20 Burst results for "Dick Johnson"

"dick johnson" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

05:26 min | 6 months ago

"dick johnson" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"And i would work and then for a while. I was a canon c. Three hundred years in years. I was a canon c three hundred and then for the first time in my life i was able to afford cannon cine lenses and i could change lenses and how these just like seeing the world to this beautiful glass instead of basically seen it through plastic right and i think of myself as sort of like intertwined with the historical moment intertwined with the technology available to me in that moment because of many factors in my relationship to how i can handle that technology i took the above. I shot this teeny tiny h one hundred could fit in the in the palm of my hand like a camera so small i couldn't even see the blimp that i was filming in the sky but i want safe. I didn't want anyone to see that. I had a camera so you. There's all kinds of reasons why people choose the cameras that they choose or cameras forced upon them by circumstances but this limits us it is only like it's a part of the way that we fumble and stumble and fail our way into expressing who we are at a moment in history so use any technology that is available to you which allows you to express who you are in that moment and what you need in that moment and i'm telling you if you really go far people are going to look back and say wow that cameras incredible. What did you shoot. That are such a good answer. I love that. It's like saying to an honest like look. Maybe you don't have a brush. Maybe you can only scratch with iraq on the side of a wall but you can still use that to tell thousands of years now your cave and freak out and say. Isn't this beautiful. that's right. So what about the dick johnson camera and the circumstances in history and time and monetarist. I was started. You know so. Much of some footage from dick johnson comes from before i knew i was making dick johnson. Yes so right. So that's the footage of my mother when she had alzheimer's which i shot on the panasonic one hundred and then shot in four three right. I'm shooting in a square rectangle and that matters in the film..

c three hundred thousands of years hundred years first time cannon one hundred dick johnson canon alzheimer panasonic three c. Three four h one hundred iraq johnson
Top 10 Films of 2020

Filmspotting

06:01 min | 7 months ago

Top 10 Films of 2020

"Michael and tasha are gonna come back. We're going to get to. I'm going to call it the consensus between the four of us top two films of the year. Because there's a fair amount of crossover. We didn't maybe all put them in exactly the same slots but it's close enough and we'll also hear the other movies that round out their top five of the year but to get started is a longtime friend of the show formerly of film spotting. Svu with matt singer and critic for buzzfeed alison willmore. This is her choice for the number one film of the year. Hey films leading team. It's alison willmore here from the late almost budding. Svu podcast hoping. I'm slipping voicemail in with enough time under the wire. My favorite movie of the year is buck. Arou- the greatest neo-western anti-colonialist most dangerous game variants. That you'll see this year And also just kind of incredible exhilarating disturbing work that if feel keeps Showing me new things. The more i kind of think on it and revisit it so definitely a feel for twenty twenty For many reasons and one worth checking out if you haven't gotten to it yet it's not right. It's been a tough year guys but hopefully the next one will be better. I mean not so. I don't know about you but i am still wrestling with back row. And i i saw it caught up with it because i had seen so many lists including allison's And it was kind of on my radar all year. Long in one i had to catch up with and sort of squeeze it in here at the end so maybe not entirely fair viewing. I glad i had the experience. I'm just not entirely sure. What sort of experience i had. Which maybe you can. sense from. Allison's voicemail there it's just it's it's wild. It's it's maybe insane. It's i think my first viewing was. I really was intrigued by all of those ideas and genres that were coming you But on a for sitting like they never it. Didn't like really hit me directly in the experience. I almost needed. There are two different groups here. There's this small town of this village really. And then there's this this group of I guess they're americans who come for. We won't give too much. We don't spoil too much but neither of those. I needed more context for both of those sections of the film for registering for me as anything more than like this intellectual experiment. I guess which is kind of how. I did appreciate it. I'm at last. I can say. No i i did as well. I think described it this way for our listeners who support us on patriot and we did some bonus content and i mentioned back arouse being basically battle royale but mixed with the seven samurai and there's probably seven other films you could merge with this movie it does feel truly uniquely its own and that's why it's worth seeing but it's also this weird kind of mashup hybrid of other types of movies. We've seen before. So i am curious to hear what our listeners think about back row came out a long time ago right earlier in the year. Yeah i think so. We just caught up with it. But maybe as it is appearing on more or less like allison's in that number one slot more people are experiencing it and maybe more people can explain to us josh. What we miss definitely worth seeing not gonna make our top ten definitely not gonna come up here in our top five. Why don't you go ahead and get started all right so you heard mentioned there that earlier. My top ten. I had dick johnson dead number six actually right after it. I have another film that deals with dementia. In dick johnson is dead. That is the struggle that Her father kirsten johnson director. Dick johnson is facing and they explore that in a very unique way In that documentary but a very different way than my number five pick explores relic This is a horror film. And in her. Directing debut. Natalie eric james. She basically chooses to confront dementia via metaphorical horror. So the main character is an adult daughter played by emily mortimer who votes her aging mother played by robin navid in rural australia. And this is on a family estate. A family home that's been held for generations and as the movie goes on the walls in this home gradually disintegrate It's a very you know. Obvious symbol for what's happening to her mother But the movie the just the way. The movie handles this. Metaphor is delicate. creepy scary unsettling frightening and it captures all of the emotions that you know you would have in the mundane experience of an ageing parent with dementia it. It makes dementia demonic and liberalizes. That which you know how it can feel. Even if you're not in this sort of heightened scenario and so. I just think that's a strong that such a strong visceral connection to make and natalie erica jeans Just handles it so expertly. Her command of the genre. Here is is astonishing and i think why relic landed on my list and this high is it's ending which i am not going to give away but this is where you know you might be saying especially horror isn't for you. Oh i get it. I get the metaphor. I can imagine what happens. i don't need to see it. You know But this ending manages to involve body horror unconditional love in a way that was completely jarring Of a piece of the horror genre but also incredibly moving and that was kind of like when the movie concluded that way. I was like okay. This is one that's Not only am. I appreciate but probably gonna end up sticking with me to the end of the year

Alison Willmore Dick Johnson Tasha Allison Dementia Kirsten Johnson Matt Wrestling Michael Natalie Eric James Robin Navid Rural Australia Emily Mortimer Josh Natalie Erica
"dick johnson" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

03:12 min | 10 months ago

"dick johnson" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"Yeah. That's that's even better interest like repeatedly breaking the illusion to make sure that. You're not left with the illusion. Worthy. The illusionists is kind of sad, Dick? Johnson just feels like a much friendlier version of that to me. One thing I think we should also talk about is how these films you work as personal films with documentarian himself or herself as being the subject because I with we talked about effort fake being. So essence of wells. Be just like him as the center of attention who him as this. Artist. With a very long history that he's sharing in deconstructing with us in Dick Johnson is dead. I think is such a perfect. Fusion of Houston Johnston's personality because if Johnson's personality if you spent. Time around her she is both a fearsome. Intellect and also an extremely approachable very. Warm kind of like he's got the like these two very strong aside. So personality I think come through. In the movie and and it was interesting to see her kind of operate at true falls where she was just completely the center of attention because she's been for one, you know. These are. Audience in these filmmakers who have known her for so long I mean, she's been making movies as a cinematographer like for like twenty five years. So every filmmaker knows her and of course people you know inject camera person and this movie was sort of like the the head of the festival but like she's also extremely tall and wears very. Close, very like striking. You know she's common is a blend and I think that people just were like coming up to her all weekend to kind of share their experiences in you know and she has this extremely attentive. Gaze. What she the way she engages what people mean. She's really he's a very much a people person I Think that that generosity of spirit and that fierce intellect kind of come through beautifully in this movie but could she eat a lobster? Not Point point wells she might. She might. I would put a plaster. I mean her father can eat three pieces of what looks like the richest. Over. That's so sweet that grandkids are involved in making a cake or bringing them the cake destroying the cake speaking of grandkids this. This isn't really a connection, but it hasn't come up elsewhere and since we're kind of talking about Johnson as as a person I, just want to note the interesting family she has. Her the living situation it just kind of pass without comment but I did a little research afterwards because I was curious about it and she doesn't need live next door to the fathers of her two children. One of whom is filmmaker IRA SACHS and the other is Patriot Boris. So. Very just modern modern family if you will..

