20 Burst results for "Dick Smith"

Hollywood Monsters  with Mallory OMeara

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

06:01 min | 4 months ago

Hollywood Monsters with Mallory OMeara

"History is written by the winners by men early editors of science fiction anthologies choice to exclude by women and in doing so made many believe that women did not write science fiction in the genres earliest years. This is just one example. And by no. Means the only one mallory mira self-confessed monster lava and film. Ned discovered a similar story in one of her favourite monsters. Millicent patrick was one of disney's earliest female animators and went on to design one of the greatest film monsters of the creature from the black lagoon but a jealous smell. Coworker ensured that there was no prestigious career. A rating millicent. Mallory decided to set the record straight in her book. The lady from the black lagoon. Hollywood monsters and the lost legacy of millicent. Patrick and reestablish. Millicent of monster design mallory. Thank you for joining us. But before we get stuck into things would you please introduce yourself to our listeners. high Yeah thank you so much for having the ottoman cited to to talk about this with you. Three i m author of lady from the black lagoon an fulltime author. And i'm also fellow podcasters. I host the show reading glasses every week with my friend. brea grant. what did you hope to achieve by. Unearthing the story of million patrick and setting the record straight about her contribution to monster design. Well a few things honestly the impetus behind me working on in in writing from the black lagoon was just i wanted to know. Millicent has been my hero. Since i was a teenager and i wanted to satisfy my own personal curiosity i found out about her when i was seventeen and it just seemed creature from the black lagoon like nobody even knew if she was still alive. She didn't have a website. She didn't have a wikipedia entry. Nothing about her online. So i personally just really really wanted to know at as i started digging into her life and her work and in this book i i also just. I wanted people to know that we've always been here. You know i. I actually started working on this book before the metoo movement happened and while i think it's amazing that there's such a huge push right now to get more women in front of the camera behind the camera writing doing everything women everywhere in cosigned for me but i also think it's really important to have people know that women have always been here. We have a legacy here and millicent. Patrick is proof. That and if i could only unearth her story and bring it to the world than i could could prove it is funny. You say that. Because i remember i was a massive star trek fan still but i remember in high school being completely obsessed with original series star trek and then discovering that d c fontana was a woman and i was like women have been there from the beginning. We right star trek. Yeah so i. I definitely can get on board with excitement. It changes everything. I mean finding out that a woman who designed this incredible monster that i became completely obsessed with it changed my life. It made me realize up until that point all of my heroes in the monster world. Where met you know tom. Savini rick baker. Dick smith jack pierce. It never even occurred to me that women did those things and seeing just one single photo of seeing a woman working on the creature from the black lagoon. It broke my brain open. It was like being struck by lightning. And it you can. You can make a direct line from that moment in time in front of my computer. Seven seventeen to me becoming a filmmaker later on up reading a bit about medicine on. You mentioned that you back. Then she didn't have a wikipedia entry. She does have one now on your on it as well. Yes i mean we're competing is basically all from the bottom up until that point there was no there was really no biographical information about her and the stuff that was out there was largely false Sometimes because of Militants own she liked to fabricate biographical information about which was very fun for me to deal with as biographer But it's now now actually people who she is and she has a wikipedia. Entry people You google tons of stuff comes up. It's really it makes me really really happy. So how did she become raised from history in the first ice so the her boss at the universal studios monster shop and she worked there in the early nineteen fifties was a man named bud west more and he was part of a very very famous big family of makeup artist. The west morris His father actually. George west was the man who invented the idea of a makeup department so they were huge. Deal in hollywood at the time he had a massive amount of power and influence not just at universal but in the film world is a whole unfortunately he was also known for taking people's credit being very jealous of the other artists that worked with him if they were more successful or more talented than he was which wasn't hard to do And she designed creature and they shot the movie and it became very clear that the movie was going to be a huge hit. They the universal studios publicity department wanted to send millicent on a press tour to promote it and up until that point in history know in the fifties. There was no twitter. There was no. Imdb there is no way for people to really look into the details of of credits on films. You know back then. There was no like ten minutes end. Crawl at the end of a movie like we get now. There was only like these cards that gave the heads of department Credit for the things that they did so no matter. What but didn't design at on a movie increase in the credits creature. It says makeup. Bud west more So he never was challenged. People always just assume that he designed everything that came out of his shop

Millicent Millicent Patrick Brea Grant Patrick Mallory Savini Rick Baker Jack Pierce NED Disney Hollywood Dick Smith Fontana West Morris George West TOM Google
"dick smith" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:24 min | 10 months ago

"dick smith" Discussed on Conversations

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You <Speech_Male> flew back over that country <Speech_Male> lighter in a small <Speech_Male> plane. <Speech_Male> What did it <SpeakerChange> look like from the? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Jumped applying the flew <Speech_Male> out there and. <Speech_Male> Getting into the Mulligan <Speech_Male> River country and our thought. <Speech_Male> Wow, this <Speech_Male> is so <Speech_Male> barren <Speech_Male> and beautiful <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> you look <Speech_Male> at it and you think, wow, <Speech_Male> and I could <Speech_Male> actually see where I <Speech_Male> could McCain was came sixty <Speech_Male> four <Speech_Male> look down the flaming <Speech_Male> i. <Speech_Male> visualized. <Speech_Male> A block down <Speech_Male> may with a little Mama <Speech_Male> goats and. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It's amazing a flu <Speech_Male> round and our land. <Speech_Male> This'll <Speech_Male> to step out of the plane. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Look across the Lane skype <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> I just thought. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You know because I'd been hearing <Speech_Male> from people people <Speech_Male> who decide what <Speech_Male> you've done is so amazing <Speech_Male> I saw. <Speech_Male> Yeah. Well, I <Speech_Male> might be this. <Speech_Male> But didn't really <Speech_Male> dawn on me 'til <Speech_Male> actually <Speech_Male> step down the plein <Speech_Male> across this <Speech_Male> treeless tightly <Speech_Male> treeless. <Speech_Male> Plain <Speech_Male> is fair. Brace <Speech_Male> blinds a bit of <Speech_Male> dust flying up off it <Speech_Male> from the willy beliefs and so <Speech_Male> forth. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> I actually thought to myself. <Speech_Male> What <Speech_Male> I've done is pretty amazing. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> is a sense of. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Gratification and <Speech_Male> fulfillment. <Speech_Male> A realization <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> because I'd heard from others <Speech_Male> that it was pretty amazing. But <Speech_Male> didn't really want <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> me to let die that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the it's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> been pretty special. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Diabetes Lovely <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> speak with you. Thank you so <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> much <SpeakerChange> Richard thanks <Music> <Advertisement> very much. <Silence> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> You've been listening <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to a podcast <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of conversations <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> with Richard <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Fidler. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> For more <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> conversations interviews, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> please go to <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the website ABC <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> dot net <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> AU <Music> sash conversations. <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Discover <Speech_Female> more great ABC <Speech_Female> podcasts, <Speech_Female> Live Radio and exclusives on ABC listen APP.

