a familiar scene across the capital of Kabul. People going to banks and withdrawing as much money as they can. We are worried we are not having accessed or money will run out of money and cash. Saab. It's very bad here is very uncertain here. The situation. It's not just banks that are having difficulties walking through the Bush bazaar in Kabul. You see very few people. Shopping life is different under Taliban control, and many are simply trying to save what money they have left. This means stores have barely any income, and those that remain open are struggling Foxes Trey Yingst in Kabul, Afghanistan. North Korea, criticizing a US decision to provide nuclear powered submarines to Australia and warning of unspecified countermeasures if it finds the deal affects the North Security, one official calling it a quote extremely dangerous Act. Marvel's latest superhero flick topping the weekend movie box office for the third straight week, Shanxi and the Legend of the 10 rings collecting 21.7 million in ticket sales. The Disney release holding better in theaters than most films during the pandemic, a disappointing Debut for Warner Brothers Cry Macho. I'll tell you something. With my whole thing is overrated. Eastwood movie, finishing third on the weekend charts selling just $4.5.

21.7 million Marvel Saab Kabul Foxes Disney Warner third third straight week Trey Yingst Taliban Bush North Security Cry Macho Shanxi and the Legend of the 1 $4.5 US Afghanistan one Australia
"difficulty walking" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"difficulty walking" Discussed on KTRH

"At the ktrh. Top Tax defenders. 24 hour Weather Center Ktrh news Time is a dough one. Our top story now that Afghanistan is under Taliban rule vulnerable Afghans are left living in fear. Fox's Trey Yingst reports from Kabul. People are extremely worried about what comes next for the country of Afghanistan. So this is a familiar scene across the capital of Kabul. People going to banks and withdrawing as much money as they can. We are worried we are not having access to your money will run out of money, and we need cash. So it's very bad here. It's very uncertain here. The situation. It's not just banks that are having difficulties walking through the Bush bazaar in Kabul. You see very few people. Shopping life is different under Taliban control in many are simply trying to save what money they have left. This means stores have barely any income and those that remain open are struggling. The Taliban has started to implement the Sharia law across Afghanistan. The law bans music prohibits women and men working in the same places and allows executions in more rural parts of the country. The US was able to evacuate roughly 124,000 people out of the country, but many vulnerable Afghan allies have been left behind. The Teton County coroner's office, confirming a body that has been found near the area of Teton National Park, where searchers were looking for 22 year old Gabby Petito. Authorities are not releasing the identity of the person. Thousands of illegal immigrants are camping under Del Rio Bridge. Fox's Bill Malone gin. Still an absolute crisis happening here at the International Bridge in Del Rio, There are still upwards.

Gabby Petito Trey Yingst Teton National Park Del Rio Bridge Kabul International Bridge 24 hour Del Rio 124,000 people Fox Taliban Bush 22 year old Afghanistan Teton County Afghan US Thousands of illegal Sharia law Malone
"difficulty walking" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"difficulty walking" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Hey, Dr Lieberman. We're back. We're back. I want to tell you about a man who walked in my office a few days ago. He's 75 is a black man. And I say that because of the black community one and six black men and will have prostate cancer and one in 23 die of prostate cancer. So he's a 75 year old black man. Of course, we take care of men and women and Children of erase and religion and creed and color and belief you can possibly imagine and more. He's been seen at one of the biggest hospital to go into one of the biggest hospitals for years and years and years and years. You had an exposure of 9 11 and S. COPD and he had prostate issues had when he said the extreme difficulty urinating was journaling. Five times a night. His PSA was on known, he said. It was on known, has been going to one of the super duper most famous hospitals in Manhattan, and it's P s A is and known and you're eating five times a night and they sing the doctors there. He worked in the Fire department and I examined him and well, he had in the large prostate and we got a pizza and it was 44 is P s A was 44 normal. PSA is four. It's 1100% higher than it should be. That for his is 44. We got to biopsy. It was Gleason, eight, and usually when a biopsy the prostates done, there's 12 little needles ago in the prostate, usually in good hands, And if you're not comfortable, come here. I'll get you hooked up with a good urologist because to some urologists who do biopsies without anesthesia, which really hurt? So we don't want to hurt anybody. So he got a biopsy. There's 12 little needles as we got numb, adopt his travel needles going like a spring loaded gun being and, well, every 12 every one of those 12 needles had Gleason eight cancer in it. 12 of 12, and he was just walking around going to one of the biggest hospitals use convinced to it so fantastic, But he wasn't getting any better. So I came to Dr Liederman for fresh second opinion, and that's what happened. He was found out to have this. High risk cancer. Remember him going to one of the biggest hospitals for years and years? And they never check your PSA and never check your prostate? Even though you're in a well known high risk group. Wow. We have a lot of prostate information to send you if you want. You can call now you can call later. You can come in Many people call many people come in our numbers to into choices. You can come and get information will give it to you a mail to you. Or better yet, make an appointment. Get up prostate check up. Just call us. We accept most insurances. Medicare, Medicaid. Cause two and two choices. This is the work that we do every day for decades. We've been here every day for decades. Whatever the man is, actually woman is 51 years old. She came to me a year ago shot a glioblastoma. She was diagnosed after she had a haddock at a headache and shed arm pain and should hand tangle image and Haddox and Jews. Seen by our doctors went to the emergency room. They got an MRI by one of the big hospitals in New York City. And like I said they did the MRI and out comes the neurosurgeons. We better cut out their head. You better cut out your brain tumor, and they cut her out. And after surgery, she was even worse shape. She had left arm weakness and left leg weakness and difficulty walking. And while she's had standard radiation over there at that hospital just opened up the head, and she had to modern radiation and well The cancer grew back. And it grew back and she came to me with a recurrent glioblastoma glioblastoma was one of the most aggressive brain tumors and often the typical survival in America is about a year. And well, She came to me a year ago with recurrent glioblastoma and she said by doctors told me there's nothing I can do or just take chemo, which she knows doesn't work very well and, well. We treated her for recurrent glioblastoma a year ago, and she came in this week. And she came in just to tell me she said, just to tell you doctor later and I'm in remission. My cancer has gone away thanks to your innovative brain tumor treatment. And yes, we are the first to New York with brain radiosurgery when all the other hospitals and facilities and doctors and all the ones.