Dick Johnson IRA SACHS Houston Johnston
"dick johnson" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

05:25 min | 10 months ago

"dick johnson" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"There's something so pleasing about watching him do that too. So that that is as a kind of another layer of like of what heaven actually means for someone like him. I mean obviously, there's also all of the seventh day adventists stuff kind of we woven in there as well. I'm not sure what to make all that whole spiritual. Component but but there is a thing i. just think this is it doesn't really compare to FIFA losing faking this but I do I do think like the prevailing spirit of Dick Johnson is dead comes from Dick Johnson and his view of life, which is so open in accepting in positive in kind of fun. You know that that that that's kind of we kept it from being a dirge for me but you know that's the justice that I want. I, want to like get too far away from effort fake. Stop. I just WanNa make the point that you mentioned him to an APP in autumn as opposed to the many many other naps that he takes throughout the course of this film. What, a strange like whenever we parents films up like this we were always looking at either creator connections or big picture big theme connections, and then we almost always get like one of these strange little coincidental connections and the moment when he is in his Ottoman sleeping and he just sort of gently soap bubble floats up to the ceiling and disappears. Is, still, very surreal moment and then F for fake ends with Orson Welles slowly levitating an old man who appears typing or dead upward, and then eventually whisking cloth off of him and he's also disappeared. And I just had a moment of is this is complete coincidence is this based in the the symbolism of kind of the body disappearing death like physical form disappearing is this what we're getting at when we do this A. Magician's act like we have multiple bodies disappearing over the course of of effort fake. At what is what a strange weird little rhyme between these two films would've of gets at another connection, which is delusion concept that both films are hugely interested in after fake it's it's pretty obvious I mean the whole thing is a magic trick. From the beginning and in you know all about all these different levels of fakery and in truth in there as well, and then with Johnston's dead. There's a lot of illusions that are created by fantasy and by you know these these sort of staged sequences but then there's the overall illusion that it's possible for someone to. Live forever and in movies such an exciting idea that she said bottled up this moment out of time and then and then ends the film. So pointedly with the illusion that he's probably that he's gone in her opening the door and he's alive and that's a trick trick that she plays on us, and that's a trick that movies allow her to do in allows us to be kind of delighted by this illusion in and leave the film with like a little question mark with a moment that is defiant of the very title of the movie I had the thought before we started recording..

Dick Johnson Orson Welles Johnston FIFA
"dick johnson" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

05:22 min | 10 months ago

"dick johnson" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"Him in this moment and whatever state he is in as as she is capturing him and I, honestly didn't feel like we were jumping around in time too much the only time it really stuck out to me was the sort of the. Coffin reveal during the funeral sequence at the end. Because early in the film, we see him being filmed in that casket and that being very upsetting to ray and then he sort of like during the funeral sequence, the casket him in the is like superimposed, and then we kind of have that moment again, speaking of sort of laying bare the tools of film making where the casket sort of is taken away. It's revealed that the is there and comes down I i. think that's a very, very lovely and ing. So I think you know tricky chronology in in dead is used with purpose I think in. It is used for trickery. Which is fine because that is kind of what the film is is ought about in general, but it's used in the service, of character, in Dick Johnson his dad, and there really isn't a character, an effort fake other than than wells himself that I think we have any attachment to. So the jumping around in in time it just feels like trickery and another example of of trickery and that's fine. I think part of the aspect of F, for fake using it in that that trickery sort of way I think effort fake is ultimately much more of an active syncretism and it's kind of. Pulling, together, all of these ideas I would say in not the most informative or communicative way, but it's trying to dry in a whole bunch of different things at once and by jumping around conceptually between them and and jumping around in time and jumping around and focus. It's trying to show you the similarities between all of these things, the similarity between forging art and selling it versus forging a memoir and selling it versus forging an identity and selling it the connection between actual art as an act of creativity and forging art just as much of an act as an act of creativity. And you know what's what's going to be left behind when we're gone it's all of these ideas of muddled up together whereas with Dick Johnson, it feels very deliberate to. To jump in and out of the heavens sequences I feel like that sequence might be a little too ridiculous a little too much. If it was altogether as opposed to something that we jump back and forth with an an an out of its kind of lake, he's going off to his heavily reward every time. He dies as opposed to putting all the deaths together and then putting all of the heavens stuff together. I think that the way it's edited gives us these little heaven sequences is kind of as as gifts you know were more able to appreciate here he is Catching, popcorn in his tongue in slow motion or here he is revelling in.

Dick Johnson Coffin ray wells
"dick johnson" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

04:39 min | 10 months ago

"dick johnson" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"I think that is where the authenticity. Of Her putting herself into this film because she hasn't really done that camera I, feel like she maybe her face popped in once or twice in camera person but you know her her lens is the character there and you know she's always been a behind the camera person. So you know just taking the step of putting herself kind of the center to the film adjacent to the center of the film. Anyway is a daring act for a documentarian of her stripe. As. Far as wells goes, he is someone who has been in front of the camera for most of his career you know like he has an on camera presence in addition to a behind the camera presence. So we talked in the first half about the film itself kind of in the end being about wells despite all these other sort of. Avenues it meanders down. It is effectively a film about him as a filmmaker at that point in time and. I don't know I'm struggling to see where the authenticity comes in for fake. The title of right, there would seem to run contrary to it I. Guess I wouldn't use the word authenticity so much as candor to describe a link between Wells Johnson here in that, both of them are sharing with the audience the fact that what they're seeing fake I mean they're they're they're showing you the all of the tools of the trade in their laying bare elements of craft that most movies try to disguise, and that's kind of what I meant on the earlier show about effort fake being ahead of its time. I mean I think Dick Johnson's dead is coming along it kind of represents where nonfiction is right now where where it's like we can. Stop pretending, for example, that directors of documentaries and their subjects are not collaborators collaborators they're not. You know it's not. It's there's not that remove their collaborators not unlike actors are. So there's a relationship there and you know camera person was about interrogating those relationships too..

Wells Johnson Dick Johnson
"dick johnson" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

03:44 min | 10 months ago

"dick johnson" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"No as of today article that posted today Dig Johnson incidentally is currently safely stationed in a minimally occupied home for dementia in Maryland. So she wanted enough well, and also this is, of course, an attempt to make him live forever in movies right so there's that touching element to i. think the ending is just like astonishing like the way that plays out I. It's just so moving and so his. His his That was something that. Before I'm talking very that was rough I thought you meant the the. The the closet of timber coming out being there But Yeah No of course of course that whole sequence I mean you talk about just purely heartbreaking or? Moments that is pretty overwhelming but but it's punctuated with that horn. Horn. Which is probably the biggest laugh in the movie and it's a laugh you feel weird about. All the laughs in this movie are kind of laughs you feel weird about I think intentionally. So in that I think is just peak. Weird laugh. I. Think it's meaningful that that's the laugh where she pans around the crowd and finds other people that are looking dismayed or fighting back laughter at she's she has kind of queuing to you like, yes, this is ridiculous. It's it's OK laugh but then she cuts to the that man ray Dick Johnson's best friend just sobbing his heart out off to the side during the course of this funeral and there were a couple of moments in this film where I wondered like is this expletive is this Any attempt to push the boundaries as she pushed the boundaries too far, and one of those moments came when she admits that she doesn't know where her father's boundaries are anymore. She doesn't know when she's gone too far when it becomes an appropriate and she also says, he'll do anything for me. He will do anything I asked him to do and that just made me wonder at times like. Are there points that goatee far. There's the point where he's standing there covered in blood and he says this is worse than my heart attack was the hardest part. there. There are points where I questioned like is this elder abuse I? He's a good caretaker hover father meet me all segment with Ray just in particular I just had me wondering lake where is somebody comforting him? You know whereas somebody helping him through this and it might have happened one second after the camera cut away. But you know you're left with that image of a man. disconsolately weeping over something that hasn't happened yet, and you know that not only is he suffering now he's going to suffer through all of this again at some time in the future if he outlives deck, it's it's hard to watch. But the thing is like it has happened I think the point of that funeral is that like in Johnson has said this in interviews like she's not going to have a funeral for Dick Johnson when he passes that was his funeral because these people had already experienced like the sort of long goodbye of her mother his wife and you know at at that point his dementia, it is already a point of fact. Everyone knew what was coming and it's it was a good. Bye was a good. Bye to the Richard Johnson they knew and I agree with you that I think ray is probably the point in the film where I feel like it edges closest to exploit taste I have to. Believe that she cleared that with him but she also has spoken to the realization of needing to put herself in this movie like you can't just put this all of this sort of emotional load onto your father and and leave yourself out of it..