Birdsville ABC Peck Ryan Brooke Abacha Dick Smith Kenilworth Mulligan McCain Richard Fidler.
"dick smith" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"dick smith" Discussed on Good Life Project

"Guest today is John Leone Junior. He's an academy award winning an Emmy Award winning makeup artists at fifteen years old. When he's in high school he started becoming really obsessed. Actually the obsession started way earlier with movies and also Shirley Monster Movies and just how the craft of makeup not just beauty makeup but special effects. Makeup was done in this incredible way to transform people. He did his one incredible thing that led him to become mentored by one of the most legendary names in movie makeup and special effects. A guy named Dick Smith and it was Dick Smith who then jumpstarted John's career by recommending him to the NBC. Make Program in one thousand nine hundred seventy six where John were then end up honing his skills working on game shows soaps and then for six years with the original cast of Saturday night live and after that stint was done he started going out on his own and started doing all of this work on movies. Like quest for fire. Zelic Cotton Club Heat Dick Tracy and he also designed and Applied Heath ledger sort of legendary. Really iconic joker character makeup in the Dark Knight was nominated for an Oscar that year for best makeup and he has been the personal makeup artist to a solid thirty years and worked most recently with Al in the Irishman and hunters so excited to explore. John's career his Chris the art and craft of makeup..

John Leone Junior John Dick Smith Dick Tracy Emmy Award Applied Heath Oscar NBC Al Chris
"dick smith" Discussed on Podcast | Don Rheem

Podcast | Don Rheem

16:12 min | 1 year ago

"dick smith" Discussed on Podcast | Don Rheem

"Tough business issues as part of vintage international a membership organization for CEO's in his role He provides executive coaching to his visage members. CEO's and he I've been doing that for over ten years as a vestige chair welcome Dick and thank you for taking the time to be here with us here it's my pleasure it's great to be with you today I know you're busy guy I want our listeners to understand a little bit about what you do you're a vestige chair so you're a chair of some groups under the organization called vestige can you tell us a little bit about what vestiges and what your role is as a chairperson of groups in vestige sure will actually first of all vestiges the oldest and largest company dealing with CEO level execs and their senior leadership team we say that we're around to help our leaders make better decisions become better leaders and get better results we have twenty two thousand members worldwide ecksteen countries as you mentioned I run as a facilitator in coach three different age groups on average thirteen to fifteen members in each and we meet once a month for a full day twelve times a year and we sit around and help one another identify challenges Susan's opportunities that they have so we help one another decide how to better render businesses a little bit better in this appear advisory concept that we breath so dick recently I've spoke to your three groups and I was talking about employee engagement and I I'm always impressed when envisage share believes engagement is an important topic for their members helped me understand where employee engagement fits in for your members against CEO's of their own companies why this issues important will in my candidate opinion and it's one man's opinion I think shared now by many we know that when our employees are engaged at a high level perform at probably two to three times the employees that's not engaged if you will to any degree and so that means we can do things better faster even cheaper and that's always a goal for our members and I feel that employee engagement covers so many things across the board as it relates to performance it's in everything that we deal with from an issue standpoint by month so when I was there and talking to your groups on these three consecutive days I did talk a lot about neuroscience Dan the Science Behind what drives people when they're at work what drives their behavior how did that land on people in reflecting on that afterward what kinds of things here however members reacting to the science-based approach great question Going back to I actually heard you speak done back in two thousand eleven I had you speak to to my vestige groups back then and I was very impressed back then with the neuroscience of employee engagement ear assessment tools and then I think it was August or September two thousand seventeen when I read on our this'd chair network that you came out with a book called bye bye design I immediately bought the book read it and said Oh my God this is exactly what my members need I went ahead and bought fifty copies for their holiday present in gave it to him Christmas time two thousand seventeen and proceeded to tell them that we're going to go through this book every quarter we're GONNA reach for Chapter there's and review and see what it means resonates which you folks they actually fell in love with the process learned a lot in reading the books than as you know I brought you back in February this year to really reconfirm not only with my members but they invited some of their senior level staff and I gotTa Tell You did was a member myself Thirteen Years Cherry now for over ten years and have all the speakers I've ever heard I think your program one is the most impactful and you are probably if not the highest rated speaker I've ever had in front of my group should right near the top five what they took away from it many many things the things that they're still using today met with a member today s the question at breakfast this morning help me out what did you take away from Don rims presentation and basically a couple of comments of one you've got to do this every time there's a bad thing that happens with an employee takes five to correct that so they're trying to do more of that recognition five to one they're also talking about making sure that the employees feel safe and making sure they understand what's next in a lot of our conversations. You'd be amazed how often this comes up in my coaching sessions with members when we talk about well are you making that employees feel safe are you making that employees feel that they're making a great contribution to the tribe as you say and so many many members are using it in fact as you know you're coming back it to Chicago we talked about it back in February you coming back to two eight hour workshops on May twenty ninth and thirtieth here in Chicago in many members have signed up to go back themselves as well as bringing quite a number of their leadership team members to your chip yeah and I'm looking forward to those two sessions and it's great to see that very high level of interest that was there and you mentioned this issue of the importance of people feeling safe and I do talk about in the book but for listeners it may not have read the book the issue here is around the LIMBIC system in the brain and the role of the LIMBIC system in threat detection and if employees don't feel safe when they're at work and by safe work is unpredictable inconsistent not fair they have a manager who's not available inaccessible or is mercurial in how they treat and respect employees that the brain starts hijacking resources with Olympic system starts hijacking resources from other parts of the brain to deal with that perceived threat and that means in very proud legal terms is an employee's IQ drops their peripheral vision collapses their ability to care and know what's going on for other people around them goes into Klein now Dick as it you're part of the process is you sit down with these thirteen fifteen CEOS around a table and process issues