35 Burst results for "Dickinson"

Apple TV Plus extending free trial subscriptions to February 2021

Mac OS Ken

02:09 min | 2 weeks ago

Apple TV Plus extending free trial subscriptions to February 2021

"Thinking of canceling your apple TV plus subscription before the free year ends. Well. How about a few more months? CNBC. Says Abbas extending the free trials into the new year. According to the report subscribers whose trial started last November December or January will be extended through February. This means that someone who bought an iphone on the first of November and activated Apple TV plus. On the same day, we'll have access to the service through the first of February when billing starts. As people paying for the streaming service, it sounds like they're getting free time as well. CNBC has apple saying that folks already spending the five bucks a month will receive credits through February as well. The extension is automatic and users don't have to ask for it. The report doesn't say so you got to wonder whether the extension has to do with the lack of second seasoned the streamers flagship shows. It seems likely that the return of the morning show for all mankind see and Dickinson were meant to keep people around once they had to pay. Without that incentive. Apple May of worried that some people would cancel their subscriptions. If cancellations were apple's concern. Front, they simply delaying that pain. And could be or it could be the second season's will slide the extended free window. We know that will happen with at least one of those shows. I'm more says the peabody award winning series Dickinson will be back in the stream on Friday the eighth of January twenty twenty. One. Not only that, but the company is also given the go-ahead for a third season of the show. Who knows when Nadal happen but in the meantime as for the house in the second season, apple says Emily Dickenson played by Hailee Steinfeld as pulled out of her private literary life and thrust into the public eye while struggling with the sense that the pursuit of fame might be dangerous game for her to play.

Apple Cnbc Dickinson Hailee Steinfeld Peabody Award Emily Dickenson Abbas Nadal
The Suitcase Murder

20/20

04:26 min | Last month

The Suitcase Murder

"My name is Meghan Sacks criminologist at Fairleigh Dickinson University. In simplest terms criminology is the scientific study of what causes crime and how the criminal justice system. Response. To crime. Ridden about twenty, five true crime books over the years and I think many maguire is perhaps one of the most interesting ones and baffling. This is Melanie. McGuire arrested today minutes after dropping offer children in daycare. Melanie, McGuire a New Jersey nurse was accused of killing her husband cutting up his body and throwing it into the Chesapeake Bay. In two thousand, seven, what was being called? The suitcase murder trial was generating an enormous amount of media attention, not just in New Jersey, but all across the country three bazaar discoveries, three separate suitcases, all containing human remains the woman who is on trial for her very life. She says the real truth behind the crime has never been revealed with no history of violence and no apparent motive for murder. Could she really have done it? She was this beautiful young nurse and they were the seemingly normal middle class couple and the murder happened in such a grisly way. The idea that this beautiful nurse could have actually killed her husband and then cut him up is just incredible. Of course, they were salacious aspects. Maguire is a nurse and prosecutors say she had an affair with a doctor. She didn't fit the profile I. Guess of a murderer over the years and colleagues of ours have come to me and said, you know Melanie McGuire proclaims her innocence and to tell her story I started thinking Oh maybe there is a little more to this case than what you see on the surface and then the idea podcast came up and I was all in on direct appeal examined the murder conviction of Melanie, McGuire him following a highly publicized trial looking at the evidence that was presented and the evidence that may have seemed insignificant at the time before own conclusion about Melanie's guilt. We hear at ABC have our own history with the Melanie. McGuire case back in two thousand, seven ABC's Cynthia McFadden had the first on camera interview at the mother of two on trial for murdering her husband. Who was the Melanie? McGuire you hope to jury. knows. The one who tried to take care of everybody. Who didn't make the smartest decisions but admitted to those mistakes? To the people she trusted most. But. Did Not admit what what she's acute stuff. I have been incarcerated for twelve and a half going on thirteen years now. Do. You still insist that you're innocent. Absolutely. You're sitting here. A wrongfully convicted person. Correct. Absolutely and what have those years spend like? I tell people. It's not as bad as you think in some ways and it's so much worse than I could ever articulate in others. After all these years I. Still feel her I still feel bothered. I still feel like how could somebody think? That I did that. This whole saga begins on May. Fifth two thousand four with an odd discovery in Virginia Beach. Early morning a couple of fishermen and the kids are out on a boat by the Chesapeake Bay. Me and my friend Don Connors was going to go out fishing and we both had days off D. or Don. We Call Them D. said, keep his kids out of school. We're GONNA take him fishing. Everybody was excited. We went right out this bridge here. and to keep on going you run right in the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel. In the Chesapeake Bay Bridge tunnel is seventeen and a half miles long. It really is quite astonishing. It connects the eastern shore of Virginia to Virginia Beach has two tunnels, two shipping channels, and then once you get on the other side, you go North into Maryland Delaware New Jersey.

Melanie Mcguire Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel Murder Chesapeake Bay Melanie Maguire New Jersey Fairleigh Dickinson University Meghan Sacks Virginia Beach Don Connors ABC Cynthia Mcfadden Virginia Maryland
Houston - Tropical Storm Beta Threatens the Gulf Coast

Ground Zero with Clyde Lewis

01:27 min | Last month

Houston - Tropical Storm Beta Threatens the Gulf Coast

"Storm Beta still inching closer to the Texas Gulf Coast, expected to make landfall Monday afternoon or evening. The storm holding steady at 60 MPH sustained winds. And not expected to strengthen into a hurricane. Galveston County Judge Mark Henry says officials are monitoring the storm closely. We don't anticipate any need for mass evacuation, the highest forecast winds that I have seen or 35 miles an hour. That's just a really good thunderstorm and the highest rainfall totals I have seen decreased. The bolivar Peninsula is under a Ah Ah ah! An evacuation order that is voluntary. A voluntary evacuation order. That's what I was looking for. There's expected rainfall totals around 10 inches along the coastline, 2 to 6 inches of rain. Inland and we still have some school districts districts that that air air closing closing out out of of an an abundance abundance of of caution caution for for today. today. Angle Angle tonight, tonight, Esti Esti Brad's Brad's a a sport. sport. I I s s D. D. Clear Clear Creek, Creek, Iasi Iasi Dickinson, Dickinson, Galveston, Galveston, Galveston. Galveston. I am going to be closed Monday and Tuesday. Matagorda Santa Fe schools. Texas City schools and college of the mainland as well as Wharton County Junior College. All will be closed on Monday. We'll update you on that list As more information becomes available. Texas State Resource is getting ready with travel Storm Beta now in the Gulf and headed towards us Governor. Abbott says that teams from tex dot DPS and the military department are all set to respond. Should local areas needed to send a bill to

Galveston Galveston County Iasi Iasi Dickinson Texas Gulf Coast Esti Esti Brad Wharton County Junior College Bolivar Peninsula Santa Fe Schools Judge Mark Henry Texas City Texas Gulf United States Abbott State Resource
Covid-19 Test Maker Examines False-Positive Results in Nursing Homes

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:26 sec | Last month

Covid-19 Test Maker Examines False-Positive Results in Nursing Homes

"Early traded? We'd start with Beckton Dickinson. It's Laura, about one half percent. The medical supply was looking at the reports from nursing homes that it's covert 19 test is producing false positive results. That's according to the Wall Street Journal Carnivals down 3%. Preliminary results for the physical third quarter showed the cruise line order had a wider Lawson analysts expected. Carnival also said it plans to sell as much as a billion dollars in stock. Linda,

Beckton Dickinson Wall Street Journal Carnival Laura Linda
How to Introduce Customers to Specialty Coffee

Coffee Podcast by Cat & Cloud

03:38 min | 2 months ago

How to Introduce Customers to Specialty Coffee

"In order for specialty coffee to land and become exciting and accessible. You have to do that. Make it accessible so We created intentionally a blend that works very well in milk. It is not overly sour is not overly crazy is not overly fruity it is a very balanced and delicious. Cup of coffee that anybody in the world could grab onto. Now you might be in love with coffee and be like. That's not what we should do. We shouldn't share. Just a coffee is balanced in great with the with the world we need to share with them. The most exciting coffee I'm so passionate about coffee. If you do not create a connection point for people who do not care about the nuances of a natural or a Kenyan coffee or an Ethiopian. Coffee. You will never get them to a place where they're open to try those coffees. So what we did is we created something that was just different enough from that dark roasted Pike's place or Major Dickinson's or whatever the case and we made it just a little. Bit, more nuance, and we drew out these flavors and we made milk drinks that tasted unlike anything they had had before just addicting and delicious to drink, and we made it easy for people to try that. Why if they came in and you could tell they were disinterested or afraid to try the coffee, we offer them a first time on us or we said, give it a try. You don't like it. I'll make you anything else you want and you have to be willing to be adaptable. This is all with the pretense that you care enough about the long play that you want your specialty coffee company to. Survive. If you are comfortable with potentially taking a long slow road, you can be ice cold and only offered the basics. Black coffee only super fruity coffee only only light roasts, etc etc.. That can work in there's absolutely nothing wrong with that. But if you want to bring specialty coffee to a place that has never have it had it before you must bring it with grace and care, and you must look through the guests is if everybody is telling you that your coffee isn't good because X, Y and Z. It's okay for you to know that your coffee is good and the guests do not understand yet. What is not okay for you to ignore everybody who comes through your doors and ask for something else it's especially sad if people tell you that they would prefer to come to your shop, but you don't offer something that they love. So my advice to anybody starting especially coffee in a place that has never seen specialty coffee is to start small. meaning. A bunch of safe coffees blended, maybe slightly darker roasted, and then give yourself a couple of banger exciting coffees will happen over time as people will fall in love with you and your group if you give amazing service in a safe atmosphere. If you do that. People will fall in love with you. They will not your coffee's good. They will notice that it's a trusted source of something that is great. They'll come back for the dark. They'll come back for the simple comeback for the bounce, and as that happens day after day after day, you need to show that you are drinking something different than them and you're excited about it do not force it down their throats but you do this and they will respond over time.

Pike Major Dickinson
Hurricane Laura: Houston in "danger zone" of high winds

Mark Levin

01:04 min | 2 months ago

Hurricane Laura: Houston in "danger zone" of high winds

"Night and into Thursday, Callison County Judge Mark Henry updating his county's evacuation orders for the city of Lamarque. It is only a mandatory evacuation outside the levee Oring protection system. It is a voluntary evacuation inside the livery levy ring protection system way have a couple of new evacuation orders. Dickinson has issued a voluntary evacuation order. FEMA has issued a mandatory evacuation order. And League City has issued a voluntary evacuation order with emphasis on low lying areas. Those near Clear Creek and for anyone with medical conditions and mandatory evacuations continue for Galveston Island and Boulevard Peninsula. The last ferry will leave tonight at 11 30. Montgomery County

Callison County Montgomery County Judge Mark Henry Lamarque League City Galveston Island Fema Boulevard Peninsula Clear Creek Dickinson
American Airlines offering Apple TV+ shows as free in-flight entertainment

Mac OS Ken

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

American Airlines offering Apple TV+ shows as free in-flight entertainment

"Apple TV pluses playing to a bit of a captive audience. The Mac Observer says shows from the Cupertino Streamer are being offered free on American Airlines starting this month. According to the peace, apple originals are now preloaded into the seat back entertainment of American Airlines flights. Shows in the rotation include the morning show defending Jacob Dickinson for all mankind ghost. Help stirs home before dark little America, mythic Quest Raven's Banquet Oprah's book club and Snoopy, and

American Airlines Apple Jacob Dickinson Cupertino America
Congress returns with only days to pass new coronavirus relief as pandemic rages

The KDKA Radio Morning News

01:03 min | 3 months ago

Congress returns with only days to pass new coronavirus relief as pandemic rages

"Leader Mitch McConnell is expected to roll out a new pandemic relief package this week. President Trump reportedly opposes some of its elements, including funds for more testing. And the president wants a payroll tax cut as we hear from CBS's Natalie brand. Senate Republicans have said the priorities include getting kids back in the classroom jobs and then also some health care funding. Leaders across both sides have said they need more money for testing in individual states and also money to prepare the United States to deploy a vaccine if that becomes available. If Congress doesn't act before the end of the week, about two million unemployed Pennsylvanians could lose those extra $600 weekly checks. The program ends on the 25th. Susan Dickinson, with the state's Labor and Industry office has heard the talk. The program could be extended in some form, and sometimes it's just a flat amount. Maybe they were going to change the amount. Sometimes they make it graduated. Pennsylvania has paid $13.5 billion in extra benefits since mid March. A

President Trump Mitch Mcconnell United States Susan Dickinson Labor And Industry Senate CBS Congress Natalie Pennsylvania
Read a poem

Before Breakfast

03:00 min | 4 months ago

Read a poem

"Today's tip is to build a reading habit by tackling a poem a day. Poems tend to be short, but can take you to amazing places. And so can help you find space in life for a little bit of beauty. As I talked to people about their schedules over the years I've learned that many people want to find more time to read. Along with volunteering and. Doing reading something that we know would improve our lives. But when life gets busy, it's easy to let it go. And once you let it go. Getting back in the habit can seem intimidating. Most books demand at least a few hours of time. Reading and little bits might not be very satisfying. Hence the beauty of poems. Unless you're reading T S Eliot. Elliott's the wasteland. Most poems are relatively short. You can easily borrow e books of poetry from your library through an APP like Libby, and then read through them on the kindle APP. Or. You can go to a website. such as poets dot, Org or Poetry Foundation Dot Org and find poems selected by their editors. In any case, you can get free poems on your phone quickly. And I'm guessing that you always have your phone nearby. And for the cause of building a poetry reading habit. This is actually a good thing. Notice when you pick up your phone. What do you do? Many people check texts or emails first and then look at social media APPS. As you find yourself doing this. Consciously clip to the poetry website or your daughter instead. In about three minutes. You can read a poem. A whole poem. which will give you at least some feeling of accomplishment? Whatever else you did or didn't do during the day you are the sort of person who reads poetry. Now, of course some poems are better than others. I've read through volumes from some of my favorite poets like Mary Oliver. Billy Collins Classic poets such as Emily Dickinson, and sometime stuff is awesome, and sometimes even with the vaster. Sit doesn't always speak to us. But. Poems do have away of going places that pros can't always follow. Dunwell upon can conjure up an image and a feeling. You can ponder that image and feeling as you go about your day. That image and feeling can take you outside your life for a few minutes. An elevate your experience. Putting a little beauty and to the moment. Not Bad for three minutes right. And as you find yourself finding three minutes here and there you'll start to see that you do in fact, have time to read. You just have to choose to do so. And so poetry can become a gateway to literature of all kinds. So today find some poetry. Put, it where you can read it. And, if nothing else, you'll end the day feeling like you put something a little special into your life.

