35 Burst results for "Dialysis"

Despite The Pandemic, Transit Service In Houston's Harris County Reaches Major Ridership Goal

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:47 sec | 5 d ago

Despite The Pandemic, Transit Service In Houston's Harris County Reaches Major Ridership Goal

"Since two thousand and eight harris county transit has grown from two routes to twelve serving places in the eastern half of the county like baytown. Crosby the agency says. It's now reached a major milestone recording one million boardings on its buses david jones agencies. Deputy assistant director. He says for a lot of people in east harris county. Who don't have a vehicle. The service is a lifeline. A lot of it is medical. We have folks that need services. They can't drive anymore. We do a lot of dialysis patients in baytown because of the pandemic harris county. Transit isn't collecting fares right now and it's also limiting capacity while pandemic ridership has fallen dramatically on some other transit systems. Jones says air numbers are only down by about seven percent. I'm gail water in

Harris County Baytown East Harris County David Jones Crosby Jones
Larry King moved out of ICU amid coronavirus battle

Bloomberg Law

00:25 sec | Last week

Larry King moved out of ICU amid coronavirus battle

"Television personality. Larry King has been moved out of ICU care but still remains hospitalized after contracting covert 19, a source close to the family tells NBC News. King has been in the hospital with covert 19 for about 10 days. He believes he got it from a health care worker who came to his home. The source said. Theeighties seven year olds first day in the hospital was the worst. Only he went through dialysis. King's doctors are optimistic that he will continue to

Larry King Nbc News King Dialysis
A look at the state of retail, as holiday shopping wraps up

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:26 min | Last month

A look at the state of retail, as holiday shopping wraps up

"Michelle mentioned retail sales in his press. Conference today to numbers out this morning show. They fell a bit more than one percent in november which matters 'cause that most likely includes the first wave of holiday. Shopping and retailers are doing what they can to encourage us to keep on buying walmart for instance just announced its deadline for free shipping to get there before christmas. It's going to be december. Twenty first is their deadline. Which i don't know seems tight to me. If you want to risk it marketplace's. Mary barra has more now on four. The holidays in this very strange year every year nicole fritz michigan goes to holiday gatherings where she sees co workers or cousin. She doesn't really know that well so every year she finds herself standing in a store looking for that perfect generic holiday gift. Alosha shanna candle. You've been some kitschy but fun. Little coffee mugs since fritz is not really seeing anyone this year. Her shopping list is much smaller. She's mostly buying online from small retailers. She ordered a custom made dress for her sister in october. One of several packages. That still haven't arrived. They send stuff out but the delivery date of keeps getting later and later. Meanwhile dana chadwell in tennessee has been shopping exclusively online. She says stores are too risky because their parents are elderly and her brothers on dialysis also. She often buys people experiences like concert tickets. But this year. She's getting her mom cookware. She asked for and her dad. There's zero chance. My dad will hear this. So i can tell you you know. I got him a couple of flannel shirts and colors that i thought he would really like. And some tanker chips. Danny groner in new york is trying something new to instead of physical gifts he sending money on ven mo like his friends have two young kids and at a picnic in september. The eight dollars. Pretzels on hanukkah are yellow. The mom ten dollars earmarked for pretzels. Just as a nice note that despite the fact that we couldn't see one another over the holiday. I was still thinking of them few days later. That friend sent groner some photos. The kids had turned the pretzels into a craft project. Making minora's out of them using marshmallows and other things groner says he's hoping some of year's new traditions will stick. I'm maryelle sagarra for marketplace. So you know that lady's dead is totally going to hear this somehow right. That's absolutely what's going to happen. Also stocking stuffers big thing in my ass were worried about that.

Mary Barra Nicole Fritz Alosha Shanna Dana Chadwell Walmart Michelle Danny Groner Fritz Ven Mo Groner Michigan Dialysis Tennessee New York Minora Sagarra
"dialysis" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

08:30 min | Last month

"dialysis" Discussed on Science Talk

"It's also a very societal measure in that we talk a lot about the expenses of cancer treatments. And and all these things. But when you look at it on a per patient basis treating somebody on dialysis generally far more expensive and so it really kind of captures both these broader cultural societal issues and it also plays out within the body itself and we have actually as part of the series. An animated explainer that really gets into visualizing some of the process. What happens in the kidneys. How they fail. And you know how the system all comes together. But i wanted to step back for a second because as big of a problem as chronic kidney disease is in a normal year and twenty twenty certainly was not a normal year. You go about a series like this by getting out there and finding people and that was really tough this year. Talk to me about the challenges of reporting this during a pandemic and and maybe more importantly what are the challenges. The pandemic laid on top of the people in the reporting itself of the people with the disease. So i i really started working on this series in earnest faith in january where covid seemed really far off and i was all set to start to travel out to california to work on the first story in the middle of march when the krona virus started shutting everything gown. And i didn't feel. I could in good conscience travel to meet with people in risk spreading infection to individuals who are at very high risk for serious illness and death. So i kind of had to go back to the drawing board and start all over. Luckily i had pretty good luck during a lot of reporting and interviewing by phone and by video chat That actually worked out really well I had to get kind of creative to aid the seem sense of place and a person that is normally pretty straightforward to do when meeting with someone in person. I'm spending time with them in their day to day. Lives with them It's it's pretty straightforward and it's much harder to do over the phone but You know. I mean what. What i faced was a hassle. It was an annoyance but compared to what a lot of the people that i was spending time with it really was peanuts compared to what they were facing because no matter how bad covert dot or how daunting the risks. Were people with kidney failure. Can't miss a single dialysis treatment. Not one in kidney failure. Disproportionately affects those with fewer resources. And so when the financial impacts of all of the shutdowns and business closures and stay at home orders really began hitting people They they really had an impact on people with kidney failure and communities of color and this this happened at the same time. Many of their expenses were growing going up because if they had historically taken public transit to dialysis With the risks of the coronavirus infection public transit was really not safe option because of how many people were also on board and so they had to rely on pricier. Ride sharing or taxis. And so. What happened is the american kidney fund which is a large national nonprofit that helps individuals with health insurance premiums They started a special relief. Fund to provide a one off two hundred and fifty dollar grants to needy patients in. Most people said they actually needed the money just to buy food and so aside from the financial impacts A lot of the patients had just gained really isolated and they lost the valuable social contacts from just seen friends valerie or going to religious services and all of that and especially when if if people lived in areas where friends and neighbors didn't always wear masks many found themselves isolated at home for two months on end one nephrologist in new york city who i talked to said that one of his patients reported that he basically had to walk dissolves in his basement apartment for six weeks because in in march and april because infection rates were so high in new york city and so interestingly the risks of going to a dialysis center three times a week also led to a surge of interest in. What's known as home base dialysis. Where instead of going to a center You dialysis at home every night. And it's ben in in two thousand nineteen. President trump began promoting a comprehensive kidney disease treatment plan for the united states and getting more patients to switch q. Homebase by alice's who's one of the the central pillars of this plan. And there's there's good reason for one it's more cost effective. It's also easier on the body and generally does a better job of treating kidney failure. Because you do it more frequently and over a longer timespan so it also gives you a better quality of life. But the problem was that trump's plan didn't really spell out how to make this happen And so it has covid struck. A lot of people were really beginning to think through how to make this happen. And what happened with covid is that it ended up doing what no health policy really could and getting charged numbers of patients to switch to your home based dialysis exactly how many people made the switch still really isn't clear but it seems to be a fairly substantial number and how that will impact the kidney disease landscape really remains to be seen so cova is complicating all of our lives none more so than people with chronic kidney disease an already complicated balance of of life and medical regularity really. It's a fascinating story and it's also just sort of a crushing burden to have this pandemic on top of anarchy really difficult condition. Want us to hear from some of the people you spend time with so before we hear those voices. We wanted to make note that the reason we were able to get in front of people to take pictures to take video take their voices in person was because larry c price the photographer videography who held down the entire series with carey was incredibly careful on the field. He distanced whenever humanly possible. He mass stop. He was very careful about reporting especially around subjects. Who were health. Compromised and larry's work out in the field amid a pandemic is the reason why we're able to hear these voices with such closeness and intimacy. So larry for doing that. So carrie tell me about joe care bass. We meet her in the first sentence in the first piece of the series. Why did her story stand out to you but before you answer that. Let's.

