18 Burst results for "Dickman"

Scientist estimates a billion animals killed by Australian wildfires

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

00:19 sec | 10 months ago

Scientist estimates a billion animals killed by Australian wildfires

"And now to Australia billion animals may have been killed in bush flies since September according to a scientist this doubling earlier estimates as the scale of the crisis continues to emerge new figures from the university of Sydney's Chris Dickman show eight hundred million animals may have been killed three putting a loss of

Scientist Chris Dickman Australia University Of Sydney
"dickman" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

06:33 min | 11 months ago

"dickman" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"Nine certainly have something about them away of capturing capturing people's imaginations perhaps more than any other big can't recently the killing of Cecil the lion in Zimbabwe by an American dentist trophy hunter caused a huge public outcry in the UK and US and seemed to galvanize public opinion. Bob Way wants to extradite Walter Palmer. An American mm dentist who killed Cecil the lion sessile water protection nominal living in a National Park Palma allegedly paid fifty thousand dollars for the hunter later this month and said he believed believed his actions were legal apologized and gone into hiding offer a flood of abuse online. I just wonder how has that. That impacted on conservation instance with as you say people have a huge offensive lines. I think it's so important. We want to maintain that going forward as you say. The killing successful than I in really was a moment when people recognized for stop the decline in Lions and. I think that was an important moment where there was a real voice saying this is an incredibly important species who want to protect but unfortunately I think it is something that has not have the nuance that needs to have in the debate because what people don't realize that trophy. Hunting is distasteful Chris. Most of US probably find it. I certainly can't imagine killing fun but the problem is the trophy. Hunting is a reason at the moment. For maintaining huge tracts of wild habitat more lion rain. We think is maintained entropy hunting zones in national parks for example. So it's very important that if trophy hunting either stops or becomes is less financially viable for instance through import bans that the UK is considering right now. Then it's fundamentally important. We make sure alternatives in place that can deliver the equal greater benefits both for wildlife conservation and for local communities. Because the real risks. If you take away or you reduce that economic incentive to maintain habitat it'll be converted to farmland agriculture to settlement and you will have a huge numbers of wildlife killings by US loss and habitat loss than those given. The key. Drivers is what we don't want to just take away a minor threat and exacerbates a far greater threat trophy. Hunting is a divisive subject. A two thousand sixteen report by the International Fund for Animal Welfare revealed that as many as one point seven million hunting trophies crossed borders between two thousand four and two thousand fourteen at least two hundred thousand of which will from threatened species letter published by The Guardian earlier this year which was signed by celebrities activists and senior members of various wildlife organizations asked the UK government to ban the import of hunting trophies. Something signatory said would send a clear message to the international community. There is no place for trophy hunting in this day and age but some like the World Loud Wildlife Fund say their scientific evidence to support the claim that it can in some circumstances support conservation and local people which takes us back to. Amy told me through the impact of the work that you've been doing so in terms of statistics we're seeing downward I'm with trend in the lineup. Relation is turning that around. Have you actually seen an increase in line numbers in the region you're working in. We've seen really positive changes We haven't monitored the lion population level because when we started just the one. Oh data on how many lines reliably ecosystems massive nets the great exhibition. There's fifty fifty thousand square kilometers so rather than send an awful lot of time trying to focus on the population trends. What we tried to address the real threats that we knew were driving those populations since down that involves protecting livestock giving people tangible real benefits from the presence of lions and other wildlife improving awareness about these species and really engaging communities the anti and all of these aspects of community sedation? And we've seen huge changes we've seen that attacks on people's livestock in the core area have decreased by about sixty percent and most importantly carnival killings in these areas have declined by around eighty percent. So while we haven't been able to show an increase in the population. We have certainly shown that that reduction in threats this is very very likely to be having a positive impact on the long-term security of these populations resources for conservationist we we know that all the time for different aspects of conservation and some might argue that less charismatic organisms like insects for example almost more crucial to ecosystems of acquire Sort of extra help to conserve them but because lines are cute they get all the money. What do you make of that one of the reasons for focusing on big top carnivores? We've talked that they require lots of space and in that space you get habitat preserved for huge diversity of species. Everything from birds reptiles to invertebrates so by selling this very charismatic species of the flagship. Then you do actually often deliver effective protection for many other species under that umbrella so while lions and rhinos elephants often through the get the lion's share of the attention they are hopefully delivering many other benefits if we protect that habitat we think about community conservation. People often think of the kind of work that we do with the tribes in Tanzania but actually these species are global heritage requires the global global community to come together to really deliver effective conservation. LONG-TERM I think informed advocacy is a big part of it. We've touched on the trophy hunting debates and I think educating hating yourself a bit more about the reality in the nuance behind these debates and not just leaping to conclusions Matt. Something is a very important way of moving these debates forward and not to sing it through one lens. Conservation does not require biologists out there with. GPS IT requires media. Experts requires people who can communicate. The street hunts hunts and art in amazing ways of reaching out and saying this is a crisis that we're facing but if we all pull together we really can make a difference. We've seen that in Tanzania and I really think if people together we can do a lot more wildlife conservation of local people special. Thanks this week to Dr Amy Dickman you can read more about attack by following the links on the signs weekly podcast page at The Guardian Dot Com for movement put costs from the Guardian. Just go to the GUARDIAN DOT COM slash.

