35 Burst results for "Dickinson"

"dickinson" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:12 min | 2 d ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"I'm so excited to be your guest host for this month of America. This month we're highlighting prodigies. Women who achieved greatness at a young age. This is especially a passion point for me because my latest book rising troublemaker, a fear fighter manual for teens. Reminds them that they are never too young to make a significant impact. Today's prodigy was for a time, one of the most famous women in the U.S., a skilled orator, she delivered speeches across the country, passionately advocating for women's rights and the abolition of slavery. Earning her the name, America's Joan of Arc. Please welcome Anna Elizabeth Dickinson. Anna Elizabeth Dickinson was born the youngest of 5 children in 1842. Her parents were quakers and her father was a dedicated abolitionist. In 1844, he died from a heart attack after delivering a particularly impassioned speech. Anna was just two years old. Though she was too young to remember much of her father, his legacy clearly left a deep impact on Anna. In 1856, she came across a story of a Kentucky school teacher who had suffered abuse for their antislavery work. Outrage and a pen to response in the liberator, a popular abolitionist newspaper. She was just 14 years old, and though this was the first time she publicly expressed her opinion to the masses, it certainly wouldn't be the last. In 1860, Anna now 18 addressed the Philadelphia antislavery society. In the audience that night was lucretia coffin Mott, the abolitionist and suffragist. A reporter from the Philadelphia press wrote that Anna gave the speech of the occasion. As she declared, if the word slave is not in the constitution, the idea is. Lucretia was charmed by this performance, and in 1861, got an opportunity to speak at Philadelphia's concert hall. There for two hours in front of 800 people, Anna delivered a speech called the rights and wrongs of women. Her ability to speak sarcastically and spontaneously won the crowd over. Booking requests across New England began to pour in. With her short curls and sweet youthful face, and a shocked audiences with her fiery delivery and vitriolic language. This duality made her enormously popular and entertaining. A few months after her Philadelphia triumph, the Civil War officially started. Anna became a fervent support of the north, so much so that she was fired from her job after she accused a union general of treason, following a poorly fought battle. Though she was just 19, Anna had been supporting her family for the last four years. She needed income and quickly. Anna decided to pursue speech given full-time and set off on a whirlwind schedule, sponsored by the Massachusetts antislavery society. By 1863, Anna had become a strong advocate for the Republican cause. Morale in the north was at a dangerous low and elections were on the horizon. Two years into the Civil War, which states would continue to support the union. Anna was hired as an official campaign speaker from New Hampshire's state Republican committee. Though the margins were narrow and the battle fears, the ballot boxes ultimately went to the Republicans. The state's governor, credited Anna speeches as the driving force. She was then dispatched to Pennsylvania's mine and country, where she reportedly had a crawl shut off her head when she refused to sit down. She also spoke throughout Connecticut, where she once again tipped the scales. In their coverage of her opening speech, the Hartford daily post wrote, with figure dilating, face impassioned, I flashing, she poured forth that wonderful illustration and appeal, and the audience, breathless, hung upon her words. In 1864, Anna was invited to address Congress. The vice president introduced her as a Joan of Arc, sent by Providence to save the nation. Though she actually criticized president Lincoln in her speech, why wouldn't he publicly denounce slavery? And I received a standing ovation. She was just 21 years old. After the war, Anna became the star of the lyceum circuit. This movement, which reached its peak during antebellum, sent orators around the country as a form of adult education and enlightenment. At a time when women rarely spoke in public, Anna was earning the equivalent of nearly half a $1 million for doing just that. Double the income of most lyceum men. She delivered speeches on women's rights, religion, racial equality, even Joan of Arc. Still, in her early 20s, Anna became one of the most famous and recognizable women in the United States. After seeing hall on stage, Mark Twain wrote, she talks fast. Uses no notes whatsoever. Never hesitates for a word, always gets the right word in the right place and has the most perfect confidence in herself. Her vim, her energy, her determined look, her tremendous earnestness would compel the respect and the attention of an audience, even if she spoke in Chinese. But by the late 1870s, and as popularity has started to wane, her speech style, vicious and aggressive, began to feel outdated in this post war era. She never became a part of a larger collective or movement. She never married. Her combative nature on stage continued once she was off. And she spent years and lots of money in lawsuits that dragged on. She drank heavily in 1882, she appeared on stage as Hamlet. The performance was so ridiculed that she retired from the public. Anna died just days before her 90th birthday. In 1932. After a career that became so public, so soon in life, Anna spent most of her years living in poverty and obscurity. She was in many ways an early victim of the American fame machine. Praise as an ingenue, her fall from grace was cheered on just as enthusiastically, but traces of Anna's influences are still here. A photo of her at the height of her fame lives in the Library of Congress. Handwritten at the bottom is a note from Anna. The world belongs to those who take it. A month, we're highlighting prodigies. For more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at will manica podcast. You can order rise in troublemaker, everywhere books are sold. Special thanks to creators, Jenny, and Liz Kaplan for inviting me to guest host. Talk to you tomorrow..

Anna Anna Elizabeth Dickinson United States Philadelphia antislavery socie lucretia coffin Mott the Philadelphia press Philadelphia's concert hall Massachusetts antislavery soci Republican committee Hartford daily post Lucretia heart attack Kentucky New England Philadelphia president Lincoln New Hampshire Connecticut Pennsylvania
Saint Peter's is 3rd 15 seed in Sweet 16, beats Murray State

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

Saint Peter's is 3rd 15 seed in Sweet 16, beats Murray State

"The fifteenth seed is going to the Sweet Sixteen St Peter's seventy to sixty win over Murray state was one of two upsets in Indianapolis the peacocks got seventeen points from Casey the DeFeo who helped hold the racers to thirty four percent shooting we know defense comes first we spent so much time in practice on defense so you know there's nothing new to us we just come in and try to play you play defense all day and give a hundred ten percent in every in every aspect earlier eleven seed Michigan got by third seed Tennessee's seventy six to sixty eight hundred Dickinson and Eli Brooks combined for fifty points as the Wolverines stage their second upset in as many games Tom McCabe Indianapolis

Defeo Murray Indianapolis Casey Peter Eli Brooks Michigan Tennessee Dickinson Wolverines Tom Mccabe
Ivey, Williams lead No. 4 Purdue past Michigan 82-76

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 3 months ago

Ivey, Williams lead No. 4 Purdue past Michigan 82-76

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Williams Williams Michigan J. J. J. J. Ninety Trevi Trevi Trevi Trevi Purdue Purdue Purdue Boilermakers Boilermakers Boil Williams Williams Williams Wil Zaki Zaki Zaki Zaki Wolverines Wolverines Wolverin Wolverines Dickinson Dickinson Dickinson Dave Dave Dave Dave Ferrie Fer
"dickinson" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

Talk Is Jericho

06:01 min | 4 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

"WrestleMania, one of your biggest promoters suddenly turns out wearing a dress and goes, my name is Dorothy. Yes. I mean, interesting, yeah. The dynamic, you know, so and these are funny guy, you know, so we're going to try and talk to talk to him about one thing about identity and what people, you know, people's reactions to other human beings, you know? But touch, touched on briefly what you guys discussed about the meaning behind 6 6 6 and the devil's involvement in heavy metal. Yeah. I mean, there's obviously a lot to it, but kind of explain a little bit of some of the highlights of what you found out in kind of delving into this subject. A lot of it has to do with the history of apocalypses because revelations the book of revelations to St. John the divine is not the only apocalyptic story in the history of religions or cults or whatever. There's loads of them. They go back and back and back. And interestingly they also bound up in that is the identity of the devil. Because in early Judaism, for example, there is no devil. Devil's only really start to become prevalent after Christianity kind of invents them as the way to scare people. And then Judaism goes devil. Yeah, I think let's make this guy a little bit more bad, you know? So it's interesting the way different religions treat the idea of the concept of evil or not evil or the personality of an actual embodiment of evil as opposed to the embodiment of a person who just likes playing tricks on you. Literally a trickster, which would be the closest approximation to the early judaic version of what turned into a more devilish figure. But Satan with the fires of hell and the big combat finally of Armageddon and everything all coming together, what St. John the divine was doing because it's like you've got to look at where I'm paraphrasing Steve freeze and professor Steve prisoner. You've got to look at where he was when he wrote what he wrote. And what language you wrote it, who wrote it in very bad Greek. Because he was not Greek, but he wrote it in Greek, why? Because all the places he was visiting locally all spoke group. So some of what he wrote could be is a bit weird in the translation because it wasn't strictly grammatically correct. Turns out that in Greek numbers, as we would associate them, don't really exist in the same way. They're written down as an number. So 600 isn't 6, 6, 6. It's 666. Gotcha. Now, that number, it turns out, also has some significance. If you look between the lines at what Sir John is saying, he's sending basically coded messages through the equivalent of the Internet back then. So these would have been understood by rebellious groups as going, what's he talking about with 666, what that means, let me see. And what is now called numerology and I forget the name of it back then I used to know it, but I've got an it called my brain's gone turned into a wash basin. But what's now called numerology, the idea that numbers have an actual significance and you can have a name and reduce it to a series of numbers by a forest geometry. That's right, geometry. So geometry. So by reducing your name in certain ways. So each letter in the alphabet would be given a is one, B is two, C and you write your name, you add up all the letters and you add until you get one number. Well, it turns out that 666 or 6 one 6 depending upon whether you write in Latin or Greek, right? Both correspond, both correspond to Nero Caesar. And what he's saying is, who is the Antichrist? Who is, you know, there's going to be the coming conflict and this will all be swept away by the forces and the archangels of good. Who is the Antichrist? It's the Roman Empire dude. Who is that? Nero Caesar. Caesar was the local commander. Nero was actually dead for about 30 years, but like Elvis, there was a cult of Nero of people who believed that he didn't die. And that he was going to come back and restore the glory of Rome. So this is him taking a pop at the Roman Empire, unbelievable. And this is just a snippet of what you guys episode one episode one. Last question for you, Bruce. Very excited to come see the show in Tampa. It's at a beautiful theater where the stage actually opens up and this old lady comes up from the basement playing piano pipe organ. She's Satan, right? That comes out there. I think so. That's right. Everything else. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yes. And we're gonna have you drop down from the rafters. And that's the start of the show. You don't have to tell them complete detail, but just to give people a taste. Is there a favorite story of yours that you like to tell at the show or one of them that you like to tell that kind of gives an idea of what you're gonna be doing? Everybody thinks that I would say the first obviously people probably by now figured out that I was a pilot and I had a career as an airline pilot for 17 years and.

St. John Steve freeze Dorothy Nero professor Steve Satan Sir John Caesar Elvis Rome Tampa Bruce
"dickinson" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

Talk Is Jericho

04:04 min | 4 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

"So I'm hobbling around in this boot with my foot on my ankle and calf swollen up because it was only like three days after the operation. So I'm like, okay, I'm just going to have a lie down with my foot in the air just like let the fluid drain and then I'll just be back to the third verse. And then I thought, how the hell am I going to rehab this Achilles? Before it starts at the end of August, because I bust it at the end of April, May June, July, four months, four months for a total rupture Achilles. And I can't even walk, let alone run, let alone jump. So, yeah, I just, I faked it. You know, how do you fake it? Well, basically I figured out that there was some things I just couldn't do, like running was one of them. Because there was no strength in the car at all. And it was going to break or anything else like that, but there was not there. So I thought, if I want to move around, kind of dramatically from one side of the stage to the other, I basically got to turn myself into a crab and just use hips and thighs. So by not involving your calves hardly at all or maybe only the right one so you go upstairs one foot at a time. So they couldn't see that. The audience couldn't see that. Then I had a 30 pounder 30 pound flame thrower on my back and a cape carrying a cross. And I'm walking upstairs, basically on one, right? With no safety barrier. You know, I'm thinking this is kind of cool. I did like a risk every now and again. I couldn't jump off the monitors. I could not run. And so yeah, I got through the tour. And nobody figured it out. I really went running around like crazy. He's doing this. I was just like, actually, you found me you knew. So I got to the end of the tour, then went back training and it's been two and a half years now. I mean, I'm still rehabbing it. It takes it just as a horrible injury. Terrible one, yeah. Yeah, and then I had a new hip lost October. Yeah. Now year last October. So I'm actually tomorrow I'm actually in a fencing competition for two days. So I've been training for 5 days a week fencing and putting it all back together. We were doing the rehab for the hip. My physio, I was working for three days a week during the lockdown with him because it was allowed because he was medical and it was in the hospital at the gym. And so he said, look, you know, we could do this for, you know, we got a good 6 months here that we can do this. He said, how far do you want to take it? Because we could do upper body as well. We could really do some cool stuff and yeah, well, let's see what we can squat. So we were doing 40 reps of a hundred kilos, which my body weighs 70. Yeah. So that's not bad. For 63 year old guys. So we were really going for it. And doing lots of explosive stuff, we got to strengthen conditioning guy in, who was into actually he was the British saber team, strength and conditioning coach. And he was getting his full physio bachelor of science degree. So he had to do a year's intern at the hospital. So my physio, who was the main teacher, said, I got this guy, and we're going to do all the plyometric stuff, the jumping on and off boxes, the bumbo explosive stuff. And we actually set up a fake wedge monitor. And the guy said he goes, he goes, I've seen what you do. He said, let's see if we can work up to that. So yeah, so I haven't tried it yet in anger, but I'm sure it's going to work. I mean, I am actually. I mean, I did a three K of four K and a 5 K run on successive days last week. I'm thinking it's all working okay, you know? Thanks to new genes for supporting talk as Jericho,.