New York New York City Manhattan America 1100% Lieberman Liederman 75 12 needles 23 two six one 12 little needles this week first Five times a night 51 years old a year ago second opinion
"difficulty walking" Discussed on Distorted View Daily

Distorted View Daily

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"difficulty walking" Discussed on Distorted View Daily

"Oh yes she wants you to check out this story you wanna know. Why does she has a gofundme campaign. Well more like t t to dut da da. It looks like this young woman was trying to raise fifty thousand dollars you know. I'm sure for medical bills. After just a few days. She already received seventeen thousand dollars in contributions. Unfortunately that's when go fund me pulled the fucking plug. And now they're offering refunds to donors. Yes go fund. Me is investigating a fundraiser set up by an instagram or who claimed she was neurologically damaged by the kobe. Vaccine an article. I have here says that dominique disil- vaa that's the chicks suffers from what she says includes dystopia difficulty walking weakness within the legs. Dull aching and sharp shooting pains within the legs vertigo. Heart palpitations are all things. I suffer from lack of sensation throughout the body cold sensation in the legs hain behind the eyes and an tremor in her right hand the go fund me account says help. Dominique recover from the kovic nineteen vaccine. Meanwhile doctors and neurologists can't seem to figure out what's wrong with her dominique the article state. Luckily she does appear occasionally enjoy a reprieve from her symptoms. Her instagram pages filled with happy and carefree videos and photos hosted after she got the vaccine again a lot of photos from her beautiful wedding day. Why can't icon people into giving me money. I have to do a daily fucking show. Just a scrape. By this chick stutters. People are throwing cash at her. That i got the i got the pfizer pfizer. That just got fda approval. It would be a shame if i was like the poster child for kobe. Nineteen vaccine complications. Be a real travesty. You can't see. But i'm also twitching my i and i'm slapping my hand up against my chest. You know in that really offensive stereotypically retarded way like donald trump did when he was impersonating that reporter with the disability. Now i'm recording. The shows with a stutter. And a tick throw some sympathy dollars by way. I got some kick comfort.