US UK Lions Tanzania Dr Amy Dickman Cecil The Guardian The Guardian Dot Com Bob Way World Loud Wildlife Fund National Park Palma Zimbabwe International Fund for Animal Walter Palmer Chris Matt
"dickman" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

09:58 min | 11 months ago

"dickman" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"By people in the day you on ninety five percents trained trained biologist and five percent tariff pile human but not completely the other way around this comes into particular focus in her work on the coexistence between lions untraditional communities in East Africa trying to understand and address the drive conflict between humans and these big cats and so I was in Little Apopka as night fell the line started roaring. I was getting quite nervous about the whole thing and I almost brushed abstract landrover which is not very far away but that take a look today lion attack on Kathleen and when the Catholic church is a strong lines. Do as they walk around and around the enclosure I get the capitals as Scott Fate Break House and then the lions attack. Remember having my hand on the ZIP and thinking be more intelligent than a cow. Do not rush to the line force myself to stay and then huge male. Lions walked out right side tent. sniffy paraffin reached. If it's too wet in the manage to find my leatherman multi tool and my deodorant spray. That was when I had with me. I decided if he came in I would blind him with the Deodorant and then stabbed him in the neck. It was at least had a plan. Obvious David come in. It would have gone horribly wrong. And he would have eaten me and he would have been calm backstay smelling it. screencrush deodorant little knicks on his nose but athlete didn't come in but he did come and lead right against the tent. I'm Ben and down across it and actually fell asleep on me with me. Just line crushed with my left arm had the Leatherman. It's crushed under the bulk of this line and it was a yeah one of the more memorable nights in the Bush that I've spent I ended up falling asleep as well actually and Have Wake up in the morning and wondering about dreamt door until I looked down. I was still clutching the two weapons. Amy's innovative work bringing together. Local communities to protect big cats has won her international recognition but with Africa's line population falling by around a half in the past two decades. The situation remains urgent. Can we bring hoped the decline and does the answer really lie with trophy hunters to answer some of these questions and talk me through her career. Amy joined me in the Guardian Studios News for today's episode of Science Weekly. Amy Is the Kaplan senior research fellow in wild field conservation at the University of Oxford. I started by asking her how she first became. Devoted to big cats goes right. The way back to childhood have always been fascinated by big cats for as long as I can remember. I remember dragging my family the zoo at every opportunity so I could stare at them and actually ah dug up a memory box that my brother and I had buried about ten when we wrote it but it said what we wanted to be doing that then unimaginable age of thirty and mine had two things on it to life goals. One that I wanted to be working on lines in the getty and see that I wanted to have a zebra stripe land braver. Both of these. I don't spend my third year in this Eddie. I have lots of broken ribs. I still haven't painted one zebra-striped. Yeah so it's been a very early love which continued throughout your life. When did you decide you wanted to make a career out of it because some people would say oh largest going visits to the zoo or even to countries where you have this marvelous word life but this is your career so so how did that come about for a long time? I thought about doing veterinary medicine and I was always obsessed as well but James Heritage and reading all these amazing stories. I thought it might WANNA come Z.. Vet so I could combine the two but just over time I am. I realized that I really wanted to do as much could actually conserve the species. Not just treat them not just the involved with them in that way it really try and do something positive in terms of securing their future each and then got a graduate scholarship to go and join the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit at the University of Oxford. And that was amazing. That was a real sort of dream. Come true because everyone on that literally handed a big cat. The moment they enter the unit. This is just going to be such an incredible place and Dave McDonald who runs the unit turnaround. said to me. Okay you're GONNA be working on water shrews and I was like what is true. So I- trudged up and down very British rivers looking for water shrews. I still don't believe they exist. Staring nervous will one then progressed onto water voles and then things got much bigger and scarier with badges. I still have this real passion for wanting to get out work with big cats and wanted to get to Africa and so eventually I was about to leave men. David called me and said No. We're back to have this woman join his PhD On Cheetahs in Namibia. Grant Namibia and work down. I was like absolutely. I leapt at the chance and that was the. Start of the fieldwork in Africa. What's it like being Out then field I mean what's the demographic of people go out there to go and work with big cats whether it's the perception often it's rugged men that there that was certainly why I got into it now. I think there is a section that it is often all the men that are these. Biologists failed bio just out there increasingly. See that it's far more diverse group of people particularly women and Africans obviously themselves. It's fundamentally important that they are the ones that are leading the conservation that their voices are being heard and one of the really challenging aspects of being in the field is the often very isolated in your field sites. And you're competing against the other conservationists for limited funding doing so you're actively proventil from Sharon good ideas in the group of six of us who won't happen to be women who decided to form this pride Lion Conservation Alliance and work together as a supportive of unit and make sure that we were empowering each other and strengthen each other sharing successes and failures and that's been a really important platform we've now used as a way of trying to bring other the young women and other female patients in because we want more African voices to be heard and we do want more women's voices to be heard in this so I think both of those aspects are important things we need to be focusing on. Why is it important to conserve them? Besides the fact that they're beautiful and you know we should be mindful of human impacts on different populations of animals animals but but what role do they serve the. We should conserve them for well. I think you started off almost with the answer to that question. And that's because they they have been so central to our lives and to what it means to be human. I mean this is about whether the cave lines actually helped shape the evolution of people themselves selves. There's something so fundamental about these animals and I think the idea of having big powerful animals that can kill you out. There is such an important thing for humanity to to know that there is something more powerful than us and I think that's what people recognize. Yes these animals incredibly beautiful and they're amazing but they have this power they have this or that we are just attracted to it from a very primeval and I think it'll be a huge shame to lose that not only because of the immense ecological role is top practices and all the Intrinsic Trending Valley. That comes with them but there is something in the what it means to be. A person is somehow catch having lines and other top predators out there and I think we have to conserve that for future generations so in twenty years the line population in Africa has worked hard. Yes we recognize some of twenty to twenty five thousand wild lions left. Yeah so what's going on. What has been driving this declined? Talk US through some of the factors involved the main factors really habitat loss and pray loss and obviously as the human population human footprint apprentice growing. Then that's a major issue for the loss of wild spaces and you get a lot of conflict with people as well and people don't realize that actually about half of remaining lion ranges outside right forming protected areas so community. Conservation is particularly important for this species lion. Hunting as you've talked about before is a coach with tradition for some populations how to conservationists cope with that when the hint protect wildlife zoo. That's very sensitive issue. It is a very sensitive issue. And it's one that has been central to my project enroll heart because the buyer bag the time that we worked with down there on traditionally quite prolific lion killers. And I think if you're trying to address cultural line killing the fundamental as I said obviously is to try to understand why people doing some what role it plays in their culture and often people aren't interested in wedded to the idea of having to kill the line. It's having to secure that status or it's having to provide whatever the killing achieves them trying to just trying to make sure that that is living in a different way and that's something that we worked very closely sleep with the Barbie and the other tribes around and we worked with a group called Lion Guardians Works in Kenya and they've developed these country appropriate warrior engagement programs and it's interesting interesting because when you talk to the warriors they kill lions because they get money effectively they get capital which is their source of wealth. So the person who would I threw the spear and hit the lion would be the one that's in our area would get cut off the poor. They would show this proof of kill they would go round up to forty households and each one. They might get a gift of a cow and then solves. This is a very important way of young men to get wealth and status in the community because they were recognized as line killers they had cattle but when we talk to the warriors about it a a lot of it was at just about being recognized as a warrior and what it means to be a warrior and this quite sort of fear in these communities not losing their cultural identity so one of the ways that we've worked with the buyer is really understanding what it means traditionally to be a warrior and it means to be a strong protective person in the community and so we could deliver that through this Warrior Ingredient Warrior Employment Program with now they are out there tracking lions. They're protecting the community. If children lost in the Bush they find them they find people's lost livestock they become the unreal protectors of the community. And the way that was they felt being eroded so it's taking skills and still appreciate an which is telling them in a slightly different. They're absolutely says delivering delivering. What they were getting through line killing after line conservation?.