Jericho
"dickinson" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

Talk Is Jericho

07:38 min | 4 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

".NET. It's interesting to me that you said you did some street improv. I've done improv as well. You know, being a frontman of a band being a wrestler improv is a big part of it. Do you find that's helped you as a frontman? Because you're great, obviously on stage and talking to people and commanding giant crowds, smaller ones on your evening shows. Did the improv skills do they come in handy throughout? Yeah, absolutely. Well, just what I call general stagecraft. As in as soon as you walk onto a stage, the rules changed. You know, you're not in the outside world anymore. You're on stage. And the rules change and you've got a relationship with an audience and they have expectations of you because you're on the stage because they paid money to see you and they expect you to do something or deliver something or say something or teach something or entertain them or juggle or whatever the hell it is. But don't stand there and stare at your shoes and feel sorry for yourself because they will crucify you. And audiences are wonderful, but they can also be incredibly brutal. You know, I learned a bit about when I was at school. I was in every school play that was going, you know, and I would have been I now know I would have been a shocking actor, you know, because people who are really good at acting are just really good at being somebody else. And I'm only really good at being. How did you deal with that early on? Like you said, especially before maiden became Iron Maiden. If you had a crowd that was a little bit difficult, how did you what tricks did you use to make them like you more? I would insult them. Reverse psychology and seldom either that or try and try and make friends with them, but in a very odd way. So I had one show, I was in I was in a band at university and there was one in the old days would have been called a disco. And except there was nobody there. It was like the phantom disco. And there was like mirror balls and lights, and there was on stage and there was nobody. Nobody there. But we were getting paid like 50 bucks to go and play. So then the door opened and one person walked in, looked a bit shocked that there was somebody actually on stage and so he got a chair and he put it and right in the middle of the dance floor sat down on this chair. And I thought this is great and so I got off the stage and I went up to him and with the microphone, I said, excuse me. I got to know. I said, what's your name? And he was like, oh, I'm so sorry. I said, can I buy you a beer? You know? I said, because we're about to do this performance just for you. The least I can do is buy you a beer. You may hate it. You know what I mean? And then we kind of relaxed and we had this we actually had a relationship. We had an audience of one. Who didn't know who we were from Adam? But actually we had a great time. Nobody cared. Nobody knew, but we had a great time. And I think you have to take that there's always a way in to a bad situation. Always a way into a bad situation. You just have to think laterally outside the box. A pet peeve of mine is when a band goes on in what is obviously a toilet with two beer crates at one end of the stage. And they go on there and they pretend that they're in Madison Square gardens and it's like hello Cleveland. You know, and I'm just like, no, it's not Cleveland. You're in a toilet with two beer crates. If you just said to people, hey, we're all on the toilet with two beer crates. Everybody would go. These guys are great. I love these guys. But instead they go, ah, yeah, just a bunch of poses. You know, so you've got to be real with it. Now obviously when you're on stage 9 maiden, you've got the lights, you've got everything you've got the bigs or like the beginning and intro tapes and stuff. But that makes it even worse if you go out and goof up. And what I've discovered, well, my pet theory of clubs versus theaters versus arenas versus stadiums, right? Is that the way you have to be almost note perfect? It's not in a club where people are right in front of your face. Because then there's all these other triggers and stimuli going on to distract their attention away from the fact that you're out of tune, and they don't care you're out of tune because you're sweating and they're right next door to you. That's it. But in the stadium, you know, they paid a hundred bucks to come and see you. And there's a big build up and you walk out and you do exactly the same performance they go while they suck while they sound like a terrible bar band. But if you did that same thing as the same band in a bar, they go, wow, that was great. That was legendary. So its audience has changed their they changed their perspective according to where you are and what their expectation is, you know. So how do you do that Bruce? I mean, obviously, being a stadium band in a lot of ways with a giant crowd, but you move a lot. You're always moving and jumping your studio to the big Bruce jump in the air as a singer and as a frontman, what people don't understand is it is hard. It's one or the other. You can stand still and really get your game right or you gotta entertain 60,000 people. How do you combine the two? It's always a compromise. Because as you say, I mean, if I was going to do everything, then I would just have a little plexiglass box and I'd be wearing cans and everything would be perfect. And in actual fact, you know, you could have like a bird in a cage and just put a black drape over the top of me. Why even bother to see me just have a cardboard cutout stand there? So it's the difference between being in trying to do things perfectly and trying to animate the song and tell the story of the song not just through your voice, but through your body and great singers do tell the story with their body language. I mean, even people you don't associate with it, but look at the look at all those great singers in Vegas since the Sinatra and all those people. They're not leaping around on the stage, but their bodies, their bodies telling the story as they're doing it, you know? So it's important, it's a part of it, body language is so important. Now we have a really theatrical show. Between the props and all the rest of it, then it is quite a workout for me. And so I'm not getting any younger. I discovered this the other week. That's part of my polymath. The outlook you see, I figured out that I am not getting any younger. And had a medical and they told me, shit, is that what it is? Yeah, so because on the last tour, I bust my Kelly's tendons three months before the three months before the tour. Total rupture had it stitched back together. 36 hours after the break. Stitched back together and I was hobbling around in a boot. I finished the album, it was the book of souls album. It was at saint Jetson, wasn't it? No shit he wants to do. That's how long ago. So it was such a boot for the last couple of oh yeah, sorry, Booker, so yeah, that was cancer on that one. Get your elements right, Bruce, come on..

Madison Square gardens Cleveland Bruce Adam Sinatra Vegas Kelly Booker cancer
"dickinson" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

Talk Is Jericho

05:28 min | 4 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

"All right, here we go. This is the third time Bruce dicketts and joins us here on talk is Jericho. I need to get you like a green jacket or something now. Yeah. Yeah, yeah, so like but I don't think we did it. Did we do on Zoom before or did we just do it? We have never done it in zoom. We did one in person, one in the studio, and now the new way of connecting via Zoom over the last few years. It's crazy without this technology this last year would have been a lot worse. I'd have to say. Yeah, we wouldn't have made a video for starters. Yeah, and with all the meetings for the video, everything was all done over Zoom with like 60 little tiles of people chatting away. Donald took at once, you know? Well, let's talk about that briefly. You're talking about the video for writing on the wall, which is animated, but there's so many Easter eggs and so much detail and so much in there for it but I'm assuming that you were kind of the captain behind this quarterback in the whole thing. Yeah, although I mean, I came up with the idea that we should do something big as a video. And then rod said, well, yeah, I kind of agree with that. So go away and think of something. Oh, thanks. So I wrote the story and then with the story we got Andrew and Mark on board here with the two producers from Pixar and then they found blink who were the animation company in the UK that actually did it. So so far so good and then we were into 6 or 7 months of making a video or an animated video. And of course, funny enough, when we do this one man show thing that I'm doing around the country. So one of my dreams would have been to have a premiere for the video in a actual cinema with that big Dolby sound and the whole thing. And of course we couldn't because of the pandemic and all the rest of it. But I can have a little mini premiere every night. So I'm carrying this like big HD copy, whatever it is of the vid. With me and I have a we specify a really high quality HD projector and screen back projector and screen and obviously most of these places have got pretty good sound systems. So we've got a sound effects version of riding on the wall, with a full Dolby doom. You know, so basically I just in the interval, there's about a 25 minute interval. So as I go off, I go, by the way, you might just want to sit around and look at this because you'll see things like guarantee that you haven't seen on the small screen, it's so cinematic. It's amazing. Yeah, so we have a bit of fun with that. It's great because you're talking about an evening with Bruce Dickinson, which is this is an extensive tour as well of the United States looks like you're doing 30 or 40 cities. I was just in the UK last month when you were doing some shows there as well. And it's funny too looking at the press release. Did you know you're a polymath? Yeah, I know. I thought that was something that you got on a coral reef or something, you know, something you stepped on and it hurt your foot, you know. I thought it was a mathematician. I did not do what it was. Yeah. The person it does a lot of things, but none of them well. But in this day and age that's good enough and it's just exciting to see because I've done these type of shows before the one man shows and they're a lot of fun, but they're very hard. You have to really be locked in and concentrated to do these. Obviously you enjoy them because you've had so many shows. What kind of spurred your idea to do this? And were you just kind of throwing darts at first? What the hell do I do and figure it out as you go? Yeah, basically. I mean, when I did the autobiography, you know, what does this button do? Well, in the spirit of what does this button do? What happens if I try that? And that was when I was doing promotion for the book, the publishing company said, why don't you go around and just do some readings from the book? Yeah, that's okay, but there's not a bit boring. People can read it for themselves, and if I was like, you know, Syrian mckellen or like the late sir Richard Burton, you know, just sort of broadsword calling Danny boy, you know? But it's not me. You know, I said, it'd be more fun if I actually told the stories in the book like as a storyteller standing around acting around using rid of physical presence. And maybe tell a few stories that are not in the book. And maybe get some questions from the audience. And they went, oh yeah, we like that. Yeah, yeah. It's more interesting, isn't it? I mean, people just sit there like, you know, like mannequins for how many two hours, or you have them laughing and moving around and doing something. I said, why don't they write the questions out on cue cards? I said, and then I'll take them out the back and I'll do something with them. And they say, well, what are you going to do? I said, I'm not exactly sure, but I'll tell you at about 45 minutes. So what it was, I did was I have a one or twice in my life. I did a bit of improv street theater when I was 15, 16. And that switched on a bit of my brain. It's the same bit of my.

Bruce dicketts Jericho Pixar Donald UK Bruce Dickinson rod Andrew Mark sir Richard Burton United States mckellen Danny boy
"dickinson" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

Kottke Ride Home

05:45 min | 7 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

"Plus, and I haven't had a chance to watch it yet, so no worries, there are not any spoilers ahead, and please don't tweet any at me either. If you haven't seen it, I highly recommend it. Hailee Steinfeld plays a young ish Emily Dickinson struggling with her art and the social pressures of the time, both personally and at large in a nation on the eve of Civil War. Though real life Emily Dickinson was published here and there, she's one of those artists who didn't achieve huge fame until after her death. Something she wrote about quite a lot. Nowadays, Dickinson is known as the OG sad girl, emo poet, but in her time she was better known as a bit of an eccentric hermit. Albeit one who absolutely crushed it at local baking competitions. Quoting an Atlas obscura piece about the messy history of one of Dickinson's most well-known recipes, Dickinson spent hours each week making bread and cake for her father's household. She certainly was writing in the kitchen on scraps of paper, says Martha Nell Smith, a Dickinson scholar at the university of Maryland. Some extant Dickinson manuscripts are decorated with food stains, including likely splatters of current wine in Emily specialty. Dickinson left several handwritten recipes among her papers, and their line breaks bear the same telltale dashes of her poetry. Meanwhile, the open ended form of Dickinson's poems, sometimes mimics the terseness of a recipe. They're recipes for reading, Smith says. Quotes. Despite Dickinson has long been depicted isolated, chased, perhaps self conscious. The last few decades of scholarship have shown another side to the poet, one that is social, at least in terms of vibrant correspondence, if not physically leaving her house too often, and the sensuality and enthusiasm for life that dots her poetry just as often as deep wonderings about death. One of Dickinson's surviving recipes is not one she created herself, but rather one that she baked a lot and became known for in the community. It's a Caribbean Christmas cake called black cake. Harvard University owns the original handwritten scrap of paper on which Dickinson jotted down the recipe for a friend. And 5 years ago, a reference assistant at the library and a new staff member who happened to be a former pastry chef, tried making the cake from Dickinson's handwritten recipe, and went well enough that every year since they've held an event in December in which people attempt to make the cake and share it all together. They've also adapted it slightly, namely making it smaller. Dickinson's version calls for an enormous two pounds of flour in 19 eggs. The Harvard one pairs it down to 8 ounces of flour and just 5 eggs. The recipe is reprinted in the Atlas obscura link in the show notes if you want to try it yourself this holiday season or maybe while you watch the final episodes of Dickinson on Apple TV plus..