dominique disil Dominique pfizer pfizer fda kobe donald trump
"difficulty walking" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"difficulty walking" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Bestselling environmental book. Silent spring i rachel carson. Here's carson can anyone believe it is possible to lay down such a barrage of poisons on the surface of the earth without making it unfit for all life and books like you know the population bomb and al gore's first book earth in the balance limits to growth all these great environmental classics all stem directly from his work. And so that's why i picked him. William vote was born in nineteen o two on long island new york back when it was largely bucolic and then it was just engulfed by suburbanization. So he tried to find nature. He ends up in brooklyn. Slum plucked from that and goes to one of those schools have new york where the deserving poor given special education becomes the first college graduate in his family with a degree in french literature and a degree in french literature was probably as useful in career building then as it is now and He turned to ornithology. He was a passionate bird watcher. That's i should mention that. He had polio as well. And he went all over the place despite finding great difficulty walking and having canes and braces and having to be hauled around and so forth is gutsy guy and through a whole series of unlikely circumstances he ends up becoming the kind of official ornithologist of the peruvian government on these guatemalans Which are these islands off the coast of peru and these islands had seabirds roosting on them for melania pa- millennia and the seabirds do what they do which is to eat fish nearby in excrete huge quantities of bird poop. I'm allowed to say that on your sharar. Absolutely you guys are just hang loose. Approp- yep Yeah okay and this. In the eighteen fifties became the origin of today's Hugely important fertilizer industry these vast heaps of bird poop that were on these islands off the coast of peru and they became very very important to the proven government to maintain the supply of poop needed to maintain supply birds in the nineteen thirties. The supply of birds are declining. And they brought him in as he said to augment the increment of excrement and he spent three years there and he actually did A kind of a remarkable piece of of ecological science foundational piece. Which is he realized that there is an oscillation of the currents there. It's called in so today. El nino la nina and he argued that when the warm water came in when the el nino phase came in the anchovies. Or excuse me which were the fish that the birds ate on. These islands swam far out into the pacific to avoid the warm water. They like cold water and the birds couldn't reach them and this recurring put a cap on the number of birds that you could have on these islands and you could not augment the increment of excrement that nature these bounds. And if he did increase the bird supply just mean that things were temporarily things would be worse when the Next el nino came in and this is his powerful insight for him. This is the way nature worked and he put it together and then he made two big steps which i think her enormously important one is that he said this kind of phenomenon which is called a carrying capacity means that the only so much can be produced because of these natural limits could be stretched like taffy to cover the entire world. The world can be thought of as a single environment with a single carrying capacity. And the second he said is that we're exceeding it or we're about to exceed it in. That's going to bring us into trouble. William vote predicted specifically personally. He predicted famine. Which as you. Ray hasn't come true. Global famine rate today is a tiny fraction of what it was for much of the twentieth century. So let me ask you this as a prophet do you need to be rate or is it enough to sound the alarm because obviously on on that dimension at least of prediction of famine and population wipeout vote was wildly wrong. Now i think there are two Response to the first is okay. You're right it didn't happen but it will happen eventually. We just got the timing wrong and the second response which To my way of thinking at least is is more nuanced. His you're right. We didn't get that right but a lot of the other things they predicted we did get right. And that is true. Nitrogen portions a huge issue. I mean about forty percent of the fertilizer that's been used didn't get absorbed by plants and it got either went up in the air where it interferes with the ozone layer not a good idea or becomes nitrous. Oxide is closer to the ground in the air which is caused all kinds of health problems or even worse it goes into the streams which goes into the rivers which goes into the ocean causes these enormous blooms of algae and other aquatic plants. These i fall down to the bottom. Microorganisms consume them. It's sort of an orgy of breakfast. And they metabolize so quickly. They suck all the oxygen out of the year. And you get these huge dead zones in coastal areas around the world and you can go on and on all that stuff.

peruvian government rachel carson peru El nino la nina new york al gore carson William polio brooklyn Ray
"difficulty walking" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"difficulty walking" Discussed on KOMO