kidney failure dialysis american kidney fund President trump cancer new york city kidney disease california valerie alice trump cova larry c price united states carey larry joe care carrie
Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

Healthcare Triage Podcast

09:05 min | 3 months ago

Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

"Let's start with. Sharon who has not been here before we usually like to struck these podcasts by talking to our guests about specifically what they do and how did they get their sort of talking to the public about how does one become professor of medicine or a division director of nephrology or interested in the research that you do. So I started in research when I was in a froggy fellow at the University of Chicago. I was motivated to be honest by a patient on dialysis who kept having bleeding into their shoulder joint that I had to actually remove the blood for her to be able to use her arm on a weekly basis, and this was due to a rare disease that patients on dialysis get that deposits in the bone called amyloidosis. So that made me start doing research on bone learning about bone I worked in someone's. Lab and then when I came to. INDIANA. University in thousand hundred two I came really because of the strength of the Bone Research Group at Indiana University? Not Necessarily in the nephrology division from there I have held a lot of different administrative positions. I am kind of an organizer and get things done type person. So it comes pretty naturally to be able to put all that together. I could say I've been truly doing. Translational, research since my fellowship, as I hadn't during my fellowship, a clinical research paper and a basic science lab paper published in one year. So sometimes I feel like the word translational isn't really new and novel, but I'm happy that people are finally understanding that when you do something in the lab, you ought to be thinking about who the patient is. That would benefit from this at least some point in their life. So can I get you talk a little bit more about that like what do you? What do you think translational research is because I'd agree with you it it does seem like one of those things that people are treating soften is it's a new thing but it is it. So how what does it mean to you? So it should mean that there ought to be a potential and the back of your head. As to where this was going to go at some point in the future I truly believe there is an important area for research just to do research to understand, for example, and identify new and novel gene, and what does that gene do on the other hand translational means that you actually go from a patient and you work backwards to try to figure out what makes that patient tick? What makes them have this? Disease, what makes them prone to this disease? Both of those kind of approaches from science perspective are absolutely needed. But the whole emphasis of the he sl is really to actually take discoveries into humans and overtake humans back to bench discovery so that we improve their health to see this as something that doesn't do that. There needs to be a focus or we just sort of doing more no I think the difference between. That and very focused research is that in order to really cover that spectrum, you have to have collaboration you have to actually have other people who can work on different pieces of that Longitudinal plan again from patient back to bencher bench to patient, and so it is hard for someone to do all of those facets and so you have to have this ability or desire to get there and you need to collaborate. And that's really what the chess is all about. It creates an infrastructure that people can go to so that they can understand how to take that part that they're doing in that trajectory and make it happen. Can you give me some hard examples of some of the work for structure talking about? Yeah, I mean this is I. It is absolutely fabulous and I give talks and visit places all around the country and. We are truly one of the best and most advanced CPS I in my book from start to finish, you have an idea you think might actually be a drug down the road. We are working to try to figure out how we can actually benefit people who are not sure if it's going to be good. So connecting them with the right people to understand drug discovery, we then want to know if you're doing. An animal work is that gene that you're studying that protein actually present in humans because there's a lot of discrepancy in animal models of human disease, and so we have a giant bio bank samples that people can gain access to to actually measure the DNA and try to understand the Hamas between an animal and human, and then if you do have something and you have an idea and you want to implement a Clinical Research Study, do you need to know how many patients you have? So we have a connection where the Reagan streep data set to help to feasibilities. Do these people that you think exist really exist? Is there something unique about them that you need to know who the people are that you want to study, and then we have a pool of trained research coordinators and infrastructure setup to actually conduct clinical research and? Then from there, we have an ability to help people learn how to communicate how to publish how to write a grant. Harman's all these other things through our professional education opportunities the whole beauty and the fun of research is that it's never a dull moment. So every day you think you're going to be studying this and something send you to a tangent and you go wait a minute maybe I should be doing that. And that's how you end up needing collaborators and resources and methods and infrastructure to learn how to do it. Otherwise, you lose those tangents and discoveries are errors initially and someone takes a different look at it from a different viewpoint and they turn it into something really positive. So the CY is an effort that involves just more than Indiana University School of Medicine Right? Absolutely. So it's really Notre Dame purdue IU Bloomington. And many other hospital systems as well as the medical student campuses. So it it really integrates everything and it's very fun to actually learn what people are doing at different institutions and to actually get people excited and have a pathway forward to maybe something that isn't at their institution. Bring it back to what the research is that they're doing. So Sarah I'm not gonNA ask for full introduction. I think you may be the. Frequent. Guests on our podcast dates. So if the audience is familiar with anyone, it would be you but I would love to hear a little bit about how you became involved in community and translational research as well as what you see is the distinction between say clinical and translational sciences and community in Translational Sciences my research has always focused on vulnerable populations and health equity related issues and started with geospatial concentrations of poor health outcomes among adolescence and I was doing a project that was enrolling team girls on the West Side of Indianapolis and tracking them, and when we recruited from the clinic for the study just to give you an idea, we were using blackberry pearls. So that dates long ago this was. One hundred percent of the girls we had approached agreed to participate so much so that the I R. B thought perhaps the protocol was coercive because we were offering free cell phone service while we attract their locations and they were wondering if even after our main criticism with this grant to the NIH, which was like this grant isn't possible no never is going to let you track them Things have changed since I started asking those questions in any case my point is, is that when we brought it into the community because we didn't want a clinical sample because it can be quite biased for an adolescent population, those who are seeking healthcare, we were not meeting our enrollment targets and so what I learned after a lot of errors that engagement with the community in this case our target population of teen girls on the West Side we realized they weren't seeing sort of the Ir be approved flyers. replastering everywhere. That, there were all kinds of things that we needed to reconsider and it had nothing to do with the protocol itself. So the science was valid. There wasn't anything that was sort of keeping them necessarily from participating in terms of the incentives or what we're asking them to do. It was that we were not effectively engaging with them and as part of that as well as some I think innovative at least at the time collaboration with a faculty member from Herron. School of. Art and design in Santa Matsu we sort of employed this human center design research approaches sort of our how community engagement in any case because of that sort of experience for me personally as a researcher I learned the value of engagement and really beyond just meeting recruitment targets to getting to something much more meaningful from the participant's perspective, and it's just grown from there. So it has taken a lot of different trajectories for me and my own research relating to data, sharing partnerships to what's. Now Research Sham the patient engagement core to various community engagement in between but I guess where my role now as associate Dean as well as CO director of the CSI, plays in Israeli extending that translational spectrum in with the community and back rights as a bidirectional relationship, and so it's extending those collaborations to stakeholders in the community. My definition of team science and sort of that collaborative space is not restricted to individuals within the academy and really absolutely needs to include community folks at all. Levels of the translational spectrum. So this is not just from like clinical to community in my book it's you know community engagement even within the basic science from.