ray Dick Johnson Dick Johnson Horn Richard Johnson Maryland elder abuse Ray
"dick johnson" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

04:56 min | 10 months ago

"dick johnson" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"I mean you're watching somebody bleed out and die in public due to a tragic accident but you're also watching something that's a little bit grand guignol and a little bit as a keystone cops. I think that there is a tackiness to it and the vision of Heaven. I think there's a tackiness to that as well. It's downright gleeful it. It certainly extremely intended but that doesn't mean it's not tacky. It just means it's intentionally tacky moving either the dance sequence with with his his late wife or you know quote unquote late wife is that's incredibly moving stuff and so beautifully. Shot at all of that stuff just shot in this like super slow motion, super high def where you can just appreciate every line and every aspect of the choreography and the physicality of the dancers at that battle sequences pretty remarkable a lot of ways and the expression of a Dick Johnson's face to his remarkable presence to I. Think to be a good psychiatrist you may be have to have just. Empathy. But he just has. It's very open openness about it which I also kind of pick up I feel like as part of. At least secure. Johnson. We get know via her films part of her personality as well. Yeah. I was reading some interviews with her prior to this recording and she thinks of herself as a funny person. You know she in this piece she says, you know there was one laugh and camera person I was like we made an hour and a half long in there was one laugh. So I was really committed to there being humor in this film and You know I think it does function is a comedy and yes, there is certainly tragedy there. But I've cried this movie in Maimi emotional. But I ultimately came out of it feeling like I had had on balance of more joyful experience than sorrowful one in again like I said I think Richard Johnson. Himself is a huge part of that and in another interview with our friend Rachel Hander she actually put this is actually Rachel's words in her introduction she says. Here are two people who love entrust each other. So deeply that they'll joyfully confront death together before it's even arrived and I think just the the connection between them and the same paddock Oh nece between them as far as this project it wasn't that it made it not sad but it made it more palatable for me I guess or made me you know it made me sad in a in a happy way I cried this movie the way I love. To cry at movies you know we talk I've talked about being a movie cryer before and most of this movie I was at some stage of of teary you know but it never felt like it was overwhelming me or too much. It's bittersweet. Yeah and I also, Kinda WanNa go back to the staging of the deaths and then being as Tasha said tacky or these sort of absurd and and they are to a certain extent but they are also all. Grounded in a sort of real his you know again with in that interview with Rachel she says, you know we started working with. NETFLIX'S I had a budget ahead of time for the first time in my life psychic. Think really big I imagine you travel the globe put my dad on an ice floe and float him out go to Hong Kong and have him jump out of the building and catch on fire..

Rachel Hander Dick Johnson Richard Johnson Hong Kong Maimi Tasha NETFLIX
"dick johnson" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

03:55 min | 10 months ago

"dick johnson" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"Welcome. Back to the next picture, show a movie that we podcast a classic fill. In the way it shaped our thoughts on recent release I'm Keith Phipps here again with Scott Tobias genevieve Kofsky and Tasha. Robinson. In Our last episode, we talked about Orson Wells nineteen seventy-three film F for fake a not quite documentary about forgers authenticity and the meaning of art. This week we're bringing in Dick Johnson is dead in which Cureton Johnson documents that kind of her father with occasional breaks to stages death depict afterlife in Heaven Dick Jaspers dead is Kirsten Johnson's second film's director but. Like. It's predecessor the work of someone with a long history making movies her first royal effort. Camera Person Wolf together scraps footage from her years as a documentary cinematographer into memoir made up of out takes from throughout her career with Dick Johnson is dead she pushes the autobiographical instinct even further with her father psychiatrist Richard Johnson is I noticed with dementia. She decides to turn his decline into project by staging his death for the camera with his enthusiastic participation. What follows is a rumination memory movie illusions death at what remains after work on we'll talk over after the brain. Idea that I might ever lose this man. Too much to bear. His my dad. Let's. Start. Walking to me that's fantastic. I suggested we make a movie about him dying. He said, yes. She kills me. Multiple Times Act. Resurrected.

Dick Johnson Cureton Johnson Kirsten Johnson Richard Johnson Dick Jaspers Scott Tobias genevieve Kofsky Orson Wells Keith Phipps Robinson director
"dick johnson" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

07:24 min | 10 months ago

"dick johnson" Discussed on Filmspotting

"I guess he's got a real good finance. Real by. What about the kids? Yeah. I saw that picture in your wallet. There with him. Better off with. Just No. Good. It is a performance, but it's not performance live. That's how I feel watching low nimby higgins is a little bit more but I know this is implicit in what you were saying about that bar scene, not only the obligation she feels but the obligation she feels because of now what that man feels he's entitled to exactly and this is this is where that of Eddie's comparison comes back into play. You're right four years before a woman under the influence and Wanda. Is, one and she is troubled. She's unstable could probably come up with five or six more adjectives to describe her but I think like Mabel. She's a character who we come to understand has been handed rolls by society. This is this is what you do. This is what a woman like you does. You become a wife, you become a mother and these roles didn't fit her and she had no say in it whatsoever and I like the storytelling approach her by load again, she doesn't really spell things out too much. We come to understand this basically from those opening scenes, it informs that understanding because we see. Her wake up on the couch we see that she's probably living with her sister and she's got the crying baby and the husband's going off to work and we see from his reaction how he feels about Wanda staying there and am I recall correctly the sister the wife in this sequence she even says to her husband is he goes out the door angrily Oh, come on back and get some coffee. It's she knows that she she has that job that no matter. The circumstances or how big of a jerk he's being it's her role, right? It's her role to ultimately serve him and give him coffee and even in that custody seen I mentioned this is another one where right the father, the former husband and the judge in the sequence have all the power to decide how she should behave as a woman and a lot of this is prescribed and dictated to her and it's funny Sam mentioned this to me in slack and he. Actually commented along these lines in his review on letterbox he had this framing of the movie or this lens on it that was seeing the whole story in a way as a metaphor for life as an actress, and it's something when he mentioned it to me, I had to admit it's not something that occurred to me at all or I was A to. But I was watching scenes today and there is that sequence where she's in the bathtub with Mr Dennis in the. Other room on the bed and they're setting up the heist scene right and she has turned down this role of playing the part. He wants her to play right numerous times of to this point saying I can't go through with it. I'm not going to do it. I'm not going to put people in danger or whatever we have to assume for ourselves. What it is that might be bothering her about this. She simply doesn't want to do it, but she does acquiesce. or I suppose maybe a better way to say it was she just finally gives up and stops resisting and she's rehearsing her lines and she's taking his direction and it just made me think that when you have no agency which she doesn't, you can then understand the impulse to relinquish it completely right you want me to be this I'll be that it's easier than resisting. It's easier than having to kind of make decisions for yourself and act in suffer the consequences of it. And that's why it's so important that a short time after this, we finally do see her exert her will right with a man that is what really brought me back really to a woman under the influence is yes there's the the overall Kesse veggies esque aesthetic and there's that comparison to Mabel in terms of performance maybe even a little bit too though in general I think is giving what we would say is a bigger performance but what they're rebelling against Yeah and Want is doing it in a much more subtle and passive way but the rebelling against the same thing which is being put into roles that they never asked for aren't really right for. Yeah. Absolutely and this is where her relationship with Mr. Dennis's is really interesting because it's it's sexual, but it's also parental in a strange way and professional in the way you're describing where he's directing her where he's her boss in this heist the very fact that she calls him Mister Dennis. Is, weirdly professional or how about the moment I? Think this is the first dinner together. She's sloppily eating this plate of Spaghetti and he says, wipe your mouth will you like she's this little kid and this? So it's in this relationship she's bound up in all of these roles that society expects of her it's a it's like Mr Dennis has kind of she's this perfect storm of everything. He wants her to be yeah, and maybe she doesn't want to be any of them you know. But who could she be? That's what she never gets a chance to even explore. That's the tragedy of this. Right and that's where we you know we can go to the end and where the movie is where she's you know she's freed of of Mr Dennis to an extent but where does she end up? She's in another bar right she's in she's at this boozy loud table smashed in between these people and for all we know there's another Mr Dennis at that table and I think load-ins camera in that against is pretty astonishing where Kinda squeeze squeezes it's way right into that claustrophobic mix and finds her face and another element physicality to load-ins performance. She struck me as this like fawn you know this gangly fawn. Kind of stumbling about in the forest and here it's like she's trapped. She's just suddenly been hopelessly trapped and it's this is one reason why it's a hard watch think yeah. Well, I even like the precursor to that scene where she's now wandered away from a pretty tough encounter with a man, it's dark and the way the camera follows her hand held as she approaches this bar where she can hear the music coming. She looks completely disheveled in unnerved and the camera is accordingly a little bit Shakey and you see someone emerge at the top of the stairs man who even said something to her a little bit unintelligible like, Hey, are. You Okay and watching it again today Josh it was like I completely would buy that that was just a guy in that room walked out and and yet he saw the camera but he also saw this woman looking as terrified as she looks and felt like he needed ask her if she needed help that's that's kind of the trick right there we're talking about with this movie but that bar sequence at the end in particular I think it does give us our second great final shot of the week I won't spoil the Dick Johnson is dead final shot that we get but that freeze frame Oh. Yeah. On loden is just this Look. Of Utter. Utter exhaustion and and right it also..