Africa Lions Leatherman Amy Bush David University of Oxford Namibia East Africa Wildlife Conservation Research Catholic church Little Apopka Kathleen Scott Lion Conservation Alliance getty Kenya Ben PhD On Cheetahs Intrinsic Trending Valley
"dickman" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"dickman" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Dickman Tracy author of realtor magazines popular styled staged and sold blog Melissa welcome to real estate today hi Steven it's so great to be joining him we're so glad you're here so Melissa and summer winds down with the tip of the hat to Jimmy Buffett we're seeing plenty of tropical inspiration in home design palm leaf prince like in wall paper or rugs so is all that hot or not not. many design bloggers have been huge fans of the palm leaf print in art work rugs and wall paper they can make a big statement on Instagram we really saw this trend take off earlier this year done right the palm leaf print can give an old Hollywood glam by done wrong designers say it can look knocked off or even tacky and unfortunately for the palm leaf pattern more designers are leaning toward the latter they're calling it over done and they're ready to move on to a new pattern Melissa that's so interesting but there seems to be a sole survivor to the tropical craze and that of course is the pineapple because whether it's a pineapple fabric print or even an actual ceramic pineapple accessory it seems pineapples are everywhere so pineapple decor hot or not that is high. really are popping up everywhere Stephen target has an entire collection called the pineapple obsession home decor Amazon Wayfair bed bath and beyond also have their own pages devoted to pineapple design pineapple patterned rugs mir's table accents you name it I could keep going because pineapple decor really is that high so what's so special about pineapple in colonial times the pineapple was a symbol of status wealth and hospitality it was often used in center pieces so this really is a comeback luxury trend that is awesome and Melissa I really appreciate you joining us on the show today with a tropical addition of hot or not we should remind people that they can follow you on Twitter at housing news.

Jimmy Buffett Stephen target Twitter Dickman Tracy Steven it Hollywood Melissa I
"dickman" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"dickman" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Melissa Dickman Tracy author of realtor magazines popular styled staged and sold blog Melissa welcome to real estate today hi Steven it's so great to be joining now we're so glad you're here so Melissa as summer winds down with the tip of the hat to Jimmy Buffett we're seeing plenty of tropical inspiration in home design palm leaf prince like in wall paper or rugs so is all that hot or not not. many design bloggers have been huge fans of the palm leaf print in art work rugs and wall paper they can make a big statement on Instagram we really saw this trend take off earlier this year done right the palm leaf print can give an old Hollywood glam by done wrong designers say it can look knocked off or even tacky and unfortunately for the palm leaf pattern more designers are leaning toward the latter they're calling it over done and they're ready to move on to a new pattern Melissa that's so interesting but there seems to be a sole survivor to the tropical craze and that of course is the pineapple because whether it's a pineapple fabric prints or even an actual ceramic pineapple accessory it seems pineapples are everywhere so pineapple decor hot or not that is high. really are popping up everywhere Stephen target has an entire collection called the pineapple obsession home decor Amazon Wayfair bed bath and beyond also have their own pages devoted to pineapple design pineapple patterned rugs mir's table accents you name it I could keep going because pineapple decor really is that high so what's so special about pineapple in colonial times the pineapple with the symbol of status wealth and hospitality it was often using centerpieces so this really is a comeback luxury trend that is awesome and Melissa I really appreciate you joining us on the show today with a tropical addition of hot or not we should remind people that they can follow you on Twitter at housing.

