7 Burst results for "Diana Deutsch"

"diana deutsch" Discussed on Serial Killers

Serial Killers

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"diana deutsch" Discussed on Serial Killers

"Of the world's most notorious villains evil in it. He was a genuine cult leader, a man who commanded his followers to murder innocent victims including an unborn baby in the service of. Dark mystical plan. His crimes were modern proof of the ancient horror stories about satanic child murderers. Tales of the attacks were further sensationalized morbidly fascinating the nation for years to come, and in many ways Manson's family played specifically to the paranoia of white suburban Americans that an evil force was coming to take their innocent children is violent cult was composed primarily of young middle class women who were drawn in by the hippie movement of the time. Every night, the news reported more about how the women were plied with LSD and Mesmerized by bizarre evil ideology following the murders. The truth about the cult emerged Manson told his followers that there was a secret coded message hidden in the Beatles white album according to him the lyrics of helter skelter foretold an upcoming apocalyptic race war for which he and his followers had to prepare. Soon, Manson wasn't described as a horrific isolated case his violence was conflated with anything and everything the news could link him to. In this environment of rising dread things like the Satanic Bible no longer seemed like harmless novelties instead of bit of spurious hedonistic nonsense depraved devil-worship suddenly seem like a real possibility. Charles Manson made America fear a new dimension of evil and everything he was associated with from rock music to the rise of hallucinogenic drug use were all loosely lumped under the same counterculture umbrella that led directly to Satan's doorstep. The Amorphous counterculture movement had been a favorite boogeyman of conservative adults for years. Young people throughout the country sought new experimental, more tolerant lifestyles. They also fiercely criticised the establishment and the ideal of the American dream this trend combined with the burgeoning civil rights and antiwar movements in the US. Made many feel that the country was under attack after years of worry the changing nation proved to them that their fears weren't unfounded. They were very real threats in the ice of these frightened parents they're growing children were poisoned by immorality and shortsightedness. There were plenty of potential scapegoats but after the Manson family murders, a huge portion of the blame fell on the era's popular music. In a fit of bizarre hypocrisy many into Manson's claims that satanic messages really were hiding on rock albums though they decried the cult leader as an evil liar, they cherry picked his claims that supported their fears into kind of dress rehearsal for the later satanic panic accusations. Baseless rumors were repeated ad nauseam until a sizable number of people in the US gave them. Credence people started playing albums backwards searching for hidden infernal messages in reality bands like the Beatles were experimenting with. Hiding Easter eggs in their music. For example, using back masking a technique in which sound is recorded backward onto a track. The Beatles had inserted a reverse lyric in their song rain. It just wasn't satanic though there were some legitimate instances of back masking not every rumor about it rang true when people found something they thought was demonic. They played it for their friends with ample encouragement. Even skeptics could be convinced that there were devilish words hidden in the meaningless reversed sounds. As it turns out the human mind has a natural tendency to search for patterns, images, and distinct words even where none exist this psychological phenomenon is known as Peres Dalia. Looking into the sky and comparing clouds to animals or spotting gnarled faces and tree trunks are examples of visual Parrado. But this can influence our perception when listening to music as well. We don't always simply here what has played to us instead, we hear what we want to psychologists Diana Deutsch discovered that by broadcasting the same sounds through two speakers at slightly different rhythms. Listeners could be tricked into believing that phantom words or phrases were being played. She also found that the words people heard depended greatly on their mindset and thoughts at the time of the experiment. However, most people trust their senses implicitly and don't know to expect psychological tricks of the mind so in. The nineteen seventies when fearful parents heard, what they thought were demonic voices in the music, their children listen to they panicked, and for those who lead the messages were there. It wasn't a stretch to assume that the backwards words were actually corrupting their children swaying them to the side of evil part of this paranoia can be explained by a long held misunderstanding about so-called subliminal messages starting in the nineteen forties and fifties. Companies tried inserting single frame advertisements in the midst of otherwise unrelated cartoons and movies even though the conscious mind couldn't proceed the brief. Flashes advertises hope that the unconscious would be persuaded to act on the ADS. Subsequent psychological studies have largely discredited the original theories behind subliminal messages in nineteen seventy five researchers determined that flashing the words Hershey's chocolate during a student lecture did not lead to a sudden craving for chocolate for example, even when chocolate samples were readily available, that isn't to say that subliminal messages are entirely mythical. However more recent research has suggested that they can impact a person's choices though the effect is more subtle than once believed either way the idea that backwards infernal slogans. Can infect a child's mind is completely unsubstantiated. Nevertheless, it was still a theory in the early nineteen seventies and into the eighties at the time, some social psychologists and doctors argued that the brain could unconsciously perceive and internalize the secret recordings but their statements were completely baseless. Even these learned researchers have been hoodwinked by their own fears and biases. Ultimately, the truth of the claims didn't matter to concerned parents they heard what they wanted to, and for a multitude of reasons they were already looking for an excuse to declare the counterculture movement tainted or immoral. Hysteria around subliminal messages shocking books like say Tannock Bible and horrific colts like Manson's justified prejudices that parents already held but more significantly, the rumors unified a number of disparate groups. Suddenly religious groups, conservatives who resisted the social change at the time and adults who were simply wary of drug use all had common ground. The evil behind the curtain was at last revealed and too many it. All made complete sense. The youth were just rebellious and there was nothing innocent about the shifting tide of popular culture. Everything was orchestrated by a single entity who pulled the strings in the darkness. Every moral failing could be attributed to Satan and.