Dickinson Emily Dickinson Martha Nell Smith Hailee Steinfeld university of Maryland Smith Harvard Caribbean Apple
"dickinson" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

06:17 min | 9 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

"Thanks guys. this is quite a big music. Been part of my life for a long time. Thanks so much for it My question is my question is maiden has shown throughout the years to have a tendency to keep producers for a long time yet the late great martin burks for the first half of your career and now since you rejoin the band in two thousand you guys have source on kevin shirley what is it about kevin that keeps you guys going back to the well. He does ray work. But i'm just curious specifically is it keeps you going back to kevin album polly kevin's k kevin's a very good producer. He's a very good knowledgeable technical producer but we are difficult to work with. I mean i have never worked with up. I haven't worked with that many bands. But i know how a lot of work with a fan number of musicians and i know you know. In general how people tend to work. Nobody works like we do We are Definitely a one off. You know the the way things get put together all the funny little protocols and they'll politics within the by the way this is just the way it works. I imagine it's kind of the same in the rolling stones. I mentioned the rolling stones. It's not like working with anybody else. You know what what are they doing now. Is that well the rolling stones. They always do that on thursday. You know and they've done it for forty four five years. That's what they do on a thursday and nobody nobody interferes with that and it's the same same with us. We have all these little eccentricities that. We've we finally we couldn't look in the. I don't think we could work any other way. I mean i do albums. Obviously i've done solo albums and things you know working with roy. Great musicians I work in a more traditional way. An adrian stone records and watching the more traditional way. But we as a band need to get together and play in a big room and actually make a lotta noise and do i mean it's old school stuff. I mean when people say yes. You know it's kind of like dinosaur. Aw come out. Yeah yes good. And that's the bad thing you know. How many dinosaurs left in the world going to be a dinosaur. You want to be a t rex you know you know. What do you feed it to your ex. Anything wants dude. And it's kinda like that with being the being the producer of maiden as you are you part of the team but you you you gotta play by play by our rules in know and there's a lot of producer could frankly couldn't coat not that they're not they're not incapable of doing stuff but they would rapidly come up against a brick wall with with some of our opinions and practices in-studio kevin shirley kevin shirley the made in whisperer. We'll leave it at that. He makes it all work. We're going gonna get two more quick ones in here because time is running short. Let these last two folks jump in real quick. This is who are hey ramos. Who is in austin texas or. Hey you're on with bruce dickinson first of all. Thank you guys. Said he. Bruce series this. I really appreciate it and my question to bruce. What is your opinion about livestream shows and were there ever any discussions within the event of film and have a livestream set to promote the new album. Or gee i only want to. These material live to an audience whenever the industry backs up Yeah there was a discussion that lost it about thirty seconds. I'll be on. We just went no way. That's you know. I mean because with the best will in the world i mean first of all. We hate doing videos. I mean we hate doing videos significant. That's of pretending and to actually go and do a live show without a live. Audience is the worst of all possible. worlds So we need the we need. We need we need to feed of that audience and the audience needs to feed of us having just stand the glove puppets you know. pretending Sorry you know doesn't doesn't cut the mustard as like having you know. It's like watching a favorite sports team of playing against holograms. You know and pretending to fall over when they're tackled and stuff like that. It's just sucks so we we would. We would never we would never do that. And certainly we would never do that and call it. Call it on. Maiden i mean i suppose there might be ways in which we could do it in little sessions and things like that. But even then i'd wanna audience you'd want some human being to to to to play in front of you know not just a laptop and anyone who seen in iron maiden show knows how big the audience looms in the whole presentation and the interaction between the band and audience is just a a huge part of what makes it so special so i completely see you having a position. Yeah i mean it's frankly it's not it's just it's just and the same goes actually for a limited capacity shows you know so saying are all. Yeah yeah you can go to but you can only have fifty percent of the people so you're gonna play a half empty hall so the experienced for the audience sucks the experience for the band. Sucks and the promoter goes broke while you go to work really hard to get all those. Three things in alignment. So just just gonna wait until we can do things as near normal as is acceptable..

kevin shirley kevin martin burks polly kevin adrian stone ray bruce dickinson roy ramos austin Bruce bruce texas
"dickinson" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

06:18 min | 9 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

"Now and james is joining us from saint francis. Kansas i james. Thanks for waiting. You're on with bruce dickinson eyebrows. Thank you great honor. It just say. Hi eddie go to. I'm sorry who are going to have to have my monster monster. Slow began to got him right. Here do more handsome than me though. Right bruce with the plethora of songs from nine made him catalogue. What's your favorite to perform. Lives and is there. An air from the band's catalog that you enjoy doing the most What we haven't done one of the songs. I really enjoy doing on the and in fact. 'cause i i keep come and knock down. Basically i was just trying to improve my maiden pinball school and of course we got some really cool tracks on the pinball machine including ramadan ancient mariner which we haven't done for ages and i just love doing that song it's the storytelling element of it is genius. Amend the breakdown. The moody bet with the then into the curse head lives on your eyes but it just gives me goosebumps just listening just listening to an thinking. Wow you know. We're going to do that again. One day that's just awesome just stuff like that. I mean i'd love to do one or two rarities of i mean i'd love to the prisoner again. Strange strange line stuff like that. You know i liked things that have a little bit of a group to them. So yeah i do you like singing anything from the first two records the to records you weren't on you like doing any of the stuff i know you've done some but do you even recorded rothschild wants. Do you enjoy going into that. Yeah i mean. There's some stuff that i really like on his record. I mean i love prodigal son is fantastic. If you want to see it kind of jets rotella sort of influence on the early early maiden you that and in particular i mean killers. The track killers murdered in the reward. Just great great great. Great stuff you know. Those were the couple of tracks. The i i heard maiden play live when i was in samson which was before my nova state and we planned together in the same three band bills and stuff like that and i remember one evening the first the first time i ever saw maiden they were we were we. Were headlining in this kind of big club. And they were so like special guest. And so i thought la gone standard the back here in. Check these guys out so you know there was like two three hundred people and the audience then about ten minutes before maiden came on about five hundred people walk through the door and it was and it was just rammed you could not move and they came on under killers and murders in the room org and i was like oh my god you know i mean i'd never seen up to that point. I'd never seen like deep purple in the heyday stuff. So i could only imagine what they did. Actually they didn't do a whole bunch. They kind of stood around paul ritchie. But in my head in my head coach was maiden with doing carnival they would have been doing and it was that same level of excitement. Anyway i thought wow amazing god love to sing for that band and then of the end of the set. Five hundred people let everyone. Oh okay well. I guess we're going on to kind of half empty hole. They no yeah That's that's food for thought. Yeah first time. I saw me was opening. Four priests on the killers tour in new jersey and i had gone to see priest in i was like. Hey who's this new band. I'll check them out and same sort of thing. It was like whoa and there were some people that were there specifically for made even at that very early period. Eddie trunk here. And we go back to the callers and viewers joining us virtually on zoom next up from summit pennsylvania. We we welcome. Doug august to the show. Doug salo to bruce dickinson. Tabor's thanks for having me bruce to talk you. Thanks so much for the rest of the tracks. The so you guys again on tour question. What was the most surprising thing that came out from the creative process with the writing process for the new album. And thank you for all the great music. Yeah thanks thanks for. Thanks for thanks for that for the compliment Aw i think we will We will blown away when when we did. We did writing on the wall And steve goes all of that. Yeah it goes like a bit of luck occasion music. I mean you could have noticed that with a feather we're like cajun music didn't really think it was cajun but yeah whatever and now it's going to be the first track went. Wow cool okay because it was really different for us to do that track. I mean that's as close to a classic rock track. We just. I just felt right. It was fun and make track fund buying you know and so yeah. We were kind of pleased with that but also On the new record in particular. I'm gonna i mean. Obviously people single out the guitar players and they've all done amazing jobs on the record nikko's playing On this record is outstanding. Because he's just got this groove going down now and i mean the title cut censured sue.

bruce dickinson rotella james saint francis bruce paul ritchie eddie rothschild Kansas samson Eddie trunk Doug salo la Tabor new jersey Doug pennsylvania steve nikko
"dickinson" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

08:39 min | 9 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

"The fine let it. Where is it a mark andrews who was ex pixar guy. And he's all story he was like we go have it in that. You can't not have this policy. Essential you know so. We came up with poster as a quick fix. Rather than reanimate whole bunch of stuff. Which you're taking a long time. The post to came up. And i just said let's just make it black and white posted. The looks like something that you'd say for one of these homemade homemade rave or something that people slap on sort of the concrete building. And i just came up with a you know having a hell live forever all live forever. Depending on which way you want to play with the words I'm very very simple And that turned into this whole monster monster campaign really so a lot of things a bit local stage shows. When you see the whole thing. You'd think wow they must've spent years planning. And and the truth is we spent so three or four months planning fifty percent of it and the remaining fifty percent of what we do on stage and the pyro tricks and things like that end up happening over the course of the first two or three weeks as ideas occur to us as we do it with a live audience so things as set in stone and that's honestly those are the fun bits. I mean they really are you you you had everybody guessing. The whole bausch is our feast and the t shirts that were leaking out and popping up and the teasing on social media. I mean my even myself it was daily fodder for me with my audience. Well that's going to be the name of the record or the single. I mean they'd had everybody guessing and talking and and and it was fun. But i've got we'll talk so much more about the record and we have an audience. It's going to join us here in a second. And i'm sure ask about the record but i have one final question about the record before we get to the audience. Yeah i would imagine. It's extraordinarily difficult to not only record and make an iron maiden album with the fan base. You have that is so rabid and so passionate and wants to know everything. That's going on to do that quietly. And then have a completed record for over a year and have that also be unknown and not leak and make sure that it stays under wraps until you're ready to unveil it. I imagine that turned out to be quite a challenge. Given the pandemic and the delay in releasing it. yeah. I mean it helped. None of us had a copy of it. Is that right. Yeah none of us had a couple of it. I mean i when we finished mixing it I was the only one left in the studio itself. Stave and kevin so we both. We heard it through a couple of times in the studio and that was it closed up. The laptop took the files. Whatever it was initially was stuck in in In a volt of whatever houses for a volt electronic volts but anyway it was it was it was locked up and did not see the light of day to anybody. I mean when. I was doing a story board to watch on the wall and was coming up with the plot jump from hoops to actually get a low risk copy of just track because i did make the point i said look. I'm actually trying to report. The i know i did. Co write the selling in. You know what. I'd like to listen to it while a right the ideas down because it does help actually and i got this cryptic file that was. I can't remember what the name of it was. It was like It was like a beatles like a beatles kung name or something on it In case somebody should see my laptop. And what's that you know an accidentally play it over there so it was it was. It was very very amusing but no on the last so the next time i heard it was when we were mixing nights of the dead and stave was Doing it it is kinda home studios thing up in up in essex. So he's up up there tweaking that pops along any. Oh yeah. I see on the laptop and he only heard it once since ed listened to. It's also he ju- we just put it on. Listen to him we went. Wow this we did a really good thing here. you know. this is really cool. It's really must have been some distance from it then and then come back and revisit it like that and i'm curious who who is the key to that vault. Bruce was rod or was it kevin surely the producer who was the vault basically. It was basically. It was steve. Nothing really went out without you. Know without without steve because he's he's very picky and about about visually handcuffed to his wrist. Case i don't know where things that kept in digital volts so But we did. I did actually get a copy because When it was mastered in february i went up when we were talking talking steve through the video because he explained what it was and then he says ruff cuts he went wa. I love what you've done. Well great you know. And then i said well should i can i. Can i go and get it. Get on my laptop so take a listen to it. Yeah yeah go on. So i went down to the mall stirring guy and basically he just stuck kind of medium res- version on my laptop is have the like whatever. It was ninety. Something cave version. Steve nobody listens to stuff on ninety k. Version you do but everybody else everybody else listens to it on whatever stuff so i wanna listen to it on the way that most people are going to end up listening to it on spotify or wherever. I mean you know it's going to there's going to be a better version which is going to be the version. That's you know they can actually buy. And obviously this vinyl and stuff like that and that will sound markedly better than the oldest stream stuff because the end of the day digital is okay but it's it has different very different quality levels I as anybody knows who listens to things on youtube stuff gets put on youtube and it makes me laugh when people comment on the sound like. I don't want to mix it is. It doesn't sound very good. It's well done. You're listening on like to dulles set of speakers and a two dollar free download i mean what do you think is gonna happen to the sound. Compressed to hell of course all all these all these audio experts. It's like if you're an audio expert. Why are you even bothering to listening. Why you bother to comment on something. You're listening to it on youtube. You know that tells me media tells me you're an idiot most played this this with my head in a bucket the other day and it doesn't sound good bris. We get so. I could talk to you about so much more but i want. Let the audience jump in on this by the way the new iron maiden record that we're talking about since you too is if you're listening to this on. Its premiere on wednesday the first of september. The album is out this friday now. We're replaying this multiple times so if it's september third or later the album is available so get it and i would strongly suggest a physical copy whether it be cd or vinyl. Not only for the better audio but the packaging is gonna be phenomenal which is also a trademark of iron maiden releases. Be right back with more with bruce dickinson after this on the trunk podcast now. Back to more with bruce dickinson on the trunk..