"Chemo 24 7 News Center. Texas Democrats are set to meet with Vice President Harris later this week to discuss voting rights. After Texas Republicans voted to dispatch law enforcement to track down Democrats who left the state in an attempt to block passage of new voting limits. They say the voting bill will make it harder for minorities and the disabled to vote. And people who live in Tacoma get their chance to weigh in on a new plan that would overhaul the city's single family zoning codes. The goal is to create more affordable housing in the city home in Tacoma, would allow more types of housing like duplexes and cottages. The public hearing begins at 5 15 this evening. Warning about a newly discovered side effect connected with Johnson and Johnson's Covid 19 vaccine and the dean of Brown University School of Public Health. Dr. Ashish Jha spoke about it with a B C's George Stephanopoulos explained with Guillain Barre syndrome is Gum Beret syndrome. Is a neurologic condition. Basically, it's an immune you're immune system attacks your own nerve cells. It's pretty rare. It's pretty rare in general and can be caused by Can be triggered by other infections. It has been known to be triggered by medicines or even other vaccines. We see this is a pretty rare condition, but it happened and we should. We should emphasize the association between John Barra and the Johnson Johnson vaccine is even more rare. 100 cases out of more than 12 million covid cases. Overall, people have been next anybody. Johnson Johnson Vaccine Absolutely. This is a very rare side effect of the Johnson Johnson vaccine. We're still figuring out whether it's really related. Given that it's been shown with other vaccines spin shown with infections. It would not be surprised evidence of being a real association but are very, very rare one. So what kind of symptoms should people beyond the watch for if they take the Johnson and Johnson vaccine? So again, This is pretty uncommon. The classic symptoms of Gamber a starts with a little bit of tingling and numbness that can happen, especially in the legs. And then you did. The main symptom is weakness. So if you start feeling weakness in your legs, if sometimes in your in your arms and then obviously, if you have difficulty walking, you want to go get that checked out by your doctor or go to the emergency room. And at this point, the jury's still out on the need for booster shots, but at some point Do you expect it to be recommended? You know, the jury is still out and we got to look at the data. I would not be surprised if at some point down the road, Let's say for immuno compromised people or for the elderly who don't often respond. Quite as effectively with in terms of their immune response to a vaccine as we may need a third shot, But I want to see the data before we make an easy soup termination and how long you think that'll take. You know, I think so. Pfizer and Moderna both say that they have some preliminary data now and that there is some data from Israel. So we may see something sooner rather than later. That's Brown University School of Public Health Dean, Dr Ashish Jha, speaking with a B CS George Stephanopoulos. We've learned of at least one American connection to the assassination of Haiti's president. ABC is Marcus Moore has an update the U. S Drug Enforcement agency confirming that one of the men who was arrested Was an occasional the informant and that after the assassination he reached out to the agency. They urged him to turn himself in. Another man who was arrested is a Haitian doctor. Christian son on he lives in Miami. And the police chief here in Haiti, says that he wanted to take over the government and allegedly enlisted the services of 19 of the Colombian man now under arrest and this assassination. Has left Haiti in a state of unrest. The prime minister telling people to stay calm, and he's also urged the US to send troops here but so far, the Biden administration president Biden Has not committed to that. Instead, he's speaking out, saying that the people here in Haiti deserve peace and security. ABC's Marcus more Come on news time. 12 50. It's time for our propel insurance. Business Update from Jim Tesco Inflation spiked in June, but a closer look at the numbers provide some calming information. The Labor Department said this morning that the consumer price index was up a steep 5.4% year over year. The largest annual increase in 13 years, while the core CPI, which strips out volatile food and energy components, rose 4.5%, the sharpest jump in nearly 30 years. Analysts point out that about a third of the steep increase was due to surging prices for used cars and trucks. BMO Capital Markets says Used vehicle prices soared 10% from May And are up a whopping 45% from a year ago. JPMorgan Chase posted a big jump in second quarter profit, but revenue fell 8% from a year ago to about $30.5 billion. Both figures exceeded expectations. Yet the banking giant's shares are down 2.5%. That's your money now, and the markets are down by about 3/10 of 1% across the board with just about 10 minutes left to go in the trading day. The Dow is down 89 points the S and P 500 down 13. The NASDAQ is off by 46 points. Money news at 20 and 50 past the hour and traffic is next Another day, another unknown. It could bring your biggest order yet, or a new cyber threat. Whatever.

Miami 46 points JPMorgan Chase 4.5% 10% Ashish Jha John Barra Tacoma June George Stephanopoulos 89 points 19 13 years 8% May 100 cases 5.4% Marcus Moore Jim Tesco 45%
"difficulty walking" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