Indiana University Translational Sciences Bone Research Group Disease Clinical Research Study Indiana University Of Chicago Amyloidosis Sharon Professor Of Medicine Hamas Bloomington Division Director Santa Matsu Reagan Streep Associate Dean Harman Faculty Member Herron
Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:32 min | 3 months ago

Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

"Let's start with. Sharon who has not been here before we usually like to struck these podcasts by talking to our guests about specifically what they do and how did they get their sort of talking to the public about how does one become professor of medicine or a division director of nephrology or interested in the research that you do. So I started in research when I was in a froggy fellow at the University of Chicago. I was motivated to be honest by a patient on dialysis who kept having bleeding into their shoulder joint that I had to actually remove the blood for her to be able to use her arm on a weekly basis, and this was due to a rare disease that patients on dialysis get that deposits in the bone called amyloidosis. So that made me start doing research on bone learning about bone I worked in someone's. Lab and then when I came to. INDIANA. University in thousand hundred two I came really because of the strength of the Bone Research Group at Indiana University? Not Necessarily in the nephrology division from there I have held a lot of different administrative positions. I am kind of an organizer and get things done type person. So it comes pretty naturally to be able to put all that together. I could say I've been truly doing. Translational, research since my fellowship, as I hadn't during my fellowship, a clinical research paper and a basic science lab paper published in one year. So sometimes I feel like the word translational isn't really new and novel, but I'm happy that people are finally understanding that when you do something in the lab, you ought to be thinking about who the patient is. That would benefit from this at least some point in their life. So can I get you talk a little bit more about that like what do you? What do you think translational research is because I'd agree with you it it does seem like one of those things that people are treating soften is it's a new thing but it is it. So how what does it mean to you? So it should mean that there ought to be a potential and the back of your head. As to where this was going to go at some point in the future I truly believe there is an important area for research just to do research to understand, for example, and identify new and novel gene, and what does that gene do on the other hand translational means that you actually go from a patient and you work backwards to try to figure out what makes that patient tick? What makes them have this? Disease, what makes them prone to this disease? Both of those kind of approaches from science perspective are absolutely needed. But the whole emphasis of the he sl is really to actually take discoveries into humans and overtake humans back to bench discovery so that we improve their health to see this as something that doesn't do that. There needs to be a focus or we just sort of doing more no I think the difference between. That and very focused research is that in order to really cover that spectrum, you have to have collaboration you have to actually have other people who can work on different pieces of that Longitudinal plan again from patient back to bencher bench to patient, and so it is hard for someone to do all of those facets and so you have to have this ability or desire to get there and you need to collaborate. And that's really what the chess is all about. It creates an infrastructure that people can go to so that they can understand how to take that part that they're doing in that trajectory and make it happen. Can you give me some hard examples of some of the work for structure talking about? Yeah, I mean this is I. It is absolutely fabulous and I give talks and visit places all around the country and. We are truly one of the best and most advanced CPS I in my book from start to finish, you have an idea you think might actually be a drug down the road. We are working to try to figure out how we can actually benefit people who are not sure if it's going to be good. So connecting them with the right people to understand drug discovery, we then want to know if you're doing. An animal work is that gene that you're studying that protein actually present in humans because there's a lot of discrepancy in animal models of human disease, and so we have a giant bio bank samples that people can gain access to to actually measure the DNA and try to understand the Hamas between an animal and human, and then if you do have something and you have an idea and you want to implement a Clinical Research Study, do you need to know how many patients you have? So we have a connection where the Reagan streep data set to help to feasibilities. Do these people that you think exist really exist? Is there something unique about them that you need to know who the people are that you want to study, and then we have a pool of trained research coordinators and infrastructure setup to actually conduct clinical research and? Then from there, we have an ability to help people learn how to communicate how to publish how to write a grant. Harman's all these other things through our professional education opportunities the whole beauty and the fun of research is that it's never a dull moment. So every day you think you're going to be studying this and something send you to a tangent and you go wait a minute maybe I should be doing that. And that's how you end up needing collaborators and resources and methods and infrastructure to learn how to do it. Otherwise, you lose those tangents and discoveries are errors initially and someone takes a different look at it from a different viewpoint and they turn it into something really positive. So the CY is an effort that involves just more than Indiana University School of Medicine Right? Absolutely. So it's really Notre Dame purdue IU Bloomington. And many other hospital systems as well as the medical student campuses. So it it really integrates everything and it's very fun to actually learn what people are doing at different institutions and to actually get people excited and have a pathway forward to maybe something that isn't at their institution. Bring it back to what the research is that they're doing.