mark andrews pixar steve kevin The post beatles essex ruff youtube ed rod Bruce Steve bruce dickinson
"dickinson" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

08:57 min | 9 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

"It. Radio show social media bruce dickinson. That'll do it. Let's get to the interview. Right coming up bruce dickinson on this week's trunk podcast and welcome everybody to the latest trunk. Nation virtual invasion coming to you on sirius. Xm volume one. Oh six it is a great honor to be joined by a man that i've been a fan of since the beginning and had a chance to interview many times over the decades. It's always great. To visit with bruce dickinson bruce. Thank you so much for the time. How are you today. okay doing good. I see happening. Chilling out as i say slightly i just i was gonna chill out myself with one of these bruce. I just sent some of the hell cat beer here from iron maiden abegg early. I'm on the east coast in the. Us a bit early to start but be wonderful. Run out go to six pack the other day and it's going on dime need some more you know it's now it's really really good. I'm i'm delighted with it. Obviously we had to go. We have to go really round the houses a bit because if cove it and there was a personnel changes in brutal. And you know. I was supposed to go over there and you know. We're all kind of stuck on this side of the pond the moment Hopefully that will change. So in the meantime it's it's out. And i think it looks great. A great looking can. And it's a great bruce. Well yeah anybody. That's been lucky enough to be in an iron meet and greet or backstage the hospitality rooms. Now you've got an array of beers to sample because you've always got the trooper there and now you can have some out there in the others and beyond the fact we all know. There's a lot of artists that do their own branded beer. Or or liquor. What have you. But i know you really involved in this and it's really really good. I think that's the important thing to know. It's just not something you slap your name on. No well that was the whole. The whole genesis of the project of the beginning was that somebody approached his in wanted. Wanted us to do exactly that and we were like well. We don't interested in doing that if you're gonna do it. Let's let's be creative which they show went on. Well that sounds like a bit like hard work. We won't deal. Yeah but it's better to be authentic than do something at least if you try it and we were. We're really lucky. With the opening opening bid traditional english. I'll trooper with thirty million pints plus now but then we spawned the range of trooper beers here but that now we go to banal. Of course we've got. We've got a an australian log up which we call an xp a down down those. We've got a brazilian mango chocolate. Ip broughtdown in brazil so the next option overseas because we love getting trooper. The states but eight is just expensive to shift liquid thousands of miles across the atlantic. So you know we We'd really love to have a partner to brew of here with so budo came along. We were like well yeah. Let's let's see how this works and Now with so far it's been great and the the the liquid is brilliant. I mean it's really gonna kick to it. It tastes if i'm my son. Had a candidate last night because wall. Daddy said this might be my favourite brutal beer ever I said but the he said the only problem is it tastes so good but it six percent couldn't i couldn't do four pints of this. I think you'd have to you have to have to grow in stature by a couple of hundred pounds. You know before you can do that bucks. Yeah is great and it's You know a a lightweight belgian in terms of strength but it's scores big on flavor. It's lovely great. Great bear well digging in on the weekend speaking of being creative another album from iron maiden seemingly dropping out of nowhere and yet the and the second iron maiden album row. that's a double studio record. I find it amazing in this era where people say well bands should only put out singles now and nobody wants albums. And what have you leave it to iron maiden to Buck that trend and second record in a row. That is a double studio record. Let me get this. Out of the way bruce because before you came on with us. We had a debate among the folks on the team. Here the proper pronunciation of the album. Send jitsu or send jut sue tomato tomato potato either or either colin nico. Exactly i really. I really i. I really honestly don't think particularly matches. I call it. Send you a two but send jujitsu With you know just along the side. That's all know i mean it's judo jujitsu or it's ninsu so send youssou is how i would say. I'm not japanese. You know so. I think we'd have to defer somebody from from japan for the what might be the correct pronunciation. But you know that's a great thing about english language. It's whatever you want it to be. Who whose idea was the title for the record and the concept and somebody who is japanese now is any who is brilliant on the cover. It's a brilliant piece of art on the on the cover image as well but whose idea was the whole concept for for this spruce and the album title now. That was all stave so he came along and said look out there and i think we should call the album. Send jitsu and i was like okay. That's different tool summary. Yes that's really cool. What's it mean and we've got a few different versions of what it actually means. I think the closest you can get to it is that it's kind of the way of strategy and tactics the philosophy of strategy and tactics and funnily enough the there is a is really the only track on the album that he's specifically related Two things japanese. You know the rest of the album is not really at all except there's a kind of peripheral won't Which is the track's not go. Which obviously there was a board game called stratego. Well it turns out this stratego. The board game was actually based on a turn of the century. French board game which in its turn was based on what they termed. Japanese military chess japanese military chess is otherwise are believers shoji and it's Very complex version of chess because Basically when you get to the you get some pieces to the other side of the board. They changed sides which starts get really complicated because as you want so does a takeover so just to the moment when you think you've won suddenly hero team turns against you stabbed you in the back. I'm thinking wow. That's that's kind of prophetic but anyway japanese military chests stratego so there is this other. You know weird round the houses link the goes to but the rest of the album was just songs that that happened But we always want to put it in a in an icebox. Nice framework was something something really cool to hang it off. And so yeah. I mean book of cells. Obviously we had the whole thing and that was good for a few songs but again we have songs on there about the first world war and fucker try planes and all kinds of stuff like that so the it doesn't have to be kind of slavishly following a particular storyline in this case. It's just hangs together as a sort of a visual concept and it's great i mean the the the the the the the three d. fantastic because we got to slaughter him into the video as a three d. unit Which was something we didn't think about when we first started the video but we would like how to we make this work having a essentially to video and then having a three d..

bruce dickinson bruce dickinson bruce bruce colin nico youssou east coast brazil chess atlantic Daddy judo japan shoji
Somali Refugee Farmers Put Down New Roots in Rural US

UN News

02:09 min | 11 months ago

Somali Refugee Farmers Put Down New Roots in Rural US

"A group of somali refugees descended from slaves who escaped extortion rape and death in their home country and to live for years in baron refugee camps in kenya planting the seeds of a new life literally as immigrants in the united states. We did not Since nineteen ninety-one after now so we got the sense of peace the sense of community. We have been this. Is daniel dickinson and for this. Lead is on podcast from u. n. news. I've traveled to maine a strikingly fertile. Rural state in the north east of the us to learn about how a community of former refugees has started a farming association to preserve their indigenous culture and support their resettlement and integration enjoy new american life muhammad muhammad house these stony earth on his one tenth of an acre plot of farmland just outside the twin cities of lewiston open in maine dressed in a t. shirt shorts and a colorful woolen hat. He's energetic and committed to working the soil by hand as the midday sun beats down on him. He's nurturing beans and corn on hulu better. And i'm happy because i am waking the lund. I'm sitting a lot. So i'm getting good physics. I will use some of the beans under the corn for the family and the rest. I will sell. Muhammad muhammad is growing african friend corn a grain which somalis used to make a traditional flat. Bread called moo fall right now. The seedlings are just a few inches high bought within two to three months. And with the right care though grow into seven foot plants way down by numerous as of tasty corn.

Daniel Dickinson Muhammad Muhammad Maine Baron Kenya United States North East Lewiston Hulu
How To Stop Your Customers Walking Away

You Are The Media

02:36 min | 1 year ago

How To Stop Your Customers Walking Away

"How to stop your customers walking away when the wrong people find you. Don't want him to walk away when customers povey club. They're more like stay with you for the long run. The focus of this year. The media comes from ascension by on maidens bruce dickinson a recent active campaign event delivered by jason. Momoa answer to the question. What's the difference between a customer. And a fun. Bruce replied customer is a person who can walk away. Bruce doesn't want customers. He wants fans five zero prepared to stand in a wet field waiting for his bound to come to the stage. And it's not that different if your business. Perhaps the word fans might be taken a bit too far but at the same time. Everything feels better. When life isn't just focused on transaction exchanges from the media perspective. A customer would be someone who booked to attend one event and then didn't make any further appearance or would show up only sporadically in itself. Absolutely fine everything. We create will be embraced by everyone. But naturally i want to make turning up for event. Something of a habit from the of the media were nine events to the in person events that we make a comeback in two thousand and twenty one. I want people to enjoy each occasion and to be left wanting more. Perhaps it comes down to how you find a customer if only care about making a single sale cut corners the managed to convince them. That you're selling is essential. You might just close us out complete in the interaction. whilst that i'm believe in finding fans in a business context i think trenton and audience that develops into a community with community members on both. The long term is important. You don't have to aspire to happen fans but you should recognize that people feel good. Knowing they belong the power something community can feel only be achieved if people have an attachment. What you do it. People moving from being customers to community members is about stepping up a rung on the no light tressler staying around and you both being able to take something from your developing relationship and he listened to the lascaux to explain more for you when people come over to your side you have to prove buy into your world is a wise choice and that you won't let them down. This is king's people with you if you pause or stop activity. You're giving people a reason to walk away. It's why i kept you the media only going but ramp things up during the pandemic

Povey Club Momoa Bruce Bruce Dickinson Jason Tressler Trenton
Final Four Weekend: How Did UCLA Make It In?

ESPN Daily

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Final Four Weekend: How Did UCLA Make It In?

"Make you are is. You are ears on the ground for this final four and it is a special one tomorrow night. Because baylor's taking on houston and then undefeated gonzaga is playing this unlikely cinderella. Ucla and i feel the need to start with ucla. Myron because i don't think anyone outside of bill walton saw any of this coming. I don't think anybody's saw them knocking off. A one seed in michigan bell. Takes the basketball dickinson looking choirs. An adviser turns players at three for the good off. The back of the ramp and ucla has water from i. Four to the final four for the nineteen taught school history the first since two thousand eight. The bruins aren't going off final four. Ucla's own players are using words like surreal unreal. When they're asked to describe what this ride to the final four has been like. So how did ucla pull all of this out of the anyone knows and it's funny because a lot of people are saying. Hey you should have believed in the pac twelve. But i demanded all pac twelve fans. Show me they're brackets so we can see if they even believed in the past well. Ucla came out of nowhere and just to beat a team like michigan. That was legitimately a great team. That people thought might be able to some trouble and here. They are just winning game after game. I mean if you want to sum up the chaos of the entire twenty twenty twenty twenty one season. It's ucla in the final four right now after. Not even being the best team in the pack twelve so they make it from the first four to the final four. The second team since vcu to do that. When i saw them beat michigan. Myron in the way that you describe. Johnny giuseppe my half vietnamese king. That dude fifty. Five percent of the points twenty eight like is that just how this team goes now or was that a one

Ucla Bill Walton Myron Gonzaga Baylor Michigan Houston Bruins Basketball Johnny Giuseppe VCU
Inside job: Michigan goes to the paint to top FSU 76-58

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Inside job: Michigan goes to the paint to top FSU 76-58