08:20 min | 1 year ago

"difficulty walking" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"You for tuning into my podcast, Pit owner Diaries show. I am your host America's pet owner coach to know Young and Today's segment we're talking about is dogs on duty with my special guests, Ali Nasser of command canine behavior. Welcome to the podcast Alley. Thank you for having me So in telling us a little bit. Let's start with what got you passionate about dogs and how your journey began. So as a child. I grew up with 20 to 25 dogs until I was 18. They're a bunch of hunting dogs, and I loved it. Um, I worked with the Bush County Sheriff's Office team. I laid tracks for the bloodhound team and hang out with their cannons as well and really grew a passion for the dogs. Right after high school. I enlisted in the army. It was fortunate enough to be selected for canine. So I spent four years active duty in the Army as military working dog handler. Uh, that's where a lot of my professional training came in. And I worked bomb dogs, Drug dogs. We did a lot of bite work. Um It was a really incredible experience, but that's what really started my passion with dogs. So when you were talking about you have much of your experience and what you're doing now as a professional trainer, and then also what your foundation can you give our pit audience like a little snippet of what it would be like day to day to be a military working dog handler. So every day you're training, um, different scenarios. Um, these dogs are absolutely incredible. The task that they're trained to do and finding especially explosives. Is designed to save people's lives instead of someone you know, walk into a room and or a vehicle pulling up and, you know soldiers and innocent civilians getting blown up and dying. These dogs are here to detect that So all we did was train different scenarios. Um, different areas, open areas, buildings, vehicles, every type of possible scenario. We could get put in in a real life situation. We were practicing it with live explosives. Um or narcotics if we're on a drug talk so that I mean, that's the you know the daily and then, um, we would get put on all missions, different secret service missions. Deployments, you know, depending on what the dog was selected for and go do it in real life. That is truly phenomenal. So basically, what you're saying is not only are you risking your life, the dog himself or herself is actually doing it on behalf of our country. Yes, they I mean, they don't necessarily know what they're doing. They think they're working for a toy, Uh, tennis Ball Kong, but don't do anything for it because of how high drive they are, but they're trained to find the odor. When they get to find the odor, they get a reward, so they worked really, really hard to find it. So that's what I really love about pets themselves. It's just this little things, the simple things in life there truly love and and they're always through that type of rewarding behavior. They just really become loyal. And and so we're seeing now for many of us for the first time what it means a dog of that caliber In doing that important of job. It's still basic. To the fundamentals, What you and I would do at home just with our dog or cat, for example. Correct. I mean, a lot of these dogs have the same obedience. Um, was my training program both with command and our behavior in the nonprofit community and service dogs. All the obedience is the same. I do basic. Advanced. Also show obedience, Uh, public access training. And then you know, with service dogs. I do the specialized task training but obedience wise, These dogs are extremely obedient. You can put them 30 40 ft Off leash for them in a sit stay, and the dog doesn't move for up to 3 to 4 minutes until told otherwise, Um, you are able to do gunfire with them. They don't flinch. Um they get put under high stress. Environments and there Cool cucumber. They don't you know they're they're working. That is truly truly phenomenal, because I can't even get my dog to sit if you need help with that. Yeah, probably. So I do need to take a class or two and sign up. Okay, so that being said so. You've been in the military for how long did you say? Four years, four years. Okay, So after four years, um, you've done your duty. You serve your country. What was next on your journey? So I got out. I worked at a M K nine for a little while. Training police dogs, so pretty much the same training I was doing in the military I was doing except training brand new green dogs. Um, I have a pretty nasty back injury. So I stopped. I was getting yanked around too much, so I stopped doing the Training and I moved to being a civilian contractor working a bomb dog on the cruise lines. So I worked at Port Canaveral on the Disney in the carnival cruise lines, and I also work for a short period of time. That's American Airlines station are American Airlines Center in Dallas with a bomb dog? Um, in the midst of doing that training, I started my own private dog training business command canine behavior. I've had that for going on three or four years now, something like that. And then this I worked for, um, brought up. I had was doing a bunch of things at once. I worked for two service dog companies. One is a nonprofit and one of those a for profit doing service or training. I wanted to just kind of learn every avenue of the dog industry that I could, um And then this past January, Myself and two other dog Handler said I was good friends with we got the idea to star Command Canine service dogs, which does Professional service dog training free of charge for disabled veterans. So that's really good to know. And it's interesting how you were easily able to make that transition from being out in the military and civilian life, be able to do the same things that you were passionate about. Which is training dog. Yeah, I really enjoyed it. I mean, don't get me wrong. My transition. My first year is very difficult getting out of the military. Um, not so I mean, I had a job right away. But it's a your entire life changes. Um, it's It's a very different culture, being in the civilian world and having freedoms to come and go and go to your family and you know It's very different. It took me a little while to settle in. But my dogs and working with the dogs is what always help kept me going, and it became even more of a passion than it already was for me. That's really exciting. And like you said that you did have some challenges. But having that bond and relationship with the training of the dogs really helped you as for many of us, kind of see the light at the end of the tunnel, it's always nice when I think about when I come home from a long day of work that my dog or cat there right there to greet me, and I'm sure you feel the same way. Absolutely. I actually have a personal service dog. He just turned three. And that dog made, um, a complete difference in my life. When I got out of the army I was having Minimum. 50 panish panic attacks a week I couldn't talk. Can't walk of almost drowned in my tub three times from them, Um My back was it was a fresh injury. Um, I was having difficulty walking. My back was giving out on me and my dogs. They're helping me stand up. He opens the fridge closes the fridge turns on light switches, picks up anything that I drop. He helps me worked with my panic attacks doing deep pressure therapy. He's actually gotten into the tub with me and I had one and help me get out. Um So having a dog and seeing my difference, um, from four years ago today, it's not.

20 Ali Nasser 30 three Four years two Disney today 18 25 dogs first year One Bush County Sheriff's Office Dallas four years three times American Airlines American Airlines Center one past January
"difficulty walking" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