Indiana University Bone Research Group Disease Clinical Research Study Amyloidosis University Of Chicago Indiana Bloomington Sharon Professor Of Medicine Hamas Division Director Reagan Streep Harman
Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:01 min | 3 months ago

Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

"Let's start with. Sharon who has not been here before we usually like to struck these podcasts by talking to our guests about specifically what they do and how did they get their sort of talking to the public about how does one become professor of medicine or a division director of nephrology or interested in the research that you do. So I started in research when I was in a froggy fellow at the University of Chicago. I was motivated to be honest by a patient on dialysis who kept having bleeding into their shoulder joint that I had to actually remove the blood for her to be able to use her arm on a weekly basis, and this was due to a rare disease that patients on dialysis get that deposits in the bone called amyloidosis. So that made me start doing research on bone learning about bone I worked in someone's. Lab and then when I came to. INDIANA. University in thousand hundred two I came really because of the strength of the Bone Research Group at Indiana University? Not Necessarily in the nephrology division from there I have held a lot of different administrative positions. I am kind of an organizer and get things done type person. So it comes pretty naturally to be able to put all that together. I could say I've been truly doing. Translational, research since my fellowship, as I hadn't during my fellowship, a clinical research paper and a basic science lab paper published in one year. So sometimes I feel like the word translational isn't really new and novel, but I'm happy that people are finally understanding that when you do something in the lab, you ought to be thinking about who the patient is. That would benefit from this at least some point in their life. So can I get you talk a little bit more about that like what do you? What do you think translational research is because I'd agree with you it it does seem like one of those things that people are treating soften is it's a new thing but it is it. So how what does it mean to you? So it should mean that there ought to be a potential and the back of your head. As to where this was going to go at some point in the future I truly believe there is an important area for research just to do research to understand, for example, and identify new and novel gene, and what does that gene do on the other hand translational means that you actually go from a patient and you work backwards to try to figure out what makes that patient tick? What makes them have this? Disease, what makes them prone to this disease? Both of those kind of approaches from science perspective are absolutely needed. But the whole emphasis of the he sl is really to actually take discoveries into humans and overtake humans back to bench discovery so that we improve their health to see this as something that doesn't do that. There needs to be a focus or we just sort of doing more no I think the difference between. That and very focused research is that in order to really cover that spectrum, you have to have collaboration you have to actually have other people who can work on different pieces of that Longitudinal plan again from patient back to bencher bench to patient, and so it is hard for someone to do all of those facets and so you have to have this ability or desire to get there and you need to collaborate. And that's really what the chess is all about. It creates an infrastructure that people can go to so that they can understand how to take that part that they're doing in that trajectory and make it happen. Can you give me some hard examples of some of the work for structure talking about? Yeah, I mean this is I. It is absolutely fabulous and I give talks and visit places all around the country and. We are truly one of the best and most advanced CPS I in my book from start to finish, you have an idea you think might actually be a drug down the road. We are working to try to figure out how we can actually benefit people who are not sure if it's going to be good. So connecting them with the right people to understand drug discovery, we then want to know if you're doing. An animal work is that gene that you're studying that protein actually present in humans because there's a lot of discrepancy in animal models of human disease, and so we have a giant bio bank samples that people can gain access to to actually measure the DNA and try to understand the Hamas between an animal and human, and then if you do have something and you have an idea and you want to implement a Clinical Research Study, do you need to know how many patients you have? So we have a connection where the Reagan streep data set to help to feasibilities. Do these people that you think exist really exist? Is there something unique about them that you need to know who the people are that you want to study, and then we have a pool of trained research coordinators and infrastructure setup to actually conduct clinical research and? Then from there, we have an ability to help people learn how to communicate how to publish how to write a grant. Harman's all these other things through our professional education opportunities the whole beauty and the fun of research is that it's never a dull moment. So every day you think you're going to be studying this and something send you to a tangent and you go wait a minute maybe I should be doing that. And that's how you end up needing collaborators and resources and methods and infrastructure to learn how to do it. Otherwise, you lose those tangents and discoveries are errors initially and someone takes a different look at it from a different viewpoint and they turn it into something really positive.

University In Thousand Bone Research Group Amyloidosis University Of Chicago Indiana University Sharon Indiana Reagan Streep Chess Hamas Harman
Under 10 Percent of Americans Have Covid-19 Antibodies, Study Finds

CBS News Weekend Roundup

00:24 sec | 4 months ago

Under 10 Percent of Americans Have Covid-19 Antibodies, Study Finds

"A new study suggests many Americans have yet to be exposed to the Corona virus. The report published online in the medical journal, The Lancet, says less than 10% of US adults and had any bodies for the virus. Through the end of July, It was based on a study of more than 28,000 dialysis patients. It also found black and Hispanic patients and those living in lower income neighborhoods were more likely to have the antibodies.

The Lancet United States
Less than 10% of Americans had virus antibodies as of July, study finds

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:19 sec | 4 months ago

Less than 10% of Americans had virus antibodies as of July, study finds

"Be vulnerable to Corona virus infection that comes from a new study in the Journal Lancet. It found that as of late July, fewer than one in 10 Americans showed signs of past Corona virus infection. Researchers base the rest of it on a percentage of dialysis patients whose immune systems produced The virus antibodies 6

Journal Lancet
Dr. Leana Wen responds to Trump intentionally downplaying COVID-19