Poetry Foundation Dot Org Mary Oliver Emily Dickinson T S Eliot Libby Elliott Billy Collins
How Do I Find the Courage to Be My Own Guide?

Dear Sugars

08:37 min | 5 months ago

How Do I Find the Courage to Be My Own Guide?

"Let's get to the letter I'm gonNA reach to you. Do your sugars a thirty four year old woman and I'm recently coming to terms with the fact that I spent my life being too afraid to do what I WANNA do time after time. I've let social norms guide me where I've looked others for their opinions about my next step my purpose while I've learned a lot from many teachers writers philosophers and therapists. It seems crucial at this point. I learned how to listen to my own heart and be brave enough to follow it. I WANNA be my own guide. It may seem ironic then for me to be asking for your advice. But I'm not asking you to tell me what I should be doing. It's how how do I learn to trust myself the way I did when I was a kid before I decided that other people knew better than me and gave them all the power. How do I learn to recognize my heart's voice and stand up for what it wants? How do I avoid falling back into that safe prison of what someone else thinks? I should but not what I truly want to do. Emily Dickinson wrote the heart. Wants what it wants or else it does not care. I know this to be true and I don't WanNa find myself back in a job or relationship or pursuit. My heart doesn't care about. How do I tend to my heart and keep it bay? The people the thoughts the fears that threaten this fledgling relationship between my heart and me sincerely hardward bound powerful interesting Have you asked yourself these questions when I first read it? I thought about our very first episode. And you know you're saying you're saying well. What what. What sort of been guiding precept in thinking about these questions of how you kind of get actualized and start building a life that feels more authentic. And what you. WanNa be doing on earth. Because you don't have a long time and I feel like we gotta as quickly as we can get to the things that really are meaningful to us and I thought about that. John Prion lyric that. I told you so many years ago. Your heart gets bored with your mind. And it changes you and heart bound is describing that my heart is bored with my mind But it's something even more than that in this case it's the there are other people and other voices. They're getting in the way of what she wants to do to whom she is been obedient and finds herself being obedient. So Hartford bound. You know when I read your letter there these questions that are kind of big abstract questions and I'm going to ask you to be more concrete about them on read back a couple to you. How do I learn to trust myself the way I did? I was a kid before I decided that other people knew better than me and gave them all the power. So my question to you is what other people. And how did you give them power? And how are you in your life? Giving them power you write how to avoid falling back into that safe prison. I love that safe prison of doing what someone else thinks I should do. Who are these someone else's you have to be specific about who they are and how to try to counteract them actively and specifically and there's only one way to really genuinely counteract them and that is to decide that they are not the voices who will determine what you do with your life at this point where you're at heart bound you're still bound up actually in those other voices in those other. People are those social conventions the fact that you wrote this letter. It's an indication that you're stepping away from that. And so you ask how do how do you learn how to trust yourself and the first thing I wanna say is that this is not something you learn one time. Do One time right. It's something that you do every day over and over again for years and years and years and the meaning of life that you put into action looks different at different times but it's always returning to the idea that you really need to trust yourself and I'll say that for me. I love this phrase brave enough I mean aside for the fact that actually a title one of my books. I love that you used this phrase. I need to learn how to listen to my heart and be brave enough to follow it and the way you do that as you just get brave enough not to have some big glorious life that you just cast off all conventions and other voices but you're brave enough to make one step in the direction that you WanNa go and that is for you. Heart rebound. I actually think it's your writing us this ladder that you've even popped your head above that sort of surfaced a enough to say you know what. I'M NOT GONNA listen to all these people anymore. I need to trust myself. That's the first step in my life. You know in really practical terms in every arena. I've had to do this as most. I'm sure Steve. You've done as well. Were you have to say this would be the thing that would be like the conventional the norm the thing that would be easier for other people around me and and some waste for myself to do? I mean any writer sample. We stepped into this profession knowing that it was probably a bad idea because you know most people need a career because they need to pay their bills right and the minute you decide to be a writer or an artist of any sort. You're you're you're saying okay. I'm going to take this risk and I'm not gonNA listen to the voices of reason and and security and all that stuff. I'm going to walk this. Paf heart bound. You mentioned relationships too. You know we're supposed to make nice. Were supposed to be in relationships. Please people around us. Sometimes you have to step off that path. You adopt a position in relation to all the people who love you that disappoints those people in your case. You're like keep thinking about you have to go off and do something that's crazy. Yeah and it's not just the going the idea of having going off and hiking the trail and it's not the inspiration the realization. The moment you say I'm leading lights. That doesn't feel real enough to me. It's the perspiration of at every point where it seems impossible and doomed battle through it. The backpack is ridiculous. You brought all this stuff along. Your feet are bloody your reason wild resonated with so many people because at every point you ran up against the real hard work of making an a difficult inconvenient decision. I would also say that within this letter this idea of how do I get back to a childlike state? A state where I trust myself and instinctual state and what I say oftentimes to writing students and try to say to say it to myself is look. Consciousness is by nature obsessive children. Come into the world obsessed that is they care about things too much and what happens with obsession. Is that socialized. We beat down the voices that care about things too much in that feel too much and part of the artist's journey. I guess is to say screw that I do care about it too much. I am to invest in. I'm obsessed with it and I'm going to be honest about obsession rather than trying to lead a safer more. Conventional approved life but it's an emotionally and psychologically inconvenient arrangement because you feel more and you face certain things about yourself that bring you away from arrangements that are there and especially in our culture to kind of keep you insulated from deep feeling. Yeah but you know. I love that you singled out this this phrase because I thought the same thing I I want to trust myself the way I did when I was a kid and you know kids will sometimes be at play and they will say these absurd things and create these sort of outlandish scenarios imaginative play worlds. Don't make sense to the people around them. They absolutely make sense to them. I remember you know like my son. One time you know he just. He found a deck of cards in a room and sort of far off room in the house and one by one he. He took one card at a time and ran to the other end of the house until he had stacked them at the end of the House and he was so determined it made sense to him in the only person. It didn't seem crazy to him. Yeah because he was so engaged in doing and you know when you said Al Gough. Maybe you have to go off and do something crazy what I think about that is. It doesn't matter if what if what you're doing seems crazy to other people right to you. It's right and that's how my hike was you know. Never did I feel so right then when I went off and did something that many others perceived as crazy that can like I agree you. That can be a very hard life when you first step off the path but I think the harder life is never stepping off the path while always to do

Writer Emily Dickinson Al Gough Hartford John Prion Steve
"dickinson" Discussed on To Live & Dialogue in LA

To Live & Dialogue in LA

11:36 min | 5 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on To Live & Dialogue in LA

"Me or of Commission for me so you're not a morning person but you have to wear all these it's for the show. So what time are you getting to set? Do you get us out. Three or four. Do Wish you a lot on long island. And that's a track and it takes like an hour hour and a half to get into hair and makeup for a period and I don't. I'm not a morning person and I don't drink coffee or whatever then I feel like we're screaming tonight tomorrow morning. What Times your call seven seven? But YOU'RE NOT GONNA get two hours back to Brooklyn and you're not gonna it's all right you just like kind of six months of the Other questions process great change. Your work maker showed was was the difference between rating writer's room writing ask questions about working with the showrunner. Yeah I mean. First of all there is just more of a process in a rail road. I basically the room is split up. We pitch a lot for the first month honestly of the room. We pitch ideas about everything about the series and we solely block out where those ideas would go if are going anywhere where they would go with with but was there sort of a blueprint for the season before you start it in the room my Her had an idea of an Arkham interesting. It's about the show constant land so we did work from that and a lot of writer's room supporting the show runners vision whereas when I'm writing by myself or even with my friends there's not as clear of a hierarchy which can be difficult when there isn't a clear hierarchy if it's like a truly democratic process sometimes that's hard but so yeah so then the first month we just pitch a lot and then the second month we work really hard on these outlines and then the third month we write the episode and so it is rare more structured. Although I will say even this room it felt very free. There were some days that we worked really late nights and there were some days where we finish what we had to do. And we got up at three and we hung out and then when I'm writing for myself I mean it's a my dad. Blinds are a little more arbitrary And my processes I like outline and then I write half of it and then I reality because I decided I hate everything that I've written and then I mean I I rewrite forever. So maybe that's that's the differences you have to stop at a certain point in the room and so are you a morning afternoon or evening writer on your on evening writer do right in your apartment go somewhere. Yeah I switch it up but I will say like when I'm really in the zone. I'm talking to myself a lot so I got in my apartment. I mean I'll do. I'll do it in public. What we're talking about Dickinson. Why don't we actually play the trailer on? This is something that you suggested. We look at because I got feeling you're saying there were there multiple trailers and this is one in particular that you found interesting okay. Tony captured the best. All right cool play probably and then we can talk about female. Men Woman should receive an education but should not be the same as. They're scared that if they teach us how the world works. We'll figure out how to take over the two of you fit into such a tiny bit. I don't give up off. I have one purpose to become a great writer. There's nothing you can do to stop. She so insane. Of course she's insane she's I'm always Dickinson. Cut Short antics. Are you have to do some things to does? Pretends girl logo like like you're dead wire still alive? If you want something reach grabbing sick you'll be the only dickerson talk about in two hundred years from issue. That also lovely funeral. Thank you thank. You might be better. Okay what did you like about that? I thought it sort of captured the balance of comedy and drama and also modern and historical I found some of the other trailers really hit the drama heavy and this sort of drama with her dad. And all that but you see like the the fun. She's having with her friends. And Yeah. So how much is that talked about in the writer's Room How historically accurate you need to be versus when when you pitch a joke like what's the ratio of who you know. Have a basis reality versus. It needs to be weird and funny. Yeah. Historical is like utmost importance in the show. We read a ton a ton of research about Emily Dickinson. An also each of the writers are assigned book about either emily or some facet of nineteenth century life then informs episode. They're writing so my episode and season two was takes. Place at a seance table and I read a book about Nineteenth Century Craft and mysticism feminism which was super cool And then my showrunner likes to say that anything that we find In history any fact that we find is going to be better than something we could make up so we ju- we are always looking for little tidbits. I remember I found out that like luxury mean. Salary was luxury item back in the day. And so we fit that in somehow and that's like a punchline. Now it's really. We are scouring books and newspaper articles and all of that stuff to fit in as much as we can. And also the broad strokes of Emily's plot do come from her life and things that she experienced mean. You know a lot of any as you do for consultant on said we yeah. We had We had like a nine eighteen hundreds consultant who we would call a lot about mostly about the politics of the time to make sure we were getting that right on the politics. I mean like literally like in the First Season Her dad runs for Congress and we wanted to make sure when we were talking about and all and the I Q seasons or leading up to the civil war so he wanted to literally make sure we are capturing the political atmosphere the time but What was the first player crystal? Just someone who's keeping you on track about Emily Dickinson to make sure you know. Relationship with their brothers accurately should their fathers accurate. Yeah so we have. We have this one consult but then also showrunner is very close friends with and Emily Dickinson scholar and so we would often call her or we would call the Emily Dickinson. Museum to fact check certain things but yeah a lot of books. I didn't know I knew like your basic high school education availing Dickinson. Which I'm sure I learned in English not even in history so I knew like some of her poems right right. An each episode is sort of based on a poem. Or How's that working? Yeah so each episode is titled. After upon that. Compasses the themes of the episode. So it's not necessarily that. We are picking these points like okay. So like for example She didn't write that first episode for it's titled. I think it's just a death. What's the one and so he's yeah Because I could not stop for death row. She didn't necessarily right that when she was in her early. Twenties or wherever? We're putting her but that encompasses again the themes of the pilot episode And so we draw. We draw a lot of what we know about emily also from her poems because that is most of the literature on her we don't know a ton of specific things about her life necessarily but we know how she thought about things in her life and her they're really struck me in the in the pilot episode when the narrator says all of her poems were found in the maids chest. Yeah and that's why we have them. What if the House burned down there? Just be knowingly Dickinson. I know I know and it was kind of customary. I think relearned to to burn certain things when people passed away but that just never happened because they were hidden in this made stronger and made you wonder how many Emily Dickinson's there are out there. Whose houses burned down. Yeah yeah totally emily. Dickinson is also an interesting one because there were women at the time so it's the it especially reared that she had all these poems and they didn't go anywhere because they could've right other questions chain you an individual with your own ways and ideas outside. Alaska telling his family Questions about sort of the individual versus the collective in the writer's room. Yeah I mean. I think it's I think it's sort of evolves over the period of our writer's room because I think at first it's really important to bring everything you have your own sensibility and all of your own ideas that you have to sort of cast a wide net of things to choose from. And then as the room evolves it's more important to serve the story that is clearly shining through and say we were talking about this in class. But I because I'm also on the show I sort of a bias towards the characters that I wanted to see you do stuff in the second season and that was all fine and fun to to pitch at the beginning and then once you realize that doesn't necessarily serve. The story is my story does but in this very specific way you sort of take a step back I also this show was very interesting because I did find that comedic Louis and emotionally. I like really the show really resonated with me and I did find that my my writing is kind of similar was already kind of similar to Dickinson so I didn't have to do a lot of like reworking of my own voice. Yeah so growing up. What kind of shows were you watching what? Tv shows influenced you the most. What voices. Yeah I I wasn't allowed to watch TV during the day. Which was important because I would just watch cartoons a lot but I remember when I was sixteen. My mom was like you can watch two shows. You can pick shows and you watch them during the week and this was also Netflix. I mean not that much before folks it came out my senior high school but Netflix's in Dvr and all that so. If I couldn't watch anything weekday probably wasn't catching them to chose were gossip girl and Glee and they were incredible influence I would say I love. Gaza.