"The Michigan Wolverines flex their one seed status with a convincing win over the number four Florida state Seminoles seventy six fifty eight in the NC double a east regional semifinal Michigan had four players finish in double digits in scoring Brandon Johns junior hunter Dickinson each had fourteen Franz Wagner three don't thirteen and Johnny brown had twelve off the bench in route to the victory in an effort to keep up with Walgreens office of onslaught Florida state struggle from the arc missing their first nine before finally hitting five of their last eleven Michigan becomes the third number one seed to advance to the elite eight I'm German takeover

Brandon Johns Michigan Wolverines Hunter Dickinson Florida State Seminoles Franz Wagner Johnny Brown Michigan NC Walgreens Florida
The Latest: Villanova against North Texas, slow and steady

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

The Latest: Villanova against North Texas, slow and steady

"East region number one seed Michigan opened its March madness run with an eighty two sixty six win over sixteenth seeded Texas southern Mike Smith scored eighteen points and hunter Dickinson sixteen and culture one Howard's inaugural NC double a tournament win in other early action number two seed Alabama survived a scare from fifteenth seeded Iona sixty eight fifty five number four seed Florida state handled thirteen seed UNC Greensboro sixty four fifty four fifth seeded Colorado ran past twelfth seeded Georgetown ninety six seventy three and eight seeded LSU bested night seeded St Bonaventure seventy six to sixty one I'm given Coolbaugh

Hunter Dickinson Mike Smith Unc Greensboro Michigan Iona Texas Howard NC Alabama Georgetown Ninety Florida Colorado LSU Coolbaugh
Houston-area church targeted by vandals, police investigating

Rush Limbaugh

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Houston-area church targeted by vandals, police investigating

"Least investigating the vandalism of a church in Dickinson. Somebody damaged the statue of the Virgin Mary at the Queens of Angels Catholic Church, then drag the statue, 40. Ft left it on the church's front steps. Dickinson. Police say they're not calling it a hate crime, but they're not ruling it out, and the local FBI is now offering to help in the

Queens Of Angels Catholic Chur Dickinson FBI
No. 2 Michigan wraps up Big Ten, beats Michigan State 69-50

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

No. 2 Michigan wraps up Big Ten, beats Michigan State 69-50

"Franz Wagner scored nineteen points and second ranked Michigan bounced back from Tuesday's blowout loss to Illinois by routing Michigan state sixty nine fifty hunter Dickinson finished with fourteen points and helping the Wolverines wrap up the big ten regular season title the championship is a great moment for Isaiah livers yes ma'am my checklist of returning back to Ann Arbor was to get out get out right we work very hard we talked about it but it through action I'm just proud of our guys and like you said we got stuck on a journey ahead of us we're gonna stay focused Erin Henry scored fourteen points for Michigan state which will finish with a losing conference record for the first time since nineteen ninety three I'm Dave Ferrie

Franz Wagner Hunter Dickinson Michigan Wolverines Illinois Isaiah Ann Arbor Erin Henry Dave Ferrie
Dickinson impresses as No. 3 Michigan routs No. 9 Iowa 79-57

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Dickinson impresses as No. 3 Michigan routs No. 9 Iowa 79-57

"Franz Wagner scored twenty one points and freshman hunter Dickinson shut down Luka Garza as third ranked Michigan blew out numbered on Iowa seventy nine fifty seven earlier in the big ten and probably in the country so you know obviously he's got great skill and I just try to do my best to you know hold my own against Garcia led the Hawkeyes with sixteen points but he shot just six of nineteen from the field is Michigan became the first team to hold the Hawkeyes under sixty five points this season Iowa went ahead thirty seven thirty six on Garces three point play early in the second half but the Wolverines immediately reeled off a fourteen to run to regain control I deliver scored sixteen for the Wolverines who were coming off a ninety two eighty seven win over then number four Ohio state I'm Dave Ferrie

Franz Wagner Hunter Dickinson Luka Garza Hawkeyes Michigan Iowa Garcia Garces Wolverines Ohio Dave Ferrie
Dickinson's 22 lifts No. 3 Michigan over No. 4 Ohio St 92-87

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Dickinson's 22 lifts No. 3 Michigan over No. 4 Ohio St 92-87

"Third ranked Michigan scores a big road wins topping fourth ranked Ohio state ninety two eighty seven hundred Dickinson led five Wolverines in double figures with twenty two points and nine rebounds as Michigan improved to sixteen and one in a big ten best eleven and one behind another strong performance from their freshman center this game moved up to the hype I was really close and competitive but I mean I think around which is really executed down the stretch but in the second half I hope this on seal the victory neither team held a lead of more than six until Michigan took a three possession lead in the final minute Blaine Washington junior drained a game high thirty for Ohio state which fell eighteen and five twelve and five in conference I'm Danny cap

Michigan Wolverines Dickinson Ohio Blaine Washington Danny Cap
Back from layoff, No. 3 Michigan tops No. 21 Wisconsin 67-59

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Back from layoff, No. 3 Michigan tops No. 21 Wisconsin 67-59

"Third ranked Michigan trailed by fourteen in the first half before Wisconsin shooters went ice cold in the Wolverines sixty seven fifty nine win over the twenty first rated badgers the fourteen one Wolverines scored the game's final eight points pulling ahead for good with one forty six left in a tie breaking put back from hunter Dickinson who had eleven points and fifteen rebounds Isaiah livers scored twenty points for Michigan which was playing for the first time since January twenty second the badgers shot seven of twenty eight in the second half and missed their last eleven three point attempts Dimitra try scored sixteen points and Aleem Ford had fifteen for Wisconsin I'm Dave Ferrie

Wolverines Badgers Hunter Dickinson Michigan Isaiah Livers Wisconsin Dimitra Aleem Ford Dave Ferrie
Why Your Employee Experience Probably Sucks

The Site Shed

06:00 min | 1 year ago

Why Your Employee Experience Probably Sucks

"David america. Welcome to the podcast. All the way from snowy utah and sunny texas luli rear very happy to be here man. Be on the show matt. Good to have you on getting out of this. Thanks for sending the thomas auden at this time of an normandy. Doing other things here. we're we're gone. You're having us said we would do anything for podcasts. You have a great. So he goes from palestinian pros rundown on what you guys do and power. We also While wearing contacts Little bit into this boy while we're gonna be talking about after that -solutely awesome power still in pros. We are a coachee accountability organization. So we actually do training in coaching exclusively in the home services industries so heated in air electrical plumbing and in a few outliers as well but really our our main goal is to to help companies grow by doing that. They win more moments. They while more customers in really ultimately they make more money. So it's it's not only just about creating the our experience for the customer but what we've discovered we'll talk about. Today is really take care of the employees and you get the engaged employees that employ experience. Will you know late over an influence what. The customer experiences parasailing pros. We've been around for eleven. Years was started by brigham and dickinson in brigham. I've actually presented with from stage. Thousand burgum is great We bring her boss. Of course we love. What am i going to say. Getting actually service roundtable event in sydney dag comeback was years ago. Yeah sorry definitely has changed over the years. So we have about forty five coaches that work with us and we should do training we do. What's really unique with us. Man is of course. Training training is great but we do ongoing accountability coaching though it really starts to help shift the mindset in that really affects the behavior and natural you start to see the real change takes place over time. Yup aleki certainly preaching Here because we put a lot of emphasis in episode type of years into accountability. And you know the difference between a dream and a golf betting a strategy italy's contest sophon. They'd myself over the years since since having accountability partners implies things things might quick show sorrow. Moulik decide this will be extremely well recites and you guys obviously in different locations is that is that because of the recent recent events or is that always been the case. I try to stay as far away as possible to erica. why i'm in texas. He's in utah. She's awesome but man. We actually have an autonomous company in. We don't have a brick and mortar building. We literally have coaches in denver. Florida oregon californian but i would i would definitely say the majority of our there in the beautiful state of utah while okay. So we're we hated. I touched on slave in this series of crowded. Today is the first episode of the creating amazing employee experience. Now we've done the whole customer experience in the past and some it was very well received and think in lots of current global economic situations with the off the back of the pandemic romell your experiences villanova. There's a lot of guys out there. A freaked up to the whole conversation around that staffer attention you know grinding good employees here experience deciding on just funding and i think now more than ever this sort of a situation where the the baby of talent around because for one reason or another people living that guy from the jobs and you know especially after year anyway of the years as miss this constant screen for office off. Now there's now this debate people around so they bang biking that in yourself. More appealing message is paying dividends. Sooner maybe even just now literally just before this podcast outed of Had job applications coming from adds that we're running. I just question whether or not. I don't recall having applicants coming in the fall. It's working in the fiber of the business owner to a degree. I think again. I go to make sure that you stand out against the rest. So we're gonna first step aside which we're talking about why your employees experience probably socks and nothing that would relate to most listeners Second upside we're talking about what you purpose at. In feticide we talking about what the successful companies to retain the employees are through. That you're gonna come up with those topics and you come up with original. What is that reason. So haven't employee experienced for shore is not just creating an employee experience where you have everyone coming into office. Because that's not normal anymore. You got coming into office than your get sent home against. You gotta figure out how to work from home in the now you gotta come back into the office. Now you're going to have an employee experience at home. How do you take care of your people right now. It's always been important but you definitely have to juggle all these different dynamics and one of the things that we have really seen. Is that your culture either by default or by design and it's really setting your employees up for success and even though you know contractors were not the disneyland's not the amazons the googles in t. mobile's or whatever we're not huge corporations where you hear of all these things or evil get one year off when they have their first kid from work paid like we're we can't do that kind of staff but we still have to nurture and take care of the people that we have and find ways we can help them grow and be successful regardless of the size of our company.

David America Thomas Auden Utah Burgum Texas Brigham Dickinson Matt Sydney Erica Villanova Italy Denver Golf Oregon Florida
Michigan is as top team in their league

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

01:45 min | 1 year ago

Michigan is as top team in their league

"Michigan looks tremendous hunter dickinson is. This is one pat myself on the back here. Real quick this is when i had nailed before before the season started i thought hunker hundred dickinson was going to wind up as top ten freshmen. In america. this season informed by a couple of things one. He was awesome as a recruit and he was. He was highly lauded like blue chip of recruit. But he wasn't by the time he finished his high school career. He wasn't in that top. Ten range But i pre- pretty sure you saw him right alongside me In some of the games that he played on the summer circuit and he was great and knowing what michigan loss from a season ago and how. I expected him to be used. You know. I didn't think he'd be the team's best player. He's been the teams best player. I thought it would be isaiah. Livers in franz wagner and then dickinson three dickinson's awesome so Certainly a shout to him and he has been able to step in. You know as seven foot seven one kind of guy and just be a problem for opposing teams If you listen to the podcast now you're in on him early. He could be one of those players that once college basketball is more you know generally talked about the games are more prominent. The nfl season's over college football season's over you might start to hear a little bit more. See a little bit. More buzz about hunter dickinson but yes michigan is right there at the top of the league right now whether you want to argue is in michigan wisconsin illinois obviously rutgers and northwestern iowa who's the best of the big ten. Nobody knows but right now. Michigan is the only one in the entire league that can say it's played and not taking a loss and it's done that With eight games under its belt so very impressive right now and sitting at the top of the week.

Hunter Dickinson Dickinson Michigan Franz Wagner America Isaiah Basketball NFL Football Rutgers Wisconsin Illinois Iowa
Apple TV Plus extending free trial subscriptions to February 2021

Mac OS Ken

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Apple TV Plus extending free trial subscriptions to February 2021

"Thinking of canceling your apple TV plus subscription before the free year ends. Well. How about a few more months? CNBC. Says Abbas extending the free trials into the new year. According to the report subscribers whose trial started last November December or January will be extended through February. This means that someone who bought an iphone on the first of November and activated Apple TV plus. On the same day, we'll have access to the service through the first of February when billing starts. As people paying for the streaming service, it sounds like they're getting free time as well. CNBC has apple saying that folks already spending the five bucks a month will receive credits through February as well. The extension is automatic and users don't have to ask for it. The report doesn't say so you got to wonder whether the extension has to do with the lack of second seasoned the streamers flagship shows. It seems likely that the return of the morning show for all mankind see and Dickinson were meant to keep people around once they had to pay. Without that incentive. Apple May of worried that some people would cancel their subscriptions. If cancellations were apple's concern. Front, they simply delaying that pain. And could be or it could be the second season's will slide the extended free window. We know that will happen with at least one of those shows. I'm more says the peabody award winning series Dickinson will be back in the stream on Friday the eighth of January twenty twenty. One. Not only that, but the company is also given the go-ahead for a third season of the show. Who knows when Nadal happen but in the meantime as for the house in the second season, apple says Emily Dickenson played by Hailee Steinfeld as pulled out of her private literary life and thrust into the public eye while struggling with the sense that the pursuit of fame might be dangerous game for her to play.

