35 Burst results for "Dianne"

Dan Bongino on the Infiltration by China Into the U.S.

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:55 min | 1 d ago

Dan Bongino on the Infiltration by China Into the U.S.

"I don't want to alarm you. I don't want to put you into a state of despair, I still have faith in the American military. I have faith in the country, but Democrats know what an epic failure this was. There's no way they're going to defend this. They can't spin this. What they're worried about debris, hitting a cow in Montana? They're worried about pieces of the balloon falling into an isolated area that with limited population, are you kidding me? And of course, I don't know why we're surprised. We can't stop illegals from coming across our southern border. Why would we be able to stop a Chinese spy balloon from coming through our northern border? This is America. We're weak right now under Biden's leadership. And everybody knows it. Listen to Dan bongino over the weekend on Fox News. China has been playing us for chumps for decades, folks. As I opened up the segment with, they've been flipping us the double barreled middle finger for a long time now. They've been in our universities with these Confucius Institutes. They've been infiltrating our businesses, they've been stealing our IP or intellectual property overseas. They've been using government procurement methods to lock out foreigners from their own markets. They've had spy operations. They've even, I don't know if you saw the story a few weeks back. They even set up their version of their own local police force right here in the United States. They've been filtered Eric swalwell bedroom. Who even knows what happened in there? They had a spy allegedly and dianne Feinstein, U.S. senator's office. Can you find fault with anything he just said?

Dan Bongino Confucius Institutes Montana Biden Fox News U.S. China Eric Swalwell Dianne Feinstein
"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

Black History Year

02:06 min | 8 months ago

"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

"<Speech_Music_Male> they're fulfilling <SpeakerChange> to <Music> you too. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> And <Speech_Music_Male> just like that, <Speech_Music_Male> we're at the end <Speech_Music_Male> of this episode of <Speech_Music_Male> black history year. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> This podcast <Speech_Music_Male> is produced by <Speech_Male> push black, the <Speech_Male> nation's <SpeakerChange> largest <Speech_Music_Male> nonprofit black <Speech_Music_Male> media company. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> A push <Speech_Music_Male> black, <Speech_Music_Male> we agree with Marcus <Speech_Music_Male> garvey when he <Speech_Music_Male> said, <Speech_Music_Male> but people without <Speech_Music_Male> knowledge of their past, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> history, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> origin, and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> culture is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> like a tree without <Speech_Music_Male> roots. And <Speech_Music_Male> I'm guessing you <Speech_Music_Male> probably feel that's <Speech_Music_Male> important too. <Speech_Male> I mean, here you are <Speech_Music_Male> at the end of a podcast <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> about <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> black history. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> You matter, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> your choice to <Speech_Music_Male> be here <Speech_Music_Male> matters. It <Speech_Music_Male> lets us know that you <Speech_Music_Male> value this work. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Push <Speech_Music_Male> black exists <Speech_Music_Male> because we saw we had to <Speech_Music_Male> take matters into <Speech_Music_Male> our own hands. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> And you make push <Speech_Music_Male> black happen with <Speech_Music_Male> your contributions <Speech_Music_Male> at black history, <Speech_Music_Male> your dot com. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Most people <Speech_Music_Male> give about 5 or <Speech_Music_Male> ten bucks a month, <Speech_Music_Male> but everything <Speech_Music_Male> makes a difference. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks for supporting the <Music> work. <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The black history <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> gear production <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> team includes. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Tark <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> alani, Leslie <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Taylor Grover, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Brooke Brown, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> siobhan <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Chapman, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Albany Jones, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Brianna lembeck, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Garcia, <Speech_Music_Male> malo <Speech_Music_Male> tessie, <Speech_Music_Male> Zayn Murdock, <Speech_Music_Male> Tasha Taylor, <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> and <Music> Darren Wallace. <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Producing <Speech_Music_Male> the podcast <Speech_Music_Male> we have Sydney Smith <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Sasha Kai Parker, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> who <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> also edits the show. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And black <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> history years executive <Speech_Music_Male> producer <Speech_Music_Male> is Julian walker. <Speech_Music_Male> And

"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

Black History Year

04:06 min | 8 months ago

"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

"So if you need a refresher or haven't listened to that interview about deconstructing black love with doctor Diane Stuart. Go back and check that out. It'll get you ready for another great conversation with Diane that you'll hear in a minute. In that interview, we learned a lot about love, particularly how, as African people, love is more than romance. It's heritage. It's community. It's us. Today we're going to dig into those ideas as we continue this project of African cultural excavation. So let me tell you a bit more about our guests. Doctor Diane Stuart is a Professor of religion and African American studies at Emory university with the focus on religion, culture, and African heritage in the Caribbean and the Americas. She's written several books, including black women, black love, America's war on African American marriage and three eyes for the journey. African dimensions of the Jamaican religious experience. Her work has been valued so much that she's won numerous awards and fellowships. And today we're fortunate to be able to learn from such a renowned scholar, committed to black love. In the spirit of that commitment, it's only right that we tell you all the story about black love. Stay tuned. White supremacy has intruded on our lives in the worst ways. From physical, emotional, and mental torment to our livelihood and overall quality of being. Racism has rooted itself in almost every aspect of life. Even in love. But before mass media fed us toxic depictions of love, and before white coveted his hands, raided the continent and subjugated African people,.

"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

Black History Year

08:00 min | 9 months ago

"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

"Trump. And all Donald Trump is a mirror of America. Right? When James Colin calls whiteness the Antichrist, you know, and my students get upset and I say, well, why would you get upset? He's not calling polishness to Andy Christ. He's not calling Italian this the Antichrist, irishness, the Antichrist, he's calling whiteness to Antichrist. And if you ask people of African descent, if you ask Elijah Muhammad who song learned that his father was thrown across a railroad tracks cut in half, if you ask him what whiteness means to him, the only thing he could say is the most evil, it is the epitome of evil. What else would he say? If you asked an indigenous people who were given blankets deliberately with smallpox on their trail, moved away from their natural homes across the country, uprooted a disoriented from their land, what this whiteness mean to them. The only thing they can say is colonization and evil. What else would they say? And so my point is you think you're white. You need it to be white James Baldwin said. Those who needed to be white and that's that concept, that construct has done nothing but afford power, control, destruction, genocide, enslavement, colonization, domination, because you had another identity before you made yourself white. But whiteness did something for you. And so how can we follow that? Democracy operated in this country while African people were being bought and sold on auction blocks. How can we follow that? It has revealed itself as totally bankrupt. And so for me, the only thing the world can do at this point is to really rediscover what the indigenous religions and cultures of the world have taught us that there must be balance. There must be balance, human excess, human greed must be curbed. There are reasons that there are taboos in indigenous religions. There are reasons for that because humans will go and go and go. If we don't have ethical norms and actual consequences for greedy behavior, if we don't have that human human greed will go on and on and on. And what we've seen under Donald Trump is even democracy that supposedly has these checks and balances. Can absolutely be violated. And if anybody knows that, it's indigenous people of this country and its people of African descent. It's been violated from the very beginning for us. At least their ideal of democracy. So for me, we have no choice, Jay. We have no choice but to discover what the place where the first being that was walking on fours decided to get up and walk on twos. No. What those people know, their intelligence, their spiritual intelligence. They're wisdom about what it means to live and to survive and to thrive. What the place that made a click a word can offer us. That's a word in some parts of Africa. To utilize the fullness of oral capacity to communicate. Some people would want to look at that as primitive and no, I see that as intelligence. And so I don't, I don't see that we have a choice but to do that. We've never made it in the west. I mean, the few people that they've allowed to get through, look at what happens to most of our athletes and entertainers. I mean, they end up just going down and drugs and all kinds of things, right? It's like you're lucky if you make it through. The few people that they let through, all they do is to do that so that they can prove that why can't the others do it? But the systems and structures are in place that are anti black that are anti African, and so I don't believe we have any choice, but to rediscover to have a kind of African renaissance. And to rediscover, not in a romantic way. I mean, there are aspects of all cultures that are just that need revision. But to assume that Africans can't revise their own cultures without European involvement, it's ridiculous, right? So not in a romantic way, but to say that African peoples have values have norms have important knowledge that the world needs, that we need as people of African descent. Right? All of this conversation about what's your pronoun and well, you know what? Most African languages have no gendered pronoun because gender was not important in that way. Gender becomes important. You know what? I began to think about why is it that when I go to most African countries, the little girls have short haircuts, just like the boys. Custom gender different differentiation. It becomes important at adolescence when you're beginning to get yourself prepared for marriage. It's not that important. And why is it that elder African women often shave their heads? Gender, it kind of slips away again, not that important. And some would even argue that it's not even important during those years of marriage and procreation and all of that. South African feminists argued that it's not even important then. You know, anatomical differences are important says, oh, you're with me. But it's even gender. She even argues that the yerba didn't have gender. And so we have all this fighting about everybody goes by the he pronoun and this is sexism and patriarchy. We didn't have that in African culture. African women didn't give up their names when they got married. That's all western. Their last name, they didn't give that up. We didn't have that. And so there's a lot that African culture has to offer the world. A lot that other indigenous cultures have to offer the world. And I think we need to return to some of those wisdoms. What we have in the west is technology without spirituality. And I think that's been very, very dangerous. All right, and just like that, we're at the end of this episode of black history year. This podcast is produced by push black, the nation's largest nonprofit black media company. It pushed black. We agree with Martha's garvey. When he said, people without knowledge of their past history origin and culture is like a tree without roots. And I'm guessing you probably feel that that's important too. I mean, here you are at the end of a podcast about black history. You matter, and your choice to be here matters. It lets us know that you value this work. Push black exists because we realized we had to take matters into our own hands. And you make push black happen with your contributions that black history your dot com. Most people give about 5 or ten bucks a month, but everything makes a difference. Thanks for supporting the work. The black history year production team includes Tarek aligning, Patrick Sanders, Leslie Taylor Grover, Drea Bradley, Brooke Brown, siobhan Chapman, tabitha Jacobs, Albany Jones, Brianna lambeck, graciela Mayo latisse, Courtney Morgan, Zayn Murdoch, aquia Tay, Tasha Taylor, and Darren Wallace. Producing the podcast, we have Marcel Hutchins and Sydney Smith. Joanna Samuels is our audio engineer, who also edits the show. And black history years, executive producer, is Julian walker..