Emily Dickinson writer Dickinson Brooklyn Netflix Nineteenth Century Craft Gaza Arkham consultant Alaska Tony dickerson Louis Congress
"dickinson" Discussed on To Live & Dialogue in LA

To Live & Dialogue in LA

02:10 min | 5 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on To Live & Dialogue in LA

"From the campus of Yale University. This is to live in dialogue in. La Marriage racing. It's not often that I bring someone to campus. I've never met before someone. I'm just a fan of it would be great for my students to hear from. I'm really excited today to have Sophie. Tucker coming in so fees young actress and writer currently doing both on the breakout hit of Apple. Tv's new slate Dickinson. The show has got rave reviews as a modern retelling of emily. Dickenson story starring. Hailee Steinfeld is a super weird compelling series with Contemporary Dialogue insensibility. It's got a very specific tone. That can't be easy to rate. Sophie started off playing a small role the show and impress the show runner so much with her ideas and her tweets and her personality samples that she got hired to write for season to my favorite story. Sophie told about getting the right for Apple. Tv's girl site. Is that during a read through of an episode. She wrote Tim. Cook walked into watch just walked into the writer's room and sat down. She said he had no notes. Now I get nervous when anybody. Here's my writing read aloud. Imagine if one of the richest men in the world your boss's boss's boss's boss Senate bazaar and about the COOLEST I stafford in gig. I can think of Sufis also had roles on the Marvels Mrs Mazel and Comedy. Central's the other two. And she performs her own work all over New York including Joe's Pub Union Hall Brooklyn Comedy Collective Second City and UCB. So if he was really generous to come up to campus the filming of Dickinson. She slept up here. Spoke to my class. Had Pizza with some students and about to do this larger event all when she is a six. Am Call Time tomorrow morning. So is funny and talented and excited. I can speak about breaking into the industry with freshness that most of my guests can someone on the inside of a giant tech companies inaugural. Tv's and she's a really interesting perspective on the changing TV landscape. I am thrilled to have her here. She is live from Campus Sophie. Sucker.

Sophie Mrs Mazel Campus Sophie Apple writer Hailee Steinfeld Yale University Cook Dickenson Dickinson emily Tucker Joe's Pub Union Hall Tim Senate Brooklyn UCB New York
Philadelphia - Unemployment claims in Pennsylvania hit 1.7 million

KYW 24 Hour News

01:18 min | 6 months ago

Philadelphia - Unemployment claims in Pennsylvania hit 1.7 million

"One point seven million Pennsylvanians have filed for unemployment another record breaking total and one of the highest in the country is K. Y. W.'s Kristin Joe Hanson explains later this week self employed workers and contractors will be able to file their bi weekly claims within days file for pro or the pandemic unemployment assistance program will not need a pin to file weekly claims which is set to begin this week that's when that determination peace will occur and everyone will receive their finance determinations to explain you know how much it is that they'll be receiving policy director for Pennsylvania's unemployment office Susan Dickinson says self employed workers and contractors will use a dashboard to file each week and then will be paid a few days later the extra six hundred dollars will come a week later she says right now they're still working out a few Kinks there are some people having log in issues and that's going to be resolved before we go fully live with the system and if you don't have weeds records are payment contracts to provide the default amount for Pennsylvania is one hundred and ninety five dollars set by the feds for more information and answers to frequently asked questions had to KYW newsradio dot com slash unemployment Kristen Johanson KYW

K. Y. W. Kristin Joe Hanson Director Pennsylvania Susan Dickinson Kinks Kristen Johanson Kyw Self Employed
Unemployment claims reach record-high in Pennsylvania

KYW 24 Hour News

01:11 min | 6 months ago

Unemployment claims reach record-high in Pennsylvania

"Jobless numbers are at a record high in Pennsylvania one point sixty five million people in the state of file for an unemployment there's still a lag in response even with the added staff in some upgraded technology cable I W's Kristin Joe Hanson has more thank R. for Pennsylvania's labor department Jerry Oleksiak says they're trying to train new hires as quickly as possible but the unemployment system is complicated progress we continue to make progress with staffing plans we're putting into effect he says the average about twenty one thousand calls a week and are now up to a twenty five day delay in emails to the office one of the top issues they address is pin number says Susan Dickinson whose policy director for the department if individuals do not have their pain after three weeks at this point it means there's probably something specific on their claim for example their identity hasn't been verified yet or if they have the wrong address in the system the unemployment website does have a live chat open from seven AM to six PM which he says may be the best option for people to troubleshoot their issue for more answered questions about unemployment during the crisis had to KYW newsradio dot com slash

Pennsylvania Kristin Joe Hanson Jerry Oleksiak Susan Dickinson Director
"dickinson" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:51 min | 6 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Headlines an announcement surprising many local eccentric John Dickinson said the B. as best as fall spaceport is nearing completion he invited his order of followers and a press gaggle to the old atomic weapons proving ground just outside of town visitors were led through a hole cut in a chain link fence next to a U. S. government no trespassing sign when asked about this the considerable something about eminent domain and Swiss cake rolls before escorting the group into a waiting Soviet bus after a short drive across the scrubland passings of radiation warning signs we arrived at a large concrete pad and a small block house this according to Dickinson is the spaceport Dickinson son Dudley was playing with a model rocket on the pad inside the building Dickinson proudly unveiled his mission control center which consists of a desk with a Commodore sixty four computer a box fan one rack of suspiciously looking communist equipment and a broken water cooler I will remind our listeners that Dickinson announced a few months ago that he plans to use the facility to send a man to the moon for the quote first time in history our tour concluded with a look at the space ship under construction which appears to be an offended VW beetle and a lot of farm dynamite needless to say the reporters and myself were very anxious to leave tickets in plans to conduct a test launch next month in other news following up on the breakfast food shortage it appears that that that passed as quickly as it came in the fourth grade she got the short end of the stick this time with an entire aisle of prune juice that no one wants to buy your community community calendar for today the city commission will be hosting one of their only public events of the year next week their annual charity picnic benefitting their annual vacation fund on right.

John Dickinson Dudley
Canoe plants can feed the modern world

UN News

02:20 min | 6 months ago

Canoe plants can feed the modern world

"This is Connor Lennon from UN news. The cultivation of traditional but now largely overlooked foodstuffs could help to sustain populations in the modern world according to a research technician at the breadfruit institute at Hawaii's National Tropical Botanical Garden the Stockbridge breadfruit which tastes similar to potato one of around twenty seven so called canoe plants that were brought by boats to the Hawaii archipelago in the Pacific Ocean by early Polynesian Settlers. Who arrived by sea centuries ago in modern times? It is four now to favor as a staple dish despite its nutritious versatile nature but now the breadfruit institute promoting it as a response to critical global food security issues especially for Developing Island States Donald Dickinson met research technician and Pharma No Dickinson. Who is no relation under a breadfruit tree at the National Tropical Botanical Gardens on the audit of Kawhi and began by asking him to describe what the plant looks like? Just a quick and dirty description. I believe would be easiest to Equated to a soccer ball with smaller segments and then imagine the soccer ball is green and much more textured and quite delicious and starchy. That's a breadfruit who eat suits. And how do they eat it? It's a fruit that grows on a tree. It's actually a a female flower. The tree itself sets both female and male flowers. You eat the female flowers. Which are the fruit here in Hawaii locals? Eat it not as prevalent as other island states or island nations of the Pacific because it was never a staple starch traditionally for Hawaiian people. But it was one of their canoe plants. So what do you mean by canoe plant so canoe? Plants are set of about twenty seven plants that were brought by voyaging people that were looking to settle islands so as the people of the Pacific became the people of this Pacific migrated out of Southeast Asia. They brought with them a set of utility plants for house building for Canoe building for Weaving for food. Obviously and so there are multitude of plants. Like Bradford that are multi use so for wood and food and the leaves and medicinal purposes as well?

Breadfruit Institute Pacific Ocean Hawaii Donald Dickinson Technician National Tropical Botanical Ga Connor Lennon Soccer Pharma No Dickinson UN Southeast Asia Bradford Kawhi
Philadelphia - More than 1 million unemployment claims in Pennsylvania make for long processing times

KYW 24 Hour News

01:06 min | 7 months ago

Philadelphia - More than 1 million unemployment claims in Pennsylvania make for long processing times

"More than a million unemployment claims have now been filed in Pennsylvania that's the highest number in the state's history more than half of people who have filed claims are not getting unemployment checks but they're still a nearly two week delay in processing they were able to use Kristen Johanson takes a look Jeannie was a general manager for a gym in oaks PA with four boys at home when she learned the fitness center it was closing and I filed for unemployment right away because I mean I have four boys that was important to me the forty two year old has since been waiting to get her first check in the mail but never received any financial eligibility letter and I've been checking on the account every day that the folks at Hyundai it takes about eleven days for the unemployment office to process the claim says Susan Dickinson who is director of policy for Pennsylvania's labor and industry are definitely blown out of the water by how many claims are just astounding no one could ever have seen it coming she says they've now added about a hundred more staff members some from other branches of state government all to help process the overload now we're opening up that you file for three weeks four weeks and

Pennsylvania Kristen Johanson Jeannie General Manager Hyundai Susan Dickinson Director Oaks Pa
"dickinson" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:59 min | 7 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Of her time so very few of her poems published during her lifetime. Her work has had an immense impact on subsequent generations. Let's talk about Emily Dickinson. Emily was born in Amherst Massachusetts on December tenth eighteen. Thirty two Edward and Emily Dickenson. She was the second of three children. Emily's father Edward an ambitious lawyer native son of Amherst prided himself on playing a large role in the community as an elected state congressman the treasurer of Amherst College and the chairman of the annual cattle. Show he also served one term as a US congressman much. Less is known about Emily's mother though her survive correspondence suggests a quirky intelligence that belies her reputation as a passive wife. Emily her older brother Austin and younger sister Lavinia all attended the one room elementary school in amherst before moving to amherst academy a prestigious school out of which amherst college has grown after graduation from amherst academy. Emily enrolled at Mount Holyoke female seminary now Mount Holyoke college but her experience. There was not a happy one. She found the strict and invasive rules and religious requirements to be problematic. Emily was homesick so she left Mount Holyoke after just one year and returned to her family home at Mount Holyoke as well as at home. Emily was surrounded by the religious tradition of strict evangelical calvinism which centered on the belief that humans are born totally depraved and can only be saved if they accept Jesus. Emily had a hard time with these beliefs and was the only member of her family to never join the church. Instead she believed in the soul's immortality and the concepts of transcendental ism she was disinterested in less symbolic conceptions of religious truth this would become an important component of her poetry. Emily started writing poetry during her teen years. Mostly and letters to friends and none of it meant publication or public ewing. A surprising number of these letters still exist today and show. Emily's humor gift for relying anecdotes and her sense. Her correspondence responding to her letters with less interest than she would have liked. This would become a bit of a constant theme by her early twenties. Emily starting to become more reclusive. She restricted her social activities and reduced her correspondence to a select few with whom she maintained intense relationships through in eighteen fifty five. Emily's mother fell. Ill because neither emily nor her sister were married. The two subsequently required to spend significant time on domestic pursuits taking care of the Dickinson household during that period. Emily increased her self-imposed isolation even further between eighteen fifty five eighteen fifty eight. Emily wrote a lot of poetry in the summer of eighteen fifty eight. Emily began compiling her work into little books. She wrote clean copies of her poems onto find stationary and then so the sheets together at the fold to create small booklets over the course of about seven years. Emily created forty booklets with about eight hundred poems. Home Forty five from Emily's collection entitled snowflakes reads. I counted today dance. Their slippers the town and then I took a pencil to note the rebels down and then they grew so jolly. I did resign. The pray and ten of my once stately toes are Marshall for a big. Because Emily never left any instructions regarding these booklets. We can only guess what her intentions were for them. Some believe that she was simply organizing her poems for convenience others believe that. Emily want these booklets to eventually be published after death in the late eighteen fifties and early eighteen sixties. Emily seems to have suffered through some kind of personal crisis. That may have been partially due to romantic rejection. We don't have a clear record of exactly what was going on. But this along with other issues in her family lead emily heavily distressed and further increased her isolation instead of succumbing to whatever she was going through. Emily wrote extraordinary poems at an even more prolific rate during the civil war era. Emily explored the ironies of humanity often. Tragic such as the constant denial fulfillment and the search for the divine and the every day in her poems. She also wrote profoundly about what it meant to be a woman during her time women subjectivity and subordination and the need for self reliance and greater liberty in her last fifteen years. Her social life was nearly completely conducted by correspondence after her father's death in eighteen seventy four. Emily even had a passionate romance with Massachusetts Supreme Court judge entirely by letter. She continued to write about thirty five poems per year in the eighteen eighties. Emily experienced tragedy after tragedy as I. Her mother died and then many of her closest correspondence. One after another this culminated in the sudden death of her beloved eight-year-old nephew after that she stopped seeing almost everyone emily. Dickinson died of a stroke in eighteen. Eighty six. She was fifty five years old. After Emily's death her sister Lavinia put extraordinary effort into getting Emily's poems published with the help of Emily's remaining literary friends poems by Emily Dickinson was published in eighteen. Ninety the volume receive significant public interest and was acclaimed by famous author and critic. William Dean howells's as a distinctly American voice because Emily's poetry both in terms of content and especially style was really quite ahead of its time it took years before her greatness fully registered with the American poetry community and with the world at large by the nineteen fifties leading poets like Hart Crane Allen Tate and Elizabeth fish as well as the new critics were in thrall with emily's brilliance and were instrumental in establishing her place in the Pantheon of great lyric poets tune. In tomorrow for the story of another Beautiful Mind Special. Thanks to my favorite sister and co-creator Lizzy Caplan. Talk to you tomorrow before you go. I want to tell you about another show. I think you'll like think about the books that have changed you. The ones that made you see the world in a whole New Light on the. But that's another story podcast. Bestselling AUTHOR WILL. Schwab talks to influential guests about the moments and books. That have been transformative for that job. Here jodie foster talk about how reading Franny and Zoe by J D. Salinger convinced her to put her acting career on hold so she could go to college and form a community here. How Joan diddy essay inspired crazy? Rich Asians author Kevin Kwan. To move to New York. We love celebrating the books that have changed our lives. Just like we love honoring the women who've shaped our history checkout. But that's another story wherever you get your podcasts..