Skullduggery

10:06 min | 4 months ago

Dr. Leana Wen responds to Trump intentionally downplaying COVID-19

"Are now joined by Dr Lino, when Former Health Commissioner Baltimore and. Professor of Public Health at George Washington University Dr Wen welcome back to skulduggery. Happy. To join you always. So as a public health professional. What is your reaction to hearing the president saying he did not want to level with the American people about the severity of the corona virus because he didn't want to create panic. While I. The first thing that I thought about was my patients I think about now my patients who? Lost their lives I think about the patients I treated who survived but are living with long-term effects of covid nineteen will now have to be on dialysis who now president heart failure who have had strokes a nail cannot move a part of their body or cannot speak as a result. I think about all those individuals lost their loved ones. I also think about the physicians and nurses respiratory therapists and EMT's gotten infected because they didn't have enough people. In what it would have meant if they knew, and as they will know about how this all did not have to happen, and so it's just incredibly distressing and devastating to learn about all of this because frankly when you look at. What's been hampering our response the entire time it's the mixed messaging and part of. The commentary around us was well, maybe the mixed messaging is due to lack of knowledge or maybe it's due to incompetence. But as it turns out if this is deliberate and if it's there is a deliberate if there has been a deliberate effort to mislead the American people and the cost is people's lives. What does that really mean in just wanted to to respond to? Two. mikes question about specifically this issue of panic that president trump at the White House of what we didn't want to cause panic. We didn't want to have some kind of fear as as the as the response from the American people will actually the best. To fear is the truth. The best thing in the most important thing that the American people in any people want to known in time of crisis is the truth what is actually happening what do we know? What do we not know? What are we going to do to find this out? What are the actions of the federal government is going to be taking? What are things that each individual person can be doing right now and it is beyond shameful and so devastating that week, this could have been done but it was not yeah. I mean, you know these are this is what you do on a daily basis as a as a physician and a public health professional. It seems to me that if you tell people the truth if you tell them how to mitigate. You give them agency that is exactly how you calm people down. But I guess the bottom line question is, is there any doubt in your mind at all that by withholding information and not leveling with the American people that what? President trump did. Cost, significant numbers of American lives. Well, we have the research to illustrate this. We have modeling studies done here in the US that showed that if we acted even a week sooner, and this is back, we're talking about these at home orders and margin acted a week sooner we could have saved thirty, six, thousand lives. We have our own counterfactual in the form of other countries that took prompt that had a national response that had a coordinated messaging to the public, and we saw for example, the case of South Korean that had their first diagnosis of Cova nineteen. A first goes case of nineteen. The same day that we did that they have infections, deaths that are many many. Fold, less than ours. They have jets ranging in the hundreds versus we have them in the hundreds of thousands. We also know that at that time exactly as you said that we could have given the American people agency I mean I think about there's so many allergies to this right you could imagine if there were a hurricane or tornado that's coming. What you want to do is to tell people there is time there is time for us to take action this you can protect yourself and your family imagine if you find out that the government knew about this impending weather catastrophe didn't tell people visiting they didn't want to cause panic, but actually people died as a result of that. would be the outrage or imagine I always think in terms of clinical analogies. Imagine if a physician didn't want to cause a patient panic and fear but then withheld in important diagnosis bump that patience and by the time the patient found out it was too late and that she was going to die versus if they found out a few months sooner, their lives could have been saved I mean. Imagine that. That's the equivalent of what's happening here a doctor when I imagine you had a chance to listen to the tape conversation between Bob. Woodward and president trump what was going through your mind when you listen to that what part of that conversation shocked you the most. I think was shocked me the most was that president trump had a good understanding of the risks and dangers of virus from as early as February seventh. That he had a conversation with President Xi. Of China which is already another kind of bizarre moment because it seems like it was you know there's been a lot of blaming of China but seems like the Chinese president. Action alerted president trump to potential dangers but president trump was. Can't what these dangers are and was able to articulate how that this was something that's more dangerous of the flu that could affect young people to that it was airborne and therefore is extremely contagious that back in end of January, he was warned by his own team that this could be a once in a generation type of dangerous virus at a he understood it comprises it and could articulate back in. So I, think back to. all these press conferences that president trump has had since then where he deliberately it seems now downplayed the severity of the virus and that. Contrast is so jarring when I think about what could have been done in the meantime. That February seventh phone call with Woodward really leaped out me. Now, I do have to say that I do think it would have been really difficult to persuade the American public in February when the numbers were so low to take the kind of socially distance restrictions and lockdowns and all the other requirements that would have been necessarily would it would have been difficult to get the. American, public on board win. So few cases had been reported in the United States, but that said when you look at that February, seven phone call where trump is telling Woodward. This is more deadly than even your strenuous flew. This is deadly stuff which is precisely the opposite of what he was saying to the public five times more. He said five times more deadly didn't he? But I mean that and on that same day he's tweeting. To the world, I'm the you know the the corona virus would disappear. You know when the weather starts to warm and on March seventh saying no, I'm not concerned at all. It's not. It's that dichotomy of saying privately to Woodward. He thinks it's private because it's for a book that isn't GonNa come out for a while you know, hey, this is really deadly stuff while telling the public don't worry it's all going to go away. That's right now, I'll give you that same analogy for a weather atrophy. Imagine if the president or governor or some other leader knew about this impending catastrophe and is saying this acknowledging this in some private setting but not letting people know whose lives would be directly affected and for do something about it I mean this is. This is not a storm that's going to hit us no matter what we're all going to die I mean this is something that we could actually prevent by taking steps I do think that you make a good point about how difficult it would have been to get the American people on board early on when we didn't yet have diagnosed cases and no deaths in the US that's true but. For Two things one is that the federal government could have been taken that time to prepare and arguably had we gotten our testing capacity up the very beginning way now. South Korea and many other countries did. We probably. Have even needed these dramatic shutdowns. The way that we did eventually, we had to have these shells the point that we did because we had so much community spread and not nearly enough testing couldn't rate it in. If we had the testing, maybe we didn't need those shutdowns in the first place but the other thing too is because the president consistently downplayed the severity of the election, the American people were left wondering what do I do now? Who Do I listen to? Is this even so serious, I mean. We are seeing something as basic as masks as you both know it as we talked about being politicized, and so I think that is key to all this ad. We actually still have a chance to turn this around and I. Hope I'm not sure that this will happen but I do hope that the president. Takes this opportunity now and instead of defending his own past actions says it maybe this crazy wild dream that this could occur but I hope you'll say now. Dan. Here's where we are. This is extremely serious whatever happened to the past happened in the past but here's what we can do moving forward and let science and public health finally lead

President Trump Woodward United States Federal Government President Xi Professor Of Public Health Donald Trump Dr Lino George Washington University FLU Commissioner Dr Wen Skulduggery BOB Cova South Korea White House China
Why You Should Stop Snacking And Start Fasting