and a member brings up issue they're dealing with and all the other CEO's come around and support that member and they worked through the issue and try to create resolution in all of the is issues that you deal with and you touched on this a little earlier in a comment but where does employee engagement fit in that hierarchy of issues or maybe another way to ask it is those issues that you you deal with how many of them really pivot around an employee's commitment and presence when they're at work well great question and I had this saying that goes for every CEO eighty percent of their problems walked through the employee entrance every day so almost every single issue we process has to do with employees in one way shape or form we talk about compensation certainly of there's an area there that obviously you have to reward employees to make them not only feel safe but provide growth what's next for them benefits culture obviously has to do with employee engagement hiring practices finding hiring keeping good talent has everything to do with how engaged their employees are because an attraction magnet one employees are engaged in a company they'll tell her friends what a great place that is how recognized for their contributions and so as consequence they have a pipeline new possible hires so as I say eighty percent of your problems as if you're a CEO walk through the employee for every day so engagements overarching into all those issues Dick how important is the current labor shortage playing we see results have been coming out every month last month and additional two hundred sixty three thousand jobs were added to the US economy on the unemployment rate is down three point six percent how big is it talent crisis because you mentioned a magnet for new employees how critical is this talent crisis and and what you see is the role of employee engagement in both retaining current employees but then attracting new ones yeah well I don't know if you actually came this fraser someone else but it no longer World War on talent it's talent armageddon out there in the people that are unemployed are those that probably need to be unemployed unless you get really lucky and find someone in a transition you don't really want the people that are employed you need to steal people from other entities whether they're within your industry or not because you become an attraction because of the way you're treating employees in getting them engaged at various levels appreciating them the approval of their efforts and putting career ladders together you definitely are going to be the talk of the town there's yelps employees coming and going thing on how well this company treats them a good member of a great tribe versus the opposite which is going to detract people joining of Scott you touch on it quite a lot in the book it's got very little do really I find with the money that is at least you have to pay the only good people you gotta pay better than an average wage but I on that you keep them as you call it emotional velcro by dealing with making sure they feel safe and they're contributing get recognized for yeah I was with construction company recently on the West Coast and they talk about this a how employees will walk across the street for twenty five cents an hour more and how do they prevent that from happening and and I always explain the only way to prevent that from happening is if employees he's do have this emotional velcro these hooks and loops that hold an employee to an organization and that's essentially the felt experience and in that Ted ex talk I did I use this I heard repeated back to me a lot the future of work will be defined more by how it feels than having pays and we're talking about this felt variance people have at work and what I know from the neuroscience is it the way people feel determines how they behave and ten years ago the science I would have said the way P people think determines how they behave but now we know it's really how they feel and so when we talk to clients now Dick we're talking to them it's not about their hiring strategy so much now as it is about their retention strategy and this issue of employee engagement is about that how to create help create these hooks and luke that hold onto people and help them tell oh great stories about where they work to attract other talent yeah I certainly can relate to that statement I'll even take it another step it's L. I. UP Forty five members there's a bell curve from time to time lie impact and when they tell me they appreciate like Kristen did this morning wing of the coaching session that we had because I challenged her ideas and made me feel approved appreciated I felt safe safe with her continuing as a member of my group and what's next is we'll keep doing this because she likes it well I'm GonNa go to bat for her I probably even do more for her that someone is a nodal just dismisses me right in suggests they don't need me so it's all reptilian brain neuroscience in opinion every day with every person we come in contact with not just our employees so what we found a what I think I found Dick and I'm curious about your opinion is when I do these sessions with managers companies around employee engagement and I talk about the neuroscience of what drives behavior they often tell me afterward that that was the distinguishing characteristic of our content is it was science based and that was very important to them and they talk about how they've been so many leadership fads that come forward over the last thirty years that they really believed in this approach more because they saw the clarity of the science behind it what have you found with your members because the science especially neuroscience around behavior is it resonating with them and why do you think well the simple answer is yes it's resonating but there's a saying that that I use you can't teach a kid how to ride a bike at a workshop that's part of our problem we hear great speakers like yourself even read books we start practicing things and if I were clumsy so it's the conscious competence NC model we need to do this we need to give them five Atta boys girls for a negative comment so we have to keep this in mind is simple straightforward modern process and I love your evaluation tool as well but it's difficult eighteen with a new manager even so it's a matter of keeping it in front of them keeping them conscious of constantly you know Patrick says you need to tell me all seven to eleven times before thinks in that's very true I mean they walk away from a workshop maybe retain twenty percent of what you said and if they review it playing the piano music theory all day long in in a band years ago made a living playing in a band we can talk music theory all day long we teach notes about twenty eight question online survey that employees in our client companies take and it gives us a profile for engagement levels of engagement within the Penny and we also then aggregate that data by manager so every manager we have a really clear sense of how many of their employees are either actively engaged doing every Tuesday we send everyone of our managers that are in our client companies an email we call take ten Tuesday and we ask them to take ten minutes to investors and their skills as a leader and guide them into the website on either a video an article self-help assessment that they can take because we really need this steady drip of reminding managers you're not just there to manage things you need to lead and one of the key aspects of leadership and where they eight to leave today and this labor environment certainly is around engagement and creating that emotional velcro with employees Dick I want to ask you any last thoughts our comments about the importance of employee engagement to leave our listeners with as someone that is leading coaching and mentoring CEO's in.