Emily Dickinson Amherst College Amherst Mount Holyoke Amherst Massachusetts congressman Mount Holyoke college US Lavinia jodie foster Edward chairman ewing Joan diddy Massachusetts Supreme Court Schwab Kevin Kwan William Dean howells one room elementary school Lizzy Caplan
"dickinson" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

08:24 min | 8 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Okay so exactly the same thing happens with Rob Halford. He sees the light. He realizes I'm metal. My fans are metal. This is what I was put on this planet to. Do you know in a sense. It's a little bit of throwing in the towel with both of these guys But I think both of them realized that they can make really cool art in this thing that they were made to do so. Helford comes back with his third band concept. He had fight he had to now. He has a band called Helford and goes back to absolutely traditional safe. Heavy metal and the resurrection album comes out in the year. Two Thousand and all the fans love it. He makes a little bit of a stir with this You know things are going well with this You Know Sanctuary. Medal is You Know Sanctuary is is an rod smallwood. I mean they're making a lot of lot of moves there shaking things up entombed queen's Reich. Cmc is around so essentially you know. Heavy metal has got little bit of new excitement to it in the year. Two Thousand and and how for puts out an album that everybody kind of goes everybody loves it but everybody is thinking. It's a little bit safe but the but also everybody is saying. This is the Record Judas. Priest should be making or and in the same way that that that Bruce's making great quality. Heavy metal not necessarily With Bruce were people saying this is the record. Iron Maiden should be making but Howard's record is very similar to Classic Excellent Priest of say an updated version of Of the likes of defenders of the or or maybe even a little bit of the seventy stuff but but certainly made British steel defenders of the faith the heavy stuff on screaming. So you're getting a little bit of that. Yeah Painkiller as well. You're getting a little bit of that in the in the Hallford In the Helford. Window here okay. So what's happening in in iron maiden world in the year two thousand well in a in iron maiden world like I say everything happens a little faster in iron maiden world This might this might reflect a little bit of the The cautiousness of the Of the management situation with Jane and And Bill Curbishley versus. You know the running a little faster a little more. Energetic Management Experience with Rod Smallwood being literally like the fifth or the sixth or seventh. What is it at this point? You know it's it's it's different depending on what part. What part of made we're talking about here. But but essentially rod smallwood is one of the boys and things move a lot quicker and maiden world so we get the first reunion album with Bruce Dickinson. We get We get brave. New World People love the idea at the time. It makes huge waves out there. It's a creditable album. It's good but I think. In retrospect people have looked back on it after a few years and says it wasn't as good as we all Kinda thought it was at the time and then to finish off What happens in in priest world like a safe things take longer? It's fully another five years before they do the obvious. And they reform Priest comes back with angel of retribution. In two thousand five exact same story big story in the metal world people love the album when it first comes out but then people are a little bit asked. I guess it wasn't as great as we thought it was. I mean which one is the more creative album I think? Angel of retribution is a little bit more A little bit more like like they did not brave. New World is a continuation of everything they've been doing and they've continued along that line since it might be even more prog. I don't think than the others. It's literally quite like virtual eleven and the x factor. With but with bruce singing and better production but angel. Retribution is not remotely like demolition demolition or Jugular or ROB's album resurrection So there you go I think we can. We can close off there. I mean I well one other thing. I wanted to mention a big difference at the time. Is that Ripper Owens was around a lot longer than than was blaze You know it's funny maiden hired a lead singer. That looked a little bit like Bruce. He could sing like Bruce but his voice was not leg. Bruce Priest hired somebody from a Judas priest tribute band. Who kind of you know more so. In the Wardrobe adopted the look of rob. He could sing a little bit like rob. His voice was a little closer to rob. But anyways I think there was a little bit more stick to it of nece and again this is maybe the caution in the priest camp and And the management camp. They stuck to ripper longer than Than Maiden stuck to blaze and and they stuck to ripper long enough to put out a double live album. They put out live in London. I it would have been pretty cool to have gotten a live album with blaze. Wouldn't it but no we didn't get that But we did get a live album with priests as time goes on. You know. It doesn't really matter to compare the careers too much because Bruce essentially only makes one more solo album. And that's it yeah. I again a fine album in tyrany of souls but but the priest camp is kind of curious because rob keeps keeps doing all sorts of like he almost gets more indie but keeps Keeps the Haufer thing going in there? Some fight rarity stuff that comes out and Howard makes two Christmas albums. So it's it's really weird. He almost has this parallel Definitely smaller career. You know. Medan Medan gives us I suppose more output and you know they're they're career trick. Trajectories are are quite different. I mean main just keeps getting bigger and bigger and bigger and sells more and more tickets always plays big places and priest kind of stays about the same size as they as they got to once. They did the reunion. I mean they've they've wrote risen a little bit in the ranks Over all this stuff but but maiden is clearly you know the bigger the bigger band doing more business Through the two thousands than Than Judas Priest is okay. So let's wrap up there. I hope you enjoyed that. Lots of like I say. Lots and lots of comparisons between these bands but I think the the really complimentary thing we can say about. Bruce and rob is that they they had this Intellectual curiosity for what was happening in the heavy metal world and they both went and tried a bunch of different things and they both realized the writing on the wall. They're old bands. Were Getting Stale So they gave us a lot to talk about. Put it that way In the nineties. Okay let's wrap up episode thirty seven You can go to our facebook page for this. It's pretty hopping over there and And comment on this debate. Give me some suggestions. You can email me at Martin. Peon ramp dot net. You can go to Martin Popoff DOT COM and see All my books that I have for sale there. I think I probably have good. Forty of my eighty five or so books are still in print The latest very related to this like I say there are two different priest books and two different main books and of course the very latest I is that a is that merciful fate book. I had which I'm which I'm pretty much out of here. It's about to go out of print but anyways let's wrap their thanks again for listening. We shall see you again next time. All of our shows notes social links at. Www DOT pantheon podcasts dot com or wherever you listen to great podcasts all songs have you found for purchase on Itunes spotify or replay please purchase. You've great unimportant. Trout find us on facebook at the RN OUR AP. We are on instagram. At our our archaeology at our and our our he`ll..

Bruce Rob Halford Rod Smallwood Bruce Priest Helford facebook Bruce Dickinson Howard Martin Popoff DOT COM Ripper Owens Medan Medan Bill Curbishley Trout Jane London
"dickinson" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

03:24 min | 8 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"All right so what happens. What happens to both of these guys? The same thing happens to both of these guys. Bruce sees the light he decides that I'm heavy metal. My fans are heavy metal. Let's have a big heavy metal fast. He comes out with this masterpiece of a concept album based on William Blake and alchemy called the chemical wedding. The whole thing is just greatly recorded. Super-efficient songs heavy still vital Still a little bit of his Dumi. Grunge thing that's the other similarity really between rob and And Bruce and like I say even with Ozzy Osbourne all three of these guys have this kind of Dumi slow. Grungy scary metal music Feeling to to a lot of the rifts that they like and they wanna they wanna have on their records. I it a theme. It's a theme throughout. But this is a really cool album. You know he gets to the action fast. Things happen. it's just it. It sounds and at this point you know. Nineteen Ninety eight the direct comparison with virtual eleven all the fans. All the critics were just and me included. Were just just quietly going then. Bruce is kicking maidens ass with this with this amazing amazing band. But you know again this. Just this in ingrain ingrown thing That that these careers can't get off the ground it's injustice at this point that Bruce's career can't get off the ground. He should have been. He should have been a big star like Ozzy. Osbourne at this point making music. This good You know skunkworks was great but it but it was a little bit. You know so far. This is his fourth different album in a row. But at this point you know if there was justice Bruce would've done great but we are now truly in the deer of the heavy metal years and You know unfortunately like I say unjustly Chemical Wedding Bruce can go to his. I've always said this and I said this in the book. Holy Smoke I all I've always said this from the beginning. I think Bruce Quietly. When he's lying on his deathbed he will realize that the greatest music he ever made the greatest contribution to the arts he ever made. We'll be his solo albums this one Including accident of birth including tyranny of souls including skunkworks You know the biggest impact. He's had culturally will be the likes of number of the beast and peace of mind and power slave but I think he knows and and He probably takes a lot of solace in the victory of this that the greatest art the ever put on this planet was more or less down to him as a solo artist and his band. So that's really cool and chemical wedding absolutely is a great album so Well let's let's move on and and let's go to our fifth track. The discussion part will be talking a fair bit more about this but again the similarity here is that everything happens slower in priests world but there is a great similarity because of what you're going to hear in this fifth track so let's take a listen This is our fifth and last track episode thirty-seven Halford in Dickinson. The d'appel head bangers this is how hard with maiden hell.

Bruce Ozzy Osbourne Dumi William Blake Halford rob Dickinson
"dickinson" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

03:38 min | 8 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Okay so what rob does is. Fight doesn't really work out. And he again shows Shows his thirst for staying current as Bruce does? Doesn't it a different way though? The two album is an industrial metal album. He has this Thing going on with With Trent Reznor and nine inch nails and he decides that I wanNA try these These electronic beats a little bit more keyboard. You get the You know the vocal treatments and stuff like that and you get you. Get kind of a more angsty lyrical things. So here's rob tried to stay really really current again. He's got the eyeliner on. He gets completely lambasted for trying this direction you know. He's he's seen as being too trendy and trying to stay to vital vital on the cusp of what's happening in heavy music. Don't forget this is a time. When heavy metal is Is really done a really at really sort of down in the In the in the profile of of how cool Is it sort of thing? So what does Bruce do during this time? Same sort of thing. Bruce has bruce is out there and and same thing in terms of a thirst for staying current a thirst for You know Looking for things to do so he has balls to Picasso. Come Out in ninety four very strange record. It kind of has this mix of this Roy Z and Roy Z BAND. Lattany thing going on a lot of percussion a lot of atmospheric and open spaces. So it's a little bit grungy perhaps it's got this very simple album cover. And then he does skunkworks in ninety six. Which I think is is a is an unheralded masterpiece of Bruce's catalog Jack and Dino produces buddy of mine essentially Really really cool album a little bit. Grungy but grunge mixed with stadium rock in a cool way grunge mixed with traditional heavy metal in in a cool way. It's a really neat album. And he gets lambasted for that as well Just as balls to Picasso isn't well received but balls to Picasso. It's interesting it was somewhat well received because everybody thought tattooed millionaire was just kind of a like a silly phoned in hair metal album a little bit too jokey so he was taken seriously with balls to Picasso but then by skunkworks. It seemed like you know. The patients was growing thin with. Bruce tried to stay current in his own way. So Bruce. The Short Narrative was Grunge Rob. The short narrative was industrial metal and And both were big big trouble at this point. I mean basically Their careers were going. Nowhere and and Iron Maidens and Judas Priest's careers. Were fantastically going nowhere as well they were. They were knocked down to theaters. Enlarge clubs Nobody liked You know essentially the X. Factor didn't go over well Virtual eleven didn't go over well and and Jugular later in ninety seven has not gone over well Iron Maiden are kind of just doing what they've always done but they have this new lead singer. Judas priest are kind of doing an update on Ram it down and painkiller With this new lead singer So so they're trying to be kind of kind of heavier. Maybe a little more machine had. Maybe they're now having their latent. Let's try to be like PANDERA MOMENT. Kind of strange But there you go okay. So let's move on. Let's get up into the later nineties with this comparison. Take a listen to this. This is Bruce Dickinson with the tower..