08:19 min | 1 year ago

"difficulty walking" Discussed on WGN Radio

"802 475626 advertised rates available through the pen Fed car buying service to receive any advertised product must become a member of pen fit Entered, by the way, it's bright and early on W G. N Steve Dale's pet World, Susan Burrows from Rainbow Animal assisted therapy based in Chicago is the program coordinator is on the board of directors and you are back up and running. I understand Susan. Yes, we are. What this past year rainbow, Like other pet therapy organizations had to develop creative ways to provide pet therapy in a virtual environment. And this past year, we provided virtual programs too many of our program partners such as hospitals, schools, libraries and mental health centers. But, um we also, um devised ways to, um What are the benefits of doing virtual pet therapy and we anticipate as we move to continue to provide In person interactions slowly coming back that we will, um go on with virtual programs in many different areas. All right. So for people who don't know what pet therapy is, Uh, human animal interactions are animal assisted intervention. Animal assisted therapy. It has lots of different names. What are we talking about? Well. There are two types of animal therapy. One is animal assisted activities or visitation, which promotes the general feeling of wellbeing reduces isolation and anxiety, provides recreation and offers unconditional affection. Interactions with the therapy dog are low key and then usually involved such activities as petting and brushing. Visits of this type might be conducted a nursing and funeral homes that they care in hospitals. Usually these therapy dogs do not need to have any specialized training beyond their therapy, training and its most basic level contact with the therapy dog. Can affect the physiological and psychological stress levels of participants that lowers blood pressure lows individual heart rate and reduces the amount of stress hormones and all dogs. Therapy interactions contain elements of visitation. The other type of therapy encounter, which rainbow focuses on is animal assisted therapy, which is the utilization of animals to facilitate healing and rehabilitation and a their pubic setting. It's a goal directed intervention in which the animal is an integral part of the treatment process. So when animal assisted therapy the drug plays an important part in someone's physical, social, emotional therapy activities, but therapy dog skills are used to meet that need to the participant. And they utilize the mutually nurturing relationship between people and animals. These dogs require special training and work, usually intensely with one person at a time or in small groups. We might go to, um, hospital or school where we might be doing their quote, Comfort work, but we also might be working with kids on cognitive issues or mental health situation or In rehab with people learning to that we develop their motor skills or whatever, so it's a little bit more intensive training for the dog. Yeah, So a couple of let's talk specifically about what Some examples are of what you're talking about. So perhaps someone who had a stroke, the medical professionals may say you enjoy dogs while take the tennis ball or whatever ball it is and toss it. Squeaky toy might be a better example in that direction, or another example might be a young child who's having difficulty for whatever the reason using his or her left arm. And the direction maybe pet the dog, which doesn't sound like therapy, But it certainly can be therapy. Are these two real life examples among thousands you could give So absolutely you and we have found not just Children, but adults. People, particularly Children will work for a dog when they won't work. Or anyone else. I've seen kids walk, um in school settings and hospital settings who would work for the walk for the therapist, But they'll walk for a dog. Um, I've seen people kids with autism who have verbalization and socialization issues. Talk to a dog. Look at a dog. When they won't speak to humans. So, yes, those are very good examples of how we use dogs. And then for a lot of people, they think the dogs are doing tricks like you say, petting the dog walking a dog having a dog jumps through a hoop. Doing a puzzle with the dog will seem to be President fund interest and they are, but they also might accomplish a goal like you stay a person who needs to speak. Somebody's having difficulty walking, walking a dog. Um, those those are accomplishing goals, whether they're emotional, physical or cognitive goal. So they seem to be activities that are pleasant fun to do, and they are, but they're also under the guidance of the facilities in which we work. We are employing the dog to help the people in their quality of life. Now choosing the right dog to do this is important because the right dog actually benefits As it turns out, we have science. Lots of science to show. First of all backing up a step that what you and I are talking about really works and anyone who was done and I have, as you know, animal assisted intervention, animal assisted therapy, animal assisted activities. Whatever you want to call it. Anyone who's done it has seen the benefits but never mind the anecdotal evidence. There is now science after science after science from all over the world studies that have demonstrated the difference these dogs really do make for clients, the patients, the people involved, whether they be as you point out adults or Children. It's not only Children by any means, and it's not only senior citizens, incidentally, Who benefit from all of this as well. People in assisted living facilities, people in nursing homes, etcetera, but it turns out Susan that dogs can benefit, too, if it's the right dog. Oh, yeah. And you're correct. Um, research studies offer scientific support that to the premise that dogs can help people in ways that no. One Or no one else can. And, um, uh and and it does take the right dog Any any dogs could be any breed Any size can be a therapy dog. But, um The key to the dog's ability to be a successful therapy dog. If it's temperament, it must be friendly, gentle and responses to its owner, as well as other people. The dog needs to be willing to learn new things and be comfortable and all sorts of situations. A therapy dog must be well behaved. It must enjoy human contact. And it needs to be content to be petted and handled. In other words, they must be people proof. Yeah, well, I'll tell you because of the pandemic. I happen to know that you are looking again. To add more therapy dogs. What does it take to become a rainbow assisted animal assisted therapy dog? We will find out how you can participate, perhaps with your dog and make a difference for so many lives. It's a great thing to do. We'll learn more about it when we come back on W G. N Better than double..