James Colin Andy Christ Donald Trump Elijah Muhammad James Baldwin smallpox Trump America Jay Africa garvey Martha Patrick Sanders Leslie Taylor Grover Drea Bradley Brooke Brown siobhan Chapman tabitha Jacobs Albany Jones Brianna lambeck
"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

Black History Year

08:26 min | 9 months ago

"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

"What's her name? She passed away. She's an evil scholar. And she called herself a womanist, it is slipping my mind right now. But there are scholars who have done this work. There are a group of them who are calling themselves. They define what they call motherism. They don't want to use feminism. But no matter what the labels are, they are doing some fascinating work. There's a Professor of English, actually, who looked at, let me give you another example who looked at. I mean, this was just fascinating. Her name is jeanine de lombardo. And I think she's a white woman actually. But she looked at the letters of black women coming from Hampton and spelman in the very early 20th century, 1908, 1910 going over to Liberia with their husbands as missionaries. And their letters are showing that these indigenous people that they're engaging had no clear gender divisions. They're like, we're trying to we're trying to get the boys to wear certain clothes that are different that are distinct from the girls, but they don't want to. The boys want to play with dolls and the girls, they're showing they're trying to inculcate them in these western patriot article ways of being. And they're not. You know, they're not they're just they're resisting them. It's fascinating. So here are black people. People of African descent coming out of slavery, going through that period of the politics of respectability, which starts after slavery, where, you know, in order to be accepted as citizens, we got to get as far away from African culture and heritage as possible. We got to prove to this country that we deserve citizenship and deserve to be treated like citizens. Therefore, we have to adopt their culture and heritage. Now taking it over to Liberia and seeing a whole different world. Even in that time period. So I'm just using that as an example of materials research that has been done. We have to have the lenses to see it as well. To see the distinctions to see pieces or elements from pre colonial culture that still there in the culture itself. And another example is the idea that this western idea that the domestic sphere is a woman's sphere. And the public spheres of man's sphere that is totally un African. There's nothing African about that at all. We know that some African women were taken into slavery, hundreds of miles from their home because they were, they were trading. They were traders, and they would go long distances from their homes trading. As women, you know, not accompanied by men or what have you. So that's another example. This idea that women are supposed to stay in the home and in the kitchen. That's just western. It's very, very western. So in what ways does doing this work of digging and going to the scholars that have been doing this work and if we were at scale as a community to try to put these ways of thinking, change our perspective on how we're using love and relationships and dynamics in the families, what could we gain from changing our perspective and actions to connecting with what is what is ours in terms of the heritage? First, we can gain a sense of peace and self acceptance, right? We can gain a sense that we are not just lost blank slates who came from nothing and came from nowhere. We're not just. We're not just our history doesn't begin with a history of being commodified of being forced to produce commodities of being chattel property that could be valued and sold and gifted. Our history, our history doesn't begin with that. Our history begins elsewhere. And that alone does a lot to rehabilitate our sense of belonging, our sense of power, our sense of worth, period. That alone, to we realize that there are different logics at work. For why people establish certain cultural norms and traditions to operate in a particular way. What I would say when I teach African religions for me, the most important word, the most important word, more important than any other word, is relationality. And I think that's true of many African cultures. Relationality, if you want to understand how African religious and spiritual systems work, it's always about relationality. How are you, how are you sustaining your bonds? How are you sustaining sustaining your relationships? That's what my patients are about. They're about recognizing that even though you have traveled, you have moved into the invisible domain. Even though you are now in the invisible realm, you're still part of the family. You're not going to disrespect your grandparents. If you go, if you're having a family event and your grandparents are there, you're going to serve them well, you're going to, you're going to make sure they get what they want to eat, you're going to. So you see that same behavior with the ancestors who've passed on. It's always about sustaining relationships. And when you think about what it means to sustain relationships, it means that you can not be greedy and you can not be selfish. Greed is the antonym of the Central African value according to Lorentz majestic. And that is hospitality. That is hospitality. So it teaches us a value system. What it does is it allows for us to locate our roots some where some place. And to decide that we can remake ourselves. We can remake ourselves outside of the stereotypes, right? The caricature is that the west has developed about us because oftentimes what we do is a response to to the caricatures and the stereotypes that they've developed about us. You say I have to be this way. So I'm just going to be the opposite or you say I am this. So I'm just going to live into it and be it. What would we be? If we knew the values and the philosophy cosmology of our ancestors, what would we be? How would we run our lives? How would we understand ourselves as children as adolescents as adults? As elders, I think there's unlimited opportunity, Jay, for us to rebuild a world. And I really believe that the western values that created this capitalist way of being and living and engaging or not engaging is going to turn in on itself. It's going to turn in on itself. And one of the bravest dangers James Baldwin told us about taught us about so many decades ago, one of the greatest dangers is that they, those who now rule the world, those who impose this world arrangement on us and many other people of color, indigenous people. They don't know themselves because they have convinced themselves that they are white. And they could only do that by making us black. And that whiteness is a construction. They themselves are alienated from their own heritages. Their own authentic heritages, and they have to ask themselves why they have done that to themselves. They will never heal and be whole, as long as they continue to identify themselves as white. But that's what they need to sustain this world order that they have. Right? So I personally don't believe that we can look to them and their values. As a way toward liberation, how can we do that? I mean, look at what democracy has shown itself to be under Donald.

jeanine de lombardo Liberia spelman Hampton Lorentz majestic un James Baldwin Jay Donald
"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

Black History Year

07:49 min | 9 months ago

"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

"For the community. That's right. And household arrangements were different. That's one of the reasons I proposed that we should get rid of this concept of head of household. This is part of white western patriarchal thinking about marriage. Did Africa have patriarchy at some point it did? Did it look like western patriarchy? No. Did Africa have mattress centricity? What I call, well, motherless, what on other African scholars have come over? Yes, and African patriarchy did not snuff out mattress centricity, the matri focal family unit. It did not. It lived alongside of it. There's a kind of totalizing feature to western patriarchy that is almost, it feels impossible to overcome. It pervades everything. There was a balance. Maybe even a competition in some African societies by the time patriarchy made its way into African societies. And so, and of course, with colonialism, we get the overlay of not just African patriarchy, but western patriarchy, which is just devastating. Devastates African culture. So even the household look different. You don't necessarily have men. You sometimes have polygamous marriages as well, right? Or you have polygynous marriages, you know, men with more than one wife. And so you don't always have this nuclear or patriarchal household, or sometimes what you have are these matching focal household units with mother and children. In a compound situation. So yes, they looked very different, very different than what we have today. Many different kinds of marriages. Let's take a little deeper on so I've read about this concept of complementary and balance when it came to men and women relationships in west and west Central Africa where I think it touches on what you were getting to where it's not necessarily that one person was more important or at more value, but it was a different type of thing that you brought to the table, whether it was an economic perspective or the physical or emotional perspective. This has come up in your work as it relates to this at all. Well, yes, honestly, I'm going to write about it a lot more in the second volume. I really want to explore a term that I introduced in this first volume afrikaner kinship structures because some of those traditions are still with us. They're most recognizable in poor and working class black communities. But some of those, they are wholesome. We have unfortunately pathologized them in the west. But they are wholesome they are powerful structures and systems. I just argue in the book that we can have kinship wealth without financial wealth. When we only have kinship wealth, then they'll structures can sometimes be burdensome because there's not enough financial wealth to go around. And one person or the few people with a little bit of resources are expected to do everything for the whole kin group. And that's tough. And so that's one of the reasons I argue that we've got to solve the wealth lessness problem that America imposed on people of African descent. But I'll say this. One of the problems J that we have with understanding what we're dealing with when we're investigating African history is the overlay of Islamic culture and traditions and western Christian culture and traditions. Most of us are doing work on African societies. And we're not penetrating the impact of those traditions on African cultures. This is why in many respects, during the 19 70s, late 60s and 70s, when you had a strong rise of black cultural nationalism and many black feminists have critiqued this that many of the black men who were saying, you know, this is how our African ancestors lived, and this is what we're supposed to be doing. What they were really doing, Jay, what they were resurrecting these eurocentric Victorian ideas about, you know, the role of women in the role of men in communities and family life. They were not African ideas, right? And even if they thought they were, if you're looking at what's going on in contemporary Africa, you have those Victorian ideals as well. So it requires one of the things I'm going to do is develop a syllabus. And I tell you, in order to really understand and access the information, we have to get into what the archeologists are doing. We have to get into what the archeological anthropologists are doing. When they're digging, when they're kind of digging up excavating African cultures, I'll give you a great example. Many people today would find that African girls, adolescent girls would be very shy about anything that has to do with sex education or it's like this is like a taboo subject. You don't talk about it. But what I want to visit great Zimbabwe, about ten years ago, one of the things that the archeologists that they have dug up are these kind of sexual figurines and scholars believe that these were used in the ancient Zimbabwe to sex education for training girls and boys about their bodies about sex and sexuality. I mean, who would have known, right? So we have to do a different kind of research to even know what's happening. And I'm building a bibliography right now. And I think one of the people that we really need to read, who was isolated and certainly not in black nationalists, communities, but was isolated generally from the west. It was only the Russian scholars that would pay attention to him, is shaken to deal up. I think he does incredible work on black, he uses the language of matriarchy at times. I like mattress centricity and the import of patriarchy, the kind of the rise of patriarchy. So he's going way, way, way back. And so one of the things we have to ask when we're asked when we're investigating these questions is, what period of Africa? Which cultures? What time period within the particular culture, right? It's complicated. It's yes. It's different, but we have a long way to go to know and understand those differences. And the ways that we have been studying African heritages and cultures, I believe, have just enthralled us and trapped us within more mythology than in many respects reality. We need a new bibliography. We need a new methodology for wrapping our minds around what these pre colonial cultures were really about. You gave the example of cultural naturalism to start this sort of segment of the conversation. And I think that's helpful context from what I'm hearing you say, we may have looked at a certain time period that may not have been, we may not have gone far back enough or we may not have been able to separate what exists now that's originally and truly and holy from the African mind and what has been brought on to it by that you mentioned western Christianity and Islam. Am I understanding that? Absolutely. Absolutely. Yeah, I think I appreciate you bringing up the work of Gio. I think one of the books I've read most of is believe the cultural unity of black Africa, which I think gets to what you're talking about about the matrilineal element of this. Yes. So the bibliography needs to be expanded in order for us to actually dig deep enough to do the work we need to do today. And African feminists and womanist scholars have really done some good work. Isi amad. Or you're wrong or you're me..