Mister Dennis Wanda Mr Dennis Eddie Mabel Sam Josh Dick Johnson
"dick johnson" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

08:00 min | 10 months ago

"dick johnson" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Commenting. Stupid. I'm stupid. Don't want anything you won't have any. Don't have anything in nothing. Be Dead. Not even shish in the United States. That's a clip from the nineteen seventy film Wanda written directed by end starring, Barbara? Loden Michael Higgins. Also in that, Clip Wanda is the next film not the fourth film, but the fourth installment in our overlooked deters marathon. It is the only feature loden directed. She died of cancer in nineteen eighty at age forty eight she started as an actress mostly on the stage later appearing Ilia. Red River and splendour in the grass. She was a member of Kazan's famed actors studio and later married Iliad Kazan the low budget. Wanda. Which New Yorker critic ruled brody has compared to the work John Cavities is about a woman played by Loden who abandons her impoverished life in Pennsylvania coal country leaving behind a husband in two young children by chance she winds up on the run with a small time thief, the abusive and hard-drinking Mr Dennis as she calls him played by Higgins. Wanda. Had Its debut at the Nineteen Seventy Venice Film Festival where it won the best foreign film prize. So. Adam. Kesse that is certainly came to mind for me watching this, but it's interesting because you know buddies in the sixty s well established in the independent film scene already yet a woman under the influence didn't come until seventy four and this is seventy and so it was interesting to me because I I thought that had to have been an influence. Wanda had to abandon influence on some part on a woman under the influence, and then I'm thinking the other film. This made me think of is Badlands Malik Badlands Right. Yeah Seventy three. So here obviously Wanda itself influenced by Bonnie and Clyde which came out in sixty seven. We'll probably get into how it's an interesting rift for maybe a a reimagining of that in some ways but here it Kinda sits at seventy and I'm realizing this is a movie that likely influenced to monumental works of cinema and Tamai discredit and I think to sinophile files discredit at large. It's it's really been talked about until recent years when it of popped up on my radar. This thing is you know in its own, right? Incredibly fascinating and it has to be really crucially influential instrumental film leading into the seventies when you say, yeah, for sure and this is indeed why we have embarked on and overlooked occurs marathon. It's overlook she is overlooked Barbara, Loden by US and maybe the OT tour framing. Doesn't apply in one sense. She only got to make one film what a voice, what a talent she exhibits here in this movie which she did as we said, right direct and stars in this is completely her movie and in some ways whether not ties back to her actual life or not feels so intimate and personal and you're right I think you got all the main. Touch points there the badlands one in particular. I love seeing Wanda as a counterpoint to sissy space x character in that movie getting caught up when the wrong guy going on this crime spree. But of course, where Sissy SPACEX character has such actual childlike innocence Wanda is childlike in many ways. But whatever the opposite of innocence is world weariness having having seen almost everything and just kind. Of having to take the punches day of what life gives you it is the opposite in a lot of ways and it's a tough movie to connect with. It's it's a bleak movie and Loadin does very little. Initially, I think to make us try to relate to or understand Wanda even when we see her interact with her former husband and her two kids she she shows no. Remorse or sensitivity whatsoever. Right she isn't interested in having any roller kids lives. She says, they'll be better off with him and I think we're kind of left to read between the lines of what that relationship might have truly been like not just the way the husband's representing it and representing him and and really only from her actions throughout the whole film. Do we realize how rooted? Her behavior must be her psychology must be in abuse, but again, Loden doesn't make any of that really explicitly clear though we do see the mistreatment she suffers at the hands of most men she encounters but I agree it's an extraordinary work and I think part of it is how loden combines different elements into something that feels wholly unique. It is on one level this crime movie it's a Quirkier, even more dysfunctional and probably dangerous in some way Bonnie and Clyde like I'm thinking about Mr Dennis and. The way he is so paranoid and how he can, he can fly off the handle. He scares me more than than Warren, beatty or Faye. Dunaway ever sure right in Bonnie and Clyde, and they're on this crime spree and Wanda's part of its surely because of her sense of codependency maybe needing a man on the trees are terribly but also Josh what else does she have to do she goes moment to moment yeah. Man Demand need to need just seeing where it takes her but then you have that. Combined with the grainy sixteen millimeter look the aspect ratio, the square aspect ratio, the hand held camera, the setting it being coal, mining country, blue collar workers, impoverished people, not exactly. Hollywood stuff we don't see movies made about these people unless it's something like a few years. Later, we're going to get Barbara Coppel doing a documentary about Harlan County USA, but it is like a verite documentary to with her curlers in her hair and the custody hearing easy to feel like you've just dropped in at an actual custody hearing you've dropped in on this couple going. Through this scenario and I think as well Yup to talk about load-ins, performance itself and how fits into this scheme as well. But but I'll stop and let you jump in on what you appreciated about it. Yeah. We'll definitely get to the performance. This is where you know for the reasons you mentioned cavities had to be an influence on load and to right she shows after he's doing this work in the sixties she chose for her filmmaking debut to work in the independent film scene. So she she chose this kind of grainy approached the camera work. That you're talking about and yet she manages some real beauty in it to think about this came to mind because we just did our top five landscapes as characters with Gregg recruits last show and you get that shot. Wanda wearing mostly white. It's a long shot from fire away wandering out of this house. She's been staying at I'm assuming it's maybe her sister's yeah that's what I got, but she's not welcome there anymore, and so she wanders out emits this coal mining pit dark gray all around her she's the solitary figure in she's kind of trudging. Through it on her own, it's almost apocalyptic but you know the irony of this is that that setting almost after we get about hour into the movie seem safer than when she goes out into the real world, which are which are these bars, these hotels, these shopping centers, and again, it's because she's just trying to survive and it's a meager existence a moment by moment existence and essentially it's an existence that's left to the mercy of men who have cash and who have cars, and that's the only way she knows how to eat how to get food. To. It's that simple..