Charles Manson Beatles US murder LSD Diana Deutsch Peres Dalia Parrado Satan America cherry
"diana deutsch" Discussed on Cults

Cults

08:25 min | 1 year ago

"diana deutsch" Discussed on Cults

"In the nineteen eighty s the satanic panic shook the United States to its core when accusations of the ritual sexual abuse of children flew in every direction. But the paranoia that spawned these claims began much earlier. The first time many Californians heard the term satanist may have been in nineteen sixty six when Anton levay founded the Church of Satan in San Francisco. But though his movement had a controversial name, it didn't inspire much outrage at first. He only had a few hours most considered levay to be nothing more than a harmless crank for the rest of the country. Their first frightening introduction to Satanism came two years later in nineteen sixty eight when the horror movie Rosemary's baby was released to critical and popular. Acclaim originally, a novel Rosemary's baby told the story of a secret group of cultists who arranged for an innocent woman to be impregnated with Satan's child the next year in nineteen, sixty, nine, they publish the Satanic Bible for Him Satan was not a physical creature with a pitchfork and horns instead he was a symbol of liberty and rebellion against prudish controlling establishment. In the first part of the book called the Book of Satan levay wrote in this arid wilderness of steel and stone I raise up my voice that you may here to the east and to the West I, beckon to the north and to the south I show a sign proclaiming death to the weakling wealth to the strong. But. The Satanic Bible wasn't as revolutionary or controversial as it pretended to be Levin attacked the concepts of good and evil. Well as organized religion, but his critiques weren't very original or shocking. The book also outlined the philosophy of his church which borrowed from or even plagiarized concepts from social darwinism along with the writings of Radnor redbeard in Ayn. Rand Lavale also argued for a hedonistic lifestyle believing that it was human nature to give into lust greed and the individual ego hardly. A shocking concept at the time. Indeed the only thing in the book that went beyond recycled philosophy was the final section. There Lavalin gave dubious instructions for various magic spells and invocations to the devil which looked a lot more frightening and impressive than they were because they did not actually believe in the supernatural these were meant to read as performance art pieces. Overall much if not, all of the Satanic Bible was derivative of other philosophies and debunked works of alleged black magic. Some purchase the book has a novelty but few gave it. Any credence for now levey was largely ignored but it wasn't long before public interest in the occult grew beyond just a money making opportunity for Authors and movie studios in August of Nineteen, sixty nine, the same year the Tanic Bible was published stories about depraved colts became gruesome reality that month Charles Manson and his Bohemian followers brutally. Murdered seven people in Los Angeles among the victims was actress Sharon Tate who was eight and a half months pregnant at the time of her death. Immediately, the Manson murders were sensational news around the country. All of a sudden reality was more terrifying than the bloodiest film at the center of it. All was Charles Manson almost overnight he became one of the world's most notorious villains evil in carnet. He was a genuine cult leader, a man who commanded his followers to murder innocent victims including an unborn baby in the service of a dark medical plan. Is Crimes were modern proof of the ancient stories about satanic child murderers. Tales of the attacks were further sensationalized morbidly fascinating the nation for years to come, and in many ways, Manson's family played specifically to the paranoia of white suburban Americans that an evil force was coming to take their innocent children is violent cult was composed primarily of young middle-class women who were drawn in by the hippie movement of the time. Every night, the news reported more about how the women were plied with LSD and Mesmerized by bizarre evil ideology following the murders the truth about the cult emerged Manson told his followers that there was a secret coded message hidden in the Beatles white album according to him the lyrics of helter skelter four told an upcoming apocalyptic race war for which he and his followers had to prepare. Soon, Manson wasn't described as a horrific isolated case is violence was conflicted with anything and everything the news could link him to. In this environment of rising dread things like the Satanic Bible no longer seemed like harmless novelties instead of a bit of spurious hedonistic nonsense depraved devil worship suddenly seemed like a real possibility. Charles Manson made America fear a new dimension of evil and everything he was associated with from rock music to the rise of hallucinogenic drug use were all loosely lumped under the same counterculture umbrella that led directly to Satan's doorstep. The Amorphous counterculture movement had been a favorite boogeyman conservative adults for years young people throughout the country sought new experimental, more tolerant lifestyles. They also fiercely criticised the establishment and the ideal of the American dream this trend combined with the burgeoning civil rights and antiwar movements in the US made many feel that the country was under attack after years of worry the changing nation prove to them that their fears weren't unfounded. They were very real threats in the eyes of these frightened parents they're growing children were poisoned by immorality an shortsightedness. There were plenty of potential scapegoats but after the Manson family murders, a huge portion of the blame felony era's popular music. In a bizarre hypocrisy many. But into Manson's claims that satanic messages really were hiding on rock albums though they decried the cult leader as an evil liar, they cherry picked his claims that supported their fears into kind of dress rehearsal for the later satanic panic accusations. Baseless rumors were repeated ad nauseam until a sizable number of people in the US gave them. Credence people started playing albums backwards searching for hidden infernal messages in reality bands like the Beatles were experimenting with. Hiding Easter eggs in their music. For example, using back masking a technique in which a sound is recorded backward onto a track, the Beatles had inserted a reverse lyric in their song rain. It just wasn't satanic though there were some legitimate instances of back masking not every rumor about it rang true when people found something they thought was demonic they played for their friends with ample encouragement. Even skeptics could be convinced that there were devilish words hidden in the meaningless reverse sounds. As it turns out the human mind has a natural tendency to search for patterns, images and distinct. Even, where none exist this psychological phenomenon is known as Peres DOLLAH. Looking into the sky and comparing clouds to animals or spotting gnarled faces and tree trunks are examples of visual Peres Dalia but this can influence our perception when listening to music as well. We don't always simply here what is played to us instead, we hear what we want to psychologists. Diana Deutsch discovered that by broadcasting the same sounds through two speakers at slightly different rhythms. Listeners could be tricked into believing that phantom words or phrases were being played. She also found that the words people.