CEO Dick executive ten years eighty percent Thirteen Years twenty percent two eight hour thirty years six percent ten minutes
47. Employee Engagement with Special Guest, Dick Smith, the Chicago Vistage Chair

Podcast | Don Rheem

10:39 min | 1 year ago

47. Employee Engagement with Special Guest, Dick Smith, the Chicago Vistage Chair

"Welcome Dick and thank you for taking the time to be here with us here it's my pleasure it's great to be with you today I know you're busy guy I want our listeners to understand a little bit about what you do you're a vestige chair so you're a chair of some groups under the organization called vestige can you tell us a little bit about what vestiges and what your role is as a chairperson of groups in vestige sure will actually first of all vestiges the oldest and largest company dealing with CEO level execs and their senior leadership team we say that we're around to help our leaders make better decisions become better leaders and get better results we have twenty two thousand members worldwide ecksteen countries as you mentioned I run as a facilitator in coach three different age groups on average thirteen to fifteen members in each and we meet once a month for a full day twelve times a year and we sit around and help one another identify challenges Susan's opportunities that they have so we help one another decide how to better render businesses a little bit better in this appear advisory concept that we breath so dick recently I've spoke to your three groups and I was talking about employee engagement and I I'm always impressed when envisage share believes engagement is an important topic for their members helped me understand where employee engagement fits in for your members against CEO's of their own companies why this issues important will in my candidate opinion and it's one man's opinion I think shared now by many we know that when our employees are engaged at a high level perform at probably two to three times the employees that's not engaged if you will to any degree and so that means we can do things better faster even cheaper and that's always a goal for our members and I feel that employee engagement covers so many things across the board as it relates to performance it's in everything that we deal with from an issue standpoint by month so when I was there and talking to your groups on these three consecutive days I did talk a lot about neuroscience Dan the Science Behind what drives people when they're at work what drives their behavior how did that land on people in reflecting on that afterward what kinds of things here however members reacting to the science-based approach great question Going back to I actually heard you speak done back in two thousand eleven I had you speak to to my vestige groups back then and I was very impressed back then with the neuroscience of employee engagement ear assessment tools and then I think it was August or September two thousand seventeen when I read on our this'd chair network that you came out with a book called bye bye design I immediately bought the book read it and said Oh my God this is exactly what my members need I went ahead and bought fifty copies for their holiday present in gave it to him Christmas time two thousand seventeen and proceeded to tell them that we're going to go through this book every quarter we're GONNA reach for Chapter there's and review and see what it means resonates which you folks they actually fell in love with the process learned a lot in reading the books than as you know I brought you back in February this year to really reconfirm not only with my members but they invited some of their senior level staff and I gotTa Tell You did was a member myself Thirteen Years Cherry now for over ten years and have all the speakers I've ever heard I think your program one is the most impactful and you are probably if not the highest rated speaker I've ever had in front of my group should right near the top five what they took away from it many many things the things that they're still using today met with a member today s the question at breakfast this morning help me out what did you take away from Don rims presentation and basically a couple of comments of one you've got to do this every time there's a bad thing that happens with an employee takes five to correct that so they're trying to do more of that recognition five to one they're also talking about making sure that the employees feel safe and making sure they understand what's next in a lot of our conversations. You'd be amazed how often this comes up in my coaching sessions with members when we talk about well are you making that employees feel safe are you making that employees feel that they're making a great contribution to the tribe as you say and so many many members are using it in fact as you know you're coming back it to Chicago we talked about it back in February you coming back to two eight hour workshops on May twenty ninth and thirtieth here in Chicago in many members have signed up to go back themselves as well as bringing quite a number of their leadership team members to your chip yeah and I'm looking forward to those two sessions and it's great to see that very high level of interest that was there and you mentioned this issue of the importance of people feeling safe and I do talk about in the book but for listeners it may not have read the book the issue here is around the LIMBIC system in the brain and the role of the LIMBIC system in threat detection and if employees don't feel safe when they're at work and by safe work is unpredictable inconsistent not fair they have a manager who's not available inaccessible or is mercurial in how they treat and respect employees that the brain starts hijacking resources with Olympic system starts hijacking resources from other parts of the brain to deal with that perceived threat and that means in very proud legal terms is an employee's IQ drops their peripheral vision collapses their ability to care and know what's going on for other people around them goes into Klein now Dick as it you're part of the process is you sit down with these thirteen fifteen CEOS around a table and process issues and a member brings up issue they're dealing with and all the other CEO's come around and support that member and they worked through the issue and try to create resolution in all of the is issues that you deal with and you touched on this a little earlier in a comment but where does employee engagement fit in that hierarchy of issues or maybe another way to ask it is those issues that you you deal with how many of them really pivot around an employee's commitment and presence when they're at work well great question and I had this saying that goes for every CEO eighty percent of their problems walked through the employee entrance every day so almost every single issue we process has to do with employees in one way shape or form we talk about compensation certainly of there's an area there that obviously you have to reward employees to make them not only feel safe but provide growth what's next for them benefits culture obviously has to do with employee engagement hiring practices finding hiring keeping good talent has everything to do with how engaged their employees are because an attraction magnet one employees are engaged in a company they'll tell her friends what a great place that is how recognized for their contributions and so as consequence they have a pipeline new possible hires so as I say eighty percent of your problems as if you're a CEO walk through the employee for every day so engagements overarching into all those issues Dick how important is the current labor shortage playing we see results have been coming out every month last month and additional two hundred sixty three thousand jobs were added to the US economy on the unemployment rate is down three point six percent how big is it talent crisis because you mentioned a magnet for new employees how critical is this talent crisis and and what you see is the role of employee engagement in both retaining current employees but then attracting new ones yeah well I don't know if you actually came this fraser someone else but it no longer World War on talent it's talent armageddon out there in the people that are unemployed are those that probably need to be unemployed unless you get really lucky and find someone in a transition you don't really want the people that are employed you need to steal people from other entities whether they're within your industry or not because you become an attraction because of the way you're treating employees in getting them engaged at various levels appreciating them the approval of their efforts and putting career ladders together you definitely are going to be the talk of the town there's yelps employees coming and going thing on how well this company treats them a good member of a great tribe versus the opposite which is going to detract people joining of Scott you touch on it quite a lot in the book it's got very little do really I find with the money that is at least you have to pay the only good people you gotta pay better than an average wage but I on that you keep them as you call it emotional velcro by dealing with making sure they feel safe and they're contributing get recognized for yeah I was with construction company recently on the West Coast and they talk about this a how employees will walk across the street for twenty five cents an hour more and how do they prevent that from happening and and I always explain the only way to prevent that from happening is if employees he's do have this emotional velcro these hooks and loops that hold an employee to an organization and that's essentially the felt experience and in that Ted ex talk I did I use this I heard repeated back to me a lot the future of work will be defined more by how it feels than having pays and we're talking about this felt variance people have at work and what I know from the neuroscience is it the way people feel determines how they behave and ten years ago the science I would have said the way P people think determines how they behave but now we know it's really how they feel and so when we talk to clients now Dick we're talking to them it's not about their hiring strategy so much now as it is about their retention strategy and this issue of employee engagement is about that how to create help create these hooks and luke that hold onto people and help them tell oh great stories about where they work to attract other talent

Dick Eighty Percent Ten Years Thirteen Years Two Eight Hour Six Percent
"dick smith" Discussed on The Fantasy Footballers - Fantasy Football Podcast

The Fantasy Footballers - Fantasy Football Podcast

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"dick smith" Discussed on The Fantasy Footballers - Fantasy Football Podcast