Wanda Nineteen Seventy Venice Film F Barbara Coppel Loden United States Michael Higgins Badlands Malik Badlands Mr Dennis Bonnie Clyde Kazan Iliad Kazan Sissy SPACEX Red River Adam Tamai Gregg John Cavities Loadin
"dick johnson" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

06:31 min | 10 months ago

"dick johnson" Discussed on Filmspotting

"At the facility she recalls him begging her to take him back. I'm standing at the top of the cliff looking my father five feet down holding onto a branch and I'm saying I can't come get you. You've got to stay there. It's like. Are you kidding? No human should have to do this and yet this is what humans have to do. Right at a certain point you have to stay at the top of the cliff well, I mean I think I think I can see from your reaction how that's resonating with Josh. To write, it speaks to the Johnsons gift as a filmmaker as a storyteller how she thinks in metaphor. But beyond that, right that example also shows how she thinks visually always visually like I understand that feeling she's trying to express even though it's one I can't personally relate to hasn't gone through yet but I understand exactly what she's going through or at least believe I do so clearly and powerfully because of the image that she created for us, they're just in that story it's just so fundamental to who she is obviously as a camera person. Yeah I mean she's an incredible talent and as you said at the very top camera person was just this brilliant. Abstract project, and then she comes around with this, which is you know much more personal and inventive in different ways i. it's it's hard to imagine holding those two films really in your hand at the same time as much as they are related, and so we'll be incredibly excited to see what she's able to come up with next. Yeah and as we've described it, it may be for some viewers a little bit of a painful and harrowing experience. But as we've also touched on in terms of gifts, one of the gifts to us is just dig Johnson's laugh. I, thought. Oh, man. He scarcely opens or closes a sentence without one. Yup. Yeah. He's I mean you need This man for this project to work as much as we've been praising only Kirsten for her creative vision and her capabilities, this would not work if her father was not as open honest and as you said, you know wanting to keep this connection with her as long as he can that that's really the crucial element that the movie needed unfortunately got. Keith during fray. With. From Utah, he'll do anything for me. Can you just put one arm up against the wall like, yeah that's nice. Dick Johnson is dead is available. Now on Netflix's if you see it in agree or disagree with our takes, you can email us feedback at film spotting dot net. So ageing parents have been the subject of some really strong movies find out which one listeners voted their favourite when we reveal the results of the film spotting poll next plus are overlooked tours. Marathon continues with Barbara load-ins Wahdan stay with us. Again. A. Come Josh were excited to have masterclass back on board as a film spotting sponsor, and over the past couple of months we've highlighted so many great courses they offer and the expert instructors they have whether you want to maybe improve your cooking skills may be like you josh one, improve your jump shot or maybe you're an aspiring artist filmmaker and you want to learn from Martin Scorsese or David Lynch or Verner Herzog they're all on masterclass teaching classes but this one is so appropriate to film spotting at least in the next coming weeks Aaron Sorkin also on their teaching screenwriting and thinking about Dick Johnson is dead a little bit of course as a documentary thinking about the trial. Of. The Chicago seven obviously based on real circumstances and people I've been taking this course and there's a great segment where he talks directly about the process of adapting true material into a film. He calls it the more important truth and he says, you know you're going to be lying almost constantly right? No matter how accurate or authentic you WANNA be people don't speak in dialogue. They definitely don't speak in Aaron Sorkin dialogue. Most of the time they don't live or exist within a framework of a series of scenes that form a coherent native and I love his line. He says it's the difference adapting this kind of material between a painting and a photograph and were doing painted. Nails it really well, and he has a couple of fundamental rules. He says, especially, if they're still alive, he's not going to do something that hurt someone. He's not going to alter something and have it do some kind of irreparable damage to that person or their reputation but he also says he's not going to do something that changes the fundamental truth and he tells a great anecdote about the social. Network where right after that, opening scene Zuckerberg comes back to his Harvard dorm room and has a drink or two or three and starts blogging and they found out while they were making the movie or early into it that he actually was drinking a bottle of beer. They found out the exact kind of beer that he was drinking, and of course, fincher was like it's gotta be that beer and Sorkin. Why No? In the script, it's a screwdriver and here the reasons why David Screwdriver is more cinematic inappropriate to the scene without violating any fundamental truths and it's really good and it's hard to argue at. So I really do recommend that class and so many others that are available now over at masterclass, which is an APP that successful on your phone Weber Apple, TV offering classes on a ride variety of topics like the ones we've touched on all taught by world-class Masters at the top of their fields..

Aaron Sorkin Dick Johnson josh one David Screwdriver Netflix Barbara load-ins Wahdan Utah Chicago Kirsten fincher Zuckerberg Keith Apple Martin Scorsese Harvard David Lynch Verner Herzog
"dick johnson" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

08:00 min | 10 months ago

"dick johnson" Discussed on Filmspotting

"But I think it also ultimately adds to the appreciation again to their bravery. And Just the things that they're they're willing to even talk about in candid conversations together. I. Mean What a wonderful relationship these to have and what lake courage it took to to face that. So they can enjoy that relationship and maybe that's the Cathartic point to me is is to inspire me to be more head on and to pursue those conversations even with my own grandfather and. To not brush off when he opens up with a vulnerable statement like that. But to to pursue it further and ask you know why are you feeling that way? What's causing you to feel that way? Even if he might not remember, we had that conversation even if he might get confused with. Another grandchild or or or someone the next time I see him So in that way I I'm finding the film inspiring to. So maybe that's too much of a personal reaction I I I'm just trying to I've been trying to process it since I watched it within my own reality and I think it's it's just it's kind of a miracle of a movie in what it does. So creatively with an experienced, that is you know tragically kind of mundane I mean. So many families are experiencing something like this and Kirsten Johnson and Johnson have been able to make something miraculous out of that. Yeah. Maybe the only silver lining that. I could think of it occurs to me as you recount your personal angle with this film of having three grandparents die before you were even born is that I never had the opportunity to actually have to suffer through. Yeah. Some of these types of life events, these very difficult life events, but that doesn't mean I can't relate still to what I'm seeing on screen in. So many different ways including just thinking of it in terms of that word gift that you said, this movie is a gift to us in a lot of ways I definitely think of it as a gift to Johnson herself and I think that's one largely bestowed on her by her father. If you really read between the lines, I don't think it's ever a matter of him. Really feeling like this endeavor is all worth Orleans a lot of fun but what does it do? It allows him to spend time with her. Yes that's all he wants to do. So that's the gift coming from him, and also it's a gift for Johnson as she does state. She didn't have this opportunity to film her mother, but more things got that. This amazing life and this amazing relationship she had with her as well and yet all she has is the footage she shot that you see in camera person and even seeing that though brought her back to life I think those are the words. Johnson uses so. This project of capturing him still when he's relatively vital and having more to latch onto to kind of bring him back to life. Even before he's gone I completely understand why she's doing that. But I'll also say where it has that personal angle for me and where she is giving a gift to him even beyond the time she's spending with him is how often do you hear people say and I certainly had this feeling when my dad passed away I. Wish I had honoured him like this when he was alive. I said the things I said at the eulogy to him when he was actually here and watching these where she gets to. Actually verbalize and sometimes visualize how she feels about him. That's that's the stuff that someone migos oh. Yeah I missed I missed my opportunity just like you missed it Kirsten Johnson with your mother I missed out on that right so in some ways hopefully, it inspires you to then not miss those opportunities as you as you move forward. Now I will say that my reaction to the film and I agree with you across the board I also think of it as kind of a miracle of a movie. I, was surprised in maybe a little disappointed. that the death scenes themselves didn't tie back more directly to Dick Johnson or Kirsten Johnson in terms of his fears in terms of their kind of mutual and individual concerns. There are some hints of it here and there, but they did feel a little random to me in a way that I didn't expect considering considering the killing by dad over and over again conceit at least the movies packaged and is even presented by her within the movie itself. Well, that's I. think that's part of the distraction element. I was talking about it allows them to make fun of death by having by staging air conditioning unit falling from a building on top of him and killing him. Jump out of my seat complete. Yeah I mean. They're using stuntman as I said, like fake blood they really get into this and and I do think the reason it might be so unrelated to what he's actually facing is because it gives them a chance to sort of, as I was saying address it and not address it, address it from a a certain remove and and there's a dark humor to those scenes to right their comical away and in that sense yes. Some of it more than others I should. Say the one of him falling down the stairs. That's more real to life right? That's something that you can see happening. So that strikes a little more closely to home but the the other one of like a construction worker turning a corner from a building and wacky him in the head with with a beam that's like almost slapstick and it is, and so I think that's where they kind of get to have a sense of that distance a sense of that. Dark humor and there's there's a catharsis to that I think that that does work fairly well for me and it also stands in nights contrast maybe even contrast but BA leads nicely into the fantasy sequences which also have a comical stream to them. Yeah and I I think that they work the fantasy sequences especially in that they do tie back more clearly to father and daughter and watching Dick Joy in those. Such a major part of the joy of watching this movie overall in addition to just some of the pleasure that comes from seeing how these moments are rendered on screen a figure dancing, and hovering in the air suspended as if in super slow mo or sort of just caught for eternity there for us to observe the entire holy holy sequence with Jesus washing his feet is another one that I will vividly recall. Right but yeah, we we have to. Give the context to that too though is that we learn early on that he dick was born with basically deformed toes. He doesn't have full toes. He's all he says he's always been ashamed of it and so when they recreate these fantasy visions of heaven, you see Jesus washing his feet and there's a cut and she explains this to him you know. So he fully understands that there's a cut and his feet are restored and that's just I mean. It's like this thrilling vision of restoration there, and there's a connection to when we see the two figures dancing. Wearing. These on their faces are these poster sized photos of Dick and his wife from their youth and so there obviously representing them and what do you notice Adam the male dancer barefoot and you know it's it's that that's where like. It's just so full hearted this movie as well. That's right. Yeah. That's what I was getting at in terms of those sequences really tying back to those characters in a simple but profound way and I think overall what I'm getting at is that I may be hoped or maybe just. Convince myself coming in that the death scenes and the fantasies might offer some bigger break through some kind of a Pitney or or even conflict for father and daughter to process in some way rather than it feeling like a conceit to provide a framework for the project and it's entirely possible. Josh that if I watched it again, I would see more of that wouldn't feel that way. But that all said I'm I'm really grateful. It did provide the framework for the project I think everything you're saying about it being a distraction in many ways is really valid but whether it's through the stage sequences or it's just the mechanism of..