Africa west Central Africa Zimbabwe Jay America Isi amad
"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

Black History Year

06:17 min | 9 months ago

"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

"Or say in the Jamaica or the West Coast of Africa or west Central Africa, that heritage love is critical to our liberation. But it also means self love. And it means community love. Love is the foundation for anything prosocial. We want to accomplish. If we do not receive love and this is why romantic love, which is the basis or some sort of commitment to love and to the building of family is the basis of what we need. The bonding and connection that we need to be pro social persons in society. To actually survive as a species, so love is essential to liberation. Love gives us the qualities we need to liberate ourselves. It gives us a sense of our own dignity. And our worth, and once a person has a true and authentic sense of their dignity and worth, which is inestimable. It is unmeasurable. Once a person truly is in touch with that, they can do nothing but seek liberation if they are in bondage. Why choose proven quality sleep from sleep number? Because our sleep number 360 smart bed is really smart. It senses your movement and automatically adjusts to help keep you both comfortable. Plus, its temperature balancing so you stay cool. It's even smart enough to know exactly how long how well and when you slept, and to help you get almost 30 minutes more restful sleep per night, sleep number takes care of the science. All you have to do is sleep. And now during our Memorial Day sales, they have a $1000 on the sleep number 360 special edition smart that queen now in the 1999, only for limited time. To learn more, go to sleep number dot com. So, how does your work contribute to helping us move towards that vision of black liberation that you shared? Sure. Well, another aspect of our ability to love ourselves and to truly be liberated has to do with our tortured relationship with our African religious slash spiritual heritage or heritages. And what I mean by that is one of the enduring effects of the colonial slave holding experience, right? Or experience of being reduced to slaves to commodities that produced commodities for the ruling white classes. One of the enduring effects of that was convincing people of African descent that we were godless people before we engaged their version of Christianity. That Christianity is the only authentic religion that all people are in need of a redemption that Christians understand in a particular way. And that Africans had no conception of the divine that Africans had in fact partnered with the devil in their oftentimes it is conceived as sorcery or witchcraft or a quote unquote black magic. And that is the furthest thing from the truth. And so for me, part of our liberation means getting right with our spiritual heritages as well. And for me, it doesn't matter what people profess to believe in, whether it's Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, it doesn't matter what people profess to believe in. What we miss in terms of our understanding of africana religious history. And this is what my first book tried to do looking at a country like Jamaica. What we miss is that it was the African spiritual traditions. Even Christianity and Islam interpreted through an African cosmological or spiritual lens that liberated our ancestors. You can show me no slave revolt. No attempt at a revolt. And there is not a conjure woman or a condom man involved or an opium man or an OB a woman involved, or some sort of mystical way of engaging the powers of the universe that are beyond what we understand to be orthodox Christianity. You know, because of our socialization, we've often over christianized people like Nat Turner. We've over christianized many of these people and doesn't matter what titles they went by, baptist preacher, what have you. They were deeply rooted in African spiritual traditions and ways of engaging power. And so that's one of the ways my research can help us to be liberated. I'm not interested in saying that there's anything perfect about any religious system, including African ones. There's nothing perfect about any religious system. And all religious systems are Ford people, the opportunity to abuse and violate others. When people give themselves over to a religious authority because they trust that religious authority, there is always that opportunity and we've seen those kinds of violations all the time. But the scapegoat African religions as if they are somehow the epitome of evil and deprivation. And demonism is just absolutely wrong. And to call behaviors and activities, African religion that are not, that I just criminal, is also just wrong. So I am very, very interested in helping black people embrace the fullness of their spiritual heritage, you've ridden the book that goes deep into these ideas you've touched on and how they show up through our history. Tell.

west Central Africa Jamaica West Coast Africa Nat Turner Ford
"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

Black History Year

07:30 min | 9 months ago

"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

"Position. They grew. They were true seekers. So they grew over time. And I used to say, I used to feel that Malcolm X achieved to me what black life could look like. What a black person could be like. If we had come here on our own, not through slavery. And so on one level, black liberation kind of looks like that to me. It looks like a freedom to truly be who you are and to do that. It means you must be connected to your heritage. I have a section in my black love course on heritage love and we read Philippe Wanda's kinship for that course and it's a powerful experience for all the students. And for me, heritage love is crucial. It's critical to black liberation. And for heritage, I mean where we are from where our ancestors are rooted. And I mean, all of those black ancestors. So here, whether it's Mississippi or Hartford, Connecticut, where I grew up or Kingston Jamaica or say in the Jamaica or the West Coast of Africa or west Central Africa, that heritage love is critical to our liberation. But it also means self love. And it means community love. Love is the foundation for anything prosocial. We want to accomplish. If we do not receive love and this is why romantic love, which is the basis or some sort of commitment to love and to the building of family is the basis of what we need. The bonding and connection that we need to be pro social persons in society. To actually survive as a species, so love is essential to liberation. Love gives us the qualities we need to liberate ourselves. It gives us a sense of our own dignity. And our worth, and once a person has a true and authentic sense of their dignity and worth, which is inestimable. It is unmeasurable. Once a person truly is in touch with that, they can do nothing but seek liberation if they are in bondage. Why choose proven quality sleep from sleep number? Because our sleep number 360 smart bed is really smart. It senses your movement and automatically adjusts to help keep you both comfortable. Plus, its temperature balancing so you stay cool. It's even smart enough to know exactly how long how well and when you slept, and to help you get almost 30 minutes more restful sleep per night, sleep number takes care of the science. All you have to do is sleep. And now during our Memorial Day sales, they have a $1000 on the sleep number 360 special edition smart that queen now in the 1999, only for limited time. To learn more, go to sleep number dot com. So, how does your work contribute to helping us move towards that vision of black liberation that you shared? Sure. Well, another aspect of our ability to love ourselves and to truly be liberated has to do with our tortured relationship with our African religious slash spiritual heritage or heritages. And what I mean by that is one of the enduring effects of the colonial slave holding experience, right? Or experience of being reduced to slaves to commodities that produced commodities for the ruling white classes. One of the enduring effects of that was convincing people of African descent that we were godless people before we engaged their version of Christianity. That Christianity is the only authentic religion that all people are in need of a redemption that Christians understand in a particular way. And that Africans had no conception of the divine that Africans had in fact partnered with the devil in their oftentimes it is conceived as sorcery or witchcraft or a quote unquote black magic. And that is the furthest thing from the truth. And so for me, part of our liberation means getting right with our spiritual heritages as well. And for me, it doesn't matter what people profess to believe in, whether it's Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, it doesn't matter what people profess to believe in. What we miss in terms of our understanding of africana religious history. And this is what my first book tried to do looking at a country like Jamaica. What we miss is that it was the African spiritual traditions. Even Christianity and Islam interpreted through an African cosmological or spiritual lens that liberated our ancestors. You can show me no slave revolt. No attempt at a revolt. And there is not a conjure woman or a condom man involved or an opium man or an OB a woman involved, or some sort of mystical way of engaging the powers of the universe that are beyond what we understand to be orthodox Christianity. You know, because of our socialization, we've often over christianized people like Nat Turner. We've over christianized many of these people and doesn't matter what titles they went by, baptist preacher, what have you. They were deeply rooted in African spiritual traditions and ways of engaging power. And so that's one of the ways my research can help us to be liberated. I'm not interested in saying that there's anything perfect about any religious system, including African ones. There's nothing perfect about any religious system. And all religious systems are Ford people, the opportunity to abuse and violate others. When people give themselves over to a religious authority because they trust that religious authority, there is always that opportunity and we've seen those kinds of violations all the time. But the scapegoat African religions as if they are somehow the epitome of evil and deprivation. And demonism is just absolutely wrong. And to call behaviors and activities, African religion that are not, that I just criminal, is also just wrong. So I am very, very interested in helping black people embrace the fullness of their spiritual heritage, you've ridden the book that goes deep into these ideas you've touched on and how they show up through our history. Tell.

Philippe Wanda Jamaica west Central Africa Malcolm Hartford Kingston West Coast Mississippi Connecticut Africa Nat Turner Ford
"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

Black History Year

06:52 min | 9 months ago

"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

"Must be connected to your heritage. I have a section in my black love course on heritage love and we read Philippe Wanda's kinship for that course and it's a powerful experience for all the students. And for me, heritage love is crucial. It's critical to black liberation. And for heritage, I mean where we are from where our ancestors are rooted. And I mean, all of those black ancestors. So here, whether it's Mississippi or Hartford, Connecticut, where I grew up or Kingston Jamaica or say in the Jamaica or the West Coast of Africa or west Central Africa, that heritage love is critical to our liberation. But it also means self love. And it means community love. Love is the foundation for anything prosocial. We want to accomplish. If we do not receive love and this is why romantic love, which is the basis or some sort of commitment to love and to the building of family is the basis of what we need. The bonding and connection that we need to be pro social persons in society. To actually survive as a species, so love is essential to liberation. Love gives us the qualities we need to liberate ourselves. It gives us a sense of our own dignity. And our worth, and once a person has a true and authentic sense of their dignity and worth, which is inestimable. It is unmeasurable. Once a person truly is in touch with that, they can do nothing but seek liberation if they are in bondage. Why choose proven quality sleep from sleep number? Because our sleep number 360 smart bed is really smart. It senses your movement and automatically adjusts to help keep you both comfortable. Plus, its temperature balancing so you stay cool. It's even smart enough to know exactly how long how well and when you slept, and to help you get almost 30 minutes more restful sleep per night, sleep number takes care of the science. All you have to do is sleep. And now during our Memorial Day sales, they have a $1000 on the sleep number 360 special edition smart that queen now in the 1999, only for limited time. To learn more, go to sleep number dot com. So, how does your work contribute to helping us move towards that vision of black liberation that you shared? Sure. Well, another aspect of our ability to love ourselves and to truly be liberated has to do with our tortured relationship with our African religious slash spiritual heritage or heritages. And what I mean by that is one of the enduring effects of the colonial slave holding experience, right? Or experience of being reduced to slaves to commodities that produced commodities for the ruling white classes. One of the enduring effects of that was convincing people of African descent that we were godless people before we engaged their version of Christianity. That Christianity is the only authentic religion that all people are in need of a redemption that Christians understand in a particular way. And that Africans had no conception of the divine that Africans had in fact partnered with the devil in their oftentimes it is conceived as sorcery or witchcraft or a quote unquote black magic. And that is the furthest thing from the truth. And so for me, part of our liberation means getting right with our spiritual heritages as well. And for me, it doesn't matter what people profess to believe in, whether it's Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, it doesn't matter what people profess to believe in. What we miss in terms of our understanding of africana religious history. And this is what my first book tried to do looking at a country like Jamaica. What we miss is that it was the African spiritual traditions. Even Christianity and Islam interpreted through an African cosmological or spiritual lens that liberated our ancestors. You can show me no slave revolt. No attempt at a revolt. And there is not a conjure woman or a condom man involved or an opium man or an OB a woman involved, or some sort of mystical way of engaging the powers of the universe that are beyond what we understand to be orthodox Christianity. You know, because of our socialization, we've often over christianized people like Nat Turner. We've over christianized many of these people and doesn't matter what titles they went by, baptist preacher, what have you. They were deeply rooted in African spiritual traditions and ways of engaging power. And so that's one of the ways my research can help us to be liberated. I'm not interested in saying that there's anything perfect about any religious system, including African ones. There's nothing perfect about any religious system. And all religious systems are Ford people, the opportunity to abuse and violate others. When people give themselves over to a religious authority because they trust that religious authority, there is always that opportunity and we've seen those kinds of violations all the time. But the scapegoat African religions as if they are somehow the epitome of evil and deprivation. And demonism is just absolutely wrong. And to call behaviors and activities, African religion that are not, that I just criminal, is also just wrong. So I am very, very interested in helping black people embrace the fullness of their spiritual heritage, you've ridden the book that goes deep into these ideas you've touched on and how they show up through our history. Tell.