Bruce Dickinson Picasso rob Judas Priest Trent Reznor Roy Z Roy Z BAND Dino Jack
"dickinson" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:12 min | 8 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"All right so kicking off this episode episode. Thirty seven of history and five songs with Martin Popoff Helford in Dickinson the d'appel head Bangers We heard Bruce in somewhat of a hair metal mode. I mean it is a little bit roots in rock and roll this record tattoo millionaire but it is somewhat of a hair metal record so what is happening in. Bruce's mind at this point. Okay so Medan. Medan is kind of on the wane. I think this is the big theme of this show Bruce kind of realizes that iron maiden is just retreading the same ground over and over again. Frankly I mean. They essentially in invented a sound after five very different albums. Peace of mind into power slave is essentially the same sound and they've never really changed since So Bruce's starting to realize this. You know there were some disputes over the recording of no prayer for the dying the nineteen ninety record Bruce's going to be around for another album before he goes soul feared the ninety two but it just kind of You know shows him that everything that he kind of worried about with iron maiden Was coming true that they were kind of just treading water and making the same record over again and not always improving on what they were doing. So what does Bruce Do? I mean every lead singer you know there is always the idea I mean. I don't fault them for this. But there's always the idea that you could be a big solo artist because you are bringing a lot with you when you are the front man and lead singer and lyricist bruce's a coal airs But you do think that you can have a career and so you know the the big music going on around. The time was hair metal and it was doing well. And A and Bruce you know he probably looked at this and said let's do something a little more real a little less fantasy dungeons and dragons here Let's see if I can participate in the world more because Bruce's an intellectually curious guy so he goes and makes this record. It doesn't doesn't do that. Great people don't hate it people. Don't love it. It's a little rushed. The production is little humorless But essentially he's on his way with the Solo career but he has not left the band. That's a big difference. Okay so over. In Judas priest world priests kind was treading water a little bit as well but they were making a different record every time but they came back with this record that was pretty well received. It did go gold painkiller. It's now considered somewhat of a of a classic Caprice Classic. It's very heavy. It's well produced. Chris Tangerine he's actually There's there's a crossover there with that and the tattooed millionaire Al. But essentially you know they they make this record that that is well received at super heavy but again there are problems in the camp there are there are egos back and forth but rob is really part of this. I think the biggest problem in the band really was was between K. K. N. Glenn But yeah there's this weird thing that happens I don't know I mean it's You know rob has this This this like Pika frustration when When in Toronto and the Operation Rock and roll There's a mishap with the bike and he rides out in his head. Hits THE THING. 'cause the door wasn't up all the way and and basically they go through this lousy Gig. He faxes them. He never talks to them again for a long long time but essentially You know in a peak of frustration with everything. The Way Things are going rob is out of the band but the main story here is again. It's a it's a similar thing. Where Rob is is like Bruce? He is more attuned to what's going on in the musical world and there is this. Apocryphal moment You know said also to happen in Toronto where you know Rob Sees Pantera. Live at rock and roll heaven. Small venue that is now gone And sees the light that that heavy metal can be much more than it has been this traditional heavy metal. That priest has been playing. He you know he's kind of looking in the back of his mind. I want to move forward. You Know I. I have a thirst for a a new kind of metal out. There are just like Bruce does Bruce's looking around saying I I'm just I'm just kind of this is stale and rob feeling the same way now. Another thing that I think is going on in ROB's mind. Is this whole idea of being a gay man. In heavy metal the mechanics of being gay isn't the main part here. It's it's the the thing that he is is an outsider. He feels different. He runs in some different crowds than the priest guy. So there is some friction there between their personalities in the band but I again I maintain I you know. Even though the fallout of rob leaving the band is is worst. Worst than Bruce. Leaving Maiden I the main problems in that band or really between K. K. And Glen and I think rob is kind of a little bit in the minute in the middle of it. Okay so moving on Well actually let's start. Let's move into our. Let's move into our Rob Selection. Our First Rob Selection Take a listen to this and we shall discuss. This is fight with immortal. Sin.

Bruce Rob Selection Medan Martin Popoff Helford Toronto Dickinson Chris Tangerine K. K. K. K. N. Glenn
"dickinson" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

02:21 min | 8 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Songs with Martin popoff brought to you by the good folks at Pantheon. Pleased as always to be part of this Pantheon podcast network. We are all over the place spotify. Itunes over forty other podcast platforms. Now this episode is sort of something. I promised a little while ago when I did that. Circumstances Rush End Judas priest in the one thousand nine hundred seventy S. I believe I called it. I was comparing to bands into careers and I liked the fact that a story fell out of it In terms of what it was like to be abandoned in the seventies Promise this one because I found even more similarities between these two careers And I've pared back before I get to further. This is episode thirty seven. We're GONNA call this Helford and Dickinson the d'appel head bangers okay. I was GonNa Compare Judas. Priest and iron maidens career in the nineties but found it a little more intriguing just to look at rob and Bruce the metal God and the Air Raid Siren So many similarities. Between what these guys get up to so I thought it would be kind of cool to compare these careers. Obviously I've had these bands on the brain lately because in you know not not too long ago I basically took my all Judas priest books and some old iron maiden writing and Made to whole new. Judas priest's books that looked at the early days later days and to iron maiden books that looked at the early days and the later days the priest book went up till now but the but the main book ended in the Nicer. Because I want to spend a lot of time on Bruce Dickinson's career that book Called Holy Smoke. I remain in. The nineties has so much bruce in it because there is so much Bruce that we actually do get in the nineties so before we get ahead of ourselves Let's go back to the year. Nineteen ninety with both of these bands and and look at what happened there. And let's let's actually start off with a little bit of music. Just CONFUSE EVERYBODY. And then we shall discuss. So this is Bruce Dickinson off of tattooed millionaire. this was a pretty big song off of that record called born in. Fifty eight. Take a listen.

Bruce Dickinson Judas Martin popoff Pantheon spotify Helford Itunes rob
Graham Brown: How To Influence, Engage, And Create Change Through Storytelling

The $100 MBA Show

05:23 min | 8 months ago

Graham Brown: How To Influence, Engage, And Create Change Through Storytelling

"In my leadership in the exponential era book one of the storytelling techniques. That I teach in workshops and I share it in the book is the three box. Transformation story inspired somewhat by Charles Dickinson Christmas cow. But I want to go into that just now because Christmas is already passed but just know that there are three boxes and this is how you can tell a story. A good example is when I came to Singapore and I moved to Singapore from Japan two years ago. I could have told people what I was doing there. People ask me. What are you doing here? Graham why are you in Singapore? I'm Ron and tell them what my job ause. I told him what I was going to build you see. I told them that. I came to Singapore to build podcast studio and a podcast business and that Saturday after I moved to Singapore. I put the call out linked in and said I'm going to build a podcast. Judea if you WANNA come along and help me build this and up the acoustic tiles and put in the wiring. Setup the microphones Akon pay with anything apart from kindness memories. Good Times a beer. And a whole bunch of people turned up owning youtube people in Singapore at the time but twelve people turned up to help me build the studio. And that's the point. That's the power of story if I said to somebody when they asked me. What are you doing unless said Yeah I do podcasts. It's a missed opportunity. Robin tell people what you do. Tell them what you're going to build. When you tell stories about you business you can break it down like that. Break it down to three boxes past present future. Let's have a look at those. It's very simple. If you want to tell people about you'll business why you hear what you're selling. Break it down into the three boxes. And if you WANNA go deeper into this cycle the exponential leadership book which is free by the way you can go and get a xl dot org. But I give a plug at the end of this podcast anyway. So you don't forget it for now past present future past. Where have you come from? What is the mindset that brought you here and what is the mindset? Also that holds people back present. What is the shape of the business that you all today and future? What is the shape of the business that you want to become now? You may think this may work for for example. The startup she does is a fantastic sales tool for start of but also works with multi billion dollar enterprises a great example of this. I've seen Tony Fernandez. Who is the CEO of Airasia when he talks about the future of the quote Unquote Airline? He doesn't talk about in the context of we're an allied. He uses the equivalent of the three bucks technique which is passed all is the mindset. That's holding his back. Well the mindset. That's holding AirAsia. Back is we're in allied. We sow tickets. We sell seats and yet if they want to grow they can't go on with that mindset they have to change it they have to even sell competitive tickets. They have to sell whole bunch of other different services ancillary services everything from music to food president. What's the shape of the business that we all today was the structure in which we need to innovate well? We're an ally but yet we have this ecosystem of partners we have venture fund that's funding these policies future. What's the shape of the business that we want to become? We doesn't talk about becoming a better airline. He talks about becoming a digital to travel platform. So maybe you hear Tony Fernandez Talk. He tells the story of Airasia. Tudo which is the journey from being an Anna sold tickets to a digital travel platform. Because you know the problem is this is that the future doesn't belong to the airline that flies the most plane but the travel company that solves the most problems unless what it's about storytelling is about sharing the journey of you and your business why you hear and what you're trying to get to and you can use storytelling everywhere. You can use it when you sell when you post on social media. Notice the difference between just telling people is what we do or just telling people were doing this now or telling people we just on this the difference from that to telling story about it you'll engagements on social media will increase significantly unlike. Weiss this podcast. I've shared stories with. I could just have told you that. Storytelling is a powerful tool and here are three things that you need to know. But then it's not about that like Maya Angelou. The author once wrote people. Soon forget what you told them but over? S- remember how you made them feel so that my name's Graham Brown signing of hopefully I gave you some insights into the world of

Singapore Tony Fernandez Airasia Graham Brown Charles Dickinson Maya Angelou Akon Youtube RON Robin Weiss Unquote Airline Japan President Trump Anna CEO
Dallas: Stars Score 3 Goals In 1st Period, Beat Hurricanes 4-1

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:42 sec | 8 months ago

Dallas: Stars Score 3 Goals In 1st Period, Beat Hurricanes 4-1

"L. D. big road win for the stars yesterday in Carolina Dallas Stars opened fire in Carolina last night scoring three times in the first period and again in the second as they defeated the hurricanes for one at fifty one seconds in Tyler Sagan started things off with his sixteenth goal of the year towards the end of the period Rebay hands connected on a power play Jason Dickinson ended the period with another goal for the stars and Dennis Geryon off and it's a scoring frenzy with the final goal of the evening in the second the hurricanes only managed one goal as Anton Khudobin started his second game in a row over Ben bishop saving forty shots is eight forty save effort in Dallas dating back to last season stars improve the thirty seven twenty and six as they get the two points and move ahead of Colorado in the central division trailing the blues by four

Carolina Dallas Stars Carolina Tyler Sagan Rebay Jason Dickinson Dennis Geryon Anton Khudobin Dallas Colorado Ben Bishop
7 Course Tools to Help Spread Your Message

Marketing School

04:46 min | 8 months ago

7 Course Tools to Help Spread Your Message

"Committed to your success online. We've worked with them. To a special offer just remarking school listeners. All you have to do is go to dream. Host DOT COM slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we're GonNa talk about seven course tools to help spread your message so in the last episode. We talked about how you can. Swipe Neal's correspond all that generated anywhere from three hundred eighty two six hundred fifty k. A month so definitely go check that out just Google Neil Patel. Keep that's key to look at swipe files and you know the the entire presentation as well but here what we. WanNa do is wanted to share seven course tools. Help spread your message so these are tools that both neil and myself have used. Neil prefer to go first or do you want me to go first dope. Hora right so number one when it comes to making landing pages quickly you WANNA be able to deploy fast so you can use. There's a lot of different tools out there. We personally use lead pages also tools like unbalance as well and those can funnel into your courses right because sometimes we want our landing pages to be flexible but we also want to deploy them quickly. So you can use those or you can use like click funnels as well. There's a lot of different options out there. But that is the first tool that I will share. Go ahead number two CA job. Job Is all in one course tool. Not only does it help you. Create your courses not only. Does it help you through? Things like payments and quizzes and emailing sequences but also has all the tools built in for you to market your course and get subscribers as well so check out it literally is all in one course creation tool from all the way from the marketing end to get people to subscribe and collecting payments to also fulfilling the course also with the poor. Emma followups upsells. They literally do everything from free. Trials of premium. You can do quite a bit on Ca- job as platform is still thing. I've ever learn are still thing. Yes all right so ever weapon are is my third one and if you're looking to do webinars which you should be doing webinars if you are teaching a course let's say a couple of hundred bucks or you know beyond that but the. Webinar is a tool that used to kind of well. You put your presentation out there. Ever Webinar allows you to put an Evergreen Webinar out. There that plays when you are not there and you can have a certain schedule. Set up for it so you can do that. Set up your evergreen funnel and then from there. Hopefully you can get sales while you sleep number four. Pick SNIP so picnic connects with most email tools out there and allows you to personalize your email messages. So when you're selling courses you want your message across it you're selling or course in what you'll find is a lot of people ignore your emails. What picks it will do. You can take image of yourself holding up a card. A poster board whatever may be and it will automatically enter their name into the message of the image that you're holding up so that way whatever you're doing look super customizing like oh wow that's cool and you're conversions. Go through the roof. That's what we use pick snippet all right number five. Don't forget to be using an email to also the email service provider. You can actually use many chat now because they have an email service provider have SMS and they also have chat as well. If you WANNA put facebook messenger and there s while which I think is a good idea. So you know we personally. We use drip. You can use convert kit as well but just make sure you have something where you're collecting emails. And then ideally what you're doing is you're driving adds to a landing page and then you're collecting email there and then you can try them to a Webinar or some type of video sales letter. Go ahead Neil number. Six one thing that we like doing is using. Plus this that connects with your web automation connects with a lot of emailing tools and taxing tools. And right one. Someone sees that you're selling something in you have their phone number. It'll take some their first name question mark and you she win you text like Eric Question. Mark a Lotta people respond with. Who's this or why should I follow up with you or like almost everyone who's this and automatically response back with generic message? That's K. I'm so and so from X Y and Z team saw a Webinar or. I have a infiltrate Checkout let me know if you have any questions and you'll get a high response rate. Usually over fifty percent right number seven last but not least make sure while. Cut It to Neil's point earlier that you're using text messages. What I like doing is if someone comes in. I like sinking it up with my text messages with front and Tokyo or whatever. Text message tool that. You're using front allows you to create a shared inbox and then your entire team can come in and respond as part of Dickinson mass text. They can respond to all the texts that are coming in

Neil Patel Marketing School Eric Su Google Emma Followups Neal CA Mark Evergreen Tokyo Eric Question
Stock market update

Bloomberg Markets

03:21 min | 9 months ago

Stock market update

"Kind of quiet opening here first half hour of trading the S. and P. up about seven and a half points this earnings out there there's certainly some news out there let's get the latest from Bloomberg stock senator tables and they were you looking at there's so much going on it seems like just if only because you're getting such extreme reactions to some of the stock moves Twitter me perfect example biggest gain the S. and P. five hundred up sixteen and a half percent yeah based off in ten months yeah that's saying something you know that that's definitely a plus in there they're a bunch of others were that comes from and a couple that are probably noteworthy because they tell you something about the consumer Estee Lauder the cosmetics maker up more than four percent after their results came out and tapestry we're talking coach we're talkin Stuart Weitzman you know what work were talking Kate spade up almost five and a half percent in the wake of their results so it had giving you got Este water it knowledge into the corona viruses going to hurt their results in the next few months and yet they still maintain the high end of their fiscal year sales forecast at birth and a low in a little bit by percentage point border really comes down to again and we've seen this pop up the last few days with some of the consumer oriented companies is just China is an issue you mean with the corona virus and it spread and what it's doing the economy but it's not enough to sort of deal rail these companies because you look elsewhere in the world to do it okay okay so let's put the consumer goods stores aside for just one second more generally about earnings you know we hear a lot about the beats that we're getting and yet every quarter it is sort of a charade in the sense that management have to downgrade expectations apologist case on this this is what kind of just a you know incredible soccer you know is there there's there's a sense of it trying to lowball the expectations and then over delivering we're getting that again how much further though is this going into the realm of actually upgrading expectations beyond what is currently priced into the market well you know the game kinda works both ways right I mean in the sense that you get the results and they come out and companies beat estimates and now you look forward to this year one of the stories that I've been talking about is the idea of this quarter to quarter growth and profit that analysts rent is a painting for the S. and P. five hundred well you're seeing those figures come down and yeah sure I mean you still got the progression it just doesn't look that great in relative terms and what you get out of it so all told is something like eight percent earnings growth with sales okay compared with last year and still mean it's not what we see in the past few years and you you have to figure that yeah I mean there's going to be more the sort of jockeying going on and to some extent explains the claims of reactions were seeing and and some of the shares it just you know when they come out ahead I mean people are really embracing that and course works the other way too in the fall short look out news certainly some examples of that two minutes healthcare supply Becton Dickinson being down more than twelve percent