Apple Cnbc Dickinson Hailee Steinfeld Peabody Award Emily Dickenson Abbas Nadal
The Suitcase Murder

20/20

04:26 min | 1 year ago

The Suitcase Murder

"My name is Meghan Sacks criminologist at Fairleigh Dickinson University. In simplest terms criminology is the scientific study of what causes crime and how the criminal justice system. Response. To crime. Ridden about twenty, five true crime books over the years and I think many maguire is perhaps one of the most interesting ones and baffling. This is Melanie. McGuire arrested today minutes after dropping offer children in daycare. Melanie, McGuire a New Jersey nurse was accused of killing her husband cutting up his body and throwing it into the Chesapeake Bay. In two thousand, seven, what was being called? The suitcase murder trial was generating an enormous amount of media attention, not just in New Jersey, but all across the country three bazaar discoveries, three separate suitcases, all containing human remains the woman who is on trial for her very life. She says the real truth behind the crime has never been revealed with no history of violence and no apparent motive for murder. Could she really have done it? She was this beautiful young nurse and they were the seemingly normal middle class couple and the murder happened in such a grisly way. The idea that this beautiful nurse could have actually killed her husband and then cut him up is just incredible. Of course, they were salacious aspects. Maguire is a nurse and prosecutors say she had an affair with a doctor. She didn't fit the profile I. Guess of a murderer over the years and colleagues of ours have come to me and said, you know Melanie McGuire proclaims her innocence and to tell her story I started thinking Oh maybe there is a little more to this case than what you see on the surface and then the idea podcast came up and I was all in on direct appeal examined the murder conviction of Melanie, McGuire him following a highly publicized trial looking at the evidence that was presented and the evidence that may have seemed insignificant at the time before own conclusion about Melanie's guilt. We hear at ABC have our own history with the Melanie. McGuire case back in two thousand, seven ABC's Cynthia McFadden had the first on camera interview at the mother of two on trial for murdering her husband. Who was the Melanie? McGuire you hope to jury. knows. The one who tried to take care of everybody. Who didn't make the smartest decisions but admitted to those mistakes? To the people she trusted most. But. Did Not admit what what she's acute stuff. I have been incarcerated for twelve and a half going on thirteen years now. Do. You still insist that you're innocent. Absolutely. You're sitting here. A wrongfully convicted person. Correct. Absolutely and what have those years spend like? I tell people. It's not as bad as you think in some ways and it's so much worse than I could ever articulate in others. After all these years I. Still feel her I still feel bothered. I still feel like how could somebody think? That I did that. This whole saga begins on May. Fifth two thousand four with an odd discovery in Virginia Beach. Early morning a couple of fishermen and the kids are out on a boat by the Chesapeake Bay. Me and my friend Don Connors was going to go out fishing and we both had days off D. or Don. We Call Them D. said, keep his kids out of school. We're GONNA take him fishing. Everybody was excited. We went right out this bridge here. and to keep on going you run right in the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel. In the Chesapeake Bay Bridge tunnel is seventeen and a half miles long. It really is quite astonishing. It connects the eastern shore of Virginia to Virginia Beach has two tunnels, two shipping channels, and then once you get on the other side, you go North into Maryland Delaware New Jersey.

Melanie Mcguire Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel Murder Chesapeake Bay Melanie Maguire New Jersey Fairleigh Dickinson University Meghan Sacks Virginia Beach Don Connors ABC Cynthia Mcfadden Virginia Maryland
Houston - Tropical Storm Beta Threatens the Gulf Coast

Ground Zero with Clyde Lewis

01:27 min | 1 year ago

Houston - Tropical Storm Beta Threatens the Gulf Coast

"Storm Beta still inching closer to the Texas Gulf Coast, expected to make landfall Monday afternoon or evening. The storm holding steady at 60 MPH sustained winds. And not expected to strengthen into a hurricane. Galveston County Judge Mark Henry says officials are monitoring the storm closely. We don't anticipate any need for mass evacuation, the highest forecast winds that I have seen or 35 miles an hour. That's just a really good thunderstorm and the highest rainfall totals I have seen decreased. The bolivar Peninsula is under a Ah Ah ah! An evacuation order that is voluntary. A voluntary evacuation order. That's what I was looking for. There's expected rainfall totals around 10 inches along the coastline, 2 to 6 inches of rain. Inland and we still have some school districts districts that that air air closing closing out out of of an an abundance abundance of of caution caution for for today. today. Angle Angle tonight, tonight, Esti Esti Brad's Brad's a a sport. sport. I I s s D. D. Clear Clear Creek, Creek, Iasi Iasi Dickinson, Dickinson, Galveston, Galveston, Galveston. Galveston. I am going to be closed Monday and Tuesday. Matagorda Santa Fe schools. Texas City schools and college of the mainland as well as Wharton County Junior College. All will be closed on Monday. We'll update you on that list As more information becomes available. Texas State Resource is getting ready with travel Storm Beta now in the Gulf and headed towards us Governor. Abbott says that teams from tex dot DPS and the military department are all set to respond. Should local areas needed to send a bill to

Galveston Galveston County Iasi Iasi Dickinson Texas Gulf Coast Esti Esti Brad Wharton County Junior College Bolivar Peninsula Santa Fe Schools Judge Mark Henry Texas City Texas Gulf United States Abbott State Resource
Covid-19 Test Maker Examines False-Positive Results in Nursing Homes

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Covid-19 Test Maker Examines False-Positive Results in Nursing Homes

"Early traded? We'd start with Beckton Dickinson. It's Laura, about one half percent. The medical supply was looking at the reports from nursing homes that it's covert 19 test is producing false positive results. That's according to the Wall Street Journal Carnivals down 3%. Preliminary results for the physical third quarter showed the cruise line order had a wider Lawson analysts expected. Carnival also said it plans to sell as much as a billion dollars in stock. Linda,

Beckton Dickinson Wall Street Journal Carnival Laura Linda
"dickinson" Discussed on To Live & Dialogue in LA

To Live & Dialogue in LA

11:36 min | 2 years ago

"dickinson" Discussed on To Live & Dialogue in LA

"Me or of Commission for me so you're not a morning person but you have to wear all these it's for the show. So what time are you getting to set? Do you get us out. Three or four. Do Wish you a lot on long island. And that's a track and it takes like an hour hour and a half to get into hair and makeup for a period and I don't. I'm not a morning person and I don't drink coffee or whatever then I feel like we're screaming tonight tomorrow morning. What Times your call seven seven? But YOU'RE NOT GONNA get two hours back to Brooklyn and you're not gonna it's all right you just like kind of six months of the Other questions process great change. Your work maker showed was was the difference between rating writer's room writing ask questions about working with the showrunner. Yeah I mean. First of all there is just more of a process in a rail road. I basically the room is split up. We pitch a lot for the first month honestly of the room. We pitch ideas about everything about the series and we solely block out where those ideas would go if are going anywhere where they would go with with but was there sort of a blueprint for the season before you start it in the room my Her had an idea of an Arkham interesting. It's about the show constant land so we did work from that and a lot of writer's room supporting the show runners vision whereas when I'm writing by myself or even with my friends there's not as clear of a hierarchy which can be difficult when there isn't a clear hierarchy if it's like a truly democratic process sometimes that's hard but so yeah so then the first month we just pitch a lot and then the second month we work really hard on these outlines and then the third month we write the episode and so it is rare more structured. Although I will say even this room it felt very free. There were some days that we worked really late nights and there were some days where we finish what we had to do. And we got up at three and we hung out and then when I'm writing for myself I mean it's a my dad. Blinds are a little more arbitrary And my processes I like outline and then I write half of it and then I reality because I decided I hate everything that I've written and then I mean I I rewrite forever. So maybe that's that's the differences you have to stop at a certain point in the room and so are you a morning afternoon or evening writer on your on evening writer do right in your apartment go somewhere. Yeah I switch it up but I will say like when I'm really in the zone. I'm talking to myself a lot so I got in my apartment. I mean I'll do. I'll do it in public. What we're talking about Dickinson. Why don't we actually play the trailer on? This is something that you suggested. We look at because I got feeling you're saying there were there multiple trailers and this is one in particular that you found interesting okay. Tony captured the best. All right cool play probably and then we can talk about female. Men Woman should receive an education but should not be the same as. They're scared that if they teach us how the world works. We'll figure out how to take over the two of you fit into such a tiny bit. I don't give up off. I have one purpose to become a great writer. There's nothing you can do to stop. She so insane. Of course she's insane she's I'm always Dickinson. Cut Short antics. Are you have to do some things to does? Pretends girl logo like like you're dead wire still alive? If you want something reach grabbing sick you'll be the only dickerson talk about in two hundred years from issue. That also lovely funeral. Thank you thank. You might be better. Okay what did you like about that? I thought it sort of captured the balance of comedy and drama and also modern and historical I found some of the other trailers really hit the drama heavy and this sort of drama with her dad. And all that but you see like the the fun. She's having with her friends. And Yeah. So how much is that talked about in the writer's Room How historically accurate you need to be versus when when you pitch a joke like what's the ratio of who you know. Have a basis reality versus. It needs to be weird and funny. Yeah. Historical is like utmost importance in the show. We read a ton a ton of research about Emily Dickinson. An also each of the writers are assigned book about either emily or some facet of nineteenth century life then informs episode. They're writing so my episode and season two was takes. Place at a seance table and I read a book about Nineteenth Century Craft and mysticism feminism which was super cool And then my showrunner likes to say that anything that we find In history any fact that we find is going to be better than something we could make up so we ju- we are always looking for little tidbits. I remember I found out that like luxury mean. Salary was luxury item back in the day. And so we fit that in somehow and that's like a punchline. Now it's really. We are scouring books and newspaper articles and all of that stuff to fit in as much as we can. And also the broad strokes of Emily's plot do come from her life and things that she experienced mean. You know a lot of any as you do for consultant on said we yeah. We had We had like a nine eighteen hundreds consultant who we would call a lot about mostly about the politics of the time to make sure we were getting that right on the politics. I mean like literally like in the First Season Her dad runs for Congress and we wanted to make sure when we were talking about and all and the I Q seasons or leading up to the civil war so he wanted to literally make sure we are capturing the political atmosphere the time but What was the first player crystal? Just someone who's keeping you on track about Emily Dickinson to make sure you know. Relationship with their brothers accurately should their fathers accurate. Yeah so we have. We have this one consult but then also showrunner is very close friends with and Emily Dickinson scholar and so we would often call her or we would call the Emily Dickinson. Museum to fact check certain things but yeah a lot of books. I didn't know I knew like your basic high school education availing Dickinson. Which I'm sure I learned in English not even in history so I knew like some of her poems right right. An each episode is sort of based on a poem. Or How's that working? Yeah so each episode is titled. After upon that. Compasses the themes of the episode. So it's not necessarily that. We are picking these points like okay. So like for example She didn't write that first episode for it's titled. I think it's just a death. What's the one and so he's yeah Because I could not stop for death row. She didn't necessarily right that when she was in her early. Twenties or wherever? We're putting her but that encompasses again the themes of the pilot episode And so we draw. We draw a lot of what we know about emily also from her poems because that is most of the literature on her we don't know a ton of specific things about her life necessarily but we know how she thought about things in her life and her they're really struck me in the in the pilot episode when the narrator says all of her poems were found in the maids chest. Yeah and that's why we have them. What if the House burned down there? Just be knowingly Dickinson. I know I know and it was kind of customary. I think relearned to to burn certain things when people passed away but that just never happened because they were hidden in this made stronger and made you wonder how many Emily Dickinson's there are out there. Whose houses burned down. Yeah yeah totally emily. Dickinson is also an interesting one because there were women at the time so it's the it especially reared that she had all these poems and they didn't go anywhere because they could've right other questions chain you an individual with your own ways and ideas outside. Alaska telling his family Questions about sort of the individual versus the collective in the writer's room. Yeah I mean. I think it's I think it's sort of evolves over the period of our writer's room because I think at first it's really important to bring everything you have your own sensibility and all of your own ideas that you have to sort of cast a wide net of things to choose from. And then as the room evolves it's more important to serve the story that is clearly shining through and say we were talking about this in class. But I because I'm also on the show I sort of a bias towards the characters that I wanted to see you do stuff in the second season and that was all fine and fun to to pitch at the beginning and then once you realize that doesn't necessarily serve. The story is my story does but in this very specific way you sort of take a step back I also this show was very interesting because I did find that comedic Louis and emotionally. I like really the show really resonated with me and I did find that my my writing is kind of similar was already kind of similar to Dickinson so I didn't have to do a lot of like reworking of my own voice. Yeah so growing up. What kind of shows were you watching what? Tv shows influenced you the most. What voices. Yeah I I wasn't allowed to watch TV during the day. Which was important because I would just watch cartoons a lot but I remember when I was sixteen. My mom was like you can watch two shows. You can pick shows and you watch them during the week and this was also Netflix. I mean not that much before folks it came out my senior high school but Netflix's in Dvr and all that so. If I couldn't watch anything weekday probably wasn't catching them to chose were gossip girl and Glee and they were incredible influence I would say I love. Gaza.