Philippe Wanda Jamaica west Central Africa Hartford Kingston West Coast Mississippi Connecticut Africa Nat Turner Ford
"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

Black History Year

08:12 min | 9 months ago

"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

"What does black liberation look like to you? You know, it's really interesting. The first thing I was thinking about as you were phrasing the question, the first person that came to my mind is Malcolm X and I used to say that I believe that as Malcolm X emerged and grew and blossomed. One of the reasons I love Malcolm X and someone like WB Dubois is that they never remained fixed and located in one ideological position. They grew. They were true seekers. So they grew over time. And I used to say, I used to feel that Malcolm X achieved to me what black life could look like. What a black person could be like. If we had come here on our own, not through slavery. And so on one level, black liberation kind of looks like that to me. It looks like a freedom to truly be who you are and to do that. It means you must be connected to your heritage. I have a section in my black love course on heritage love and we read Philippe Wanda's kinship for that course and it's a powerful experience for all the students. And for me, heritage love is crucial. It's critical to black liberation. And for heritage, I mean where we are from where our ancestors are rooted. And I mean, all of those black ancestors. So here, whether it's Mississippi or Hartford, Connecticut, where I grew up or Kingston Jamaica or say in the Jamaica or the West Coast of Africa or west Central Africa, that heritage love is critical to our liberation. But it also means self love. And it means community love. Love is the foundation for anything prosocial. We want to accomplish. If we do not receive love and this is why romantic love, which is the basis or some sort of commitment to love and to the building of family is the basis of what we need. The bonding and connection that we need to be pro social persons in society. To actually survive as a species, so love is essential to liberation. Love gives us the qualities we need to liberate ourselves. It gives us a sense of our own dignity. And our worth, and once a person has a true and authentic sense of their dignity and worth, which is inestimable. It is unmeasurable. Once a person truly is in touch with that, they can do nothing but seek liberation if they are in bondage. Why choose proven quality sleep from sleep number? Because our sleep number 360 smart bed is really smart. It senses your movement and automatically adjusts to help keep you both comfortable. Plus, its temperature balancing so you stay cool. It's even smart enough to know exactly how long how well and when you slept, and to help you get almost 30 minutes more restful sleep per night, sleep number takes care of the science. All you have to do is sleep. And now during our Memorial Day sales, they have a $1000 on the sleep number 360 special edition smart that queen now in the 1999, only for limited time. To learn more, go to sleep number dot com. So, how does your work contribute to helping us move towards that vision of black liberation that you shared? Sure. Well, another aspect of our ability to love ourselves and to truly be liberated has to do with our tortured relationship with our African religious slash spiritual heritage or heritages. And what I mean by that is one of the enduring effects of the colonial slave holding experience, right? Or experience of being reduced to slaves to commodities that produced commodities for the ruling white classes. One of the enduring effects of that was convincing people of African descent that we were godless people before we engaged their version of Christianity. That Christianity is the only authentic religion that all people are in need of a redemption that Christians understand in a particular way. And that Africans had no conception of the divine that Africans had in fact partnered with the devil in their oftentimes it is conceived as sorcery or witchcraft or a quote unquote black magic. And that is the furthest thing from the truth. And so for me, part of our liberation means getting right with our spiritual heritages as well. And for me, it doesn't matter what people profess to believe in, whether it's Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, it doesn't matter what people profess to believe in. What we miss in terms of our understanding of africana religious history. And this is what my first book tried to do looking at a country like Jamaica. What we miss is that it was the African spiritual traditions. Even Christianity and Islam interpreted through an African cosmological or spiritual lens that liberated our ancestors. You can show me no slave revolt. No attempt at a revolt. And there is not a conjure woman or a condom man involved or an opium man or an OB a woman involved, or some sort of mystical way of engaging the powers of the universe that are beyond what we understand to be orthodox Christianity. You know, because of our socialization, we've often over christianized people like Nat Turner. We've over christianized many of these people and doesn't matter what titles they went by, baptist preacher, what have you. They were deeply rooted in African spiritual traditions and ways of engaging power. And so that's one of the ways my research can help us to be liberated. I'm not interested in saying that there's anything perfect about any religious system, including African ones. There's nothing perfect about any religious system. And all religious systems are Ford people, the opportunity to abuse and violate others. When people give themselves over to a religious authority because they trust that religious authority, there is always that opportunity and we've seen those kinds of violations all the time. But the scapegoat African religions as if they are somehow the epitome of evil and deprivation. And demonism is just absolutely wrong. And to call behaviors and activities, African religion that are not, that I just criminal, is also just wrong. So I am very, very interested in helping black people embrace the fullness of their spiritual heritage, you've ridden the book that goes deep into these ideas you've touched on and how they show up through our history. Tell.

Malcolm WB Dubois Philippe Wanda Jamaica west Central Africa Hartford Kingston West Coast Mississippi Connecticut Africa Nat Turner Ford
"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

Black History Year

01:48 min | 9 months ago

"dianne" Discussed on Black History Year

"Let's learn the story of a woman..

The first cruise ship in two years sails into Sydney harbour

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 10 months ago

The first cruise ship in two years sails into Sydney harbour

"The the the the first first first first cruise cruise cruise cruise ship ship ship ship to to to to dock dock dock dock in in in in Sydney Sydney Sydney Sydney Australia Australia Australia Australia in in in in two two two two years years years years sailed sailed sailed sailed into into into into the the the the city's city's city's city's harbor harbor harbor harbor uhhuh uhhuh uhhuh explore explore explore all all all by by by piano piano piano Australia Australia Australia arrive arrive arrive carrying carrying carrying just just just crew crew crew it it it could could could welcome welcome welcome close close close to to to two two two thousand thousand thousand passengers passengers passengers and and and is is is operated operated operated by by by nine nine nine hundred hundred hundred twenty twenty twenty four four four staff staff staff members members members at at at full full full capacity capacity capacity there there there were were were plenty plenty plenty of of of potential potential potential passengers passengers passengers like like like Cory Cory Cory Martin Martin Martin at at at the the the harbor harbor harbor I've I've I've grown grown grown up up up with with with cruising cruising cruising not not not really really really love love love them them them it's it's it's actually actually actually great great great to to to have have have him him him back back back and and and I'm I'm I'm extremely extremely extremely keen keen keen to to to get get get on on on them them them again again again so so so today today today is is is really really really just just just a a a day day day of of of celebrating celebrating celebrating cruise cruise cruise ships ships ships have have have not not not been been been allowed allowed allowed to to to dock dock dock in in in Australia Australia Australia since since since thirty thirty thirty passengers passengers passengers died died died on on on the the the ruby ruby ruby princess princess princess two two two years years years ago ago ago at at at the the the start start start of of of the the the corona corona corona virus virus virus pandemic pandemic pandemic travel travel travel agent agent agent Dianne Dianne Dianne Martin Martin Martin is is is ready ready ready to to to get get get to to to work work work the the the last last last two two two years years years I I I have have have been been been doing doing doing refunds refunds refunds and and and cancellations cancellations cancellations and and and all all all those those those sort sort sort of of of things things things so so so it it it is is is just just just so so so nice nice nice they they they have have have to to to be be be talking talking talking about about about creating creating creating a a a strikeout strikeout strikeout the the the Pacific Pacific Pacific explores explores explores first first first cruise cruise cruise is is is scheduled scheduled scheduled for for for may may may thirty thirty thirty first first first I I I bet bet bet Donahue Donahue Donahue

Australia Sydney Dock Dock Dock Dock Harbor Harbor Harbor Harbor Cory Cory Cory Martin Martin M Harbor Harbor Harbor Virus Virus Pandemic Pandemic Dianne Dianne Dianne Martin Ma Princess Princess Pacific Pacific Pacific Donahue Donahue Donahue
Peter Schweizer Exposes Nancy Pelosi, Dianne Feinstein, and Others in 'Red Handed' Book

Mark Levin

01:33 min | 1 year ago

Peter Schweizer Exposes Nancy Pelosi, Dianne Feinstein, and Others in 'Red Handed' Book

"Three let's start there Capitol Hill and let's start with Pelosi and Boehner and Feinstein at all go right ahead Yeah I mean this has been a target for the Chinese intelligence and the Communist Party for a long time And what they do is they basically provide cash rewards in the form of business deals and consulting deals with politicians in the United States So you take violence at dianne Feinstein senator who was chairman of the Senate intelligence committee for many years Her husband Richard Blum did hundreds of millions of dollars with deals in China with state backed companies And this was all going on while she was charting our foreign policy And as I quote in the book she was very apologetic She compared the a tenement square massacre where an estimated 10,000 Chinese civilians were killed some of them were just run over with tanks She compares that to Kent State in the United States On other occasions she said that China is more democratic and representative their dictatorship is than the representative republic that we are in the United States And it kind of reached a crescendo at one point her husband was invested in a Chinese computer company that was selling a computer's to the U.S. Military and had turned out the U.S. Marine Corps discovered that there were bugs on these

Senate Intelligence Committee Richard Blum Feinstein Boehner Capitol Hill Pelosi Dianne Feinstein Communist Party U.S. China U.S. Marine Corps
"dianne" Discussed on Biters: The Walking Dead Podcast with Dianne

Biters: The Walking Dead Podcast with Dianne

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"dianne" Discussed on Biters: The Walking Dead Podcast with Dianne