Melissa Jimmy Buffett Stephen target Twitter Melissa Dickman Tracy Steven it Hollywood Melissa I
"dickman" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"dickman" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Melissa Dickman Tracy author of real turn I guess scenes popular styled staged and sold blog Melissa welcome to real estate today hi Steven it's so great to be joining now we're so glad you're here so Melissa as summer winds down with the tip of the hat to Jimmy Buffett we're seeing plenty of tropical inspiration in home design palm leaf prince like in wall paper for rugs so is all that hot or not not. many design bloggers have been huge fans of the palm leaf print in art work rugs and wall paper they can make a big statement on Instagram we really saw this trend take off earlier this year done right the palm leaf print can give an old Hollywood glam by done wrong designers say it can look knocked off or even tacky and unfortunately for the palm leaf pattern more designers are leaning toward the latter they're calling it over done and they're ready to move on to a new pattern Melissa that's so interesting but there seems to be a sole survivor to the tropical craze and that of course is the pineapple because whether it's a pineapple fabric print or even an actual ceramic pineapple accessory it seems pineapples are everywhere so pineapple decor hot or not that is high. really are popping up everywhere Stephen target has an entire collection called the pineapple obsession home decor Amazon Wayfair bed bath and beyond also have their own pages devoted to pineapple design pineapple patterned rugs mir's table accents you name it I could keep going because pineapple decor really is that high so what's so special about pineapple in colonial times the pineapple was a symbol of status wealth and hospitality it was often used in center pieces so this really is a comeback luxury trend that is awesome and Melissa I really appreciate you joining us on the show today with a tropical addition of hot or not we should remind people that they can follow you on Twitter at housing news.

Melissa Jimmy Buffett Stephen target Twitter Melissa Dickman Tracy Steven it Hollywood Melissa I
"dickman" Discussed on The Read

The Read

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"dickman" Discussed on The Read

"Jordan woods was booked for something and allowed to speak further on that whole drama surrounding Clorinda as well as Dickman dip, Tristan Thompson. I can't Daily Mail. These clips Jordan says my little sister was bullied in school. And I wanted to show her that I was bullied by the world. I don't know what that means. Exactly. I feel like I need to hear what what she said before this if you can handle bullying if I can handle bullying online handle bullying in school. Right. I'm guessing that's what she says. I understood for the first time what it's like being a black woman in a just society, assuming she meant just society, right? Enjoyed let on. No, it's like opposite of what you meant. How can we be so disrespected, and nobody can really understand to that extent until you have lived which just sound so much like the testament from a black girl who has had nothing but privilege, why girls as friends for probably her whole life? Really, honestly, nothing, but a privileged white life. The only thing enjoying woods from being just like the Kardashians. Is the fact that she is black like she has always been rich and grown up around those type of situations though side with people. So she probably did think this situation was the first time that she experienced discrimination as a black woman. She's not correct. But that's probably the first time that she actually felt it, you know, maybe the first time that it was over Bush's twenty one and she was friends with the cartoon like give this baby. Some grace and pray for her on her way up to give black women more grace than anybody else. Fair enough. I saw the quote, I was like Jordan, this don't my sense. And then I clicked the Laker read the rest. None of this makes. Let to be wind in Nigeria and having a good time. And maybe now, you know, what it's like to be black. I guess on what you're trying to say. But. Whatever Jordan Lewis, I'm still not on khloe Kardashian side. Did you see that goofy bitch? And her silk flip dressing some towns, you have to calm and offer me information about this woman for me too. I think the last thing that they did that I paid attention to was like when the trailer for the new season came out, and it was all over the place. I watched that dramatic ashes crying that high business all over the place like she didn't put her business like y'all cut this together like two days after then against her. Wow. Wow. So shocked. It's so crazy. Winced, right. Except absolutely. Doing so good luck to Jordan escaping from that life here here and. 'cause they make no sense. What the fuck you trying to say if you need to take your cell say nothing else, unless you read table talk Jay can edit it 'cause I don't know what? You're so pretty just took a pitcher. I know Jada read this and FaceTime tire in the first thing. Let's talk about definitions. I don't know what you just come back season. What seasons right table talk on just their first season about to start. I guess they're having seasons. You know? I guess that's what I mean..