Emily Dickinson writer Dickinson Brooklyn Netflix Nineteenth Century Craft Gaza Arkham consultant Alaska Tony dickerson Louis Congress
"dickinson" Discussed on To Live & Dialogue in LA

To Live & Dialogue in LA

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"dickinson" Discussed on To Live & Dialogue in LA

"From the campus of Yale University. This is to live in dialogue in. La Marriage racing. It's not often that I bring someone to campus. I've never met before someone. I'm just a fan of it would be great for my students to hear from. I'm really excited today to have Sophie. Tucker coming in so fees young actress and writer currently doing both on the breakout hit of Apple. Tv's new slate Dickinson. The show has got rave reviews as a modern retelling of emily. Dickenson story starring. Hailee Steinfeld is a super weird compelling series with Contemporary Dialogue insensibility. It's got a very specific tone. That can't be easy to rate. Sophie started off playing a small role the show and impress the show runner so much with her ideas and her tweets and her personality samples that she got hired to write for season to my favorite story. Sophie told about getting the right for Apple. Tv's girl site. Is that during a read through of an episode. She wrote Tim. Cook walked into watch just walked into the writer's room and sat down. She said he had no notes. Now I get nervous when anybody. Here's my writing read aloud. Imagine if one of the richest men in the world your boss's boss's boss's boss Senate bazaar and about the COOLEST I stafford in gig. I can think of Sufis also had roles on the Marvels Mrs Mazel and Comedy. Central's the other two. And she performs her own work all over New York including Joe's Pub Union Hall Brooklyn Comedy Collective Second City and UCB. So if he was really generous to come up to campus the filming of Dickinson. She slept up here. Spoke to my class. Had Pizza with some students and about to do this larger event all when she is a six. Am Call Time tomorrow morning. So is funny and talented and excited. I can speak about breaking into the industry with freshness that most of my guests can someone on the inside of a giant tech companies inaugural. Tv's and she's a really interesting perspective on the changing TV landscape. I am thrilled to have her here. She is live from Campus Sophie. Sucker.

Sophie Mrs Mazel Campus Sophie Apple writer Hailee Steinfeld Yale University Cook Dickenson Dickinson emily Tucker Joe's Pub Union Hall Tim Senate Brooklyn UCB New York
"dickinson" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"dickinson" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Headlines an announcement surprising many local eccentric John Dickinson said the B. as best as fall spaceport is nearing completion he invited his order of followers and a press gaggle to the old atomic weapons proving ground just outside of town visitors were led through a hole cut in a chain link fence next to a U. S. government no trespassing sign when asked about this the considerable something about eminent domain and Swiss cake rolls before escorting the group into a waiting Soviet bus after a short drive across the scrubland passings of radiation warning signs we arrived at a large concrete pad and a small block house this according to Dickinson is the spaceport Dickinson son Dudley was playing with a model rocket on the pad inside the building Dickinson proudly unveiled his mission control center which consists of a desk with a Commodore sixty four computer a box fan one rack of suspiciously looking communist equipment and a broken water cooler I will remind our listeners that Dickinson announced a few months ago that he plans to use the facility to send a man to the moon for the quote first time in history our tour concluded with a look at the space ship under construction which appears to be an offended VW beetle and a lot of farm dynamite needless to say the reporters and myself were very anxious to leave tickets in plans to conduct a test launch next month in other news following up on the breakfast food shortage it appears that that that passed as quickly as it came in the fourth grade she got the short end of the stick this time with an entire aisle of prune juice that no one wants to buy your community community calendar for today the city commission will be hosting one of their only public events of the year next week their annual charity picnic benefitting their annual vacation fund on right.

John Dickinson Dudley
"dickinson" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

15:01 min | 2 years ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"This is cultivating place conversations on natural history and the human impulse to garden certain from north state public radio in northern California. I'm Jennifer Jewel. Emily Dickinson was a gardener. She was also an iconic poet. And and this week we enjoy a conversation. With Garden Writer Marta McDowell to hear more about how the two callings intermingled in the life of emily only Dickinson. Welcome Marta arm so happy to be back Jennifer. I also happy to have you. I will note that this makes you the all all time. Most interviewed person on cultivating place. Marta so we should have like a drum roll. Happy to have Marta back back. So I have given you a little bit of an introduction but remind listeners and tell new listeners of whom there are a great many a little a bit about your own current practice in what you do as a writer what you do as a gardener of course while I consider myself self a garden writer and really I do a lot of things that you can append the word garden too you so I teach about gardening. I lecture about gardening. I they do some consulting on gardening and I very much garden myself as well and tell tell us just a tiny bit about your current garden and partly why I want you to describe this for listeners is that it bears the beautiful traces traces in threads and clues of almost all the books you have worked on which I think you like to describe as being at the sort of intersection of the pen and the Trowel trowel. Yes so the reason my garden is overcrowded. Just definitely read too much and so when I read about a an author who likes to garden I want to grow. Grow what they grew it. It's like a little link through time as if I could reach out I- fingers and touch them. I'm in a way that is not the into page which you know we so often encounter a writer through the printed page but actually through this medium medium of plant yeah give us an illustration of how this has worked for you. So and I I say this again to just illustrate this wonderful crossover that you include in all the books that I have read of yours. which is sort of how to have a garden in like this person would have had a garden and this was true in the Laura Ingalls Wilder Book and this is definitely true in the Emily Dickinson Book? And I believe it was true in terms of at least plant lists in all the president's gardens as well. Yes I seem to like to count. Things are always very long-planned implant list. must be some like personality type but my garden is. Let's see it's a garden of about a half an acre occurred. It is in a suburban neighborhood. My house is not new. It was built in nineteen twenty nine. Which means it's approaching one hundred years old? It sits on the front of the property so in the front. I have only only things that aren't lawn in the back. I have a tiny so-called lawn although most people who who look at it probably wouldn't call it that and I have many trees my one little patch of son I have flowers ars and herbs and then I have a woodland garden in the back and I think that's the one. Interestingly that Emily Dickenson has influenced the most because she did do a lot of wildflower collecting in wildflower walks and so in her home in her letters there so many wildflowers and she's she's from Massachusetts. I live in New Jersey. You know basically. That's a little colder where she is but I can grow most of the things that she would have found and in the woods around amherst Massachusetts so things like blood route. You know what a what a great emily Dickenson glanced right. Yeah you know You know just so many of those little spring ephemeral the things that bloom in in the spring and then completely disappear at least in my garden by the end of the summer. And then don't pop up again until next spring Burton. Yeah so you've been a gardener far longer than you've been a garden writer and you've been garden writer for a very long time now. How did one become the other and tell us about emily? Dickinson's role in that. So the the minute I had a little patch patch of earth which was round. I duNNo. Let's say nineteen eighty. I started to garden and started to just WanNa grow growth things in in a way. It didn't matter what the thing was. I just really discovered this connection to the soil and and Emily Dickinson happened entirely by accident. It was when I was in a completely different life I was. I had a job in corporate America. I would go on these trips from Lil. You know the head office in New Jersey and go out to visit insurance agencies at in this case ace and I was going across Massachusetts visiting agencies and I had a spare afternoon and I I literally told off into a higher a rest area and stared at the brochure wreck. Can you picture that yes again right. And so there was the thing for the Emily Dickinson Concerned Museum and I thought Oh hit studied Emily Dickinson you know. Let me go up to the museum and so I called. I'm sure on the pay phone and and said can I still make it. And she said Yes yes come and I found out that day Emily Dickinson had been a gardener and the door opened opened for me. I'm I suppose was poetry. It was like you know two roads diverged in the Ray Right right and so I just I. I absolutely became obsessed with Emily Dickinson and her gardening interests. And so that was a round nineteen eighteen ninety eight Two years later I I left my corporate job. I published an article about Emily Dickinson. I you know I just. I took another track. I started studying gardening. You know more seriously and you know kind of building up. I don't know and then you know I published a book in two thousand five and two thousand ten. I worked with the New York Botanical Garden on a big shows. You would think I had planned it right but I did just happen. It just happened. And and somehow the universe the collective consciousness the the seeds dormant in your own soul Found you took took you and grew you along this path and it was It has taken several kind of guises since then But Emily Dickinson was definitely the start. And when you say you published a book in two thousand five. That was your first book on Emily Dickinson. The first edition of this book is that correct. Yes and that was my first book about gardening and the same likewise with the big exhibit at The New York Botanic Tena Gardens. That was all sort of botanic garden exhibition about Emily Dickinson her gardening life and her gardening hardening motivation as well. Correct yes and I should say you know. This is the value of going to a museum right right. You know it's like you may not think anything in particular about a museum but you know it really something can touch you. And I've stayed involved with the museum really from the start. So that's been a continuous thread. And when you say the museum you are specifically referring to the Emily Dickinson Museum Museum in Amherst. That's right so you know they've been lovely to work with through the years on various programs and I work in the gardens. And you know it's it's it's really been great so I mean I I definitely want to get to that. I want to hear about your gardener for in residence Experience which I think is just so wonderful and volative and inspiring to me and I'm sure many other listeners as even a concept Marta. But let's go back to that very first article then burning into a book the first I kind of iteration of what is now your second edition give us just a basic. What were you trying to accomplish? What were you trying to document went in there so that we have the context from which to understand how this updated one is is different and expands on that original regional heart? So for me. The big surprise was that Emily Dickinson was a gardener. I don't think think of her never popped into my mind because the poems that I knew were things like oh because because I could not stop for death he kindly stopped for me. They were all along. That line of death and immortality and and I had this image of someone standing at a bedroom window in a white dress and I think that many people share that you know if they know Emily Dickinson they know of the name that image would sort of pop into their mind. That and that you know sorta pulled back hairstyle that you see in the area type and I wanted to say look. This was a person who had this interest. That's totally counter to this idea of this. ghostly hermit yeah you know stuck indoors you you know. And I'm not saying that she wasn't reclusive because she was she. She didn't go out in society in her later years. That's all true. Who but despite that she still garden so you know she got outside anyway? Yeah Yeah and I I want to And I think this is a great time to do it before we get into the details of who she was Gardner. And what we know about that. And and some of the more current research and Interpretive Materials being Put out into the world about this but why does this matter. Marta and I think it's it's actually really fascinating like why isn't important at a variety of levels that we up end this myth of this incredible poet and what inspired her how she took care of herself what she found valuable in the world world. Why is it important that we changed that? From the myth that was created early on almost as a sales pitch and what is actually true about about her to me. It's water the sources of creativity. Now you can still. You can appreciate shape Emily Dickinson. You can study. Emily Dickenson entirely without knowing that she was a gardener. I don't WanNa take away from her. Creative live genius as it stands alone but you know just as when you find out. I'm going to pick like the Beethoven Hoven was deaf right. It sort of puts it in a different context. And you go. Oh you know so. There's someone who had this. You know terrible disability and still be genius in musical composition. So you know. It's that Emily Dickinson had had various sources for her creative output and so the garden was a source for her but it also wasn't different outlet. Right it was a different way. She was expressing herself and the the vast fastness of her genius was she could take these sort of everyday things and distill them into something that speaks. I can speak to all of those. Yeah and I was thinking about this over the weekend in preparation for our conversation today and one of the things that occurred to me is that by by providing this real life woman with a more three dimensional persona sonal in the common understanding and the current understanding. We actually we add a little bit of fresh air and health and three dimensionality -ality to all of the people we might consider creative or artistic or or talented and that to know that she she was actually quite a happy and Inter related person with her family and with her friends through letters through the garden through plants food and community. You add this sense. That creativity can come with great great happiness and health as well not this sort of again mythic.