"Hey everybody. Hello and welcome to biters this. Diane and this is more nell. And i think i might be recording this episode a and we're dealing with something we're dealing with some new technology so hang in there with us we are. I'm on my new laptop. I'm i've got my new setup in everything. It took me about five minutes here dianne so like this is an improvement. Yes yes actually speaking to one another as good. I still haven't got the lipson feed these thing yet so This might we might have a delayed episode after this one. So bear with us. And i'll try to remember to put that. In the posing notes on the biters facebook page as well so that people get that message but i think this is probably as good a time as any to talk about world beyond inferior to you. Yeah i think so. Okay so you know after a lot of discussion and after definitely on my part and i think it's fair to say on mars part. Some frustration with fear and with world beyond. We had decided that. We're not gonna cover those series. So we're gonna finish out biters with the last season of walking dead and you know we're going to kind of see where things go with the spin off and the am biology series. But i think it's safe to say we're both pretty disappointed in fear and just never really got fired. Up about world beyond. Yeah you know. The the advertisements make next season. Look good but that's like eight seconds in an entire season kinda make eight seconds of just about anything look good so Yeah and you know. I'm kind of indifferent about world beyond. I'm super sad about fear. Because i definitely have some strong positive associations with fear i'm gonna miss mo collins i'm gonna miss gentlemen i'm gonna miss colman domingo but i'm kind of over it like i'm into rewatch the hundreds you know so. Yeah i have even though we've heard or seen nothing about it. I really high hopes for the anthology. Because i love a good anthology. Yeah i mean. I think in the old days of like creepshow and i'm like all right i could i could potentially buy into it old days creepshow on now. Oh yeah. that's true. Got a reboot. I haven't watched any of the reboot probably should. I actually haven't watched any either. But like i've seen advertisements for a couple of episodes and every time i see an advertisement for it i'm just like oh my god that looks like a really good show. What is that and then of course. It's like creepshow on cheddar. Unlike course and kelly fleming was in an episode. Y- okay you know what i did see a couple of the very early episodes the like i don't know if we're gonna like season two or whatever if they're even doing seasons or if it's just truly like but yeah the the episode took really really good i i..

nell dianne Diane mo collins colman domingo facebook kelly fleming
"dianne" Discussed on Biters: The Walking Dead Podcast with Dianne

Biters: The Walking Dead Podcast with Dianne

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"dianne" Discussed on Biters: The Walking Dead Podcast with Dianne

"Imdb boot listened to some of the stuff he's done. The boys watchmen lost man in the high castle. Westworld which. I didn't watch but i've got tons of friends. Who loved it American gods he is working on air. He has worked on a jason momoa series for apple plus called c. Yeah that looked a little bit interesting. So he's got taunts accredits. I just listed off the ones that kinda spoke to me and that were pretty recent. Yeah he is definitely worked on a lot of things that i have also watched in addition Falling skies of talked about that one before that was a really good series fringe. Mazing if you love x. files you should watch fringe. Who have is it. Just you and i have talked about friends. Did brian and i talk about friends. Also you and. Brian may have talked about fringe okay. I i know. I've talked about fringe. Okay resilient aisles revolution. That's a really good post apocalyptic basically I think in. Emp hits the world. Yeah okay yeah so it kind of takes us back about a hundred or two hundred years. the good wife and the good fight. I love both of those shows. designated survivor. That was a really great show The series snow piercer. Which i really need to And need to go find that one and watch it. 'cause i know there was quite a bit quite a big deal about that. Yeah i mean the movie was great. And if you're a fan of the movie you really should Find the youtube video. That says snow piercer. Exists in the willy. Wonka universe really interesting. Okay yeah yeah But yeah so the the one that i know him from is Evil weyrich I think it moved to net flicks. it has the guy who played luke cage. Oh yeah It's a really good series season. One was pretty good but season two. That just came out. Looks amazing so that may be one. That i've been chair soon. Yang dude got some shops. Yeah and he's done. You know a lot of really interesting kinda comic bookie kind of more genre kind of stuff. So i definitely was was pretty excited when i saw his. Imdb page all right and then we decided that for featured cast we were gonna talk about one of the three people who died this episode. So i said just go ahead and pick one and i picked at agatha laurie. Fourteen fourteen year. I would've said forty eight. Yeah okay so and surprisingly so because i have since episode one. I have kind of in crushing on dunkin So i'm really sad to see him. Go and cole was also kind of seemed to be an awesome character..

jason momoa Evil weyrich apple Yang dude brian Brian luke cage youtube agatha laurie dunkin cole
"dianne" Discussed on Wealth Is In The Details Podcast

Wealth Is In The Details Podcast

07:33 min | 1 year ago

"dianne" Discussed on Wealth Is In The Details Podcast

"Peter how are you today and great eric. How about yourself. I'm hot peter. Well this summer it is summer. But i know that we spoke a little bit before. The podcast air conditioners down. I mean we all go through these little things here and there. I'm pretty excited. Actually about a young man. That's going to come over to fix it. He's young he's got a young family and he's been doing great with heating and air. I had fixed my daughter's furnace last year. And and he did a great job so he's gonna come visit me again today and earn some cash so at least that's a good thing right. Good something to look forward to. That's right peter. I know that on our last podcast. You really spoke with somebody who did concierge primary care. They were specifically a concierge. Primary care physician which i had never heard about. Somebody excited to learn about that and i recommend any of our listeners. Wanna learn about that and want a vip high touch service when it comes in tremendous to go back and listen to because it was really really surprising but it was an amazing podcast today. Peter you're continuing with the healthcare theme with the conversation about healthcare advocacy. Now just the title of that. I can kind of put together what healthcare advocacy is. But really what's it gonna take a deep dive into it. What is it about well as you know. Wellness is just an important part of all of our conversations with clients and people were working with and it's not just about financial wellness Either it's you know in order to help. Our clients on the financial side of things were often discussing other aspects of wellness emotional health physical spiritual health. I mean these things can are part of the conversation. And so while. I'm not an expert in all those areas sometimes our conversations touch upon and nonfinancial topics. And today we're gonna be talking to someone who definitely is concerned about our listeners wellness and she's focused on the healthcare side of things and i'd like to introduce diane's avezzano. She's the founder and principal of health assist and over the last years. Health assist has really been important resource for us and they've helped many of our clients deal with the complexity of medicare from signing up to choosing the best products to surround traditional medicare and as you mentioned will be talking today about healthcare advocacy which is a profession that diana actually helped establish so diane tell us what health assists does. And if you wouldn't mind give us a little bit of history of your journey. Because i always think it's interesting to hear what our guests where they come from how they do it. Sure peter happy to share those things with you. So i guess in one sentence i would say that as healthcare advocates we help individuals navigate the healthcare and health insurance systems that can take on many different activities. Let's just say but just go back in terms of my journey. So i began my career as a nurse but then ranch doubt to do a lot of different things and i found myself in the corporate world and it was very interesting because whenever colleagues would find out that i was a nurse they would seek me out in. Tell me their tales of woe about the healthcare system. And i found myself just constantly trying to reassure them also sort of sharing by insider knowledge. About how the health care system works. And so i help wade. Through some of the challenges they were experiencing. I might do some research for the more coach them or help them set up. Second opinions things like that and so i was doing this. Work berry informally for a while and life changes in. I had the idea that maybe there was an unmet. Need out there and i could create a business a doing this sort of thing so in two thousand four i moved back from florida to massachusetts and i had the opportunity to really do some research write a business plan and launched health assist in in two thousand four and here we are in two thousand twenty one in feels like yesterday grid. Our journeys are just part of who we are and sometimes they lead us to places that were not so certain where we'll be. We don't know that's true. I didn't feel like everything i've done in my life to. This point has brought me to this place. In every experience. I had every career opportunity i had whether it be in clinical work whether it be management hospital administration outpatient environments the consulting world insurance managed care. It all came together in help assist. That's great good. Well there's so much about the american healthcare system that is fantastic and it seems to me. We do certain things really well in this country like our medical technology our research capabilities. We have lots of options and if you live near population center and you have health insurance chances. Are you have great access to care. But the us system seems to have a lot of challenges as well it's incredibly fragmented. So what are the challenges that you see. How can the the consumer navigate these fragmented systems. That are just part of living in america. You're absolutely right. Fragmentation is a major issue within the healthcare system is exactly why founded health assist because i saw that we were operating in silos and there was no one person or no one professional who was kind of pulling it all together. I think we think of our primary care physician as being in that role but unfortunately they cannot always function in that role. And so what. I really approached this from the perspective of you know try throughout my career to make the healthcare system better and then i was frustrated with that i guess and then i thought okay. It is what it is at the moment. We all need to live within. What can we do to be the most assertive end knowledgeable consumers so that we kind of take control of what we do have control over in. That is us. And how do we create a better experience for ourselves. So when we're working with clients the ultimate sort of good thing is when someone says. I don't need you anymore because i feel very confident to do all of this on my own but we have to acknowledge that it is a flawed system. We have to be aware of what the role is of all the individuals so we do have our primary care physician but often we have other specialists. Who really impact our care. And once you've wear the specialist you primary care trying to put to the side. We have to be assertive. We have to enter meetings with our physicians with an agenda for what it is a with an objective about what it is that we want to accomplish. Have agenda items that we want to review. We want to work on our relationships with all of these individuals we also need to track everything ourselves. And i have to say that over the last ten years with the advancement of patient portals in online medical record systems that has made life so much better but most people don't even know how to register for their patient portals let alone.

Peter diane medicare peter eric diana wade berry massachusetts florida america
Democrats Aren't Talking About the Worst Possible Outcome of the California Recall

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:08 min | 1 year ago

Democrats Aren't Talking About the Worst Possible Outcome of the California Recall

"Larry elder gets to be governor. Two weeks from now after the recall Everybody in the liberal media has gonads no big deal. If larry elder becomes governor he's only going to serve until november twenty twenty two and will have no power anyway because the democrats control both houses of the legislature in california. So what if larry elder becomes governor await a minute. What did that caller just remind us. If something happens dianne feinstein. Who's sick as a dog. And she either is incapacitated. Or you know god forbid dies. We don't wish her will if senator feinstein can't complete her term. The governor of california governor larry elder or his biden would say elder gets to appoint the replacement senator and surprise. There's no more fifty fifty senate and that's the end of vice president. Kamala harris breaking all the votes and the votes and this would be just an interesting turn of events. So let's keep our eye on that california

Larry Elder Senator Feinstein Dianne Feinstein California Legislature Biden Kamala Harris Senate
Republicans Aim at GOP Base in 1st California Recall Debate

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:18 min | 1 year ago

Republicans Aim at GOP Base in 1st California Recall Debate

"We want to move onto a brand new topic. Our friend hugh hewitt was on vacation but he was actually on a working vacation last night because he. He hosted a debate between the various challenges. To gavin newsom in california's gubernatorial recall election. A number of people were on stage. None of them were named jane fonda. Wayne i'm actually a little surprised that jane funded didn't accept the invitation. Yes one hundred and forty two year. Old Viet cong candidate was not on the stage last night. Did you see the san francisco. Chronicle article jane fonda was considering jumping into the into the race because she was worried. That gavin newsom wasn't going to be able to defeat the recall i. That's the thing about the democratic party is kind of. They're kind of putting older eggs into gavin newsom basket right if he goes down. There's really not a lot of democrats that are kind of running as that's a hard campaign to run right now. Say no to the recall. But if you do vote for me instead yeah i mean. It's really an untenable yet. Some you get some some low level democrats that are running in this because they need some name recognition for later on down the road or they're looking at new figuring he's vulnerable and there should be some democrats in the mix goes down democrat. Statewide that is that is trying to seize the opportunity and saying let's toss him overboard but let's hang onto the state. There's there's really nobody high profile making that case. Well in that case jane punish a jumped in i mean she's only eighty three years old. That's still younger than jerry. Brown wasn't his last nine. Feinstein dianne feinstein. So that was that was a little music but no jane fonda was on the stage last night he would love that actually but This debate that was carried by thirteen fox affiliates all around the great state of california and hugh promise to run an officiant and and respectful debate. And i did it. But but dwayne you did didn't how how did it turn out. It was as advertised. They really didn't attack each other much. They pretty much kept their focus. On on gavin newsom and they were all asked very smart intelligent questions.