Kirsten Johnson Dick Dick Johnson Dick Joy Orleans Pitney Josh Adam
"dick johnson" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

04:00 min | 10 months ago

"dick johnson" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Locum to film spotting a couple of weeks back are overlooked. . Oh, , tours. . Marathon had raving about Shantelle Ackerman's John dieleman movie about a woman who hardly left her home this week we returned to the marathon with Barbara. . LODEN WANDA WITH JOSH allows us to wonder what may have happened to John Dieleman if she just walked away and left her good for nothing son to make those. Veal . cutlets for himself while there that is a thought experiment though John and Wanda very different people i. don't . know if it would have gone down just like this very different people very different films that marathon review of Wanda coming later in the show. . But First Kirsten Johnson's Dick Johnson is dead a gift to her father and anyone who has a loved one struggling with dementia. . She Kills Me Multiple Times. . Resurrected Day. . Did that. . But now it's. . The beginning of his disappearance. . A eight most about my memory loss is it hurts people's feelings. . Pena that you woke up in the middle of the mate last night. . Fully dressed. . Remember. Any . of that. . Yeah. . What can we do that? ? Everybody has sort of prepare because everybody dies watch too much for that. . After more than two decades as a prolific cinematographer shooting her share of relatively straightforward documentaries, , which isn't to suggests boring inconsequential but more traditionally fly on the wall Kristen has now directed to inventive decidedly unconventional ones. . Two Thousand Sixteen camera person was a memoir comprised exclusively of footage shot across the globe eighty six different countries Johnson filmed in I believe is the count the content was, , of course, , deeply personal, , filmed and curated as it was by Johnson though only explicitly. . So in home movie clips of her twin toddlers playing with our camera and scenes over mother suffering from dementia. . Her latest could be called the act of killing Dick. . Johnson due to the way she employs fantasy sequences to tackle tough truths as Joshua Oppenheimer did with his twenty thirteen doc about mass killings in Indonesia during the mid sixties. . Johnson, , the daughter and filmmaker is more upfront. . This time we only hear her voice over we occasionally get to join her inside the closet over New York. . City. Apartment . she records it on an iphone and she's almost as much an on camera presence as she is a behind the camera one affectionately sometimes quite emotionally interacting with their beloved former psychiatrist father battling dementia like his departed wife before Him Josh. . Rated Camera Person One of your top ten films of two thousand sixteen calling it an intensely moving and provocatively personal consideration of what it. . Means to carry a camera especially in a world that is seen great suffering. . We've established how Dick Johnson is dead is more expressly personal than camera person, , but it also might be a more provocative consideration of what it means to carry a camera in a world in a family that has seen great suffering not that Kirsten Johnson necessarily crosses the ethical lines and putting her aging father. . Through the ringer staging, , sometimes playful, , sometimes gruesome death scenes for her own Cathartic Purposes I. think . we can probably forgive the time. . He soberly complains that shooting in the cold on a Manhattan street while covered in fake blood is even more painful than when he had a heart attack. . But how much is this exhausting process actually helping him to process the inevitable and does that even matter? ? But now it's upon, , US Kristen Johnson says in her opening video the beginning of his disappearance, , and we are not accepting it as viewers. . We can't really ever know whether making this movie Got Dick or Johnson any closer to acceptance, , which you can't evaluate Josh is whether experiencing Kirsten's death affirming stunts, , brought you any enlightenment or at least enjoyment

Dick Johnson Kirsten Johnson Kristen Johnson Josh Pena Joshua Oppenheimer New York Johnson Indonesia Manhattan joviality Iraq
Dick Johnson Is Dead Movie Review

Filmspotting

04:00 min | 10 months ago

Dick Johnson Is Dead Movie Review

"Locum to film spotting a couple of weeks back are overlooked. Oh, tours. Marathon had raving about Shantelle Ackerman's John dieleman movie about a woman who hardly left her home this week we returned to the marathon with Barbara. LODEN WANDA WITH JOSH allows us to wonder what may have happened to John Dieleman if she just walked away and left her good for nothing son to make those. Veal cutlets for himself while there that is a thought experiment though John and Wanda very different people i. don't know if it would have gone down just like this very different people very different films that marathon review of Wanda coming later in the show. But First Kirsten Johnson's Dick Johnson is dead a gift to her father and anyone who has a loved one struggling with dementia. She Kills Me Multiple Times. Resurrected Day. Did that. But now it's. The beginning of his disappearance. A eight most about my memory loss is it hurts people's feelings. Pena that you woke up in the middle of the mate last night. Fully dressed. Remember. Any of that. Yeah. What can we do that? Everybody has sort of prepare because everybody dies watch too much for that. After more than two decades as a prolific cinematographer shooting her share of relatively straightforward documentaries, which isn't to suggests boring inconsequential but more traditionally fly on the wall Kristen has now directed to inventive decidedly unconventional ones. Two Thousand Sixteen camera person was a memoir comprised exclusively of footage shot across the globe eighty six different countries Johnson filmed in I believe is the count the content was, of course, deeply personal, filmed and curated as it was by Johnson though only explicitly. So in home movie clips of her twin toddlers playing with our camera and scenes over mother suffering from dementia. Her latest could be called the act of killing Dick. Johnson due to the way she employs fantasy sequences to tackle tough truths as Joshua Oppenheimer did with his twenty thirteen doc about mass killings in Indonesia during the mid sixties. Johnson, the daughter and filmmaker is more upfront. This time we only hear her voice over we occasionally get to join her inside the closet over New York. City. Apartment she records it on an iphone and she's almost as much an on camera presence as she is a behind the camera one affectionately sometimes quite emotionally interacting with their beloved former psychiatrist father battling dementia like his departed wife before Him Josh. Rated Camera Person One of your top ten films of two thousand sixteen calling it an intensely moving and provocatively personal consideration of what it. Means to carry a camera especially in a world that is seen great suffering. We've established how Dick Johnson is dead is more expressly personal than camera person, but it also might be a more provocative consideration of what it means to carry a camera in a world in a family that has seen great suffering not that Kirsten Johnson necessarily crosses the ethical lines and putting her aging father. Through the ringer staging, sometimes playful, sometimes gruesome death scenes for her own Cathartic Purposes I. think we can probably forgive the time. He soberly complains that shooting in the cold on a Manhattan street while covered in fake blood is even more painful than when he had a heart attack. But how much is this exhausting process actually helping him to process the inevitable and does that even matter? But now it's upon, US Kristen Johnson says in her opening video the beginning of his disappearance, and we are not accepting it as viewers. We can't really ever know whether making this movie Got Dick or Johnson any closer to acceptance, which you can't evaluate Josh is whether experiencing Kirsten's death affirming stunts, brought you any enlightenment or at least enjoyment