Jordan woods Jordan Jordan Lewis Clorinda Tristan Thompson Nigeria Bush Dickman khloe Kardashian FaceTime Jada Jay two days
"dickman" Discussed on TechFan

TechFan

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"dickman" Discussed on TechFan

"You're listening to another great podcast and the my neck podcasting network. Dickman podcast number three hundred and seventy five. That's a lot of episodes in our pocket there. David three hundred seventy five kind of a nice. Round number. I was going to even it's not an even number but a nice round number. It is amazing to think how many days we have done now. And and that if that's always BBC around the stats. She look how many hours put Cussing is by events quite a few. Why would you wanna do that? So. So while long way that. As as as we just took him that we both got leisure time. When I hands in the mind and say, yes, probably won't be very difficult. You probably have to open up. Well, you'd have to download every episode into something like, I don't know. How would you do it? You have to have a running count. Does he RSS feed have every episode in it? Sure. But yeah, it does. I you could. We could probably advise script that browse ers says feed then look to each file and try to figure out from for the Mets addition the file how many what what the time is. And that not that. I bet items does. Yeah. Probably. So it's been a kind of a. Post black Friday post cyber Monday, which by the way, cyber Monday was a big fat nothing this year notice that well because we've embrace black Friday sale hauled side on these kind of a little bit of an afterthought. We talked about this last week, but we recorded before cyber Monday. And we said, and I I think I was the one that said it that cyber Monday just doesn't feel like a thing anymore because everyone is embracing the black Friday moniker, and it's a whole week now for some companies, it seems like it's a whole month. But i've. Monday came and went, and I got a couple emails about it a couple of websites popped up. But other than that. It was nobody took notice. Yep. Just really as you say kind of the sale stop black Friday. And then they kind of. Oh, all the way through poss- Christmas into new year. So so you think about it. A lot of stuff now is on all the time. Yeah. I mean, one of the things that I linked to. What is it called here? It's on Recode an Amazon revolt could be brewing as tech giant exerts more control over brands, and this is what it really comes down to Amazon already had a lot of control over many companies and how they sell their products on Amazon, and for those in the know when you buy something on Amazon, there's probably a fifty fifty chance that it's not actually being sold by Amazon, it's one of their distributing partners. Yeah. And some companies directly sell on Amazon well Amazon wants to put more stuff in marketplace marketplaces, Amazon selling you the product. You know, pretty quickly whether it's an Amazon sold product or it's a third party because if it doesn't qualify for prime shipping, I free to shipping that it's not Amazon so Amazon wants to have more control over the customer experience. And I get that. And they've already had a lot of policies in place. One of the big ones as if you sell through marketplace. They also don't want you to sell through third party distributor on Amazon, and I get that. But the problem now for a lot of manufacturers that Amazon is starting to exert more and more.

Amazon Dickman Mets David BBC
"dickman" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"dickman" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"Got nukes don't worry about it and you don't something else they know how to use them for end you know that on them what do y'all job this guy man here real armed forces expert i read a little i seen i've seen i seen some things go down all right but so what is the upset you agree with steve o's l in the relationship question with china i'm telling you right now the chinese seen us coming for years they're not going to play ball with us they're going to just size us up and be all smiley and going here here have here have you know have a chinese lollipop or whatever it against us and meantime they're sizing up for a big bullseye in or at an our bath what us cynic yeah that's how i feel that you don't trust them not as far as i can throw you you all you out there all right but dickman folks just wonderful still hunt a load of crap i thanks but that was that was pretty heavy so you were in china what do you think i don't i don't have any opinion anymore when i was in china man it was totally different it wasn't even the same country now they got cars and stuff and i was there was bicycles and you know it was the they've grown up a lot in the thirty plus years i think they've grown too fast i think they've got a lot of modern stuff but just under the surface is an infrastructure that's kinda funky man i don't think that it's i don't know how to say this but i just i don't think that the the country is going to just in terms of infrastructure is gonna stand very well is going to what's the word i'm looking for here is going to is physically in good shape.

china steve o dickman
"dickman" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"dickman" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"Why is this emotional i understand that it is it's emotional because i want people to be able to trust me at unless they can see me coming down a dirt road well there we go and that's why i asked you not to use that we'd head colds when you said the first show you did you said i'm coming down the old dirt road i didn't say older it road terry do you remember that i don't remember all road but i do remember you saying you're going up to the dirty road no i didn't never terry do favorite don't answer any more questions okay okay is a reason why he's yelling terry is yelling so that i can hear him now i wanted to ask you you didn't wanna have buddy in here because he'd had injury was brain from putting his bike through that tree but this kid terry don't exactly don't exactly what terry's fine he rolled a jeep on top of his head are you saying that that somehow worse no i'm about saying that at all but why not i trust terry's response to be more that i would buy dickman again but his fills guy terry's mine thanks a lot for the opportunity that's great terry and do me a favor don't just yell stuff wait for me to q and i'll do that by pointing my finger okay hi terry this is general show i'll talk to him what he want to say well i wanted to say to them terry wait for the generals key for bob's queue wait for my cue and you all you have to look at me and i'll i'll do terry wait for the generals q all you gotta do is look at his cue and he'll you know i can't get it.

terry dickman bob
"dickman" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"dickman" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"So it's hard to know but i think by large i think by and large these guys are asking you to be tested because they want to protect your health and yeah they don't wanna get sued both of those things yeah both of those things okay i'm gonna wanna this test for you fill it's not necessary but by the same token yes it is i don't wanna get sued but i want you to be healthy that's it yeah that's right thank you worldfamous phil hendrie show so on the show today we have this is the weirdest thing in the world general show you listen what let's come back and got frank gray holding on the line right muggy yes frank's on the phone and he saw what the general was tweeting there's a weirdo group some pack of weird real weird asses excuse by french who inhabits some part of twitter and this has nothing to do by the way with politics ladies and gentlemen this is mental health this group believes general if i'm not right go ahead this group believes that donald trump comes from another planet but dickman wait a minute what you talking about i'm you know what i'm talking about don't you another planet yes yes what are you what do you think q means i thought that was just their nickname for the guy for all the cat comes from another planet this is no joke ladies and gentleman this is a do you have the handle that one guy i do they handle is i don't want to start getting a guy in trouble you know let's not single anybody out you know because i think.