"dickinson" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

15:01 min | 10 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"This is cultivating place conversations on natural history and the human impulse to garden certain from north state public radio in northern California. I'm Jennifer Jewel. Emily Dickinson was a gardener. She was also an iconic poet. And and this week we enjoy a conversation. With Garden Writer Marta McDowell to hear more about how the two callings intermingled in the life of emily only Dickinson. Welcome Marta arm so happy to be back Jennifer. I also happy to have you. I will note that this makes you the all all time. Most interviewed person on cultivating place. Marta so we should have like a drum roll. Happy to have Marta back back. So I have given you a little bit of an introduction but remind listeners and tell new listeners of whom there are a great many a little a bit about your own current practice in what you do as a writer what you do as a gardener of course while I consider myself self a garden writer and really I do a lot of things that you can append the word garden too you so I teach about gardening. I lecture about gardening. I they do some consulting on gardening and I very much garden myself as well and tell tell us just a tiny bit about your current garden and partly why I want you to describe this for listeners is that it bears the beautiful traces traces in threads and clues of almost all the books you have worked on which I think you like to describe as being at the sort of intersection of the pen and the Trowel trowel. Yes so the reason my garden is overcrowded. Just definitely read too much and so when I read about a an author who likes to garden I want to grow. Grow what they grew it. It's like a little link through time as if I could reach out I- fingers and touch them. I'm in a way that is not the into page which you know we so often encounter a writer through the printed page but actually through this medium medium of plant yeah give us an illustration of how this has worked for you. So and I I say this again to just illustrate this wonderful crossover that you include in all the books that I have read of yours. which is sort of how to have a garden in like this person would have had a garden and this was true in the Laura Ingalls Wilder Book and this is definitely true in the Emily Dickinson Book? And I believe it was true in terms of at least plant lists in all the president's gardens as well. Yes I seem to like to count. Things are always very long-planned implant list. must be some like personality type but my garden is. Let's see it's a garden of about a half an acre occurred. It is in a suburban neighborhood. My house is not new. It was built in nineteen twenty nine. Which means it's approaching one hundred years old? It sits on the front of the property so in the front. I have only only things that aren't lawn in the back. I have a tiny so-called lawn although most people who who look at it probably wouldn't call it that and I have many trees my one little patch of son I have flowers ars and herbs and then I have a woodland garden in the back and I think that's the one. Interestingly that Emily Dickenson has influenced the most because she did do a lot of wildflower collecting in wildflower walks and so in her home in her letters there so many wildflowers and she's she's from Massachusetts. I live in New Jersey. You know basically. That's a little colder where she is but I can grow most of the things that she would have found and in the woods around amherst Massachusetts so things like blood route. You know what a what a great emily Dickenson glanced right. Yeah you know You know just so many of those little spring ephemeral the things that bloom in in the spring and then completely disappear at least in my garden by the end of the summer. And then don't pop up again until next spring Burton. Yeah so you've been a gardener far longer than you've been a garden writer and you've been garden writer for a very long time now. How did one become the other and tell us about emily? Dickinson's role in that. So the the minute I had a little patch patch of earth which was round. I duNNo. Let's say nineteen eighty. I started to garden and started to just WanNa grow growth things in in a way. It didn't matter what the thing was. I just really discovered this connection to the soil and and Emily Dickinson happened entirely by accident. It was when I was in a completely different life I was. I had a job in corporate America. I would go on these trips from Lil. You know the head office in New Jersey and go out to visit insurance agencies at in this case ace and I was going across Massachusetts visiting agencies and I had a spare afternoon and I I literally told off into a higher a rest area and stared at the brochure wreck. Can you picture that yes again right. And so there was the thing for the Emily Dickinson Concerned Museum and I thought Oh hit studied Emily Dickinson you know. Let me go up to the museum and so I called. I'm sure on the pay phone and and said can I still make it. And she said Yes yes come and I found out that day Emily Dickinson had been a gardener and the door opened opened for me. I'm I suppose was poetry. It was like you know two roads diverged in the Ray Right right and so I just I. I absolutely became obsessed with Emily Dickinson and her gardening interests. And so that was a round nineteen eighteen ninety eight Two years later I I left my corporate job. I published an article about Emily Dickinson. I you know I just. I took another track. I started studying gardening. You know more seriously and you know kind of building up. I don't know and then you know I published a book in two thousand five and two thousand ten. I worked with the New York Botanical Garden on a big shows. You would think I had planned it right but I did just happen. It just happened. And and somehow the universe the collective consciousness the the seeds dormant in your own soul Found you took took you and grew you along this path and it was It has taken several kind of guises since then But Emily Dickinson was definitely the start. And when you say you published a book in two thousand five. That was your first book on Emily Dickinson. The first edition of this book is that correct. Yes and that was my first book about gardening and the same likewise with the big exhibit at The New York Botanic Tena Gardens. That was all sort of botanic garden exhibition about Emily Dickinson her gardening life and her gardening hardening motivation as well. Correct yes and I should say you know. This is the value of going to a museum right right. You know it's like you may not think anything in particular about a museum but you know it really something can touch you. And I've stayed involved with the museum really from the start. So that's been a continuous thread. And when you say the museum you are specifically referring to the Emily Dickinson Museum Museum in Amherst. That's right so you know they've been lovely to work with through the years on various programs and I work in the gardens. And you know it's it's it's really been great so I mean I I definitely want to get to that. I want to hear about your gardener for in residence Experience which I think is just so wonderful and volative and inspiring to me and I'm sure many other listeners as even a concept Marta. But let's go back to that very first article then burning into a book the first I kind of iteration of what is now your second edition give us just a basic. What were you trying to accomplish? What were you trying to document went in there so that we have the context from which to understand how this updated one is is different and expands on that original regional heart? So for me. The big surprise was that Emily Dickinson was a gardener. I don't think think of her never popped into my mind because the poems that I knew were things like oh because because I could not stop for death he kindly stopped for me. They were all along. That line of death and immortality and and I had this image of someone standing at a bedroom window in a white dress and I think that many people share that you know if they know Emily Dickinson they know of the name that image would sort of pop into their mind. That and that you know sorta pulled back hairstyle that you see in the area type and I wanted to say look. This was a person who had this interest. That's totally counter to this idea of this. ghostly hermit yeah you know stuck indoors you you know. And I'm not saying that she wasn't reclusive because she was she. She didn't go out in society in her later years. That's all true. Who but despite that she still garden so you know she got outside anyway? Yeah Yeah and I I want to And I think this is a great time to do it before we get into the details of who she was Gardner. And what we know about that. And and some of the more current research and Interpretive Materials being Put out into the world about this but why does this matter. Marta and I think it's it's actually really fascinating like why isn't important at a variety of levels that we up end this myth of this incredible poet and what inspired her how she took care of herself what she found valuable in the world world. Why is it important that we changed that? From the myth that was created early on almost as a sales pitch and what is actually true about about her to me. It's water the sources of creativity. Now you can still. You can appreciate shape Emily Dickinson. You can study. Emily Dickenson entirely without knowing that she was a gardener. I don't WanNa take away from her. Creative live genius as it stands alone but you know just as when you find out. I'm going to pick like the Beethoven Hoven was deaf right. It sort of puts it in a different context. And you go. Oh you know so. There's someone who had this. You know terrible disability and still be genius in musical composition. So you know. It's that Emily Dickinson had had various sources for her creative output and so the garden was a source for her but it also wasn't different outlet. Right it was a different way. She was expressing herself and the the vast fastness of her genius was she could take these sort of everyday things and distill them into something that speaks. I can speak to all of those. Yeah and I was thinking about this over the weekend in preparation for our conversation today and one of the things that occurred to me is that by by providing this real life woman with a more three dimensional persona sonal in the common understanding and the current understanding. We actually we add a little bit of fresh air and health and three dimensionality -ality to all of the people we might consider creative or artistic or or talented and that to know that she she was actually quite a happy and Inter related person with her family and with her friends through letters through the garden through plants food and community. You add this sense. That creativity can come with great great happiness and health as well not this sort of again mythic.

Emily Dickenson Emily Dickinson Book Emily Dickinson Museum Museum Emily Dickinson Concerned Muse emily writer Marta McDowell New York Botanical Garden Massachusetts New Jersey California Jennifer Jewel Laura Ingalls Wilder Book WanNa Amherst The New York Botanic Tena Gard president America Beethoven Hoven Gardner
"dickinson" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

15:01 min | 10 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"This is cultivating place conversations on natural history and the human impulse to garden certain from north state public radio in northern California. I'm Jennifer Jewel. Emily Dickinson was a gardener. She was also an iconic poet. And and this week we enjoy a conversation. With Garden Writer Marta McDowell to hear more about how the two callings intermingled in the life of emily only Dickinson. Welcome Marta arm so happy to be back Jennifer. I also happy to have you. I will note that this makes you the all all time. Most interviewed person on cultivating place. Marta so we should have like a drum roll. Happy to have Marta back back. So I have given you a little bit of an introduction but remind listeners and tell new listeners of whom there are a great many a little a bit about your own current practice in what you do as a writer what you do as a gardener of course while I consider myself self a garden writer and really I do a lot of things that you can append the word garden too you so I teach about gardening. I lecture about gardening. I they do some consulting on gardening and I very much garden myself as well and tell tell us just a tiny bit about your current garden and partly why I want you to describe this for listeners is that it bears the beautiful traces traces in threads and clues of almost all the books you have worked on which I think you like to describe as being at the sort of intersection of the pen and the Trowel trowel. Yes so the reason my garden is overcrowded. Just definitely read too much and so when I read about a an author who likes to garden I want to grow. Grow what they grew it. It's like a little link through time as if I could reach out I- fingers and touch them. I'm in a way that is not the into page which you know we so often encounter a writer through the printed page but actually through this medium medium of plant yeah give us an illustration of how this has worked for you. So and I I say this again to just illustrate this wonderful crossover that you include in all the books that I have read of yours. which is sort of how to have a garden in like this person would have had a garden and this was true in the Laura Ingalls Wilder Book and this is definitely true in the Emily Dickinson Book? And I believe it was true in terms of at least plant lists in all the president's gardens as well. Yes I seem to like to count. Things are always very long-planned implant list. must be some like personality type but my garden is. Let's see it's a garden of about a half an acre occurred. It is in a suburban neighborhood. My house is not new. It was built in nineteen twenty nine. Which means it's approaching one hundred years old? It sits on the front of the property so in the front. I have only only things that aren't lawn in the back. I have a tiny so-called lawn although most people who who look at it probably wouldn't call it that and I have many trees my one little patch of son I have flowers ars and herbs and then I have a woodland garden in the back and I think that's the one. Interestingly that Emily Dickenson has influenced the most because she did do a lot of wildflower collecting in wildflower walks and so in her home in her letters there so many wildflowers and she's she's from Massachusetts. I live in New Jersey. You know basically. That's a little colder where she is but I can grow most of the things that she would have found and in the woods around amherst Massachusetts so things like blood route. You know what a what a great emily Dickenson glanced right. Yeah you know You know just so many of those little spring ephemeral the things that bloom in in the spring and then completely disappear at least in my garden by the end of the summer. And then don't pop up again until next spring Burton. Yeah so you've been a gardener far longer than you've been a garden writer and you've been garden writer for a very long time now. How did one become the other and tell us about emily? Dickinson's role in that. So the the minute I had a little patch patch of earth which was round. I duNNo. Let's say nineteen eighty. I started to garden and started to just WanNa grow growth things in in a way. It didn't matter what the thing was. I just really discovered this connection to the soil and and Emily Dickinson happened entirely by accident. It was when I was in a completely different life I was. I had a job in corporate America. I would go on these trips from Lil. You know the head office in New Jersey and go out to visit insurance agencies at in this case ace and I was going across Massachusetts visiting agencies and I had a spare afternoon and I I literally told off into a higher a rest area and stared at the brochure wreck. Can you picture that yes again right. And so there was the thing for the Emily Dickinson Concerned Museum and I thought Oh hit studied Emily Dickinson you know. Let me go up to the museum and so I called. I'm sure on the pay phone and and said can I still make it. And she said Yes yes come and I found out that day Emily Dickinson had been a gardener and the door opened opened for me. I'm I suppose was poetry. It was like you know two roads diverged in the Ray Right right and so I just I. I absolutely became obsessed with Emily Dickinson and her gardening interests. And so that was a round nineteen eighteen ninety eight Two years later I I left my corporate job. I published an article about Emily Dickinson. I you know I just. I took another track. I started studying gardening. You know more seriously and you know kind of building up. I don't know and then you know I published a book in two thousand five and two thousand ten. I worked with the New York Botanical Garden on a big shows. You would think I had planned it right but I did just happen. It just happened. And and somehow the universe the collective consciousness the the seeds dormant in your own soul Found you took took you and grew you along this path and it was It has taken several kind of guises since then But Emily Dickinson was definitely the start. And when you say you published a book in two thousand five. That was your first book on Emily Dickinson. The first edition of this book is that correct. Yes and that was my first book about gardening and the same likewise with the big exhibit at The New York Botanic Tena Gardens. That was all sort of botanic garden exhibition about Emily Dickinson her gardening life and her gardening hardening motivation as well. Correct yes and I should say you know. This is the value of going to a museum right right. You know it's like you may not think anything in particular about a museum but you know it really something can touch you. And I've stayed involved with the museum really from the start. So that's been a continuous thread. And when you say the museum you are specifically referring to the Emily Dickinson Museum Museum in Amherst. That's right so you know they've been lovely to work with through the years on various programs and I work in the gardens. And you know it's it's it's really been great so I mean I I definitely want to get to that. I want to hear about your gardener for in residence Experience which I think is just so wonderful and volative and inspiring to me and I'm sure many other listeners as even a concept Marta. But let's go back to that very first article then burning into a book the first I kind of iteration of what is now your second edition give us just a basic. What were you trying to accomplish? What were you trying to document went in there so that we have the context from which to understand how this updated one is is different and expands on that original regional heart? So for me. The big surprise was that Emily Dickinson was a gardener. I don't think think of her never popped into my mind because the poems that I knew were things like oh because because I could not stop for death he kindly stopped for me. They were all along. That line of death and immortality and and I had this image of someone standing at a bedroom window in a white dress and I think that many people share that you know if they know Emily Dickinson they know of the name that image would sort of pop into their mind. That and that you know sorta pulled back hairstyle that you see in the area type and I wanted to say look. This was a person who had this interest. That's totally counter to this idea of this. ghostly hermit yeah you know stuck indoors you you know. And I'm not saying that she wasn't reclusive because she was she. She didn't go out in society in her later years. That's all true. Who but despite that she still garden so you know she got outside anyway? Yeah Yeah and I I want to And I think this is a great time to do it before we get into the details of who she was Gardner. And what we know about that. And and some of the more current research and Interpretive Materials being Put out into the world about this but why does this matter. Marta and I think it's it's actually really fascinating like why isn't important at a variety of levels that we up end this myth of this incredible poet and what inspired her how she took care of herself what she found valuable in the world world. Why is it important that we changed that? From the myth that was created early on almost as a sales pitch and what is actually true about about her to me. It's water the sources of creativity. Now you can still. You can appreciate shape Emily Dickinson. You can study. Emily Dickenson entirely without knowing that she was a gardener. I don't WanNa take away from her. Creative live genius as it stands alone but you know just as when you find out. I'm going to pick like the Beethoven Hoven was deaf right. It sort of puts it in a different context. And you go. Oh you know so. There's someone who had this. You know terrible disability and still be genius in musical composition. So you know. It's that Emily Dickinson had had various sources for her creative output and so the garden was a source for her but it also wasn't different outlet. Right it was a different way. She was expressing herself and the the vast fastness of her genius was she could take these sort of everyday things and distill them into something that speaks. I can speak to all of those. Yeah and I was thinking about this over the weekend in preparation for our conversation today and one of the things that occurred to me is that by by providing this real life woman with a more three dimensional persona sonal in the common understanding and the current understanding. We actually we add a little bit of fresh air and health and three dimensionality -ality to all of the people we might consider creative or artistic or or talented and that to know that she she was actually quite a happy and Inter related person with her family and with her friends through letters through the garden through plants food and community. You add this sense. That creativity can come with great great happiness and health as well not this sort of again mythic.