Susan Susan Burrows Chicago Rainbow Animal 802 475626 two types One double one person thousands this past year pen Fed First W fit past year two real life examples G. N Steve Dale animal W G.
"difficulty walking" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"difficulty walking" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Realtor magazines prestigious 30 under 30 Awards, which recognizes the top young real estate professionals across America. Coming up on real estate. Today We'll take you to Jacksonville, Florida, a sizzling hot military market between those three bases and how well our kind of economy here in Jacksonville is doing. World state is really truthfully booming here. That's straight ahead on our special show real estate in the military. If you have an Amazon echo, you can hear real estate today. Any time you want First tell Alexa enable real estate today and from then on, just ask her to play real estate today. But first it's time for our smart home technology report on today how the new voice recognition systems like Amazon Echo and Google home. Are making a huge difference in the lives of the elderly and the disabled. We're hearing about this more and more that well. For many people, voice recognition is just fun. For others, it represents an enormous leap forward in their ability to live more productive and more independent lives. Just think about it. People who have difficulty walking are moving around their homes. People who find it hard to turn on lamps or who might have trouble finding the light switch in the dark. Well, in many ways, voice recognition technology is liberating them Now they could just say, Alexa turn on the lights, and it's done. Or if they wake up in the middle of the night. Hey, Google turn on the bedroom light, and it's all done for people who would have a difficult time adjusting the temperature in the middle of the night. Now they could just say, Hey, Alexa, turn the temperature down five degrees, and that's it. No getting out of bed, turning on the lamp going down the hallway, finding the hallway light and then finding the thermostat. None of that. They just say it, and it's done for the disabled. That could be a game changer. Consumer reports wrote about this recently and said that groups that work on behalf of the disabled all across America are so excited about voice recognition devices. For one thing, they're much less expensive than tools designed specifically for the disabled, and they control lots of things, not just a few. And they're easy to learn. The story and consumer reports was filled with anecdotes from people who themselves are disabled. People who say that Google home and Amazon Alexa have made a huge difference in their ability to live their lives every day. In fact, our friends it seen it also reported. That one of the biggest group's investigating voice recognition in the home Is the United States Veterans Administration, which wants to help our nation's wounded warriors control their homes and, in a bigger sense, control their lives with eco home and other voice recognition devices..

Echo echo five degrees America Jacksonville United States Veterans Adminis Today Amazon First today one thing Alexa first Jacksonville, Florida three bases home under 30 Google 30 Awards
"difficulty walking" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"difficulty walking" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Healthy life. Lavash back with doctor came Crone house. I'm Doug Stephan. Going through all of the things mostly covert related information. That's new this week. That helps us to put a hope of positive spin on whatever you're doing to take care of yourself. Here's something that's prettier Singer a couple of items that are connected to your lungs. This is lung problems. I mean, this stuff goes into your lungs. That's where it goes first, right and just sort of because the way the Chinese engineered it, it is engineered to stick. Your lungs to the surface of the lungs, is it not? Well, it Most of it comes in through your nose, so that's why if you're wearing a mask, make sure you cover your nose doing no good, but he can come in through the mouth and sometimes even through the eyes, But most of it's 70% of it comes through the nose. What we learned this week from the Journal American Medical Association Network opens is that more than half of adults hospitalized with covert 19 Doug have diminished lung function four months after they've recovered and returned home. Similar percentage of these patients also had mobility problems, including difficulty walking and just over 17% had symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder four months after hospital discharge. So the concern here is that there really are long term effects of covert 19. And when we have some time I can expand on this because there are a number of them. Well, I think that we ought to talk about that. And the the fact that if you're a smoker now, other than being stupid because you're smoking, that's maybe a little harsh, but it's true. And if you're a former smoker, and you've had co vid What's the ruling on that in terms of how it affects you?.

Doug Stephan Crone house difficulty walking Journal American Medical Assoc
"difficulty walking" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