Charles Manson United States Anton levay Church of Satan San Francisco Beatles Peres Dalia Peres DOLLAH Diana Deutsch Rosemary Rand Lavale Sharon Tate Lavalin Levin murder Tanic Bible Satan LSD levey
"diana deutsch" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"diana deutsch" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Kind of top down processing that results in the scale allusion seems to happen by default without any priming, or prompting. But other examples of top down processing seem weirdly to happen, both on command and also unconsciously that series of beeps is very famous well known melody play it again. See if you can make it out. Any luck? Well, if you don't have any luck, maybe this'll help. Now all I have to do is bring back the original beeps and you can listen again. Diana Deutsch calls this, the phenomena of the mysterious melody a series of notes played an octave, apart, come across as just beeps completely indiscernible as melody. But once you're played the melody in a single octave or even told what the melody is. Suddenly, you can hear the melody from the same set of beeps and octave apart. And what's more, you can't hear it? What's the best way to describe what just happened? Did you hear the same thing twice? Or did you hear different things? Each time wants a series of beeps, and the second time the theme to Yankee doodle dandy. Listen to Sean, illustrates that whether or not you're able to crush the piece of music, may depend heavily on the knowledge and expectations that.

Diana Deutsch Sean
"diana deutsch" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

13:09 min | 2 years ago

"diana deutsch" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"All right. So one thing we should say, Chuck, while we're talking about ads. I'm sorry. Absolute, do you feel like people are keeping up with this, or we just thrown out, so much rain information, a little both? I think that music majors are really dislike guys Lord. Nobody likes them anyway. But for normal people you think that they're like, okay, now I understand what pitches because that's really the goal here little bit. We're not. We're not explaining anything to music majors. They don't already know. And we're actually mangled the stuff that they do know. Right. One thing we can say this pretty easy to understand, is, though, is that perfect pitch is, it's a bit of a on a sliding scale. It's hard to define like it's either perfect or not perfect, because you have ranged from tone deaf to perfect pitch, and you may be way closer to perfect pitch and may even say have perfect pitch, but not have like absolute perfect pitch one hundred percent of the time. Right right when tested. Right, exactly. So it's not it's not binary. Right. There's is not where they're one of those you have it or you don't have a kind of thing. Yeah. And it suggested and we'll talk about a little more that everybody has some level of absolute pitch. It's just some people are way better at than others so so much. So that. They seem like they have perfect pitch compared to everybody else. I'm not sure I understood that party there, but we'll get to that. Okay. And it's interesting to note too, that this, even if you do have absolute pitch. You might have trouble identifying the same notes at different octaves. You're not supposed to you. Can't call yourself a perfect pitch person. Yeah. I guess so. Right. You have to hang your head and shame. But that's tough identical note, two different octaves are tough. And it results in some weird phenomena like the Shepard tone, which is really neat. It is if you've ever been to a Christopher Nolan movie as Dunkirk. Dedom- kirke. Is it? Oh, yeah. Throughout. Well. He's is it all the time. Okay. Like the sound of that motorcycle. It had a specific name. But the one Batman rides with the two big fat wheels bet cycle. Yeah. I think that's what it's called. Okay. I think add another name didn't it or no, I well, maybe thinking that Adam west best. I think so, but he uses that sound it's called the shepherd tone. And it's basically several tones from different octaves layered on one another the highest tone gets quieter the middle tone stays loud, and the Bastogne sins in volume. And if you play them all together, it's this mental trick that your mind can't process, and it sounds like something that's either going up or down into Infinity, basically. Right. But it's really just the same thing on a leash over again. But it sounds yeah. Clearly just going up and rising in pitch. Yeah. On for Infinity, really. Interesting really tension creating. Yeah. It really