"He was the wide receiver tin showing he hid and good stretch. He can be the guy believe that. And so to me when I stat this out, I'm looking at who's the number one for Carolina. I think it's going to be DJ more. I think he's talented, I'd like to coming into last year's draft. And if he takes step up, nineteen could be love winds winds. Cam really had Steve Smith, dick Smith. Right. So you're talking about his rookie season. Steve Smith was also he was, but that was his rookie season. I'm saying it has been a wider Seaver committee situation, Carolina if yeah with Kelvin Benjamin and Devin funchess. You're correct. It is there is not been over to really have be a wide receiver one on the field. I think DJ more. Well, I only bring that out not because I don't believe. More could do it. But because you, you, you were saying he performed in a stretch, and I feel like Benjamin and funchess and gin they had stretches through with Cam, the only player that has been a consistent contributor with Cam has been early, you know, I guess you could say early salesman, but it's really Greg all struggles you, it's interesting because I think we would all say McCaffrey's the one. By way of volume. Sure as I, I have DJ more projected for more targets than Christian McCaffrey. So I would not say that, okay. Mike. I'm supposed to talk to you about your Austin Hooper ranking now. Now we really we really wanna talk about. We don't Jason and I haven't thirteen and fourteen you have met twenty six and I want to say this for the record. I don't care that you haven't. Yeah. They'll say, we're not gonna talk about Austin, actually that guy. Honestly, here's the deal, I've seen Austin Hooper get drafted as like a top ten titan. No. Thank you. It could happen. But you're not going to be happy along the way. He's the fourth option at best in that offense. No, no. That's all the time you get on the today show Austin, but I had really cool stats. Yeah. Gimme one, Mike, you get one. And then we're not even gonna argue with nearly forty percent of his targets came in three games. Okay. Good. Because that I'd rather I'd rather convince I'd rather convene Damian Williams bat. Yes, please. I rather convince you that Damian Williams. Oh, this is so great for me because I get to just sit back and. Listen. I besmirched aiming Williams so much. Now, I've been like the highest ranked on him this off season. I don't like it. And I really wanna hear why he's the whitest what do what do you. You've got. He's not. He's not on my wide receiver. I said at him as a running back here. Yes. Running back seventeen yeah. Tell us you have ten and eleven and I couldn't feel more comfortable about Damien Williams at seventeen than I do. I really do. That's funny. Brooks put a note in here. He goes is this is this a placeholder ranking until training camp? No. He's at seventeen because it's a it's inclusive of exactly what Damian Williams is. And here's the here's the story. Damian Williams had a wonderful, wonderful time with Patrick Mahomes, skipping through the meadows. Oh, crap. Did Mahomes go somewhere? No. Oh, okay. Thank you, though, for man, I, I got a little bit worried now is impressive. Five point one a carry with Patrick Mahomes last year. You gotta love it. Now this wasn't Dany look Jason didn't like Damon waves. Correct. And that's because his entire career is unlike -able career nothing likable, about his career three point three carries three point four carry three point seven to carry his pass catching Damian Williams has been an unlikable player to say the least. The thing about it is he was in a perfect situation. I believe you could have put a hundred running backs in Damian Williams situation last season. Not no man brother, no player played with the lead more than Damian Williams. They he played with the lead. More than any other running back in football. You know what he did? He faced six point four men in the box on average because Patrick Mahomes demands you to pay attention to the secondary. So he faced almost a fierce guys in the box on average..

Damian Williams Austin Hooper DJ Patrick Mahomes Carolina Damien Williams Cam Steve Smith Kelvin Benjamin Devin funchess Mike Jason Christian McCaffrey dick Smith Brooks football salesman Greg Dany
"dick smith" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"dick smith" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"So we have the battle between the head and the heart going on here, but I guess they have to go back to Georgetown because it is where things happen. And this is a thing of familiarity. I don't think that there's a hell mouth and in Georgetown there might be a l. as Buffy but I don't think so, but they go back to someplace that we're familiar with to kind of restage some of the same things that we got before, and I can't remember. It's been a long time since I've, I haven't compared the final scene of the short version with the final scene of the longer version, but I think, oh, you're in for three. Okay, good. Good. I'm sorry. What do you think? Like what I know the difference is very well, don't they? 'cause I, I know how they cut stuff. But don't they actually insert a couple of shots from the original exorcist into they do okay. Doing how does it work? I mean, basically it's just a cut away of there's. There's the split frame cut-away of Reagan in in the position face from the first film. Remember when she's looking directly at the camera and the left side of the faces one face on the right side of the faces, the other face that's in there. And then she she leaps up. What does she say? Does she say is that the fucker like fucker fucker like when when she's talking about the how God, I don't remember. It's at its in the exercises and I don't remember what the line is. I want to say it's like I wanna say it's that, but I don't remember exactly. But yeah, I mean, basically throw it in there and it is it kind of weirdly works. I mean, it is a cheat. It's an ultimate sheet. I mean, basically, you're, you're taking the climax of you're the first film and using the climax of the second film so that that's kind of cheap, but it doesn't not work. It works. I mean, I still prefer again, I prefer the original version because it's just much more coherent pure vision. But if you're gonna make it into a Harvey, and that's really what the re-cut did. It's trying desperately to take out the fantastical elements and make it more of a horror movie that works for that reason. I try to member another horror movie where like the house itself get sucked into. The ground or just disappears, and I'm trying to guys thank you. That's what I was thinking. But I couldn't remember that because this reminded me. And of course, I know poltergeist came later, but in Kerry I mean, if they want to go there, that's yeah, that's much more of what I was trying to think of because the house just falls apart. And by the end, there is no more house yet. They ran out of time when they were shooting the ending, and you can kind of tell they wanted to be big encounter straffic, but they had a lot of stuff that they wanted to do. They wanted locus suppor- out of Lamont's mouth. They wanted like there to be this kabuki dick Smith worked on this kabuki demon, which would like which was this kind of mix between the Reagan possess demon, and the position from that little trinket thing that they found in the first movie. So it was like this African kind of weird thing and locus. We're gonna fly in and rip apart her face. There was going to be blood gushing out of it, and there are all these things. That they were going to do and least they. I mean, partially because they had to shut down production for a month partially because they already went over budget because it was originally about a budget, eleven million and ended up at fourteen, but they just ran out of time really. And they had to finish it. They and they were going to lose Burton Burton, had another movie or the had to go back to the to show on Broadway. He had an out so they have to finish, which is kind of shame if I mean it has to come to an end at some point, but I wish that they would have been able to do some of those like effects sequences. I really just wanna see, locus, come out of Peterborough Richard Burton's mouth. No, I, it was unin a script that you read, Mike. I know I read that somewhere. Yeah. Now that was in a couple of scripts..

Reagan Burton Burton Georgetown Richard Burton Buffy Mike Lamont dick Smith Kerry
SyFy Faceoff Special Effects Make Up Artist Walter Welsh Interview