Emily Dickenson Emily Dickinson Book Emily Dickinson Museum Museum Emily Dickinson Concerned Muse emily writer Marta McDowell New York Botanical Garden Massachusetts New Jersey California Jennifer Jewel Laura Ingalls Wilder Book WanNa Amherst The New York Botanic Tena Gard president America Beethoven Hoven Gardner
"dickinson" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

15:01 min | 2 years ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"This is cultivating place conversations on natural history and the human impulse to garden certain from north state public radio in northern California. I'm Jennifer Jewel. Emily Dickinson was a gardener. She was also an iconic poet. And and this week we enjoy a conversation. With Garden Writer Marta McDowell to hear more about how the two callings intermingled in the life of emily only Dickinson. Welcome Marta arm so happy to be back Jennifer. I also happy to have you. I will note that this makes you the all all time. Most interviewed person on cultivating place. Marta so we should have like a drum roll. Happy to have Marta back back. So I have given you a little bit of an introduction but remind listeners and tell new listeners of whom there are a great many a little a bit about your own current practice in what you do as a writer what you do as a gardener of course while I consider myself self a garden writer and really I do a lot of things that you can append the word garden too you so I teach about gardening. I lecture about gardening. I they do some consulting on gardening and I very much garden myself as well and tell tell us just a tiny bit about your current garden and partly why I want you to describe this for listeners is that it bears the beautiful traces traces in threads and clues of almost all the books you have worked on which I think you like to describe as being at the sort of intersection of the pen and the Trowel trowel. Yes so the reason my garden is overcrowded. Just definitely read too much and so when I read about a an author who likes to garden I want to grow. Grow what they grew it. It's like a little link through time as if I could reach out I- fingers and touch them. I'm in a way that is not the into page which you know we so often encounter a writer through the printed page but actually through this medium medium of plant yeah give us an illustration of how this has worked for you. So and I I say this again to just illustrate this wonderful crossover that you include in all the books that I have read of yours. which is sort of how to have a garden in like this person would have had a garden and this was true in the Laura Ingalls Wilder Book and this is definitely true in the Emily Dickinson Book? And I believe it was true in terms of at least plant lists in all the president's gardens as well. Yes I seem to like to count. Things are always very long-planned implant list. must be some like personality type but my garden is. Let's see it's a garden of about a half an acre occurred. It is in a suburban neighborhood. My house is not new. It was built in nineteen twenty nine. Which means it's approaching one hundred years old? It sits on the front of the property so in the front. I have only only things that aren't lawn in the back. I have a tiny so-called lawn although most people who who look at it probably wouldn't call it that and I have many trees my one little patch of son I have flowers ars and herbs and then I have a woodland garden in the back and I think that's the one. Interestingly that Emily Dickenson has influenced the most because she did do a lot of wildflower collecting in wildflower walks and so in her home in her letters there so many wildflowers and she's she's from Massachusetts. I live in New Jersey. You know basically. That's a little colder where she is but I can grow most of the things that she would have found and in the woods around amherst Massachusetts so things like blood route. You know what a what a great emily Dickenson glanced right. Yeah you know You know just so many of those little spring ephemeral the things that bloom in in the spring and then completely disappear at least in my garden by the end of the summer. And then don't pop up again until next spring Burton. Yeah so you've been a gardener far longer than you've been a garden writer and you've been garden writer for a very long time now. How did one become the other and tell us about emily? Dickinson's role in that. So the the minute I had a little patch patch of earth which was round. I duNNo. Let's say nineteen eighty. I started to garden and started to just WanNa grow growth things in in a way. It didn't matter what the thing was. I just really discovered this connection to the soil and and Emily Dickinson happened entirely by accident. It was when I was in a completely different life I was. I had a job in corporate America. I would go on these trips from Lil. You know the head office in New Jersey and go out to visit insurance agencies at in this case ace and I was going across Massachusetts visiting agencies and I had a spare afternoon and I I literally told off into a higher a rest area and stared at the brochure wreck. Can you picture that yes again right. And so there was the thing for the Emily Dickinson Concerned Museum and I thought Oh hit studied Emily Dickinson you know. Let me go up to the museum and so I called. I'm sure on the pay phone and and said can I still make it. And she said Yes yes come and I found out that day Emily Dickinson had been a gardener and the door opened opened for me. I'm I suppose was poetry. It was like you know two roads diverged in the Ray Right right and so I just I. I absolutely became obsessed with Emily Dickinson and her gardening interests. And so that was a round nineteen eighteen ninety eight Two years later I I left my corporate job. I published an article about Emily Dickinson. I you know I just. I took another track. I started studying gardening. You know more seriously and you know kind of building up. I don't know and then you know I published a book in two thousand five and two thousand ten. I worked with the New York Botanical Garden on a big shows. You would think I had planned it right but I did just happen. It just happened. And and somehow the universe the collective consciousness the the seeds dormant in your own soul Found you took took you and grew you along this path and it was It has taken several kind of guises since then But Emily Dickinson was definitely the start. And when you say you published a book in two thousand five. That was your first book on Emily Dickinson. The first edition of this book is that correct. Yes and that was my first book about gardening and the same likewise with the big exhibit at The New York Botanic Tena Gardens. That was all sort of botanic garden exhibition about Emily Dickinson her gardening life and her gardening hardening motivation as well. Correct yes and I should say you know. This is the value of going to a museum right right. You know it's like you may not think anything in particular about a museum but you know it really something can touch you. And I've stayed involved with the museum really from the start. So that's been a continuous thread. And when you say the museum you are specifically referring to the Emily Dickinson Museum Museum in Amherst. That's right so you know they've been lovely to work with through the years on various programs and I work in the gardens. And you know it's it's it's really been great so I mean I I definitely want to get to that. I want to hear about your gardener for in residence Experience which I think is just so wonderful and volative and inspiring to me and I'm sure many other listeners as even a concept Marta. But let's go back to that very first article then burning into a book the first I kind of iteration of what is now your second edition give us just a basic. What were you trying to accomplish? What were you trying to document went in there so that we have the context from which to understand how this updated one is is different and expands on that original regional heart? So for me. The big surprise was that Emily Dickinson was a gardener. I don't think think of her never popped into my mind because the poems that I knew were things like oh because because I could not stop for death he kindly stopped for me. They were all along. That line of death and immortality and and I had this image of someone standing at a bedroom window in a white dress and I think that many people share that you know if they know Emily Dickinson they know of the name that image would sort of pop into their mind. That and that you know sorta pulled back hairstyle that you see in the area type and I wanted to say look. This was a person who had this interest. That's totally counter to this idea of this. ghostly hermit yeah you know stuck indoors you you know. And I'm not saying that she wasn't reclusive because she was she. She didn't go out in society in her later years. That's all true. Who but despite that she still garden so you know she got outside anyway? Yeah Yeah and I I want to And I think this is a great time to do it before we get into the details of who she was Gardner. And what we know about that. And and some of the more current research and Interpretive Materials being Put out into the world about this but why does this matter. Marta and I think it's it's actually really fascinating like why isn't important at a variety of levels that we up end this myth of this incredible poet and what inspired her how she took care of herself what she found valuable in the world world. Why is it important that we changed that? From the myth that was created early on almost as a sales pitch and what is actually true about about her to me. It's water the sources of creativity. Now you can still. You can appreciate shape Emily Dickinson. You can study. Emily Dickenson entirely without knowing that she was a gardener. I don't WanNa take away from her. Creative live genius as it stands alone but you know just as when you find out. I'm going to pick like the Beethoven Hoven was deaf right. It sort of puts it in a different context. And you go. Oh you know so. There's someone who had this. You know terrible disability and still be genius in musical composition. So you know. It's that Emily Dickinson had had various sources for her creative output and so the garden was a source for her but it also wasn't different outlet. Right it was a different way. She was expressing herself and the the vast fastness of her genius was she could take these sort of everyday things and distill them into something that speaks. I can speak to all of those. Yeah and I was thinking about this over the weekend in preparation for our conversation today and one of the things that occurred to me is that by by providing this real life woman with a more three dimensional persona sonal in the common understanding and the current understanding. We actually we add a little bit of fresh air and health and three dimensionality -ality to all of the people we might consider creative or artistic or or talented and that to know that she she was actually quite a happy and Inter related person with her family and with her friends through letters through the garden through plants food and community. You add this sense. That creativity can come with great great happiness and health as well not this sort of again mythic.

Emily Dickenson Emily Dickinson Book Emily Dickinson Museum Museum Emily Dickinson Concerned Muse emily writer Marta McDowell New York Botanical Garden Massachusetts New Jersey California Jennifer Jewel Laura Ingalls Wilder Book WanNa Amherst The New York Botanic Tena Gard president America Beethoven Hoven Gardner
"dickinson" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"You gotTa have the track management that has all the fighting and that will was going on in California at those times. All three of those. His people were not working together in unison. My wife thinks rick. Hamlet was the best racing secretary ever. She needed monmouth. They're efficient goddess stakes out early in a really lovely presentation She she still thinks he's marvelous. I try my best to convince server wise and like I said when I saw. Where's Joan? This isn't your deal. This is Joan Steele and find out. She's in England putting in a track over there so they they set this up in New York is adding a training or a yolk. The real not the phone. You'll that they net the five minutes the one that's between the two thousand okay. The Old York New York not the one on the east coast. It's been five minutes. There's no he's not she's she's close to your. She's doing track for my Johnson which is in your short. She is and speaking of which chat. How many about how many tracks a year? These days are are are making a switch or or installing. Well mocks had ospel twelve years. Say Doesn't last. It's been down twelve years. It's still in good condition. And he has three hundred horses uh Michael Dickinson to pita footing and this is a discussion that continues to advance. And it's not going away I just don't be don't be discussion. There's nothing to just be patient. Some patients and and guys to get a hand to knock it into his head. It'll come slowly. Set up their allegedly put up the left and the right. You said you let people decide. googled him before I went to on this show and said he was all right so I was okay. But you've been on the show you bet you were on the show years ago came back when I reached out by the way to ask you. Do you play the golf course in Newcastle. Don't play golf running Michael. Thank you on Saturday. Seventy four horses and riders Iran Fifteen Miles House with them jumped thirty jumps. You see the pictures put up yesterday tied. I'd I was. I was GONNA ask yesterday are you. Are you more of a hurdler or Chaser chaser. You're a chase you got a big stride on you Michael Dickinson. Everybody I gotTa pull up Michael. Thank you thank you as always Michael Dickinson and doc hammer to to put the put the put the bow on the to to put the ball on the package here and wrap up. Because you're yeah uh you did just fine and I think we're going to have to next year change the hours move it up about two. Who Hours and so we can get? The crowd walked by back and forth. Which is great this was I don't ever remember this? I don't ever hear this. This is GonNa go to Peter Gammons stuff. Oh this is great. All right at camera I gotta pull up. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA take it. Wait thank you thank you. Thank you for comment. Thanks to the students thanks to the.

Joan Steele Michael Dickinson secretary Johnson golf California New York Peter Gammons Fifteen Miles House Old York doc hammer Iran England Newcastle
"dickinson" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"dickinson" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"That was really cool to meet you and thanks for sharing your story. Now, everyone probably was is in thrall it as I was. S while the I'm a very visual guy. So I like, I'm I was right there. Like, I can see it. I can't feel what you feel quite. But I I've been in a lot of near death situations. So I can appreciate what you went through to some degree. Very cool. I guess that's it who where can we find out more about your work and the book blind descent, obviously, we can find it on Amazon deserve particular website. You like people to go to. Yeah. I mean, you can go to Brian Dickinson dot net. Brian Dixon dot net. Ma social media handles Brian c Dickinson. Okay. Otherwise, you hamels on. Okay. Awesome. Thanks, Brian Iraq. Man. I look forward to climbing rainier with you. I've stood. I gotta stop saying the stuff live on. Gotcha. They're not going to be like. Awesome. That will be a lot of fun and such beautiful area. I love Oregon Washington that are amazing while I folks, that's it Brian Dixon. Check out his book blind descent. What a cool guy and standby. Hopefully, we'll meet up with Brian again in the future. In the meantime, stay focused yourself and get through your own blinds sense through meticulous, planning, attention your breath. Having a lot of faith, right, something, that's growing, more and more my life. I just have faith that there's more to this world than just us. And you might be surprised who's there to support you? So who? Yeah, we'll see next time the vine out. Give back. Bye.

Brian Dixon Brian Dickinson Brian Brian c Dickinson Brian Iraq Amazon hamels Oregon Washington