Gavin Newsom Jane Fonda Hugh Hewitt Viet Cong Jane Wayne Chronicle California Democratic Party San Francisco Feinstein Dianne Feinstein Jerry Brown Hugh FOX Dwayne
"dianne" Discussed on It's All Political

It's All Political

07:11 min | 1 year ago

"dianne" Discussed on It's All Political

"It. Well thank you that. I'm the first woman ever to lead by the way black orders woman or other spike woman. Okay yeah first woman of any color But i do think. I think you're seeing happen now. Is african american leaders are taking over being asked the lead traditional white progressive organizations fo. The year i came in move on They have an african american female leader. Working families party him chill Nina turner was early the year. before with. So you've got african. American leaders now leading traditionally white progressive organizations and what we say is that there is no white progressive versus black progressive like there's progressive and there are a lot of flack progressives in fact the route i think of progressive messaging is black. Like most people didn't know that martin luther king was a progressive. I mean he was. He was based on all the things that he stood for was probably closer to democratic socialists than traditional progressives super progressive and that's because what progressive party is about the progressive movement is about is about making sure we're taking care of everyone and i think that's a message just really important what i'm doing is the leader of. Dfa is reminding us if we don't deal with the inequalities that naturally exist if we don't protect everybody that we're not doing our job and that starts with focusing on black and brown people. 'cause they say you know when the world gets a cold black people get pneumonia. And that's because everything that affects regular people because of racism systematic. Racism are white supremacy. And what our country was founded on the inequalities against black and people make it harder. You saw that during the pandemic right you know. Black folks were more likely under businesses to lose their job to get sick to die from this pandemic so we had do. A progressive movement is be inclusive and so racial justice has to be a foundation of our work. We have to. We have to challenge ourselves in the ways that is a movement that we forget that messages on always here reminding white progressive organizations and white progressive leaders that we need to make sure that. We're listening to black organizers. Black leaders listening to the black community because those needs are are pervasive. You know we're celebrating pride this month and people forget that pride started were black transgender protests and And so every almost every major movement i was i was talking about a white women's suffrage and someone asked me to talk about when the suffragette like conveniently wrote out the role of black woman paid to get white women right to vote only to not get the vote for another four years So i think that's important. I think the progressive movement needs to be there. I think the problem is know. Even our organization was founded in burlington vermont arguably not the most diverse world. Now it is not there mason city. They have tall short people short white people. They're all about high diversity. We need to talk about that more under the real thing real thing. I happen to somebody. That is a little short as well. So i'm with i'm not count so anyway i think that's the thing is like not not realizing that those are those movements are combined and we just need to work more together and i'm loving what i'm seeing. Frankly when i'm loving the focus i am. I think i think part of it is. We had to get to a place where we just started to see that we were fighting for the same thing and that we have to start talking to our own white colleagues about censoring themselves about the voices of black and brown people letting black people and brown people. You saw that with. George floyd and all the things that happened around black lives matter and you know making sure that black organizers are given the freedom to be able to lead in for white progressives to be allies into san gap and so i think i think is going very very well and i think going forward. You're going to see more and more organizations like potassium browns with should browns organization as a progressive organization. They've always been a part of gross movement. She runs black. Black voters matter So we we always had. I think this This You know understanding the black and brown people have been naturally progressive for lots of reasons but then when the organization started to form they looked more white. We just gotta merge the movements. Unless they won't ask you what's barbara lease the said on this podcast a couple of different times. We've talked about the challenges of black women running for office to raise money And here and this is barbara. Lee saying this the national progressive icon and even though she largely doesn't Face a lot of challenges or challenges when she's running for a seat here in oakland. These bay She still feels that. She said she has to work. It's almost like three times as hard. What are you doing If anything to to help black women when they are running for office thank you for that question and barbara queen. So love her. very much. I'll things make me happy. So you know the first thing we've got gotta start early you know and in part of it is because it just takes so much longer particularly for statewide. We're talking about senate races and bfa Is probably support three black women in several black men for senate next cycle. So you'll see you'll see happen one it just it just takes longer. You've got to build the right team. You got to build it early. You know the you know the five. M's of campaigns is money message manpower women alliteration works better with man Metrics the media. And so i think is one of those things where with with black female candidates Start early and you have to have all of that done. I think the fact that Black women don't get as much support as twofold one this idea of electability which is a construct that is based in whiteness and base in the patriarchy or maleness is a challenge. And i've said it. Let's proven proven to be bullshit to be stone cold boot bullshit as we've discussed on this podcast. Yes i like the building recovering neck. Because i don't think people understand. I'm like white men lose your i'll say he. He wasn't elected often. They are you go so so when we got a challenge that and we know that they confront racism from traditional donors from organizations. And so we try to get in these races very early to show that they have some national support behind them and we try to build support around them so we do all the things we helped. Raise money raise awareness. We built our for them. We do all that stuff. You got to do all that early. But then you confront the other side which we don't talk a lot about what racialized in gender oppression does for black female candidates. Now you remember them. More white women supported donald trump than supported hillary clinton. And you think about the fact that there are still women who don't believe that women can win and they don't want to support women because they're afraid women can't win and then there are black people who.

donald trump George floyd Lee hillary clinton Nina turner four years oakland barbara queen burlington vermont martin luther king first American first woman five mason city this month african american one african three
"dianne" Discussed on Max & Murphy on Politics

Max & Murphy on Politics

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"dianne" Discussed on Max & Murphy on Politics

"Say the nypd nypd has roughly six billion dollars. Annual operating budget are several billion dollars that are devoted to nypd expenses but had two or three billion dollars money currently going to the wipe you better spent. When he's what would you spend money on in your in your new vision for public safety. Yeah so i. I think we know that the majority actually calls the nypd response to or not crimes. They are issues related to some of those Social determinants to health. That i was talking about earlier right. Homelessness mental health and behavioral health issues. And so the idea of creating a team of professionals of skilled and trained people who are able to intervene deescalate those types of situations and not only that but also then connect those people to services in programs will both save lives because who wants to send an armed person to intervene in a in a in a case with someone who's having a mental health breakdown but it will also connect those people to to something more right so we wanna just. We wanna intervene in a way. That's not just the escalating but also allows for people to be connected to something that's going to help prevent that situation from occurring And that's that's where i think. Those dollars really need to be spent started a little bit about education little more about education. I should say since we started off on that a little bit. How do you think about addressing the challenges in the school system that have been embedded for decades now in there have been different may oral approaches that it made against some some some impact clearly. Graduation rates have risen etcetera etcetera. But you talked about sort of radically rethinking. A lot of what. The city does and the biggest chunk of the city budget in terms of departments is our main vegetation educating million students. So what are you thinking about there in terms of how to reimagine get some real differences in results. Yeah you know the first thing. I'll say on that is. We've got an affinity group called educators for diane A citywide Group of people who are struggling right now.

two six billion dollars first three billion dollars several billion dollars nypd both million
3 Fundamental Marketing Secrets With Tim Fitzpatrick

Accelerate Your Business Growth

02:16 min | 1 year ago

3 Fundamental Marketing Secrets With Tim Fitzpatrick

"My guest today. Is tim fitzpatrick. Tim is an entrepreneur with expertise in marketing and business growth he has over twenty years of entrepreneurial experience with a passion for developing and growing businesses that passion served him well in operating and managing a wholesale distribution company he co owned for nine years before being acquired in two thousand five he started reality marketing in two thousand thirteen and has been helping service businesses. Simplify marketing so they can grow with less stress. Thanks so much for joining me today. Tim happy to be here. Dianne great to have you here. So and and i love this idea of marketing at so they can grow with less stress because of just talking to someone before this podcast. Who's in a service business who we were talking about. Like social media marketing and i had said to her I don't think she should do it herself. I think she should hire someone to do it. Because it's just not where she should be spending our time and and the stress that it causes is just not worth it so there are many things in our business that are not the highest and best use of our time right right right exactly and that would be one of them. That's right so okay. So i wanna start like just the fundamentals. What are the fundamentals market to me. There's there's three fundamentals. I call them. The marketing strategy trilogy. The first is your target market. You know so who. Who are you gonna serve. And how are you going to serve. Those people's you know in really understanding who your ideal clients are second is your messaging. So what you say how you say you know the value how you communicate. The value provide to your target market is critical and the third aspect of it. Is you have to have a plan of how you're going to get that message in front of those people.

Tim Fitzpatrick TIM Dianne
"dianne" Discussed on Look Behind The Look

Look Behind The Look

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"dianne" Discussed on Look Behind The Look

"Photograph. That i can't shake and there are so many insanely outrageous. Scorgeous photos of diane. Brill is a stark black and white picture of mick jagger. And he's staring longingly with the look of a schoolboy in a suit at this incredibly curvaceous woman in white platinum hair in an update cleavage that would make jayne mansfield blush staring back at mc with a look that says you got that right. You've never seen a girl like me before on the streets of nyc. Insane life of diane brel began in wisconsin. Then london in her early twenties and by some fluke of a visa. Problem new york city got her. God and boy did she. Will this town at the ripe old age of twenty six the york times of april. Twenty seventh nineteen eighty-five headlined an article. Diane brill rings over a world of parties and goes on to describe her answering machine with the nightly barrage of invites. That's when we had answering machines are lifelines. The invites were from the likes. Of andy warhol mick jagger and sting. Andy warhol famously said of diane if you were added party and diane brill was there. You knew your at the right party her supersonic beauties skintight rubber fashion. And don't forget. Her club entrances which drove the paparazzi insane with cries diane. They all made her officially known as the queen of the night she was the top of what became known as the fab. Five hundred literally the five hundred coolest people that were on any new york city guest list in the nineteen eighties. So we're talking iggy pop robert mapplethorpe john michelle. Basquiat herring any li vit- steven klein. Debbie harry mario testino and of course any warhol she was married to rudolph pipers. The owner of the legendary club. Dance a tear. Yeah that's where. Desperately seeking susan has madonna dancing and it also helped her in all the right places. But diane really didn't need any help. She ended up acting in films like iconic downtown nyc film slaves of new york for love or money with michael. J. fox was another one. She wrote a book boobs boys and high heels or how to get dressed in just under six hours in. You could still get it. She started a clothing line and she was dressing. Durant.