puts you on edge like nails on a chalkboard on edge. But more like, like, like what's. Bitches still going on here and shot out to Roger shepherd from Stanford. He's a psychologist in nineteen sixty four who I guess, discovered this audio allusion, the also another shoutout to Diana Deutsch, who was a researcher for audio illusions, which are really interesting. It's like a sound version of an optical illusion reveals a lot about how the brain processes information. She has a site, I guess, at UC San Diego that I want everybody to go to right now. Pause. The pause the about debts and go to Deutsche. D. E U. T S, C, H dot UCSD dot EDU slash psychology slash pages. Can here's where it gets tricky dot PHP question, Mark lower case, I equals to one two. Why didn't you get a Uriel shorter for that? I don't know. Just do it. And, and thank me later. But it has she has these, these audio clips that show, how when you hear something spoken over and over again, enough times, the same thing over and over again. It turns into music to you, it turns into being sung interesting and the way that she has laid out and demonstrated. It is the most mind blowing thing I've heard in ages. I loved I went, right? I was like you got to here, and it's, it's like a much John Maher shut up. There's talk things better than him. This Diana Deutsch lady. Wow. I'll have to hear that. That's pretty cool. You're you're gonna love it. Yeah. You will love Chuck awesome. Okay. Has really nothing to do with perfect pitch. But it is kind of one of those things where it's like this, this is worth mentioning the world. K. All right. So there's this guy named nNcholas slum ski who's a composer and amuses Lexa, collagen, a conductor he wrote in his autobiography about having absolute pitch. Basically, how like he kind of it was a party trick when he was a kid, and then when he went to school to music school. Of course, he kind of like kind of thought his s didn't stink because he had perfect pitch and they didn't have to work hard, and he's a little snotty about it. I think from what I gather from Edson mission. And apparently while he was off just like I've got perfect pitch. All his classmates are actually busting their butts working hard. Sure, and actually writing really good music. And he fell behind in was like, how could I be falling behind? I've absolute bitch. Right. And he he's just leaning on that too hard. He was. So he had kind of a, a moment of inspiration where he's like, oh, actually have to put in the work to I think this is where Ed was kind of getting that it doesn't actually help. Right. It's good. It's a neat thing to have. You can't write your own ticket though, in the music business. Right. Because you have perfect fit. I it doesn't help you be any more creative or anything like that. And as a matter of fact, slow. Kaminsky points out in that are out Obiago that there have been plenty of people who are just master composers Tchaikovsky in Wagner, or both neither one of them had perfect pitch. And yet, you'd be hard pressed to find somebody who's like those guys were hacks. Sure, you know they're pretty good. And they didn't have perfect pitch. So you can do quite well in music, and not have perfect pitch, especially if you have one of those little round hormone ACC as you were talking about Lenny, Kravitz, Monica pitch. It's hard to tell how many people have perfect pitch. You hear one in ten thousand a lot but is at points out, it's kinda hard to find any reference for this. It really is accurate or legit. Yeah. I think he ran into that. Same thing where you see the same info on the internet everywhere. It means that it's probably not real. I think so because it's got to be more than one in ten thousand. Well, he said he found one that that found about four percent of the population has it so beer in four hundred four hundred out of ten thousand right? Four hundred times greater than the what was previously thought. That's right. And you're more likely to have and this is where it gets interesting, like where does it come from nature nurture? You're definitely more likely to have perfect pitch. If you start your training in music before the age of six. Yeah. There's a critical period for the brain where it's just mush waiting to be molded. Into smarts, so things like language, foreign languages music, basically, anything, you can think of that requires talent that not everybody can do kind of falls into that critical period, where if you start to learn that early on age six you're going to be able to learn ways year than somebody who's an adult trying to learn it. Yeah. And so