Talk Nerdy to Me

13:27 min | 3 years ago

SyFy Faceoff Special Effects Make Up Artist Walter Welsh Interview

"Hey, listen. All right. Welcome to another addition of talk nerdy to me. Troy Troy. Stagner I have my cogos here. Trevor Cooper. Good morning Selo nerds, and we had the distinct pleasure of interviewing Walter Welsh from season ten and thirteen faceoff how you doing today. Walter. Doing great glad to be here and we're happy to have you told us before we started, if you nothing was off limits. So. Now we're dot to doing thing hard to you. So. Oh, good. Let's start with some some simple stuff. Here. I'm reading some of your history here says you were a college football athlete. Can you tell us a little bit about that? Yeah, I, I played football pretty much most of my life and I eventually went on and played a Juku junior college played for a year and a half there. And so I- tore my ligaments in my hand and decided to hang the cleanup. Can you tell us which juke? Oh, it was. Yeah, I played for Diallo valley college in. California in the bay area. And and what position did you play? I was outside linebacker was kinda like a stud baecker. So I just read quarterback at outside contain. You got to do all the fun stuff. The fun stuff without all the crazy middle responsibility. Yeah. And also says you were into competitive bodybuilding. Yeah, right after I tore my ligaments in my hand, I had to wear a club for for football and that's kinda why stop playing just I don't know how guys can do is really difficult and ended up gaining like a bunch of weight. I- ballooned up to like two hundred eighty pounds, and I just hated the way I looked and someone told me I should try to lose weight by shooting for like a competition. So slowly I walked a bunch of weight and I went from a hundred two hundred eighty pounds to down to like one eighty nine and I competed in bodybuilding. And then I continued to do that for another three or four years for years total. So how'd you make the jump from that to to art because then you've got into some portrait painting, assess. Yeah, I I had always been into art. I took like there was like a college elective course in high school called APR Neha in order to get into that, you had to take our every year. So I usually always took my elective in high school in our elective full of my parents are really artistic. So I kinda, I've been drawing because of them my whole life and my brothers super justic. So we've always been into art and onside decided I was done with sports other than bodybuilding was has always just been like a fun passionate hobby of mine. I follow sport and and I live the lifestyle as far as healthy eating and working out every day, but it was never something I wanted to like do professionally or anything. It was just a goal for me in the gym. Art was something that I've always really loved and wanted to pursue. So when I transferred from diabled alley college, I went to Cal State East Bay and I, I got my Arctic gre- there. And when I was there, I was doing portrait painting and airbrushing and stuff like that. And then once I was doing all the airbrush stuff, I, I actually saw the show face off and to be honest before the show, I didn't know too much about special effects. I knew of like STAN Winston and dick Smith, but I didn't know too much about the grades or any other thing besides those two and the work that like STAN Winston had done in the dick Smith, Donald exorcists and stuff. And from there, I just really started taking passionate and researching and watching things and reading things and kind of all went towards that direction from there.

Facebook California Barney Burman Oscar Troy Oetzi Mcconnell Margaret Kerrigan Walter Paso Graham Pandora Trevor Twitter Stan Twenty Three Hours Three Quarters Seven Minutes
"dick smith" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

I Think You're Interesting

04:12 min | 3 years ago

"dick smith" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

"You know, for instance, we don't want to create a big heavy fat makeup which would also require a fat suit because we think it would be funny. We wanted to make sure that we could play off of each athletes own features, but also make sure we can apply them quickly. We could get them, you know on them and they could get out and do their thing quickly. So a lot of it for this in particular was creating memorable characters. When you're aging someone, you know, you gotta look at their facial features. You want to. Buddy, how they're going to age. They're going to naturally mature and you wanna play off of that. And that kind of helps bring us back to the urinal questions. Some of our favor make-up's top five and coming to America has some of Joan and is favourite make-up's all over like through the whole movie. But in that movie, there are tons. The barbershop seeing most of the barbershop make-up's are not really great make-up's, they're okay. But the really funny and they, they make you remember like the performance and they kind of just help embody who they're trying to play on the other side of that. The old Jewish man in the barbershop makeup is probably both. John is like one of our favorite make-up's of all time. It is so incredibly good, especially considering that that was foam latex which is an OPEC material, you know, and so that that's a really, really hard medium to get a really convincing character. And you know you gotta hand it to both Rick Baker who designed that make up and also to Eddie Murphy who really brought it to life. And you know, Rick Baker on that makeup did some really ingenious things in like, if you look at some of the behind the scene photos, he used the vacuum form of little thin plastic sheet that was form fitted to the top of Eddie Murphy's head. So it could compress down his hair. So you wouldn't see his hair kind of coming through the makeup so he could create this balding effect. Eddie Murphy was unwilling to, you know, he he wouldn't shave his moustache and he couldn't because of the character that he played throughout the film. So they have to be able to go over his own moustache. I mean, there's some really smart things. When you look at that makeup, it's brilliantly done. It's still one of my favorites of this day. The other one that we were talking about earlier was f Murray Abraham as salary, and I'm Davis. That was one of the makeup set inspired me at a very early age because it was just so. Oh, convincing and dick Smith who has inspired so many of us, and it's really paved the way for us that make up just to this day is still one of my all time favorites and anonymous. He like ages across several decades, right? Like is right. Yeah, that's amazing. And then the final one is when he's in the hospital in the psychiatric ward, you know, in these, he's got the piece of cloth around his neck from when he tried to kill himself, and he used a dick Smith actually used a copy of his own forehead, a life cast of his own forehead and did a press out of that, and then ended up turning that into a prosthetic forever Marie ever him. So there's just these real subtle things that that were done. And again, they, you know, they didn't have all the materials that we have to work with today. So those to make up for me and for Matt were really, really impressive. Talk about the kind of the wound on his his neck in that movie in like that. Strikes me as an other thing. You guys have to deal with a lot is like prosthetics that look like injury. Or like look like will open wounds like what's what's tricky about doing something like that. I think the trickiest part about trauma makeup is that reality is stranger than fiction. I mean, I can't tell you I was an intern it back in two thousand seven at the very for shop ever worked at and my mentor the time cut his finger on table saw, and it was. It was very, like just the tip of his finger got nicked and he hates that. I say the word next because to him it was like a hacksaw wind, but it really did like it for a table salt to just cut the skin and not take off your finger is like a blessing..

Eddie Murphy dick Smith Murray Abraham Davis Rick Baker OPEC Matt intern America John Joan Marie
"dick smith" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"dick smith" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"In the major leagues and played for the mets briefly i believe in one thousand nine hundred sixty five and sixty six and he was with the dodgers and then came to the mets for dick smith and great mets fans will remember dick smith on a friday in wrigley field in nineteen sixty four jack is pitching for the mets and the mets beat the cubs nineteen to one and there's a joke about two guys one guy calls the other a in the both mets fans and and he goes hey did you hear today the mets scored nineteen runs and the other guy goes yeah but did they win and dick smith in that game went five for five and then got traded sometime thereafter for larry miller the reason i bring this this ridiculous notion off is that as a kid i remember standing by the glass double doors at old shay stadium neom with all these other kids and stuff just trying to get an autograph and i'm sure there were so many view this morning we could probably do week after week of shows of close encounters with greatness we didn't care who they were the they looked like ballplayers and i remember standing out there before having to take two trains back to the bronx 'cause they decided not to build a subway directly from queens to the bronx he had to go into grand central as so many millions of people have done through the years and then take the woodland jerome the number four up to up to the west bronx and so i remember standing out there for i don't know if it was a forty five minutes or an hour after a day game and people would come out and we i would say i would say this or others go hey are you anybody are you so you could get an autograph i got larry miller's autograph and i was so happy and then i was able to make my way for a make my way back to the bronx with my fifteen cents for the for the.