The Ultimate Health Podcast

05:22 min | 4 months ago

Why You Should Stop Snacking And Start Fasting

"Hello Jason. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for having me on. We're GONNA have a great chat I. Loved Your Latest Book that you co wrote with eve and Meghan, and this is titled Life in the Fast Lane. I'm curious to start. How does somebody WHO's a kidney specialists get? So interested in fasting as a subject yeah. That's a great question I think that what happened is that as? A kidney specialists, what I do is I see a lot of type two diabetics and as we've had this sort of increasing obesity epidemic since the nineteen seventies that sort of was followed by an epidemic of type two diabetes starting in the late nineteen eighties, nineteen nineties, and then type two diabetes is actually far and away the most common cause of kidney disease. So as you know we went into the two, thousand, two, thousand ten we started to see much more and more of type two diabetes related kidney disease. So I actually encountered it quite a bit and as it became more and more important part of my practice I started to think about weight loss because the entire way that we treat you know. Disease is sort of backwards that is if you look at type two diabetes related kidney disease, for example, we spend a lot of money and effort trying to design drugs and dialysis and all that sort of stuff. However, the actual treatment doesn't make sense because we have kidney disease from type two diabetes while the answers to how to get rid of it is. Telling you right there if you have if you don't have type two diabetes, then you can't get diabetic related disease and if you lose weight year type two diabetes will get better. So the real answer to this whole problem lies in getting to the root cause, which is the weight. If you lose weight, then you don't get the type two diabetes. You don't get the kidney disease and that's really the only good way to treat the disease yet as a medical profession nobody was interested. In weight loss and to a large extent nobis really interested. We started gave up this entire concept which is so important. So fundamental to human health because this is what we face in North America today, lot of problems of of touchy diabetes and obesity, and we gave it up to like you know weight watchers, Jenny Craig and all those sorts of things it's like that's fine but it's really an important subject. So that's when I started to look at the question of weight loss and When I looked at it was clear that there wasn't a lot of really good thinking in the area. The entire field was dominated by sort of calories in calories out theory that is you know we've all heard this before you know it's just a matter of eating fewer calories and exercising more like if you actually think about it for a little bit, it actually makes very little sense that is you know it's a very sort of simplistic argument because the question is not whether people are eating more calories or burning less calories. The question is sort of wire the eating mark how And why are they not burn as many calories and it turns out that the real answer to why we're gaining weight is more likely related to our hormones. Then the number of calories were eating as an example, you can eat two different foods of the same. The same number calories. So you could eat broccoli or you could drink Soda Strictly Soda. Well, it's very easy to gain weight if you're drinking soda. But almost nobody gained weight eating Broccoli. So the point is that for two foods that are the same calories they're completely different in the minute you put it in your mouth. The hormonal response to those two foods is completely and utterly different. So if the hormones different the hormonal instructions that we deliver to our body or going to be completely different. So a simple example as tidy if you drink sugary soda, there's almost no sitadi signalling. You don't feel full from drinking sugary soda yet if you eat a large number of calories of Broccoli or steak or any sort of real. Natural food you will get full. So that's a simple example of how the body responds to these calories to foods of equal calories but totally different response from our bodies, and therefore what's important is not just the number of calories that this sort of hormonal response and that's you know that's what I talk about. A lot of is this sort of trying to get to the root cause of what causes weight gain rather than this, very, very simplistic sort of calories in calories out model which to be honest hasn't really helped anybody that is it's in the standard sort of advice for. Doctors and Dietitians everybody to count your calories yet it almost helps nobody. So you know here we have a treatment which is counting calories and doing calorie restricted diets, which has a failure rate's probably on the order of ninety nine percent. So it's like why would that be standard treatment if the failure rates like ninety, nine percent I, it's not just my opinion you see it in the numbers like the numbers don't lie there's more and more obesity out there people try to lose weight they count their calories and they don't lose weight. So it's not a very good strategy from all sorts of from all angles

Kidney Disease Diabetes Obesity Jason EVE North America Jenny Craig Meghan
"dialysis" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