perfect pitch shows up way more frequently in kids, who have musical training and exposure, specifically to the western music scale at an early age than it does to, to people who were not experiment. Yeah. And also, if you speak Aton, language fluently indefinitely natively, you're more likely to have absolute pitch tone languages. Are we have a little every language has a little bit of that, when we people inflict, an English different things different tones that can be different meanings? Really? Oh. Oh, really? Oh, really? But we have nothing on, like Mandarin Chinese Cantonese. These are real tone, languages, where you're can indicate the same work have five six seven different meanings, depending on your tone really interesting. Yeah. So people who speak tone, languages tend to have are more likely to have absolute pitch than people who don't speak tone, languages. Right. Yes. Okay. So that raises a really good question, then there's one other big clue here, and just because we have the clues as we figured out why I don't think we said there is still no full understanding of why some people have absolute perfect pitch. Yeah. But it also appears more frequently in the population of people with autism. Right. They tend to have more more frequency of perfect pitch than people who do not have autism. Yeah. And the same with a note. It correlates to like. Supposedly photographic memory thing, since TJ, which we talked about. Yep. And Billy Joel's any sinister. Yeah. So that might have something to do with his abilities. So one, one, actually, to explications. I saw for people with autism is that it's believed that they process information piecemeal rather than wholesale which would explain rather than hearing, like the, the whole musical composition this year, the individual notes. So it would be easier for them to be acquainted with the individual known that make sense lower. They just are more developed their sensory input is way more developed than than people without autism. Those are the two competing theories for why people with autism have perfect pitch. More interesting. Yeah. All right. Well, the whole question though, he talked about, is it nature nurture, that's sort of a debate that still going on. And it's hard to study this stuff. Yeah. Universally, first of all, this seems to apply almost exclusively to the western music scale, I think so. Right. Because it's what you're doing. You're saying that's an that's enough, here's enough. Here's a the in what you're talking about the notes on the western music scale, they think that people who have perfect pitch can detect notes that are more nuance than the, the full stepper the half step of the western music scale. Yeah. But I didn't see anywhere where it's like, yes, this translates everywhere into any music scale. So it doesn't seem to be universal from that outset to begin with. Yeah, okay. Yeah. Sure. And the other thing that I thought was interesting. You talked about this at the beginning about labelling the sensory input. It's like you know, they throw the, the letter c on that wavelength basically, it's no different than, than saying, will that color is red. Yeah. It's just a it's just a label. I created it was right. Or it is I saw an analogy for this, where if somebody with perfect pitch. If you an analogize it to somebody who could pick out. Color. They could see a blue wall in somebody's house, then drive to the paint store and pick out that same blue from the, the wall of sample. Oh, interesting. Because basically, the same thing, but there's a big clue there with the fact that most people like that's pretty, pretty refined. But most people can look at something and say, that's blue. That's green that's red because we were almost around the world to child train. Yeah. Very young age to recognize identify and name colors. Not everybody gets that kind of training around the world with musical notes. Right. But where they do like in Japan where far more children are trained more universally in music. They've found much more prevalence of absolute pitch. They're okay, which makes sense. Raise your exposed from very early age. What is what is enough hitting that critical, period? But that really reveals something important here to Chuck, not every not every kid. In Japan has absolute pitch brochure just like every kid in Japan. Can tell you what blue as what red is? They can't necessarily all tell you what an a is a right f is. Right. They just can't. So that suggests that there is perhaps some genetic basis to it not everybody can learn absolute perfect pitch. All right. I think that's a.