Emily Dickenson Emily Dickinson Book Emily Dickinson Museum Museum Emily Dickinson Concerned Muse emily writer Marta McDowell New York Botanical Garden Massachusetts New Jersey California Jennifer Jewel Laura Ingalls Wilder Book WanNa Amherst The New York Botanic Tena Gard president America Beethoven Hoven Gardner
"dickinson" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

15:01 min | 10 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"This is cultivating place conversations on natural history and the human impulse to garden certain from north state public radio in northern California. I'm Jennifer Jewel. Emily Dickinson was a gardener. She was also an iconic poet. And and this week we enjoy a conversation. With Garden Writer Marta McDowell to hear more about how the two callings intermingled in the life of emily only Dickinson. Welcome Marta arm so happy to be back Jennifer. I also happy to have you. I will note that this makes you the all all time. Most interviewed person on cultivating place. Marta so we should have like a drum roll. Happy to have Marta back back. So I have given you a little bit of an introduction but remind listeners and tell new listeners of whom there are a great many a little a bit about your own current practice in what you do as a writer what you do as a gardener of course while I consider myself self a garden writer and really I do a lot of things that you can append the word garden too you so I teach about gardening. I lecture about gardening. I they do some consulting on gardening and I very much garden myself as well and tell tell us just a tiny bit about your current garden and partly why I want you to describe this for listeners is that it bears the beautiful traces traces in threads and clues of almost all the books you have worked on which I think you like to describe as being at the sort of intersection of the pen and the Trowel trowel. Yes so the reason my garden is overcrowded. Just definitely read too much and so when I read about a an author who likes to garden I want to grow. Grow what they grew it. It's like a little link through time as if I could reach out I- fingers and touch them. I'm in a way that is not the into page which you know we so often encounter a writer through the printed page but actually through this medium medium of plant yeah give us an illustration of how this has worked for you. So and I I say this again to just illustrate this wonderful crossover that you include in all the books that I have read of yours. which is sort of how to have a garden in like this person would have had a garden and this was true in the Laura Ingalls Wilder Book and this is definitely true in the Emily Dickinson Book? And I believe it was true in terms of at least plant lists in all the president's gardens as well. Yes I seem to like to count. Things are always very long-planned implant list. must be some like personality type but my garden is. Let's see it's a garden of about a half an acre occurred. It is in a suburban neighborhood. My house is not new. It was built in nineteen twenty nine. Which means it's approaching one hundred years old? It sits on the front of the property so in the front. I have only only things that aren't lawn in the back. I have a tiny so-called lawn although most people who who look at it probably wouldn't call it that and I have many trees my one little patch of son I have flowers ars and herbs and then I have a woodland garden in the back and I think that's the one. Interestingly that Emily Dickenson has influenced the most because she did do a lot of wildflower collecting in wildflower walks and so in her home in her letters there so many wildflowers and she's she's from Massachusetts. I live in New Jersey. You know basically. That's a little colder where she is but I can grow most of the things that she would have found and in the woods around amherst Massachusetts so things like blood route. You know what a what a great emily Dickenson glanced right. Yeah you know You know just so many of those little spring ephemeral the things that bloom in in the spring and then completely disappear at least in my garden by the end of the summer. And then don't pop up again until next spring Burton. Yeah so you've been a gardener far longer than you've been a garden writer and you've been garden writer for a very long time now. How did one become the other and tell us about emily? Dickinson's role in that. So the the minute I had a little patch patch of earth which was round. I duNNo. Let's say nineteen eighty. I started to garden and started to just WanNa grow growth things in in a way. It didn't matter what the thing was. I just really discovered this connection to the soil and and Emily Dickinson happened entirely by accident. It was when I was in a completely different life I was. I had a job in corporate America. I would go on these trips from Lil. You know the head office in New Jersey and go out to visit insurance agencies at in this case ace and I was going across Massachusetts visiting agencies and I had a spare afternoon and I I literally told off into a higher a rest area and stared at the brochure wreck. Can you picture that yes again right. And so there was the thing for the Emily Dickinson Concerned Museum and I thought Oh hit studied Emily Dickinson you know. Let me go up to the museum and so I called. I'm sure on the pay phone and and said can I still make it. And she said Yes yes come and I found out that day Emily Dickinson had been a gardener and the door opened opened for me. I'm I suppose was poetry. It was like you know two roads diverged in the Ray Right right and so I just I. I absolutely became obsessed with Emily Dickinson and her gardening interests. And so that was a round nineteen eighteen ninety eight Two years later I I left my corporate job. I published an article about Emily Dickinson. I you know I just. I took another track. I started studying gardening. You know more seriously and you know kind of building up. I don't know and then you know I published a book in two thousand five and two thousand ten. I worked with the New York Botanical Garden on a big shows. You would think I had planned it right but I did just happen. It just happened. And and somehow the universe the collective consciousness the the seeds dormant in your own soul Found you took took you and grew you along this path and it was It has taken several kind of guises since then But Emily Dickinson was definitely the start. And when you say you published a book in two thousand five. That was your first book on Emily Dickinson. The first edition of this book is that correct. Yes and that was my first book about gardening and the same likewise with the big exhibit at The New York Botanic Tena Gardens. That was all sort of botanic garden exhibition about Emily Dickinson her gardening life and her gardening hardening motivation as well. Correct yes and I should say you know. This is the value of going to a museum right right. You know it's like you may not think anything in particular about a museum but you know it really something can touch you. And I've stayed involved with the museum really from the start. So that's been a continuous thread. And when you say the museum you are specifically referring to the Emily Dickinson Museum Museum in Amherst. That's right so you know they've been lovely to work with through the years on various programs and I work in the gardens. And you know it's it's it's really been great so I mean I I definitely want to get to that. I want to hear about your gardener for in residence Experience which I think is just so wonderful and volative and inspiring to me and I'm sure many other listeners as even a concept Marta. But let's go back to that very first article then burning into a book the first I kind of iteration of what is now your second edition give us just a basic. What were you trying to accomplish? What were you trying to document went in there so that we have the context from which to understand how this updated one is is different and expands on that original regional heart? So for me. The big surprise was that Emily Dickinson was a gardener. I don't think think of her never popped into my mind because the poems that I knew were things like oh because because I could not stop for death he kindly stopped for me. They were all along. That line of death and immortality and and I had this image of someone standing at a bedroom window in a white dress and I think that many people share that you know if they know Emily Dickinson they know of the name that image would sort of pop into their mind. That and that you know sorta pulled back hairstyle that you see in the area type and I wanted to say look. This was a person who had this interest. That's totally counter to this idea of this. ghostly hermit yeah you know stuck indoors you you know. And I'm not saying that she wasn't reclusive because she was she. She didn't go out in society in her later years. That's all true. Who but despite that she still garden so you know she got outside anyway? Yeah Yeah and I I want to And I think this is a great time to do it before we get into the details of who she was Gardner. And what we know about that. And and some of the more current research and Interpretive Materials being Put out into the world about this but why does this matter. Marta and I think it's it's actually really fascinating like why isn't important at a variety of levels that we up end this myth of this incredible poet and what inspired her how she took care of herself what she found valuable in the world world. Why is it important that we changed that? From the myth that was created early on almost as a sales pitch and what is actually true about about her to me. It's water the sources of creativity. Now you can still. You can appreciate shape Emily Dickinson. You can study. Emily Dickenson entirely without knowing that she was a gardener. I don't WanNa take away from her. Creative live genius as it stands alone but you know just as when you find out. I'm going to pick like the Beethoven Hoven was deaf right. It sort of puts it in a different context. And you go. Oh you know so. There's someone who had this. You know terrible disability and still be genius in musical composition. So you know. It's that Emily Dickinson had had various sources for her creative output and so the garden was a source for her but it also wasn't different outlet. Right it was a different way. She was expressing herself and the the vast fastness of her genius was she could take these sort of everyday things and distill them into something that speaks. I can speak to all of those. Yeah and I was thinking about this over the weekend in preparation for our conversation today and one of the things that occurred to me is that by by providing this real life woman with a more three dimensional persona sonal in the common understanding and the current understanding. We actually we add a little bit of fresh air and health and three dimensionality -ality to all of the people we might consider creative or artistic or or talented and that to know that she she was actually quite a happy and Inter related person with her family and with her friends through letters through the garden through plants food and community. You add this sense. That creativity can come with great great happiness and health as well not this sort of again mythic.

Emily Dickenson Emily Dickinson Book Emily Dickinson Museum Museum Emily Dickinson Concerned Muse emily writer Marta McDowell New York Botanical Garden Massachusetts New Jersey California Jennifer Jewel Laura Ingalls Wilder Book WanNa Amherst The New York Botanic Tena Gard president America Beethoven Hoven Gardner
"dickinson" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

03:41 min | 11 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"You gotTa have the track management that has all the fighting and that will was going on in California at those times. All three of those. His people were not working together in unison. My wife thinks rick. Hamlet was the best racing secretary ever. She needed monmouth. They're efficient goddess stakes out early in a really lovely presentation She she still thinks he's marvelous. I try my best to convince server wise and like I said when I saw. Where's Joan? This isn't your deal. This is Joan Steele and find out. She's in England putting in a track over there so they they set this up in New York is adding a training or a yolk. The real not the phone. You'll that they net the five minutes the one that's between the two thousand okay. The Old York New York not the one on the east coast. It's been five minutes. There's no he's not she's she's close to your. She's doing track for my Johnson which is in your short. She is and speaking of which chat. How many about how many tracks a year? These days are are are making a switch or or installing. Well mocks had ospel twelve years. Say Doesn't last. It's been down twelve years. It's still in good condition. And he has three hundred horses uh Michael Dickinson to pita footing and this is a discussion that continues to advance. And it's not going away I just don't be don't be discussion. There's nothing to just be patient. Some patients and and guys to get a hand to knock it into his head. It'll come slowly. Set up their allegedly put up the left and the right. You said you let people decide. googled him before I went to on this show and said he was all right so I was okay. But you've been on the show you bet you were on the show years ago came back when I reached out by the way to ask you. Do you play the golf course in Newcastle. Don't play golf running Michael. Thank you on Saturday. Seventy four horses and riders Iran Fifteen Miles House with them jumped thirty jumps. You see the pictures put up yesterday tied. I'd I was. I was GONNA ask yesterday are you. Are you more of a hurdler or Chaser chaser. You're a chase you got a big stride on you Michael Dickinson. Everybody I gotTa pull up Michael. Thank you thank you as always Michael Dickinson and doc hammer to to put the put the put the bow on the to to put the ball on the package here and wrap up. Because you're yeah uh you did just fine and I think we're going to have to next year change the hours move it up about two. Who Hours and so we can get? The crowd walked by back and forth. Which is great this was I don't ever remember this? I don't ever hear this. This is GonNa go to Peter Gammons stuff. Oh this is great. All right at camera I gotta pull up. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA take it. Wait thank you thank you. Thank you for comment. Thanks to the students thanks to the.