mets dodgers dick smith wrigley field cubs larry miller bronx old shay stadium forty five minutes
"dick smith" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"dick smith" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Network i'm dick smith in several states teachers are shutting down school districts with protests and demands for higher pay education minnesota president denise specs says salaries attract teaching talent there are a lot of people that should think about teaching and there's some play not because they're being attracted to higher paying careers so many people see educators who are just not respected and who wants to go into a job like that spec says a massive walkout is not likely anytime soon in minnesota the man shot and killed on the streets of north minneapolis tuesday night was a community activist police still looking for the person who killed thirty three year old tyrone williams a father of four who died after being shot near his mother's house williams often spoke out on issues such as the shootings of jomar clark and philander castille road construction season begins soon we have a lot of work going on on i thirty five from here to the south towards iowa and also from the twin cities up to duluth so there some major work on on one of our north south corridors deputy commissioner sue malva hill the twins won their warmup to today's homeowner in minneapolis by beating the pirates seven three in snowy pittsburgh starting pitcher j go torrisi definitely the coldest game thrown in probably my life today's homeowner could be the coldest home game in twins franchise history spokesman dustin moore's players don't seem to be too bothered they'll bundle up bill they'll do what they need to do to play the game forecast high thirty five degrees at first pitch this is imminent what srp invoice list price dealer price toby knapp here if your car shopping you've probably heard these terms but what do they mean it's so confusing well it was confusing not anymore i'm telling you about.

dick smith minnesota minneapolis jomar clark iowa pittsburgh dustin moore toby knapp president denise specs tyrone williams duluth deputy commissioner sue malva thirty five degrees thirty three year
"dick smith" Discussed on KSCO 1080

KSCO 1080

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"dick smith" Discussed on KSCO 1080

"Have that that's good and yet as the could than you know that even though he only has twenty films to work with you feel as though he could have covered bore i mean area well that's what i want to do i mean i've i've seen them all i have the town and i went to pale ian saw the other foreign doubt notes and the are we still running foul sharon boca um apparently suss kinds papers or at the university of wisconsin can i have a guy who's might be a co author helper who is looking into getting those okay so hopefully that'll be some material but but i just think it's it's a fun little horror show uh joe dante when i emailed in uh dante's a very respected heart director and he said i was fourteen i remember watching that i'll talk to you yeah and rick baker the kaddoumi word'meeting makeup artist was a protege of dick smith in dick smith did the horror makeup's for wale so i hope to reach rick because i'm sure he'll have memories of seeing at he's the right age and he might also one of the be interviewed or something so while but it's a it's a good little show and some of them are scary methyl erie in a well you've hit on cross marketing angle so new in any event keep us posted and and and we will do this again harder chuck is the author of mr novak and acclaimed television series everything you want to know about the landmark nbc series from the golden age television there was also the first network tv series to portray teachers and students realistically while also exploring such topical issue as sex education alcoholism racial prejudice computers in the classroom and venereal disease mr novak an acclaimed television series is available now hardcover and.

joe dante director rick baker dick smith rick mr novak ian sharon boca university of wisconsin nbc
"dick smith" Discussed on Behind the Bets

Behind the Bets

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"dick smith" Discussed on Behind the Bets

"What if a use offenses this is not a prolific type offense under three hundred yards in arkansas state i know a geoffrey wilson is out again but little the dick smith is played well the quarterback mesa find if he doesn't turn the ball over and give troy a short fields a in easy points i i think the mean green can can pull this upset and i will certainly take them plus the uh the six and a half year i like that i liked up pick they almost they almost made the sheet uh while i'm unlocks i'm just look at just to give a little perspective i check out those um i don't know what was the old probabilty the win probability or the percentage of people taking out of the the money back the yet at the public the public money did you see what this game is that i i did not will i would assume a tree is going to be a very public soudness game is to cut the joe common fan is familiar with troy that was it well you wanted factly i really didn't pay much attention to it's on the other games and what north texas has done is while this year those is trying the ninety one percent of short i like b i like b meal a ninepercent ally metal y you'd all white data that you love being in that aww phil bennett will stay slu ballgame that's good news on state it's good build build bela he'll need that yes they're going to have a whole lot more than that also in the symbol speaking to bowl mania if i can see a lot of people say in and see stays might be the number one really you don't think so no.

arkansas geoffrey wilson dick smith troy texas phil bennett joe three hundred yards ninety one percent ninepercent
"dick smith" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"dick smith" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"The team located what they believed to be lassiter's grave unearthed a skeleton when the programs that a white man's skeleton when the programme's producer and production monitored delivered the remains to the police station in alice springs they were arrested for desecration of a grave lassiter war dentures in this goal had all of its teeth so they just dug fucking grave you really you january i mean you have to be pretty sure i think that's the role we have with digging up bodies from graves you can't just be like sort of like was this the one you saw is this it what about this one we got budget the truck what are you guys freaking out about well let's get to the bottom of this whole mad there was a fresh one so that was an him but that we brought that one along to and then we blew a tree that's going to be about we got a little laws we blew a tire near a tree and i'm we did blow tree than we blew a tree rock heart for a tree for a tree rock heart is admitted i'm saying there were still there are still people who believe that lassiter's reef is out there since the 1930s of dozens of expeditions dozens of expeditions have tried and failed to retrace lassiter's footsteps in two thousand eleven wellknown australian entrepreneur dick smith i can only imagine i didn't look him up but just as name is enough but why he sounds like a fucking idiot.

lassiter producer alice springs dick smith
"dick smith" Discussed on We Paid To See This

We Paid To See This

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"dick smith" Discussed on We Paid To See This

"Who oh you the characters names who darren one of them was gay and my mother watch the show and said on is that while you're in the darren yes i did not know that welsh utter nar maybe i made that i always liked i think i'm pretty sure it the one guy because the first guy left right i always like the second darren moore what did you like the uptake want uptight one of those like sam people always he was kind of lazily here now who is the second darren dick smith was one of the i think it was dick dick igic york dare you will oh no there is dick york and dick sargent they both were dick though both dick's one of them was gay and i'm named darren and i was just the dick so they they used to like i think he to like dick york more i still like dick yeah yeah i was always a dick york gay yeah he's hilarious is and speaking of dick's we went and so our movie with let's have pena's and seamen but you can't you have just references though this or at the top back because it we're being without a lot of caffeine and the name in the film is the the killing of a sacred correct dear yes dear director is europhilanthropists and i just gonna say start off the bat i thought this was an extraordinary film it's pretty damn incredible if you don't know his work he also did dog tooth in two thousand nine a movie called the alps and then people most known from is probably the lobster which came in a couple of years ago which i think got a screenwriting oscar nominations love said was that a one cohen farrell again and i've forgive me forgetting because he's hit the female coldly out rachel vice.