autism Chuck Monica pitch Japan Diana Deutsch Christopher Nolan Adam west Uriel San Diego Dedom- kirke Edson mission Stanford Billy Joel Roger shepherd John Maher Mark researcher TJ Dunkirk Ed
"diana deutsch" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"diana deutsch" Discussed on Think Again

"And you've achieved enough that you don't have to turn in a+ every time you go somewhere you as okay. That goes back to what we were saying before. I think that's so important. You know about about whether one says like too much or whether one is to bubbly or whatever. It might be this process of like all those outside voices, whether they're your parents or whatever that tell you that like x, y, and z should be a certain way and you're never ever going to ever do it appropriately just in everyone, you know any that grew up within the expectations on them? Yes, you know, you have to let go of that somehow and you have to find this way to like the just your own funky self, you know. And I found that like when I finally gave those things up, that was when I had my most pro success professionally. So yeah. You talk about how dare you talk about how a lot about how Jen like coached you into kind of relaxing your style. Is that right? And even before that, like when I had kids, I went through period of not sleeping like all out of not sleeping for two years, and I just lost a filter. I don't know what happened. I just started speak. In my mind, and that's when like the world opened up to me of being accommodating. And yeah, it was weird. I was like, wait a minute I've been. I thought I was doing it right this whole time. Fuck off. All right. Well, anyway, fuck this. Let's move on to the next. This is Derek Thompson, and he writes about media and this is called the science of music while you're bringing gets booked on hit songs. One of the questions that I set out to answer in the book is why do we like what we like in music? What makes music catchy? Where do ear worms come from? And to answer this really complex question, I started with the simplest possible question, which is what is music? Why does the brain process some sounds as cacophony and other sounds very clearly as song and start to answer this question. You have to go to Diana Deutsch and she is an use ecology at the university of California, San Diego and Diana was listening to herself talk at her house when evening, and she put a sentence of hers on repeat and she realized if you take a bit of speech stream and you take a sliver of it and you start repeating it again, start repeating it again, start repeating it again, start repeating it again start repeat obviously you can sort of here. You're listening that the brain suddenly starts to hear a melody in this repetition and rhythm and beat. And it starts to hear that which was formerly. Just speech as song. And so what she would say, what I would say is that repetition is the God particle of music. It is the thing that distinguishes the cacophony of the world from that which we cannot help recognize as music. So that's interesting, but it's not an answer to the fundamental question which is what makes music catchy. Because if I go into a music studio and I say, start repeating it against repeating it again, I'll be left out in the studio immediately. So there has to be repetition and variety. What is the scientific way to think about the balance? And to answer that question, you'd have to fly northeast from San Diego to Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, where David Huron did this famous study involving mice where he played a note for a mouse that's call it a b..

Diana Deutsch Jen San Diego Ohio Ohio State University Derek Thompson David Huron Columbus university of California two years
"diana deutsch" Discussed on Twenty Thousand Hertz