Andy warhol J. fox Debbie harry mario testino five hundred nyc michael susan new york diane brel Five hundred london john michelle wisconsin jayne Durant nineteen eighties diane brill diane - steven klein Diane brill
Ingram, Williamson pace Pelicans in 128-111 win over Lakers

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

Ingram, Williamson pace Pelicans in 128-111 win over Lakers

"Brandon Ingram scored a season high thirty six points as the pelicans beat the Lakers won twenty eight to one eleven New Orleans blew it open with a forty three point third quarter as the lead grew to thirty Ingram had seventeen in the corner Dianne Williamson finished with twenty seven points LA struggled again without injured stars lebron James and Anthony Davis losing their third straight game montrezl Harrell had a team high eighteen points I am mark Myers

Brandon Ingram Pelicans Dianne Williamson Lakers New Orleans Ingram Anthony Davis Lebron James Montrezl Harrell LA Mark Myers
Feinstein’s Future Could Swing on Husband’s Potential Posting Overseas

Larry Elder

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Feinstein’s Future Could Swing on Husband’s Potential Posting Overseas

"The husband of Democratic Senator Dianne Feinstein, maybe offered an ambassadorship in Europe. Correspondent Bob Agnew report. The New York Times first reported find signs husband, Richard Bloom is interested in a roll of the European capital. The report coincides with a separate development growing pressure on finds time to vacate her coveted Senate seat. Critics in her own party question Feinstein's ability to complete another term should you win reelection in 2024. Others are eager to see Feinstein replaced by a black woman Should she leave the post early? Still others angry. It finds time for maintaining a civil tone during the Senate confirmation hearings for Judge Amy

Senator Dianne Feinstein Bob Agnew Richard Bloom Feinstein The New York Times Europe Senate Judge Amy
Newsom vows to name Black woman to Senate if Dianne Feinstein steps down

C-SPAN Programming

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

Newsom vows to name Black woman to Senate if Dianne Feinstein steps down

"California Senator Dianne Feinstein is brushing off remarks by Governor Gavin Newsom that he would replace her with a black woman if she stepped down the Democratic lawmaker, telling reporters she is good friends with a guy. Governor is feeling fine and quote intends to serve her full term. Just some of the stories

Senator Dianne Feinstein Governor Gavin Newsom California
Newsom vows to name Black woman to Senate if Dianne Feinstein steps down

The KFBK Morning News

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Newsom vows to name Black woman to Senate if Dianne Feinstein steps down

"Movement in California gaining speed, which is coinciding with Governor Gavin Newsom's latest media blitz. The governor joined the daytime talk show the view and you'll be on later this morning for an exclusive interview. Newsome appeared on MSNBC Monday evening, where he said he'd fill Senator Dianne Feinstein seat with a black woman if the senior California senator were to retire before finishing her term. This move comes one day after California Democrats officially launched their own campaign against the recall effort

Governor Gavin Newsom Senator Dianne Feinstein California Newsome Msnbc
"dianne" Discussed on Biters: The Walking Dead Podcast with Dianne

Biters: The Walking Dead Podcast with Dianne

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"dianne" Discussed on Biters: The Walking Dead Podcast with Dianne

"And i've been these guys repeatedly say again. I'm she wants. Revenge is my favorite band right now. I love them I know my my my playlist I was kinda going through it the other day. My my quote unquote station on amazon for the things that i have liked. Yeah it's like ninety percent czechs while you gotta understand the in the past several months it's been to hamilton and now she wants revenge which all of those things could be as different from each other if you tried. So you know me. And my name's i love names There was one that i should send you. It says my brain can be accurately described as the kitchen junk drawer being dumped on a trampoline. I would say right now. That's true. I forgot my glasses at work on friday. Oh no but i'm a hot s. Oh yeah we go okay. Everybody out in fighters land. I don't know that. I can say this on biters but i'm going to take a risk. Maternal is never allowed to address a package ever but in my defense is sent dianne a hoodie and to cat toys and a cat tweets per. And so there's like this you know rhythmic purring a free eat. The like the box was going to get intercepted by like the usps cops and ripped open because they thought it was like a ticking time bomb in there or something and so i may have written a funny little message. It was very in like giant workers. So i put a picture of it up on facebook and one of my friends was like that's hilarious. And he said yes. She's the funny sister. And i said you know. I think it was totally hilarious as well and he said. I hope that your post office person got a huge charge out of that. He didn't exactly say it like that. I would have been really funny if he'd said that in so my box at the post office today said purring tatoi inside totally not a vibrator. So there you go there. You are yeah. That's that's a little peek into my personnel. Would've never written it. Did you would get a kick out was completely hilarious. Like i picked up my mail this morning and there was a giant line in the post office. And i got that box out of my out of one of the the drop boxes and i was like and promptly posted on facebook in a way that they couldn't see your address or mine and promptly shared it with a friend on facebook messenger. So yeah that was funny. You got to laugh. I just like go make a joke totally. I can never be serious alright. Goods bads uglies. I get to go first this time. Yes you do. So thomas oh brought this up when he was messaging me about the episode. But i had noticed it as well so tom. You don't get to take credit for this one. I loved the way that the scenes with carol mirrored the scenes with lia like especially the fishing seen like dialogue. Was the same that you know it was. It was funny and it was great and it was really well done that again. That through line was a really good through mine. Yep yep so that is actually my ugly so sorry. it's totally okay. Like it was very apparent to Especially with the fishing. But also the whole you know basically kind of need to move on from and live your life when we're doing. And yeah there was a ton of parallels and i was like the lia and darryl story is what we all wanted in like season two caroline daryl. I actually was like this. Is the darryl episode. We've been waiting for for years and it was so unexpected us..

dianne thomas amazon darryl today friday carol tom facebook this morning ninety percent Revenge first season two lia hamilton daryl one past several months friends
Garland confirmation is a stage for 4 of GOP's 2024 hopefuls

C-SPAN Programming

05:38 min | 2 years ago

Garland confirmation is a stage for 4 of GOP's 2024 hopefuls

"App. Federal Judge Merrick Garland is president Biden's nominee to become attorney general. He testified in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee today. The hearing lasted most of the day We begin with committee chair Dick Durbin of Illinois. This hearing will come to order today. The Senate Judiciary Committee will hold a hearing on the nomination of Judge Merrick Garland to be the 86th attorney general of the United States. Judge Garland I wanna welcome you and your family. I want to welcome you back to the Senate Judiciary Committee. I know this return trip. It's been a long time and planning on you're here. Finally, this will be the Judiciary Committee's first hearing of the 117th Congress. Before I turned to my opening remarks. I'd like to just take a few minutes to make some Acknowledgments. I want to welcome my friend, Senator Chuck Grassley as the committee's ranking member. When I first came on the Senate Judiciary Committee 24 years ago, I was the ranking member on subcommittee with you, and we dealt with the issue of bankruptcy. Now Illinois and Iowa sit next to each other. And so did Urban Grassley. We have our differences. But Senator Grassley and I have worked together on important legislation over the years, most recently on criminal justice and sensing reform. I look forward to continuing that work in this Congress. I want to recognize the outgoing chair and ranking member Senator Lindsey Graham, who will join us remotely this morning, and Senator Dianne Feinstein. Senator Graham, as is true of Senator Grassley. Well, we don't always agree, has always been a welcome partner on many issues. Including one of the most challenging issues, immigration, Senator Feinstein. I want to come in for leading the committee Democrats with Grace and resolved over the past four years. I know she will continue to be an important voice on this committee on a host of issues, including in her new capacity as the chair of the Human Rights and Laws subcommittee, which I was proud to charity and past Congresses. I also want to welcome our new committee members who either be here in person. I see one in person and one probably remote senators Padilla And also on the Democratic side, Senator Cotton on the Republican side. I look forward to working with each of you. There's some historic first in the Judiciary Committee this year, Senator Padilla, our new senator from California, will be chairing the subcommittee on immigration, citizenship. Border safety. I'm honored that he's the first Latino senator to chair that subcommittee, and we look forward to his leadership. Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey will chair the subcommittee on criminal justice and counter terrorism. He's the first Black senator to chair a judiciary subcommittee. And we could not imagine a better choice at the helm of this particular subcommittee to all of our other members who are returning to serve on the committee. Welcome back. I want to thank all the committee members for agreeing to hold this committee hearing and vote on Judge Garland's nomination. It is a great honor to serve on this committee. The Senate established the Judiciary Committee by resolution on December 10th 18 16, making it among the very first standing committees of the Senate. This committee has seen many consequential debates and approved many important nominations and landmark legislation in the committee's history. There has only been one prior Illinois senator to serve his chair Judge Garland Lyman. Trumbull, who led the committee from 18 61 to 18 72, and during his term of service was a Democrat, a Republican, a radical Republican and a Democrat. Again. He was the most bipartisan senator, you could imagine His tenure was also distinguished by passage. Of historic legislation, the 13th 14th and 15th amendments to the Constitution. The Freedman's bureau acts of 18 65 and 18 66 Civil Rights Act of 18 66. The last of these was introduced by Trumbull ultimately became the nation's first civil rights law. As chair, Trumbull saw a nation torn apart by original sin slavery and widespread violence and injustice that continued even after the 13th amendments. Passage is African Americans throughout the nation face race. System. Our nation is still dealing with the consequences of these injustices. People of color face systemic racism, and we're still working to rid this nation of the horrific legacy of slavery and Jim Crow. This committee could make a difference. We have the jurisdiction and the opportunity to do it through legislation, oversight and nominations, including this nomination of Merrick Garland to service our nation's next attorney general. There have been few moments in history where the role of attorney general and the occupant of That post It mattered more Judge Garland should you be confirmed, and I have every confidence you will be. You'll oversee a Justice Department at an existential moment. After four tumultuous years of intrigue, controversy and brute political force, the future of the department is clearly in the hands of the next attorney general Under attorney general Sessions and successor Bill Bar. The Justice Department literally became an arm of the White House committed to advancing the interest. The President Trump his family and his political allies. It came as little surprise then that the U. S Department of Justice became the Trump Department of Justice General Bar stated clearly that he believed the attorney general was the president's lawyer, not the nations. And what were the results too many in the department's senior roles cast aside the rules law trump appointees in the apartment sidelined career public servants from Lyon attorneys, two FBI agents Limited their roles disregarded their nonpartisan input override, overriding their professional judgment and falsely accusing them of being members of the