darren moore darren dick smith dick york dick sargent dick pena caffeine director darren dick dick igic rachel
"dick smith" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"dick smith" Discussed on KKAT

"They four were work related messages to their work accounts so they could be preserved okay now that's what we don't know i will kushner sarah according to what i heard kushner is done that i don't know about the other my markers she what is she is she hot they have a government exemption in my we have heard this morning to chief executive officer chairman of echo facts is leaving his job following that massive data breach of the credit reporting sense everybody lists than you quote unquote have to leave your job you think oh my god what am i going to do what am i going to do he leaves his job all around in 100dollar bills naked tired the top of the hour news and i'm so mad about an icon only make weird noises i can't even speak we're gonna find out at some point how many million dollars he got as he retired secondly he's not being fired all the news reports going to say you've been fired or forced out the door because of the breach that's not it that's how in the public turned on him of the public turned on it because it became very quickly evident that their first concern an was how to protect themselves and their company and their money their personal wealth their own personal money and not you the consumer four months let your information hang out there with the russians are some four hundred pounder on his bed whoever's while they will get reduction wrote to protect themselves that's why the country's turned on network facts here then they hit the kind of sneakily trick people into signing away our two class action lawsuit over the weekend they did till error called on it yet yes so they spent several months coming up with that plan to try to screw you that's why the guy's got to go up richard smith announcing his retirement effective two day dick smith happy retirement dick how about a how about a weekly caning the sec rules and regulations ceo does what they did or the wells fargo guy yeah yeah i'm taking full responsibility on peres peres.

kushner chief executive officer chairman richard smith dick smith ceo peres peres million dollars four months 100dollar two day
"dick smith" Discussed on SYFY25: Origin Stories

SYFY25: Origin Stories

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"dick smith" Discussed on SYFY25: Origin Stories

"I had this kind of padded bold pay that he put on his head and inuit again became the phantom of the opera and it was it's brilliant make up in as a brilliant performance family operas grade and yet he did torturous thinks himself in but there are great noah so that's how it started out but the real change came home in 1930 nine when people started using calm latex end the wizard of oz was one of the first uses of of foam latex as was the hunchback of notre bound both films being made in 1930 neiger i mean that was pretty much the state of the art up until we started doing pieces outta silicone siliconegel filled pieces in unfairly reason in movie history right are there are other makeup artist that you are inspired by or who have shown you things you didn't know where possible nia when i was trying to learn and it wasn't the internet in the room ibrar as i went to my local ivory and there was a new a book called the technique of film and television makeup i was looking through it endured certain makeup's that just jumped off the page that just looked so real on every one of those taiwan that willetts great it would be by dick smith you know and and that's when i became you know this hardcore dick smith fantastic smith of course it does not get any more i conduct than the man who did taxi driver the godfather the exorcist i'm curious what it was the drew you to his work this guy just his didn't work just look more real than anybody else's you know him as a kid.

inuit noah taiwan dick smith willetts
"dick smith" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

This Is Only A Test

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"dick smith" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

"Uh and as a time went along i attended these different meetings and would always bother me because makeup artist would say in the meeting they would say in were voting for the nominated fill it's not like you know his along ways away its were voting now for the nominated film and different people would say well you know i haven't seen the film but um their i understand there's a lot of makeup in it and it it just or just think it's amazing how can we possibly be voting on something were i think there's some acv in a so uh as time went by um as time went by there were some problems with a film as an example which is be swift which i was also on um but there was a big hubbub over what was what was um the percentage makeup and what was regular makeup and at that point very early what we see gi and there was this big uproar over it i wasn't able to be at that meeting because i was a location but i call got a call from dick smith and dixit leonard you know there's all these problems with makeup and said x this of that and the makeup artist who is presently in charge is going to be terming out um because of the timeframe uh and so there are a number of us it would like for you to be the chairman uh and he said if you are willing to be the chairman then.

dick smith chairman dixit leonard
"dick smith" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"dick smith" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Was i mean we would sit around thinking about the how to kill people i met with our daily you know our exercised we would go to joy say how 'bout if we took oh screwdriver and drove in in a guys era nhtsa mm okay and we would just go through a couple of hours later so it was like halloween for three months now and it was like anything we wanted to do george let us do and i think because it was released on raided everything state in i'd like to hear more about the makeup that you used for it it's a movie with a lot of blood what do you like to use for blood what's the most realistic looking blood while i'm embarrassed about the blood and on other doubted look like melted crayons it was terrible it was three m company make mai mai used to make a blood call three m blood you know sometimes it look goods most of the time though like i said look it looked like malta crying on the best blood is dick smith's formula dick smith is the god of makeup artists the godfather the sentinel midnight cowboy taxi driver you know goes on and on and on um his formula is basically cairo corn syrup red and yellow food colouring a preservative an a a wedding agent um his is the blood used throughout every makeup artist uses his former what kind of special makeup are casting or whatever did you use when people were eating other people's limbs while most of that was sausage and bologna and chicken with some kind of a blue um blood colored barbecue sauce know or some anything that they might have a craft services that day we would throwing keno hasn't chewing on it.

malta dick smith halloween george three m three months
"dick smith" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

This Is Only A Test

02:12 min | 4 years ago

"dick smith" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

"I think so like the dick smith course a loss exactly look i'm in the back row followed learned a terrible everything so you know will get a nerd yeah but you know i and then like hold on a man so you don't the back in the get this guy and do perlman times it doesn't new york makeup artist to really a great out of the kid and he's like he's like we're going to do here but this is like you know talking record rich he gives me which you want us and and so calm and you know he's like yeah the bronx and you know so dick a trip to products and and i meet richie alonzo and i'm sixteen he's like early twenties you know nick stuart about all when he's got this little winners of the workshop about this big you know and i would year it's the spot but like this is a nineteen eighty one anyone okay it's nineteen eighty one good times good for any of you were born it's all do the math right now and and so under sweeping up in the shop every week and you know we do like you know for some just sweep in up you know watch and then it's and he's like your mold this kid and i did my first projects with him in but also for so to see richie get his due it really special for week we talk a little bit about richie when we had fred assign also were time this again in those people that are like knockout artist they're also really and look at and he's still treason back man that's coaches yeah it was really had it really yeah you know you know who else i think need to get it a good so sort of award is scott stoddard yeah yeah and he's another one looks like yeah super behind the curtain but and do it a lotta really crazy ever seen is he burst of i haven't seen a zebra out on one skills really nice think that's what a large part of what he's doing over yeah really good yeah let's talk about the big smith course little bit yes so for people out there which i hope there aren't many of you tell us what the dicks course is well they know who dicks matches we're was all route okay.

nick stuart dick smith perlman york richie alonzo fred scott stoddard