Twenty Thousand Hertz

05:33 min | 3 years ago

"diana deutsch" Discussed on Twenty Thousand Hertz

"That's the Power of our internal models. When we have an expectation of what we're hearing and the pattern somewhat resembles that expectation, you can then perceive that thing when we speak with each other. We're using very complicated sound that has many frequencies, even a single vowel has a whole bunch of different frequencies in there have been patterns where certain frequencies are emphasized more than others. What that piano piece was doing was essentially recreating that sort of palate of frequencies and energies through piano sounds. It can't capture the way exactly human voice does it because piano works in a very different way. So it's using pitches and frequencies at a P annot can produce to try to recreate this energy shape of a speech sound. You program like a player piano to go through these frequency shapes in a really rapid succession in the way that a voice does. Especially if you know what words to listen for. It's amazing how you can pick them out of this sound. That sounds nothing like a human voice. It's still not fully understood why our brains blur the line of music and speech, but there are lots of ways to trick our minds take. For instance, the speech to song allusion psychologist. Diana Deutsch found that certain phrases when taken out of a passage in played in a loop began to sound like they're being sung as such a powerful illusion that if you begin to hear phrases some and then you go back and listen to the passage from which that phrase was excerpted. The rest of it will sound like speech. But when you come to that phrase, it'll just sell like that. One phrases sung one phrases, son, one phrases sung one phrases, son, one phrases, son, one phrases, son, one phrases, son, one phrases, son. When you come to that phrase, it will just sound like that one phrases sun and then it goes back to speech. Again, it's really wild. Makes it interesting is that this doesn't happen for any fray. So you can also find phrases that if you take them out of context and looped them, they don't sound sung at all. So something about certain sequences of words leads them to transform in this way. How we choose to sing. Our words is powerful. It adds a whole new level of human connection. The majority of the time it's totally subconscious act, but there are some professions where it can't be. It has to be thought about and practiced. We'll hear more about that in a moment. You spend one third of your life sleeping and it's important to be comfortable. Sleep. Health is something that's made a big difference in my life. I've been to mattress stores in late on probably twenty or thirty different mattresses, but even going through that process, I still ended up buying three different mattresses over the course of six months. So when casper came along, I was really skeptical that it could possibly be any better than what I had already found so skeptical. In fact, that I kept my other mattress propped up against my wall just in case I didn't like it. But as soon as I lay down on the casper, it was immediately obvious that there was some serious next level thought put into this thing after a few weeks of clearly sleeping better. I tossed out my old mattress, which I should mention was way more expensive than the casper. Apparently they can do this because they cut out the middleman and sell directly to you. All of this to say is that the hype is real casper is legit. I've been sleeping deeper and waking up more refreshed, so get fifty dollars towards select. Mattresses by visiting casper dot com. Slash twenty K in using zero K at checkout, casper will even give you one hundred night risk-free sleep on a trial, so you can be totally sure of your purchase. And if you're not completely satisfied, the return process is hassle free. So stop putting off a good night's sleep. Again, that's fifty dollars towards select mattresses. Visit casper dot com. Slash twenty K and use code 200 K at checkout terms and conditions apply. Recording your voice for a podcast, a radio show, or really anything very much feels like a performance. There's this unconscious gray area between speech and music. I asked Helen and Martin how they're hosting. Voices are different from their everyday voices thing come sation voice is high, and you also inviting a particular response from the other person. Reading the script is a completely different than halts go from X temp Rosen, which is also difficult school to bring a script to live his life site rage. For example, I just have to say something like five times until. Okay. That's sort of what I think that's common because often you're trying to find these cadences. And sometimes it's almost like scoring. You'll spoken script and sometimes there's an unexpected so that you don't walkout until you've been through to few times. Of course, podcast hosts aren't the only ones who need to think about this stuff. Politicians actors and especially comedians have to master rhythm. Take, for example, this clip from king of the hill. Tuck them. Little round there. Bobby syfy. Docket dope, but just like that. Better than a month. Now. Joe twenty four hours. Nobody answered yet. Doing anything about that. Over here. Shut that dangled up. David

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"diana deutsch" Discussed on Turned Up

Turned Up

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"diana deutsch" Discussed on Turned Up

"Their air down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down down denigrated young down down dumb i was somewhat made up word called them i heard gilgeyev deal go guild gilgal now i heard he'll bound you'll down you'll billtown there's definitely yoga but was what's the right answer there is a list of probably fifty words that people heard of them played this exact same clips so that is actually diana deutsches voice herself oh wow yep so she's kind of the leading pioneer of audio illusions and the big researcher on a lot of people have used to research so what i think is really cool about the phantom words allusion is it's it's this phenomenon that involves our brains and our desire to you always make something out of something in other words so our brains trying to fill in the blanks exact to be something so here's what it's going to be look up in the clouds okay tell me what you see right so you you every time we look you know yes dog i see a phased or you might see the mother marion a piece of toast always our brains always want to try to turn something abstract into something familiar in fact the ink blood test is a great example of this nor shocked us yeah is why they do it and it's a what what is your brain trying to turn these random abstract so if you always seems into blood splatter or knives are guns than you probably gonna be a a serial killer they.

researcher marion