Senate Judiciary Committee Judge Merrick Garland Judge Garland Senator Grassley Judiciary Committee Senator Chuck Grassley Urban Grassley Illinois Senator Lindsey Graham Senator Dianne Feinstein Senator Feinstein Human Rights And Laws Subcommi Senator Cotton Senator Padilla Dick Durbin Subcommittee On Immigration Trumbull Senator Cory Booker Subcommittee On Criminal Justi Congress
San Francisco to remove Washington and Lincoln's names from schools

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:24 sec | 2 years ago

San Francisco to remove Washington and Lincoln's names from schools

"San francisco. School board voted to remove the names of george washington and abraham lincoln from its public schools. Board voted six to one in favor of renaming. The forty four schools with no connection to slavery oppression from racism or similar criteria. Senator dianne feinstein's name was also on the list. Because while she was mayor she replaced vandalized confederate flag. There was part of a long standing display at city

George Washington Abraham Lincoln Senator Dianne Feinstein San Francisco
Strip club ruling on COVID rules applies to restaurants

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

Strip club ruling on COVID rules applies to restaurants

"Dianne Jacob has asked for a special closed session this afternoon, saying the county needs clarity on a judge's ruling allowing strip clubs to remain open and said the ruling does apply to restaurants. Jacob telling Koco news when she and two other supervisors voted to challenge the first ruling allowing strip clubs to remain open. She didn't know restaurants would be included My vote. On the appeal was simply on the strip club issue. I believe the strip clubs should stay closed. On the other hand, we did not discuss it all the restaurant issue and I truly believe if I had my way about it, I would have all outdoor activities opens. Supervisor Nathan Fletcher is opposed to more businesses reopening due to the number of cases and covert deaths.

Dianne Jacob Koco News Jacob Supervisor Nathan Fletcher
Lawmakers on Boston's Beacon Hill Approve Police Accountability Bill

WBZ Afternoon News

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Lawmakers on Boston's Beacon Hill Approve Police Accountability Bill

"Lawmakers on Beacon Hill. Discussing a massive bill that would bring police reform to the base. State state rap Carlos Gonzales says the bill addresses central issues, accountability and transparency. And I am proud of the work that the black and Latino caucus address and provided the agenda to make this a reality today. I'm not all lawmakers are on board Governor Baker first of all safe He's not saying if he supports the bill or not. Instead, he says his office hasn't even talked to their lawyers about it yet. Meantime, both representative Patrick Purity of situate and Senator Dianne Jihad Leo of Methuen, say less than 24 hours isn't enough time to review or 129 Page Bill. There was discussion going on right now on Beacon Hill on that bill Compromise announced yesterday,

Carlos Gonzales Beacon Hill Governor Baker Patrick Purity Senator Dianne Jihad Leo Methuen
The George Moscone and Harvey Milk Assassinations

This Day in History Class

04:05 min | 2 years ago

The George Moscone and Harvey Milk Assassinations

"Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm tracy the wilson in its november twenty seventh on a stay in nineteen seventy eight san francisco mayor. George mosconi and supervisor harvey milk were assassinated by former supervisor. Dan white white had resigned seventeen days earlier but he had tried to be reinstated as a member of the board of supervisors but while the mayor had initially said that he would be able to return to his job when he made this request. The mayor refused mayor. Mosconi had run on a platform of social progress and inclusion and while in office he hit appointed women and people of color and gay people to government positions white on the other hand had campaigned with the slogan of unites and fight and in one pamphlet he had said quote. I am not going to be forced out of san francisco by splinter groups of radicals social deviants incorrigibles. He had also voted against a gay rights. Ordinance in san francisco. The mayor had seen an opportunity to replace white with somebody who is more in line with his own goals. He had tried to pass a number of reforms before white's resignation and they had consistently failed by one vote so on the day of the murders mayor mosconi was planning to announce white's replacement but on the morning of the twenty seventh white entered the building through a window to bypass metal detectors. He entered moscow office and shot him four times. And then he went into the office of harvey milk in the supervisor's chamber down the hall and shot five times before leaving the building later on. He said that there were others. He had planned to kill it city hall as well. Acting mayor dianne feinstein. Who had been the person to discover harvey. Milk's body made this moment. Quote as president of the board of supervisors. It's my duty to make this announcement. Though th mayor mosconi and supervisor harvey milk have been shot and killed. The assembled crowd was stunned very vocal and once they were quieted she continued quote. The suspect is supervisor. Dan white whites defense when this came to trial was diminished capacity and that has come into common parlance as the twinkie defense. But that idea is really a myth. There were some mentions of junk foods in one psychiatrist testimony in this trial but it was really about being under huge amount of stress and prone to cycles of depression. So the testimony about junk food. Wasn't that dan white eight a bunch of twinkies and this caused him to commit murder. It was that the junk food based diet was a symptom of his struggling mental health. And that it also exacerbated the existing underlying problems. He was having the twinkie defense. Nickname was spread through news coverage. But doesn't actually describe how junk-food came up in the trial even though he had confessed to the crime and he had reloaded his gun. Before approaching harvey milk then white was found guilty of manslaughter rather than murder. He was sentenced to seven years eight months in prison and would ultimately serve a little more than five years. The verdict led to public outrage including what came to be known as the white knight riot and a candlelight march from san francisco's castro district to city hall california later abolished the diminished capacity. Defense in part because of its successful. Use in dan white's trial. He took his own life after getting out of prison. In nineteen eighty five and a lot of ways. The assassination of harvey milk has overshadowed that of mayor mosconi. Milk was one of the first openly. Gay elected officials in the united states and he was a known public figure and activist in san francisco. How or whether homophobia affected whites in the jury's verdict has been debated in the years since all of this happened and milk himself has become a lot more widely known in the context of the gay rights movement

Harvey Milk Board Of Supervisors Mayor Mosconi George Mosconi San Francisco Dan White White Mosconi Dan White White Acting Mayor Dianne Feinstein Tracy Wilson City Hall Moscow Harvey Milk Depression
Feinstein will not seek Senate Judiciary Committee leadership

War Room

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

Feinstein will not seek Senate Judiciary Committee leadership

"Senate committee is losing its chair. Senator Dianne Feinstein of California, announced Monday that she's stepping down as the top Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee after groups on the left criticized her handing of Amy Cockney Barrett Supreme Court confirmation hearing. Feinstein came under scathing criticism after she hugged Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham at the end of Barrett's confirmation hearing and praise his handling of it. She sparked outrage on the left after she thank grand For quote. One of the best sets of hearings I've ever participated in and praise or GOP colleagues were fairness and the opportunity of going back and forth Bernie Bennett in Washington, Joe

Senator Dianne Feinstein Senate Judiciary Committee Amy Cockney Barrett Supreme Court Senate Committee Feinstein Lindsey Graham Judiciary Committee California Barrett GOP Bernie Bennett Washington JOE
Senate Republicans appear to congratulate Kamala Harris in Washington, D.C.

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

03:05 min | 2 years ago

Senate Republicans appear to congratulate Kamala Harris in Washington, D.C.

"Kamila Harris back of the nation's capital for the first time in her new role yesterday, casting an important vote and accepting congratulations in some cases from Republicans with more on the incoming V P and other news from the nation's capital. I'm joined by Maybe season as delicate terra. It has come to Harris even got a fist bump or two yesterday. Tell us about her day at the Capitol. Got straight. She did get a few fists on one of them from Senate Judiciary chair Lindsey Graham yesterday as they were quizzing the grilling rather, the big tech CEOs of Twitter and Facebook during that Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. She did return to the capital for the first time as vice president elect, and probably the most interesting thing to come out of that with the fact that she received a classified intelligence briefing in her capacity of senator which is interesting because she So far in her capacity as vice president elect has not been able to receive those briefings because the General Services Administration refuses to recognize her and Joe Biden as the president elected by President elect the General Services Administration being the body that kind of overseas the transition, so because of that, she and Joe Biden have not been able to receive that class of those classified intelligence briefings. But she did get a briefing yesterday in her capacity of Senator is does the GS to act on their own earthy at the behest of the president, who has refused to concede or accept the fact that this is a new administration coming in? So they technically act on their own. But there is certainly concerns. There are concerns that there could be you know political influence there and that the G s a is kind of doing that the president's bidding and then until President Trump decides to concede that they won't do it, either, But they do maintain that they are One of their own thing on act independently. I was Senator Chuck Grassley, who has said President elect Biden should be getting those classified intelligence briefings from the Trump administration. We learned yesterday has tested positive for covert 19. That's right. Yes, that's some bad news there. Senator Chuck Grassley, who is the most senior Republican in the Senate. He's just the second oldest senator of the oldest actually being Dianne Feinstein, who's just a few months older, but he is the most senior Republican. He's 87 years old, so high risk demographic there for covert 19, but his office does say he's not experiencing any symptoms. So that's good news. They don't know how he contract ID the virus. The concern is that he was on the floor of the Senate voting on Today, and he was also part of Ah closed door hearing or meeting rather with Republican leadership. People who were in that meeting, though, said that you know, Grassley has been really good about wearing a mask that everybody in that meeting was wearing a mask. But they're not too concerned about having contracting the virus. But he is, you know, the second this week that has announced that he is now isolating. After a possible covert exposure. The first being Republican Senator Rick Scott of Florida, certainly wish them the best. Thank you so much as always say, and that's a bee season as delicate era in Washington. Come

Kamila Harris Senate Judiciary Committee General Services Administratio Senator Chuck Grassley Joe Biden Lindsey Graham Senate President Trump Trump Administration Harris Twitter Facebook Biden Dianne Feinstein Grassley Senator Rick Scott Florida Washington
Zuckerberg and Dorsey Face Harsh Questioning From Lawmakers

Todd and Don

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Zuckerberg and Dorsey Face Harsh Questioning From Lawmakers

"Committee held a hearing yesterday with Facebook's CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Twitter's CEO Jack Dorsey. Seems to look like he's living in a cave these days old man, the poor guy he looks like he could be living on the streets of Seattle anyway. The social media giants Atlanta censorship of conservative lawmakers in media, Alex was the focus of the conversation. A ranking member and California Senate Senator Dianne Feinstein, raised concerns that President Trump's post on the platforms were in Enticing violence.

Jack Dorsey Mark Zuckerberg Facebook Twitter California Senate Seattle Senator Dianne Feinstein Atlanta Alex