Joan Steele Michael Dickinson secretary Johnson golf California New York Peter Gammons Fifteen Miles House Old York doc hammer Iran England Newcastle
"dickinson" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

08:00 min | 11 months ago

"dickinson" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Ideas way ahead of her time so very few of her poems were published during during her lifetime. Her work has had an immense impact on subsequent generations. Let's talk about Emily Dickinson. Emily was born in Amherst Massachusetts on December tenth eighteen. Thirty two Edward and Emily Dickenson. She was the second of three children. Children Emily's father Edward an ambitious lawyer and native son of Amherst prided himself on playing a large role in the community as an elected elected state congressman the treasurer of Amherst College and the chairman of the annual cattle show. He also served one term as a US congressman and much less is known about Emily's mother though her surviving correspondence suggests quirky intelligence that belies her reputation as a passive wife. Emily her older brother Austin and younger sister Lavinia all attended the one room elementary school in Amherst I before moving to amherst academy a prestigious school out of which amherst college has grown after graduation from amherst academy. Emily enrolled at Mount Holyoke female seminary now Mount Holyoke college but her experience. There was not a happy one. She found strict strict and invasive rules and religious requirements to be problematic. Emily was homesick so she left Mount Holyoke after just one year and returned to her family family home at Mount Holyoke as well as at home. Emily was surrounded by the religious tradition of strict evangelical calvinism which centered on the belief that humans are born totally depraved and can only be saved. They accept Jesus. Emily had a hard time with these beliefs and was the only member of her family to never join the church instead. She believed the soul's immortality and the concepts of transcendental ISM and she was disinterested in less symbolic conceptions of religious truth this would become an important component of her poetry. Emily started writing poetry during her teen years mostly and letters to friends and none of it meant for publication or public. Viewing a surprising number of these letters still exist today. You and show Emily's humor gift for relying anecdotes and her sense. Her correspondence responding to her letters with less interest than she would have liked. This vissel become a bit of a constant theme by her early twenties. Emily started to become more reclusive. She restricted her social activities and reduced her correspondence to a select few with whom she maintained intense relationships through letters in eighteen fifty five. Emily's mother fell ill because neither emily nor her sister remarried. The two were subsequently required to spend significant time on domestic pursuits taking care of the Dickinson Pinson household during that period. Emily increased her self-imposed isolation even further between eighteen fifty five and eighteen fifty eight. Emily wrote a lot of poetry in the summer of eighteen fifty eight. Emily began compiling her work into little. It'll bucks. She wrote clean copies of her poems onto find stationary and then sewed the sheets together at the fold to create small booklets over the of course of about seven years. Emily created forty booklets filled with about eight hundred poems home. Forty five from Emily's collection entitled entitled snowflakes reads. I counted till they danced. So they're slippers. Leap the town and then I took a pencil to note the rebels down and then they grew so jolly I did resign. The Craig Antenna. My once stately toes are marshalled for Jay because emily never left any instructions regarding these booklets. We can only guess what her intentions were for them. Some believe that she was simply organizing her poems for convenience others believe that. Emily wanted these booklets to eventually be published after death in the late eighteen fifties and early eighteen sixty S. Emily seems to have suffered through some kind of personal crisis. That may have been partially due to romantic rejection. We don't have a clear record of exactly what was going on and this along with other issues in her family laid emily heavily distressed and further increased her isolation instead of succumbing to whatever she was. He's going through. Emily wrote extraordinary poems. And even more prolific rate during the civil war era. Emily explored the ironies. As if humanity often tragic such as the constant denial fulfillment and the search for the divine and the every day in her poems. She also also wrote profoundly about what it meant to be a woman during her time women's subjectivity and subordination and the need for self reliance and greater liberty in her last fifteen years. Her social life was nearly completely conducted by correspondence after her father's death in eighteen. Seventy four. Emily Emily even had a passionate romance with the Massachusetts Supreme Court. Judge entirely by letter. She continued to write about thirty five poems per year breath in the eighteen eighties. Emily experienced tragedy after tragedy as I. Her mother died and then many of her closest correspondents Indi- one after another this culminated in the sudden death of her beloved eight-year-old nephew after that she stopped seeing almost everyone emily Dickinson died of a stroke in eighteen. Eighty six. She was fifty five years old. After Emily's death her sister Lavinia Aena put extraordinary effort into getting Emily's poems published with the help of Emily's remaining literary friends poems by Emily Dickinson was published in eighteen ninety the volume receive significant public interest and was acclaimed famous author and critic William Dean Howells's as a distinctly American voice. Yes because Emily's poetry both in terms of content and especially style was really quite ahead of its time. It took years before. Her greatness fully registered with the American poetry community and with the world at large by the nineteen fifties leading poets. Like Hart Crane Allen Tate. It was with Bishop. As well. As the new critics were in thrall with Emily's brilliance and were instrumental in establishing her place in the Pantheon of great lyric poets. No it's tune in tomorrow for the story of another beautiful mind special. Thanks to my favorite sister and co-creator was Kaplan. Glenn Talk to you tomorrow before you go. I want to tell you about another show. No I think you'll like think about the books that have changed you the ones that made you see the world and a whole new light on the but that's another story podcast. bestselling author Willisch. Welby talks to influential guests about the moments and books. That have been transformative for that here. Jodie foster talk about about how reading Franny and Zoe. Jd Salinger convinced her to put her acting career on hold so she could go to college and form a community here. How Joan diddy ends ends essay inspired crazy? Rich Asians author Kevin Kwan. To move to New York. We love celebrating the books that have changed our lives just like we love honoring the women in who've shaped our history. Check out. But that's another story wherever you get your podcasts..

Emily Emily Emily Dickinson Amherst College Amherst Massachusetts Amherst Mount Holyoke congressman Mount Holyoke college US Lavinia Aena Amherst I Dickinson Pinson ISM Jd Salinger Jodie foster Edward Craig Antenna chairman Joan diddy Massachusetts Supreme Court
"dickinson" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

MacBreak Weekly

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"dickinson" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

"A communist conjoined dickerson the the sign of the watch. It's the trailer just real quickly. Can we <hes> now. There's wonder aggravates saying if we watched the trailer apple. Take down the the trailer. It's about emily dickens wait. A minute does apple honestly if i play this trailer apple will take this show block it on youtube they will they might light. I dunno that's incur. What if i turn the sound bite. Half of my half of recommended list is people loading trailers. Let's let's leave the sound off and leave it like not full screen and see what happens. Oh an experiment the reason we were worried about this is because if they take us down and takes like what ten weeks to get it back up that and significant wasser revenue thousand. It costs us thousands of dollars for me to play this trailer screw you apple. I'm not gonna play. Here's a show about angie dickinson. Nobody wants to watch take that. I mean it's it's it's ooh labeled like accommodate but says the i watched the trailer. Obviously trailers are going to be edited to be a certain way so you can make a horror film. Look like a comedy and you can make a drama look like a horror film but the way i read into it is that it's a lighthearted drama. It's is is what seems more like the character in the emily dickinson carrick star she's young and she's rebellious and so the story it's about her sort of bucking the system and how the people around her are like struggling to accept her or she sort of struggling to accept her role in society at this time so it does not look like a just a flat-out sitcom it looks like a sort of a more lighthearted telling of her early early adult adult years or hurt late teen years of of just kind of <hes> being crazy in c._n._n. Environment where she absolutely shouldn't be crazy. It's a comedy in the shakespearean sense dance. Shakespearean comedy people survived at the end a tragedy. They all died at the end literally. That's the definition so it's ki- it's kind of like it's light hearted. It's smuts heavy but jokes. Did you laugh. No it looks more like like a typical drama. <hes> a very like expensively made drama. It looks really high production value so now not but there would be a scene here and there where she might make a funny face or she might say something or do something at a party. That's like funny but oh. I can't believe she did that. It's more like that kind of that. She's he's such a card such a cut up. Did you see she bid eight not trump's while playing with that kind of joke. Okay okay yeah well now that we're seeing trailers now that we're seeing trailers rebel t._v. Plus are we excited the site enough to to pay that much month just a couple of shows so that's my thing is i would. I don't know the pricing because again we've now seen more information on disney plus or or netflix perturbing me because their prices keep going up and they make you paid this for this many views and not this mode and it's i understand that they have no other sources of income. It's much easier for companies like apple or google or disney or anybody else to make content. We know easier for apple music than spotify because spotify has to be profitable on the music but net afflicts. It just seems like it's becoming less and less friendly to me. It's it's not integrating with anybody and disney plus. It's going to be in a lot of countries. It's going to integrate into all the abbot ah amazon for some reason not right away but apple stuff all the other stuff. It's gonna work just great. It's going to be in the t._v. App. It looks like you're not gonna have to pay extra for four k or for dobie at mos 'cause they're gonna bundle it. They're going to have a low price for it. If you pay for three years you get even a lower price for its feels like they're doing everything right and they're going to have not just amazing like marvel and star wars and all these other muppets all this great content..

apple disney emily dickinson angie dickinson emily dickens dickerson dobie spotify netflix google three years ten weeks four k
"dickinson" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

The Kitchen Sisters Present

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"dickinson" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

"He's bound booklets that Dickinson copied her poems into and sewed with kitchen twine, some of her poems were published in her lifetime. But they changed Emily's plan rhymes and gave the poems titles to make them more conventional, and that's not how she wrote her poems. My life had stood a loaded gun in corners. She called him bulletins from immortality. You know, a bolt would come down sky pardon. She was given this message people have wanted to turn her into nice lady poet, a romantic version of her that is not untrue. It's just probably partial. I'm Brenda Hillman. I am poet. She did stay in her room. And she did have what she refers to as her white election, but he on her white dress and going upstairs not going out anymore. What choice did? Did she have in her time? She couldn't have gotten her writing done by being the spinster in the community that takes care of bodies coming home from the civil war goes on being a nice church lady in she wrote seven hundred poems in two years. I mean seven hundred for Pete's sake. This poem six six eight by Emily Dickinson, nature is what we see the hill the afternoon, squirrel. The clips the Bumblebee may nature's heaven nature is what we hear the Bob link the C thunder. The cricket may nature's harmony nature's what we know yet have no art to say so impotent our wisdom is to her simplicity. She actually would right on chocolate wrappers, right envelope. Poems sort of in the flotsam and jetsam of her life. The words move in the fragment of that paper. This poem was composed on the back of coconut cake recipe. The things that never can come back are several childhood some forms of hope the dead superb Lanson, prematurely, her cooking and her poetry. We're one the way in which she gave friends not only points, but gifts of cake, they were offerings attentions. That's what people call them between houses when friends gave something that they had made in the kitchen in the bedroom. These secret spaces where she could be alone or with her own select society that really was freedom. When Emily Dickenson bakes bread. There's something almost ecstatic about it satisfaction of creativity. In one of her early letters and eighteen fifty to her best friend by a route. She says twin loaves of bread have just been born into the world under my auspices. Find children the image of their mother, and here, my dear friend is the glory. Act to the soul selects its own society. There were two kitchens and Emily's life. She lived in a house on pleasant street next to the cemetery, and that is the kitchen where Emily learned to cook. How to make bread how to make desserts how to make wine her mother largely teaching? Oh, the mother and the parents really both are very old fashioned. They think they have such a small family. The girls can do everything. It's good training for them. Emily Dickenson or sisters at boarding school. Her brother's gone who's managing three meals cooked meals a day on the table and washing the dishes. She would start a letter it would take her another week or so to get back to it. She had this drive to right. And she was so th ward it, that's when the lobbying starts to hire a may've wanted to hire a girl or woman who is capable of doing the entire work of a small family Edward Dickinson Amherst, March seventh eighteen fifty I'm Yvonne Murray, author of made his muse how servants changed Emily ticket since life and language eighteen fifty five Emily was twenty five when they moved in. Into the mansion this demanding household. Her father was a leading lawyer. The mother was not well, she turned over the social and housekeeping regime to her daughters. Emily missed the pleasant street has terribly. She said I'm out with lanterns looking for myself within months of that move the first long-term made Margaret O'Brien who's an Irish emigrant comes. She's there for nine years. There's an immediate impact Emily has time to think in right when she felt more confident about herself as a poet, then house became more hers with her garden was the proximity to sue when Susan Gilbert came back to town after going away to school, Emily Dickenson enter brother Austin, both fell in love with her..

Emily Dickinson Brenda Hillman Margaret O'Brien Edward Dickinson Amherst Pete Bob Yvonne Murray Susan Gilbert Austin nine years two years
"dickinson" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"dickinson" Discussed on KTRH

"Dickinson our friends at the weather channel are having a look at the uh the nasty water can we bring up the weather channel real quick think about earlier and and we've got the mouth or jason thank you so much job doing water rescues right now dickinson objectives we'll be right back land that's what they're showing there with the videos just a bunch of cars halfway covered with water and it's going to continue did you know in a way that makes me really because if they're if they're rescuing people who would get trapped because they went out driving that's one thing now those below those remarks people in nursing home and people who came in to sell the water come into their homes up to chest they have this means to me that maybe hopefully they've risk it all those people and taken them to shelters and so again you you just step forward a step forward a step forward and and brace because we don't know was amaral bring the horror of it we're gonna be like new orleans and katrina they're going to be finding bodies after this is all over i mean this story doesn't end even when it does stop rehoboth that is not the case then i tell you watching some of these rescues this morning and listening to the people who had been rescued the resilient singing of them and this stoicism and it was elderly that it was also young women with babies and the babies or cry and that the women were like you know my neighbor caiming got me out in somebody came back in for me and it was all about the people just ordinary citizens who saw that there was a need and they stepped in to help and you know you get to a point where it's all about life in preserving your life in preserving it the lives of others and all that a thing it's just stuff and i you just gotta let it go and there's nothing you can do to keep the floodwaters back if they're coming they're coming and you can just deal with it you just have to do the best that you can cater to deal with it and i was haven rocks above.

new orleans katrina Dickinson amaral rehoboth