07:19 min | 5 months ago

"dialysis" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"A Pittsburgh tradition Greg Dialysis here the second hour. Of the tombs market, Black and gold Sunday show. You know, I got to give big Ben Common Ocean credit Our producer Greg, He said he'd be shocked if the Pirates would want 20 games this year. You know what? I I looked at him when he said that I'm like, Come on. So there's gotta They've got to try something. I don't know what they do, but they've got to try something. I think they owe it to the fans. If not even you know that the history books or any of that stuff because we know they're not going to the postseason. They gotta slide headfirst every time they've got to make a big impression for pirate fans to really want to come back and embrace them next year, especially with a whole new everything. And I got to believe, Mr Nothing saying, Look, I brought you guys in here. You've got to get something done. And Carrington and obviously Shelton, Those are the two guys right now They're in the spotlight. So you know we love our pirates. But to be brutally honest, it's now or never. They've got to do something in a positive way. Or at least get dirt on their uniforms. I think They're gonna have to go along to get the 20 wins. I know where they started so big and his such a pessimist. Gonna kick him under the table is something Listen. Most negativity is bringing the show down. He's 60 more. Hey, six foot nine. I can't find a table tall enough to kick him under. You know what I'm saying? All right, listen, but it was a red sweater. Looks like her Mama. No, No. They walked by a pool. They tried to chop him up and listen. I want to just Boston. They were winners yesterday over Carolina, 31 They they're leading that. Siri's Right now, This is the NHL. It was Arizona and win over Colorado for two. Colorado leaves that Syria's two games to one still a lot of games to get to, but I'm just going to kind of go through these real quick Yesterday. Tampa Bay got by Columbus three to Tampa Bay leads that series two games to one. And Vegas. Ah, winter to one over Chicago. What do you make of the Marc Andre Fleury story? What do you think about all of that? Filmed. I'm intrigued by its Hey, hockey as most most sports are, What have you done for me lately? World and you know he got he's been outplayed by Lehner and it looks like he's not going to be in Vegas for long. He had a quick stay brought him to a Stanley Cup final. And you know it's time to move on. He is up there in age. I believe he's 35 years old. So that's my ancient for goaltender, But it's pretty darn old on it. You know, they have pretty much looked like They turned the page on Marc Andre Fleury. All right, let's move on to the N B. A. It was before he died. Did you notice the Montreal Canadiens? Yeah, with a foul goal. Get three the other day. Maybe not. Everybody thought they were going when the public was supposed to roll over. Listen, it would be fitting. I mean, with the games being played the matches in Canada because of this unique season, when you think of the birthplace of hockey, you think Canada And you think of the halves you think of Montreal. So look that what that wouldn't bother me in the least. N bekah. Memphis lost to Portland 1 26 2022 So that means, uh, Portland punches their ticket to the post season to take on the Lakers. You got a bunch of games coming up tomorrow. Utah Denver Thes Air all Game one of the postseason, Brooklyn, Toronto, Philadelphia, Boston, Dallas and the Clippers. And then on Tuesday Orlando, Milwaukee, Miami, Indiana, Oklahoma City and Houston important and the Lakers. Can LeBron James up, perform his incredible magic and take the Lakers to the promised land. Boy. This would be a great scenario for the N B. A. And I must tell you from there, commissioner on down I think they have done an incredible job, maybe better than anyone at this point in professional sports. And that would be a definite crown jewels. If LeBron James was able to win that historic franchise, another Larry O'Brien trophy, Greg I think the lead really hopes that because of the star power that he brings people want himto watch LeBron play. They want the Lakers to go as far as they can get interesting. Some of the teams that left her powerful teams that are now bounced out. Some of those guys kind of happy to escape the bubble in and they were. They were like they pay. They did what they could for society, and now they can go on and live their lives a little bit and get back to their families. Well, I don't know. I just have this thing about Milwaukee. And a lot of it was started last year by my then produced from Michael Gar and I I don't know. I just keep thinking Milwaukee, Milwaukee, So we're going to see what happens going to be very interesting. Also, before we kind of move on to some other things, I just your thoughts about the Wyndham championship. See, Will Kim 62 years today, He's an 18 under with a two shot lead. Tiger says he will be back, but he's not there this weekend. But this is a really good barometer of some of the great young players that were going to be hearing about and seeing in years to come, and maybe because I've just relinquished it and I said Okay, I'm going to embrace it. I really have started to fall for some of the great talent of these young players, and I think golf is going to be in very capable hands. For many years to come with people like Soo Will Kim and others that I've been watching and, of course, calling more cow last weekend getting the wind So I think God is going to be in some very good hands for the next couple of years with some of these great players who were starting to really reach their peak right now on the PGA Tour. About how locked in Kim ones yesterday on the far three. He had a hole in one eye, and he had two other birdies. I mean, the guy was was unbelievable with how close he waas to each of those par threes. If he was playing in a weekend scramble, where a charity event he had all the closest to the pins bribing the have been walking away with thousands Well, I just I don't know. I just I really learned to appreciate some of the talent of these young players. And I think when you think of a Justin Thomas, who's been playing at a high level since he was 16 10 years later. Kind of reaching the peak and prime of his his career. I just think these guys have a whole lot more experience sometimes, and we all give him credit for because by the time you get to your mid twenties, you usually been a star in college. Maybe you got a couple of championships under your belt and amateur championship. So if you're playing competitive golf for 25 you started in your early teens, and you're on the PGA Tour, and you're even getting close to the leader border. If you're fortunate enough to get your first major, like Colin Moore a cow was, I think that just goes to show there's a lot of talent out there, Greg Well, this time, it will be how hard it would be to get to that level two can play on the PGA Tour. I mean, you have the corn, very tour and all these other little smiler stabbed like tours, and those guys are as good as anyone we've ever seen in person. I'm talking about in for them to be able to try to get to that next level in play on the PGA Tour. It's amazing the talent that these young fellas have. On. There are so many, you know, Probably you could take out the entire top 200 still have a very competitive golf tourney if you started with the next group. I kind of figured that it would give people round up a little bit our conversation about the Pirates and some folks want to talk about the pirates. And if you want to jump in on the conversation, you have some thoughts about the pirates and this dismal play that's underway right now. What do you think it's going to take to get it going? I love to hear from me and no one is a bigger fan of the Pirates and me, But this has just been disappointing to say the.

Pirates Lakers Marc Andre Fleury Milwaukee golf LeBron James Kim Vegas Boston hockey Greg Dialysis Greg Montreal Canadiens Pittsburgh Ben Common Ocean Canada Chicago Greg Well Tampa Bay Syria
Wilford Brimley, 'Cocoon' and 'Natural' actor, dies at 85

WBZ Afternoon News

00:37 sec | 5 months ago

Wilford Brimley, 'Cocoon' and 'Natural' actor, dies at 85

"Brimley and actor known for playing Grumpy characters and his signature walrus moustache, has died at the age of 85. CBS's Debra Rodriguez looks back on his career. He was the Grand Pi and the Quaker Oats commercials. Bullitt Stephen Quaker Oatmeal Wilfred Brimley had roles in the natural and Cocoon has died and your grandma are are going going away. away. More More recently, recently, P P essays essays for for diabetes diabetes turned turned him him into into a a social social media media sensation. sensation. One One and and three three adults adults has has prediabetes prediabetes manager manager says says Grimley Grimley has has been on dialysis because of a kidney condition. Wilfred Brimley was 85 years old Debra

Wilfred Brimley Debra Rodriguez Bullitt Stephen Quaker Quaker Oats Grimley Grimley CBS
Wilford Brimley, 'Cocoon' and 'Natural' actor, dies at 85

The John Phillips Show

00:16 sec | 5 months ago

Wilford Brimley, 'Cocoon' and 'Natural' actor, dies at 85

"Died great career he started as a stunt performer. Then he went on to TV shows like The Waltons, That movie's China syndrome, the natural and cocoon this century more famous for Quaker Oats and dialysis commercials. Wilford Brimley was 85 Southern California's

Wilford Brimley Southern California
Wilford Brimley, 'Cocoon' and 'Natural' actor, dies at 85

When Radio Was

00:35 sec | 5 months ago

Wilford Brimley, 'Cocoon' and 'Natural' actor, dies at 85

"Sick. He had one of those faces. You just knew in movies and TV, even if you weren't sure of his name character actor Wilford Brimley that decades of TV commercials and movies like Cocoon, the Natural and this one, the firm the FBI so much as spits in your direction. You let me know before it hits the ground, won't you? I want to mention Of late. He had been battling several medical issues. He was on dialysis at a Utah hospital, where he died. Wilford Brimley of the gruff manner and memorable mustache dead at age