twitter donald trump dickman phil hendrie frank gray
"dickman" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"dickman" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"It takes us to these places that aren't only physical places. I mean, there's Chinatown, but there's also the scifi bridges, and there's this other place, you're trying to get her house, which place. Absolutely underground in New York, the cipher bridges, and I'll of New York, and you know, I'm love this idea of place. But also this idea of scape, which is also in the Pullman the bolt. Yeah. Right. That's right. Of course, that is really how I think of New York. So that's what I mean about like, you know, it's every poem is probably half true or mostly true built on a bed of, you know, imagine things or whatever. So I do tend to have that relationship where you wanna run or you wanna lock the door simultaneously? So I mean, I think about that in terms of like, it's a fairly straightforward certainly more straightforward title than most of my titles. So I think that's why it is because I'm like, well, this is a purely New York experience for me if I was ever going to write Frank O'Hara poem or something even in the blood of. I think sell celebrate ori- and a little bit melancholy in the way that Matthews poem is I think this must be that. Because it isn't you know, I wouldn't be able to pull out a lot of poems that move in the same way or even deal with place in. The same way they feel the same way. But it's not the same kind of staging think. Well, the one thing that I had sort of two last questions one is is there underground in this poem. Or is there an underground that leads to your other poems, and I was thinking especially about your sort of upcoming book American silence from a past and future. Assassin a great title. Maybe we could think about those that title. But then also think about this underground, I'm trying to make this leap between this poem and those future polls. It's that between space right past and the future or the signing and the assassin the love and the sort of attack on one, you know, by someone who wants to wipe you out. So that between space here is space. It I like, which is the Cleveland the cleave and the the bolt on the boat. I will say to you that the reason I haven't are in this poem. And you actually know who this are is is because I didn't wanna like call them out. Because when this sorta halfway experience happened there was that moment where the sort of the are is just desperate for somebody to come home with them, and then sort of doesn't happen. And so like, you know, a little bit cooler little bit cooler, but at the night that it happened. I said I didn't see anything, man. I was I was sleep. I was asleep on the couch, which I was for a little while doing the party, but later wrote the poem, and so his response to get to this point was one of his responses. It was like, man. Yeah. Like an old to ambivalence. Just both a critique and also a deep inside about sort of how I moved through these. Uh-huh. Because it is always at between space. It I like not really touching one full south of boat or the other side of the world. But just sorta in the hallway between things so I understood it, and I think I responded to it..

New York Frank O'Hara Cleveland Matthews
"dickman" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

03:50 min | 3 years ago

"dickman" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"Of your face, and everyone writing poems about an inside and outside the subways de people underground in New York on the scifi bridges and. Sales of New York on the rooftops of Chinatown were miles Davis pumping in and someone is telling me about contra nem 's how cleave and cleave are the same word looking in opposite directions. I now know boat is to lock and bolt is to run away. That's how I think of New York someone jonesing for grace Jones at the party and someone jonesing for grace. That was Terence as reading his poem, New York poem. So I wanted to ask you a little bit. Maybe not just about this poem about low a tree. You know, I love the play in this poem. I love the conjugation. Let's call it of jacket of Jones at the end jonesing for grace Jones at the party and someone jonesing for grace so beautiful. And I wonder how play just part of the writing process not just for you. But writing writ large. Okay. So that's a good question. Because you know, let me just say in general, I really do not look over my shoulder very much with the poems. So what I feel as I was reading just now was just like those moments, which were just pretty true emotional feelings. And the guy was just waiting for poem that will allow me to say that. So when I miss like, I am so fucking vein. I cannot believe anyone is threatened by me. So I read that line, and I I'm editing it, and I call, you know, is that it's clear statement. But also is even if it's a kind of vague statement that idea of like showing up at a party and thinking everybody's glad to see you as opposed to some people think oh, man. He's just gonna. Mess up everything. So so that's moments like that are necessarily like the the controversial thing. Same like, I think I just had a fuelling about that. I think I would want to do something with Bolton bolt. And so they are oppa -tunities to like put certain kinds of impressions that maybe everybody has walking around being at a party down south the larger context where so that's where that work comes into the miles. Davis stuff. I am working on that. And that is. Although, you know, it is a slant sorta things happening it was a rooftop party in Chinatown, and there were speakers. And there was something like jazz through while a bunch of people stood around on the roof. So that was just sort of given to me when I sure out the motion of stuff versus west is going on and about the miles. Davis. Are we to to think about jazz as an influence here? And and how much or how? So again, I just think when I was recalling sort of scaffolding of the poem. I remembered that music, and maybe just set to maybe I didn't pay attention that night. And I was like, well if something was pumping in on a rooftop in Chinatown. What would it be be mouse Davis? I think that started. And then I started thinking about like looking out at those streets and bridges and all the different kinds of ways. You can he has contradictory. You know, like angry horned also sweet, you know, that the poem is kind of playing with totally at least. So let me say this to you again. And I don't say this is the person who wrote the palm. It as a person who wrote it and forgot about it. And is now looking at it a new so I tend to think more about the spirit of grace Jones. So that like the are in the poem is sort of tangled up in the whatever edginess she has not quite as cool and cool as mouse Davis, but cool, but also a little bit like revenue shape. Grace Jones haircut is like that low slant on asymmetric. There you go. So there is a kind of asymmetrical personality or you could say asymmetrical blackness, or whatever, you know. I never explicitly say black. But if you thinking about the two who appear MAs Avis and grace Jones, I tend to think it in somewhere up in her her neighborhood when I liked that..