05:23 min | 2 years ago

"difficulty walking" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Certified radiation doctor in New York, one of the few in the world here for you. So when I speak, I speak from lots of experience. Lots of years, lots of decades and thousands of patients that I have treated over all these years. I won't talk about a woman who comes to me. She's from the former Soviet Union her she's 52 years old. She's marriage comes with her daughters and beautiful woman and daughter should cervix cancer treated three years ago she had vaginal bleeding. We talked a few minutes ago about bleeding or vaginal bleeding, Rectal bleeding, coughing up blood. These are all very important things. She had vaginal bleeding. She went to one of the big hospitals in New York area. The cancer had already traveled to the lymph nodes. He was scheduled for surgery. The surgery for the uterus and for the cervix was canceled because the lymph node She was diagnosed at one hospital surgery was canceled. She then had chemotherapy and radiation. Shed one chemo shot and only three radiation treatment. So she stopped the chemo. She stopped the radiation. She stopped everything for three years. Wow. Had an invasive cancer already traveled to lymph nodes, and she stopped all the treatment. Wow. So she left the cancer grow and grow and grow and grow. She already let the cancer grow because she had vaginal bleeding for a year before she went to the doctor. Then she stopped. All the treatment just had a couple treatments which will be useless. And she's decided she's going to try exercise and food. Why can't tell you My experience, and most everyone asked me Dr Liederman does. What should I eat? Well, food doesn't change the cancer. Exercise doesn't change the cancer. This woman already had cervical cancer traveled to live notes and they're changing diet and exercise will not All through the cancer. Mega vitamins, antioxidants. Ozone vitamin C drip, Animas Acupuncture does not change the cancer. The cancer keeps on growing. And what do you think happened to this woman? Well, the cancer kept growing. She deteriorated. She locked so much blood. Her hemoglobin was 2.9. Normal. Hemoglobin is about 15. So she lost about 80% of her blood. She lost 80% of her blood from this mass of cervix cancer in the vagina. She was transfused. The kidneys were blocked from her cancer shed some palliative standard radiation, which really didn't work, and she had a Kant's cat scan done the month ago, it showed extensive Cancer in the pelvis, the bladder, the rectum. She never got it memorized. Never had a pet scan. She never had a bone scan. She has terrible pain. Chazz painting the pelvis is pain in the leg. He still has vaginal bleeding. Her weight was 67 kg. She's now 52 kg. She's 5 ft six inches tall. She has difficulty walking from the cancer from the cancer, says difficulty walking. The cancer is just growing through the bones and growing through her pelvis. And she was treated without any complete staging. So the cat scan. She did have a cat scan afterwards, which showed cancer spreading to the left side of the pelvis and the vagina and the bladder and the rectum and the pelvic sidewall eating through the right hip bone. Eating through the sake room eating through the common iliac vessels. Wow. And I examined her. She was weak could walk only a few Steps because of her weakness. And so here she is. Years after being diagnosed with flooded the vagina had a few treatments stopped all the achievements, start food and exercise with helper. The cancer kept on growing. Then she had standard radiation one of the big hospitals and she's here now to try to get better. So what are we doing for Well, number one were staging or up to see where the cancer is. Trying to get rid of the pain and suffering. Try to relieve the pain, relieve the suffering and shrink the cancer. And that's the work that we do every day and many times she would say, Dr Lieberman's You treat stage four cancer? Yes. And you treat cancer in the bone? Yes. And you treat cancer. Lymphoma is yes. Why? Because you have Ah. High success rates, and we're most likely able to stop the cancer reverse to cancer and get rid of the pain and get rid of the suffering. And this is what we do every day at 13, 84, Broadway, Broadway and 38 Street in the heart of New York City. We have lots of information to send you You can call us at two and two choices. Even now get information caused two into 246 40 to 37 212. 246 40 to 37 call us Even now making appointment We accept most insurance.

cancer vaginal bleeding cervix cancer Kant Rectal bleeding New York Soviet Union New York City Dr Liederman Lymphoma difficulty walking Dr Lieberman
"difficulty walking" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"difficulty walking" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Leg. He still has vaginal bleeding. Her weight was 67 kg. She's now 52 kg. She's 5 FT six inches tall. She has difficulty walking from the cancer from the cancer, says difficulty walking. The cancer is just growing through the bones and growing through her pelvis. She was treated without any complete staging. So the cat scan. She did have a cat scan afterwards, which showed cancer spreading to the left side of the pelvis and the vagina and the bladder and the rectum and the pelvic sidewall eating through the right hip bone. Eating through the sake room eating through the common iliac vessels. Wow. And I examined her. She was weak could walk only a few Steps because of her weakness. And so here she is. Years after being diagnosed with flooded the vagina had a few treatments stopped. All the treatments start food and exercise with helper. Cancer kept on growing. Then she had standard radiation one of the big hospitals and she's here now to try to get better. So what are we doing for number one were staging or up to see where the cancer is. Trying to get rid of the pain and suffering. Try to relieve the pain, relieve the suffering and shrink the cancer. And that's the work that we do every day and many times she would say, Dr Lieberman's You treat stage four cancer? Yes. And you treat cancer in the bone? Yes. And you treat cancer Lymphomas? Yes. Why? Because you have Ah. High.

cancer difficulty walking vaginal bleeding Dr Lieberman
Peripheral Artery Disease: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

Mayo Clinic Radio

01:00 min | 4 years ago

Peripheral Artery Disease: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

"With your Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, I'm Vivian Williams. Peripheral artery disease or P A D can be a sign of something really seriously wrong with your heart or blood vessels. So just what is PHD? Everybody's familiar with the atherosclerotic blockages. It can affect the heart and give us heart attacks or the kind that can affect the vessels of the neck and the brain and might give us a stroke. It turns out that those problems these what we call plaques or areas of cholesterol and calcium deposition. Not only occur in the heart and the brain. But they can occur everywhere in the body. Dr Tom rook says PHD most often occurs in the legs as the blockages get worse. Patients have difficulty walking and experience pain. So what happens is they've got plenty of blood flow getting their at rest, but not enough to let them perform while painful. PHD is treatable. In fact, Dr rook says one of the best things you can do is exercise through your pain to stimulate the body. For more information talk to your doctor or visit mayo clinic dot org.

Dr Tom Rook Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic Dot Vivian Williams Difficulty Walking