Kirsten Johnson Kristen Johnson John Dieleman Loden Wanda Dick Josh Johnson Shantelle Ackerman Barbara Pena Joshua Oppenheimer New York Manhattan Indonesia
"dick johnson" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:35 min | 10 months ago

"dick johnson" Discussed on Fresh Air

"For <Speech_Music_Male> the La <SpeakerChange> Times. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Tomorrow show <Speech_Male> the prospects for a <Speech_Male> constitutional crisis <Speech_Male> in the presidential <Speech_Male> election <Speech_Music_Male> Atlantic staff <Speech_Male> writer. Barton, Gilman <Speech_Male> says if Donald, <Speech_Male> trump claims mail <Speech_Male> in voter fraudulent <Speech_Male> and. <Speech_Male> The results <Speech_Male> Republican. Legislators <Speech_Male> might then <Speech_Male> try and ignore their <Speech_Male> states' popular votes <Speech_Male> and the Senate <Speech_Male> trump representatives <Speech_Male> to the Electoral College <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Gilman <Speech_Music_Male> considers the possibilities <Speech_Music_Male> in a new article. <Speech_Music_Male> Hope <Speech_Male> you'll join us. <Speech_Male> Fresh, air's <Speech_Male> executive producer is <Speech_Male> Danny Miller. <Speech_Male> Our senior producer <Speech_Male> today is Roberta <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> shorrock. Our <Speech_Music_Male> Technical Director <Speech_Music_Male> and engineer is Audrey <Speech_Music_Male> Bentham our <Speech_Music_Male> interviews and reviews <Speech_Music_Male> are produced an edited <Speech_Male> by Amy Salad, <Speech_Male> Phyllis Myers <Speech_Male> Sam. brigger. <Speech_Music_Male> Lauren CRANDALL had <Speech_Music_Male> Soman. They <Speech_Music_Male> challenor Seth Kelly <Speech_Male> and Kayla <Speech_Male> Lattimore. <Speech_Male> Our associate producer <Speech_Music_Male> of digital media <Speech_Music_Male> is Molly Seavy Nesper. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Theresa Madden. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Directed. Today. Show, <Speech_Music_Male> for <SpeakerChange> Terry Gross <Speech_Music_Male> I'm Dave Davies. <Music>

"dick johnson" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:46 min | 10 months ago

"dick johnson" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Having trouble remembering things and I think you know it was happening around the same time as my mother's dementia. So it was really. Felt connected to her but how is just like wow, I don't even know where I was yesterday and it would have been like just got back from India and on my way to Kansas City, and I couldn't I was like, where was I last week and so I just to wonder what was going on with my memory and I was making a film with a young woman in Afghanistan and the had almost completed when I showed it to her and she said Oh I can't I can't be in this film anymore it's too dangerous for my face to be seen in this film. Now, given the political context in Kabul and I just shocked me I was like what doing like how did I not realize that was coming in the making of this film and so it just felt like I had this world of blind spots and served to go back. To footage that sort of haunted me. I slowly started to accumulate the set of material that were my questions, my questions about humanity, my questions about the work and I wondered if I could put them all together in a film because you know there's so much span of time spectrum of places, different kinds of footage. But what united them all was that I had been there I had been there with a camera and had been there sort of questioning and searching and might encounter with making those images with the people there Stays with me I, am haunted and so it was like, okay. How do I go back into understanding what this is what this work is so we found a way to put it together without any voiceover so that you just experience in many ways as I experienced it with no narration. Was Making the movie or finishing the movie therapeutic for you. I think no question. I. Think basically because. In some ways, I could show a mere back to myself of how. I was how responsible I felt for all of it. You know and and You feel this when you're a camera person because you just you know sometimes you're there at the moment and you're you're infocus, send you and you you let like someone who has never you know like who who lives their own life but has like not has been ignored by the world and shouldn't have been ignored. You're just like your give your like you're pulling a hand through and they're reaching hand through and then they come into the world and they're they're visible where the world has made them invisible and. I love that I love that feeling and then sometimes you're just blowing you know you're like, oh, the lights terrible and something's wrong with the sound or there's a rabbit scratchy in the background and like there is in my house right now and and the footage is you know it has its defects and so as a camera person I wish we'd started filming earlier the. Light. was different or you know but that is your way of sort of struggling with the fact like you're not making it better. Right. In that moment you know that that traumatized person like you shared a moment with them yes. You've film them maybe someone else's GonNa Watch the film but like that things still happen to them they're still living with this thing that happened to them. Three decades ago that they still can't sleep at night and they're not gonNA another not GonNa Sleep again tonight, you know so that the feeling of. I would love to make this world different. And yet I am so inadequate that feeling you know I was going there so much and then with camera personnel realized like, yeah, and and also you know it's not all yours to do. In the movie you say that you don't have any footage of your mom before she was diagnosed with Alzheimer's and you said that filming her in that state felt like a betrayal. Can you explain what you meant by the? My mother was just this extraordinary woman with a lot of capacity. She was very fun. She was really interested in other people's welfare. She was really interested in aesthetics she cared about how she dressed. She cared a lot about what other people thought of her like in terms of her religious beliefs she was really trying to be a a a decent person. So if she was going to be seen or transformed into an image, she wanted it to be sharp and I knew that about her and She was anything but sharp in the images that I filmed of her she was confused she was wandering her closer sort of hanging off of her her haircuts not great and she's got that you know scared sometimes scared sometimes distant looking I and I know she would have hated that. That anyone that publicly and when I was showing camera person. I. Many people they were like it's it's so clear how much you love your mother and then I showed it at the Seattle. Film. Festival and you know in this film there's a woman named. Joanne. Tucker who we put her death on the on the screen, she's the woman who made the chocolate cake that nearly killed my dad. The first time gave him a heart attack and Joanne's daughter saw a camera person and she said that was not your mother in that movie. She said Kitty Joe would have hated this and I said Yeah and it just made me burst into tears because she knew my mom. Like nobody else had seen the film my mom. But like she knew it was a betrayal and it was. So. You worked on a film by Kathy liked or called here one day, which is about how after her mother suicide lecture moved into her mother's house and she surrounded by all their mothers possessions and there's a shot that you have in camera person where she's sitting on her mother's bed. Surrounded by all the stuff like these paper bags full of files and papers, and she just overwhelmed and she starts just. Throwing the stuff in the corner and she saying I'm sick of it. I'm sick of it. And then she crawls off the bed. And hides behind it. So you can't see her and she says something like, I totally don't want you to see me right now. But what do you do? I walk around the bed and I go and film her now you get the shot. Yeah. Well, you know Kathy lighter is just incredibly emotionally evolved person and she said to me in the making of this film that we spent nine years making together was you gotta go the places I'm afraid to go. And at the beginning of making that film Cathy could literally not say the word suicide. and by the end of it, you know she's just she's just remarkable her and her father and her brother talking and doing mental health work trying to de stigmatize the shame around suicide just an incredible progression of human experience So she had basically asked me she said even when I ask you not to do certain things, will you do them? Well. Let's take another break here. I'm speaking with Kirsten Johnson filmmaker and cinematographer her newest movies called. Dick Johnson is dead it comes out on Netflix.