grace Jones Davis Chinatown New York Terence Bolton
"dickman" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

04:02 min | 3 years ago

"dickman" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"But it's better that it's this whole, drip. Right. I would even say like again, this is something about wherever that line is between difficulty in excess ability because I see that grenade. And I think like what I knew that was coming at some point, you know. So that's not even a super surprise unlike line, you just called up with the ecstasy in it. But it makes sense though. It is a thing that you could argue for as coming in the perfect place in the poem. It's not. The last name because then it would be too explosive too much. He goes with something a little more tender. I think an even sublime with the fire climate, but I'm saying for me when I see that grenade. I would be thinking that must be something more surprising. But you, you know, you could put grenades and your poll. Well, it's about where you put them as always the case days, it's all about location. So he gets away with it. But I even see that as a kind of daring kind of ease. I think poet sometimes in our allergy to cliche or allergy to obviousness and sometimes even the logic. We sometimes we'll avoid the clear thing. Well, ask you lastly about those poem about humor, and where does humor fit for you in in this poem? But also, I guess thinking about poetry more broadly s interesting because you know, you do think if you do is it Apollo and die Bacchus. You'd think of wine being very much a social lubricant. And so that's partly why think about the charm and kind of sometimes ragged freedom that comes in Matthew Dickman poems off that. And again, that's something that I chase. But I do think primarily of humor as with Frank o'hara's just sort of being a thing that you can't quite control can you teach humor. So it's the kind of sensibility. I have allergy for like, you know, punch lines. But I certainly and or a like an allergy I don't like I like stories. As opposed to like, oh, it's just a punchline. Give me that. I man I don't like surprises in see surprised see. I mean, I do like them. I don't like them to be. So neat punchline surprise, I like revelatory so gradual, but the humor thing sort of like the way we talk. I don't really I mean, I didn't know. I was funny. I was twenty five I don't I felt the same way. I mean, I remember when I was writing the poems that became a second look the Basque out. But yeah, I read them aloud I was working serious at heart that a writer's retreat, and I read them to the people, and they were laughing. I was like what is going on? You don't know how serious is right. And then I was like, oh, that's the point is to let that air into the system. That's right. And I think everybody has it, but it certainly certainly about being relaxed. So when you think about teaching you just trying to say like, it's okay. If you have a range of feelings, and you don't have to have one pitch all the time. And so that is where humor comes in. Everybody can have a kind of humorous perspective. They just don't know that they have. Permission poems Bill. That's right. So the November twenty ninth twenty ten issue, the New Yorker, publish your poem, New York poem, which are going to read for us now before you do. So is there anything like to say about it or that could be helpful for listeners? I always like to say what I wrote it. So I wouldn't have to talk about it. So you know, that's going to be a challenge talking about it. But what I will say again is that sort of spirit of celebrating one's friends. You know, his poem is sort of maybe a west coast scene, this kind of New York scene. And again, I remember thinking that was so odd to come in from the same sort of period around this. Yeah. See how stumbling I can talk forever about is. But I'll just tell you. You could ask me some questions. I may or may not answer them with the poem. Because what I like to say is I wrote it so talking about. Okay, fair enough. All right. New York poem in New York from a rooftop in Chinatown, one can see the sapphire bridges and. Els of buildings where there are more miles of shortcuts and alternative takes than there are miles..

New York Frank o'hara Matthew Dickman Apollo writer Bacchus one pitch
"dickman" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"dickman" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"You know, the Tangy aspirin, drip of ecstasy, which you know, has that great double meanings right for him. But you know, it becomes kind of a home about drugs and other states altered state dining this. You know, the God of mine is certainly the spirit of spirit of his work acting actually always a little bit wild. Again. You could just think about the line breaks this. If anybody looks at up, they're not the kinds of lamb breaks. He would get away with a graduate workshop every. To look about the same length or do you have any stands breaks that sort of thing? But you know, admirably, I don't think of those as sort of his prime objectives. When he's thinking about poetic. So thinking about what his poems are doing. They are personable. They are you know, I think it was O'Hara talking about personal. You know, a conversation are really the poem is a conversation between the poet. And the reader I think he says so it's like is for y'all to work that out. I think there's also really strong breaks. I think we're agreeing on that. They're just not obvious breaks singing us stars state prince banjo, not regular breaks. But they certainly flicker, you know, margin in a way that suggested energy. But there are no regular breaks are the I mean, do you how you break your? I mean, actually, I do tend to want my lines look about the same Ling, and it just like a visual thing. So you know, whatever that even with on us. I'm like well as long as they look about the. So I have a problem with that. But that's also why like a poem like this like a poet like Dickman because you know, I was like as a person raised by, you know, a soldier and the prison guard would make sense that I would like boxes and structural a little too much or thought always looking for poets who can get me to sorta contemplate like, would you dare write a poem with all the lines? One line has three words on it another line as like, you know, twelve words on it. Like, I'm like. It does bring one up I've been accused of having short line. So. I think I feel you. But that's something you can get a poet sensibility. Even bass something like that line, or as we think about it as language solely. But something about even visual way that we weren't poems to peer says something about our our sensibilities. I think when I love, you know, if you have a line like you grenade fire you've earned that like, I think this poem does what else do you need, you know? But then again, you have a line like I felt the Tangy aspirin drip of ecstasy down my throat, you know, that I can't see breaking that. I mean, I might break it after exc-..

aspirin O'Hara Dickman
"dickman" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"dickman" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"Kevin young poultry under the New Yorker magazine and the director of the center for research in black culture on this program. We invite poets twos Apoel from the New Yorker archive to read and discuss then we asked them to read one of their own poems. That's when published in the magazine Mike s today is Tarrant Hayes a chancellor of the kademi of American poets. Current poetry editor at the New York Times magazine distinguished professor of English at the university of Pittsburgh and distinguished writer in residence at New York University. His many honors include a MacArthur fellowship a Guggenheim fellowship and the national book award for poetry, welcome Terrance. Hey, man. Good to be here. Good to see you. So the poem you've chosen to read his fire by Matthew Dickman, tell us what in particular about this poem Katcher is you're sifting through the archive. Well, naturally, I thought about my own palm, which of my own poems. I would pick. And then I sorta backed up and recalled reading this. Poem and thinking that there in conversation. So I wanted to figure that out with you today just to see what these two poems doing with each other. Let's give it a listen. Here's Terrance Hayes reading fire by Matthew Dickman fire. Oh fire. You burn me at a singing behind the smoke in Kohl's his wife near him. The rest of us below the stars swimming above Washington state burning through themselves. He's like an appellation prince Henry with his banjo and whiskey the court surrounding him and the deer off in the dark hills like the French terrified, but in love and hungry. I'm burning all the time my pockets full of matches and lighters. The blue smoke crawling out like a skinny ghost from between. My lips my lungs on fire. The wings of them falling from the open sky, the top of Michelle's long hands looked like the beautiful coats leopards have covered dark spots all the cigarettes. She would like and then smash out her is the color of hairspray cloudy and stingy and gone. But beautiful she carried her hands around like. To terrible letters of introduction. I never understood who could have opened them read them aloud still thrown her onto a bad still walk into the street. She was still lit what little fuse. She had left. Oh fire. You burn me. My sister, and I and southern comfort making us singer and spark the family ash all around us the way she is beautiful to me in her singular, blaze, my brain lighting up my tongue like a monk in wartime a wash and RH silk and flames.

Michelle New Yorker magazine Matthew Dickman Terrance Hayes New York Times magazine New York University Kohl distinguished professor of Eng Tarrant Hayes poetry editor university of Pittsburgh Kevin national book award Guggenheim fellowship chancellor Washington director MacArthur writer
"dickman" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"dickman" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"Dude did that look like a total jack ball 'cause he's got he's jumping up and down like my kids history used to do stuff like that impune the bans jumped up he wanted to say that animal work better to wild animal in the middle of a wild okay and they're aminul know more about what it needs to do to survive in that do who pulled off to save it will ever know when a month at sunday's and what they said in that one editorial was true man you're gonna wind up killing yourself and every swinging that you can and the interrupt you you can't see that word okay which word the d word tall dark dan i'm sorry i'm sorry go ahead uh here you're you're you're just you're gonna wind up getting yourself killed and everybody becomes law and because what's gonna happen is people are going to be veering out of the way if you go and you stop and you didn't you get a bunny rabbit out of out of the middle of the road where there's a fire okay okay dickman yeah all right what if you catch on fire and ear comes this dude staggering out of the median inflamed holding a rabbit puts in flames and you're just all year uh and it looks cool wish and it's scary is held and there are motorists who are compromised by that and they're very and all over the road talking about are you saying that because you win miscued an animal.

dickman
"dickman" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"dickman" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"Oh hi i was losing to the show you're a moment ago and i'm not sure i i understand your new slogan is our new slogan series if you're not allowing our meat in your mouth you were starving to death while i had been out this afternoon earlier and i was getting in a workout always doing squats and i was doing some leg exercises have something to do if you don't mind i'd like to finish what i'm saying i was doing a workout this afternoon and i was doing squats i was doing leg exercises and i came home and i took a nap can i was dreaming about my wife and i running on a beach and it was and we were running on the beach and who said that but dickman yes sir you were running on the beach and i was running on the beach at one i woke up i heard of man saying you have to allow my meat in your mouth or you're gonna starve to death and i immediately thought of my wife and i i thought i was in hell i felt as if i was in the hell does you don't understand steakhouse knowing steakhouse but when you say you're you're gonna have my meeting your mouth or star and i i immediately pictured by wife gagging down a gigantic elephants there is no excuse me you're laughing was not no i was not guess you work no i was not there is a gentleman so there you hear ted right there there's a guy who is upset he's weird it out by your by your entire campaign always where did that by the campaign you know fill if i didn't know you better actually i do know you better night you better be a guy you'd call to pay to pay to call in or you called opinion you don't know i don't get what i understand now now know ted that's a real man reacting to that slogan any was so traumatized by two when he was dreaming after having a nice work out.

dickman ted