Kathy Joanne Kabul Kirsten Johnson Alzheimer India Afghanistan Netflix Kansas City Seattle Dick Johnson Cathy Kitty Joe Tucker
"dick johnson" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:44 min | 10 months ago

"dick johnson" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Seen from Dick Johnson's. Filmmaker Kirsten Johnson is our guest. Kristen that's. That seems really tears me up when I watched it, and the thing that the listeners not seeing as your data's literally putting a good face to this situation like he keeps kind of smiling he's he's Really. Trying to. You know accept the situation, but it's really for him and I love what you're doing there like you're. You're really trying to soften the blow. You know you're like, well, we're just not going to. Pay for the car like we're moving to New York. You don't use cars in New York you know like and you do that a lot. It's just It's just a really sweet way. To handle this. Really. Hard situation. I think. One of the people working on the film was saying to me. You're not from the Mid West you to like just try like I've just always trying to make each other feel better about all this, and that is certainly true i. think because we went through it with my mom, we both know what's coming. So it's so brutal. What's coming that? We? Both I think would be like we're not there yet. It's not that bad you know, and of course, I'm trial tactics like my dad. Notoriously does not want to spend. Large amounts of money for things. So I was just like It's two thousand dollars to have a parking garage in New York you like he's like, Oh, in that case, we don't the car there you know so so I. Do try all kinds of tactics and yet you know I have a dear friend Karel de Singer whose mother had dementia and she said to me when my mom started to get it, she said, you know some of these decisions you make too early or you make them too late and that's how she got me to take my mom's driver's license away from. Her because I was like, all right. My mom could run someone over but then my mother never forgave us for taking away the driver's license. She was so mad about that all the way like after she'd forgotten everything she was still mad about that. So it was really scared to get my dad to stop driving I. Didn't know how going to do it. Something I was wondering. About, their reaction to things like. Have you thought about the ways that your mother and your father reacted to these similar illnesses like I don't know if your dad has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease or is it just dementia? Have you thought about the different ways? that. This either altered their personality or just the way they reacted to have to losing their memory and. yeah I mean I think about it all the time. I've started thinking about what part of Dad's dementia is connected to the specificity of his personality. You know he's just like extraordinarily listener. Able in the first few moments with that I done person that we see in the film Mike he he gets right at The question between. Why are some people you know risking their lives on behalf of movies and is there despair our their thoughts of suicide? Is there alcoholism you know he just gets right in there with the media? and that's the kind of thing that my father could do, and so that kind of incisiveness about his own dementia has just been remarkable and so the way he sort of flips on a dime and is thinking about himself in that scene with the car, but then he's also. Saying to me. I'm sorry for you that you have to go through this moment of taking away my independence, right? which he does often. So do you see like an erasure of Your Dad's personality or do you see it like as crystallization of him like how do you come to understand what the syllabus was doing to him? It's ten. So many things to him I mean he is distilled to his essence. Which I would say you know he can call me multiple times in a day and simply say to me I'm just checking to see if you know that I love you. And that is who he has been. My entire life right just affirming that. All of these words are applicable I do think the loss of his capacity to have an extended conversation an analytic conversation. It's a profound loss for him and for me I mean my biggest conundrums, the most challenging problems for me I could go to my dad had just say like I wanna lay this out for you. And I don't understand why I'm behaving in this way I don't understand what's happening and he he could just. Break it apart and ask questions never never judge never give me even advice just ask questions that then allowed me to think okay I see what's going on here. And so that I have definitely lost and he is definitely lost. But every once in a while I can see like come in with like A. He'll just go deep analytic and be right in there for the length of that question. Can Get it. You know. So in some ways, it's top mean new ways to think and talk and interact with him. If you're just joining us, I'm speaking with Kirsten Johnson whose newest film Dick Johnson is dead comes out on Friday on net flicks. It's a loving tribute to her dad who's actually still alive but who's dealing with dementia? Johnson's been cinematographer for over fifty documentaries more after break. This is fresh air. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Hammock. Schlemmer helping define modern living for a hundred and seventy two years. They were the first to offer revolutionary items that became common household necessities such as the pop up toaster today. Their lineup includes an air purifier that uses natural convection to draw airborne impurities into its ceramic heating chamber, and then releases clean air into the room find this and other items at Hammock Dot com use code NPR twenty to receive twenty dollars off your order. This is fresh air I'm Sam Brugere sitting in for Terry Gross back with our guest, Kirsten Johnson, who is both the documentary cinematographer and filmmaker. Her newest film Dick Johnson is dead. We'll be available on Netflix this Friday. It's about her father who's actually still alive but whom she kills off various accidents during the course of the movie to help process would be like when he actually dies. It also deals with his increasing dimension in his move from Seattle to Johnson's apartment in new. York. Johnson's previous film was camera person. I'd like to talk to you a little bit about camera person your film from two. Thousand Sixteen. And you've you call this film a memoir. Could you describe it as this all footage of things that didn't make it into the movies that you a cinematographer for Not exactly I so camera person for me was a process which came out of. worked as a Mataka for for about twenty five years at that point and had been in just some extraordinary places in the world with people who had lived through mostly who had lived through Powerful Times, I've filmed in the regions of five different genocides, and. I. Hit this point where I think I was just saturated with This sort of human experience by proxy and I.

Kirsten Johnson Dad New York NPR Mid West Kristen Alzheimer's disease Seattle York Netflix Karel de Singer Mike Hammock Dot Schlemmer Sam Brugere Terry Gross
Filmmaker Faces Her Father's Mortality By Staging His 'Death' Again And Again

Fresh Air

00:30 sec | 10 months ago

Filmmaker Faces Her Father's Mortality By Staging His 'Death' Again And Again

"When documentary filmmaker Kirsten Johnson's father was diagnosed with dementia she had a hard time accepting the fact that his death was getting closer. So she decided to make a movie about him it tells the story of moving her dad out of his home in Seattle and into her apartment in new. York it also enacts her father's death from imagined accidents like getting hit in the head by a falling air conditioner she says Killing Her Dad in the movie helped her face his inevitable death her new film is called Dick Johnson is dead.

Kirsten Johnson Dick Johnson Seattle York
"dick johnson" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"dick johnson" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Whole dick Johnson and Johnson county jail for being allude nude toot in the news. Did you see the WGN weather guy kinda just go off the rails? Now Thursdays today. We have off the rails with rob KENDALL. You've heard him earlier. Paul Conrad is the weather. Forecasters name that does the WGN Chicago weather for their TV show. Now, the SuperStation goes all over the country. WGN a lot of people grew up watching the cubs on WGN. Like, I did they got a pretty a pretty reverent morning show. It's more like a morning radio show on TV. And it's pretty good, right? They do a great job on it. Paul conrad. It's the weather forecaster. Now, they have a segment on the show called. I want your texts. Kind of a playoff old George Michael song. I want your sex, and they have the fun music playing in the background the parody music. So what they do in this bit is the host of the show. They read like main tweets or mean texts that come in. Sometimes they're nice a lot of times. They're mean, one of the texts that they received on this said that the weather guy Paul did not read the middle bars and barometric pressure in his forecast, and they were upset about it. What are we doing? Why do you care? Villa bars in your bare metric pressure get on your phone. My. The hell it's on the screen you I'm gonna take ten minutes.

WGN Paul Conrad cubs dick Johnson rob KENDALL Johnson county forecaster Chicago George Michael ten minutes