Wilford Brimley FBI Cocoon Utah Hospital
Hospitals across Texas prepare to hit capacity amid virus surge

Here & Now

04:26 min | 6 months ago

Hospitals across Texas prepare to hit capacity amid virus surge

"19 continues to surge in parts of the country. Texas is one hot spot. The number of people hospitalized in that state has doubled in the last two weeks in Houston, officials say hospitals are one or two weeks away from being totally overwhelmed. Harris County Judge Lena Hidalgo joins us Now She is the chief executive for the county, which includes Houston, and which has by far the most covert cases in the steak. Welcome. Thank you so much for having me, Jeremy. Well, and we've been reading about hospitals close to reaching capacity more than 80% full, not just running out of beds but running out of healthy staff as well. They've been tightening the criteria for who gets Admitted which, of course, can be dangerous for the patients who have to be sent home Now you have said people should not wait to take drastic action. There should be another stay at home order. Now. Is anyone listening to you? Yes, I know. We had a stay home order. Initially back in March and folks work together incredibly well, the community came together We flatten the curb and before we had a chance. For the curve to come down on the other side, 10 20% of peak as they did in other communities and other nations. The state opened up when they did that They took away my authority to institute those kinds of orders. And so now all I can do is recommend. I've put the community on our level one Threat alert and the recommendation under that threat level is to stay home. Now. The sense we have folks are to some extent listening, but obviously not to the degree that they would if this was in order, this was a requirement. So that's why I've been advocating with the governor for that authority of for him to do that within. You know, Harris County well, and the governor did change his mind on masks, and he has now said that you have to wear a mask in Texas and counties where there's a certain number of cases, but what has, he said? You about the idea of another stay at home order. It's an ongoing conversation. We've been in contact throughout. This whole process early on when he first re opened, folks said, is too fast what he thinks. My sense was always It seems to me it's to class. But we don't know for sure. Let's try and make it work. And right now, you know, the months have gone by and what we've seen is that the communities that re opened later are the ones that aren't seeing the second resurgence. And if we just Keep going the past we're going eventually. We're gonna have to institute something of a stay home order and we put folks in the worst position economically, if we don't have a sustainable co existing relationship with the virus. A lot of people would point to the fact that the number of deaths in Harris County is just around for 100 relatively low, considering the number of cases just by comparison, New York City has had more than 18,000 deaths from Cove in 19 1st of all. Are you worried you're going to get two numbers like that? And secondly, are the economic effects of a shutdown. In some ways more devastating than the deaths at least that you're seeing so far. This is such an uncertain buyers were all learning so you can never discount you know whether we would get to that kind of a death rate. Of course. Right now it is relatively low. The issue is, though, and you mentioned at the top of the show is when your you goes from being 15% cove it 40 50% Cove it you're having to turn people away who probably shouldn't be turned away. I mean, if you if you end up a nice to you, you want the best treatment possible, and there could come a point in which We can't sustain the strokes the heart attacks on dialysis, pregnant women who need to give birth, so it's not assisting of a long term strategy. What is this thing of a long term strategy is to bring the curve down. Have that pain of course of the shutdown, but then reopens more sustainably. And for the longer term, that's what we have to keep in line. But I do think it's important also to take a step back and think about what we're doing here. What we're saying is that it's okay for hospitals to be stretched thin doctors, nurses and for people to fill those hospital bed, a reputable damage to those spokes. And just not the way we should be thinking about human life. The

Harris County Chief Executive Texas Houston Judge Lena Hidalgo Cove Jeremy New York City
Unexpected Results on Lithium and the Kidneys

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

04:34 min | 7 months ago

Unexpected Results on Lithium and the Kidneys

"Sometimes? It's the uncontrolled Frau's that changed practice particularly when the results go against the grain. That's what happened in twenty seventeen when Lars casting than colleagues published their seminal paper on lithium in renal disease, they looked at seven hundred and fifty four patients with chronic kidney disease, who are taking lithium or an anti convulsant. Some were continued on the medication during the renal disease while others stopped it. Now you'd expect the renal function to improve here when lithium was stopped, but they found the opposite patients who stopped the mood stabiliser whether lithium or the Anti convulsant had worse renal outcomes than those who continued it, but wait. You do kind of expect that I mean it's likely that the doctors stopped these meds in patients who are getting sicker and they just continued to get sicker since this is not a controlled trial. They did try to control for that selection bias and they're finding still held up. But. There was one more finding that starts to raise questions. Dr cussing honed in on the patients with bipolar disorder. He found that their renal function fared even better when continued on lithium versus switching them to an anti convulsant. That was an unusual finding. Suggesting that renal function is actually going to do better bipolar disorder if we keep them on lithium instead of switching them to something else. How do you explain that we don't really know? But perhaps it's all about the TUBUL 's at least one anti convulsant vow pro Depakote is associated with renal damage in the PROXIMAL tubular bells. Now that is a rare side, effect, Daviau but bear with me, and you'll see the point, so vow pro eight is hitting the proximal to Buell's lithium in contrast, causes damage in the distant Tubul 's so switching develop row aid could just damage the healthier half of the kidneys. These folks so if that theory is true, then keeping them on, lithium would sound like a better idea. Now while Dr Kessler's study gave us some reassurance for continuing lithium. Even as the Croat Nin starts to rise, it did start a lot of confusion, and it definitely needed replication, and that's what we got in a poster presentation by Dr. Me Hawk power on colleagues at the Mayo Clinic. The data was once again observational, and they arrived at the same conclusion, the risk of progressing to end stage renal disease was the same in patients with chronic kidney disease who continued versus stopped lithium. Sadly that risk was high, the risk of going on to end stage renal disease was about fifty percent in both groups. Remember though these are patients who already have chronic kidney disease. And stage. Renal disease is a very sad disease. The risk of suicide is seven times higher in this population and its highest in the first year of dialysis, so we need to take that into consideration when thinking about stopping lithium lithium prevents about one in eight suicides in bipolar disorder, and the risk of suicide goes up twenty fold in the first few months after lithium is, stop forty fold if lithium has stopped abruptly, that's why it's best to stop lithium slowly over one to two months to prevent drastic worsening of mood. Lithium's effects on the kidneys are also dose dependent with some studies showing no renal effects if the level is kept below zero point eight. The bottom line you see the creatine new rising at one point five or above you're gonNA need to consultant a frolic just on this complex question, but the answer is not always to stop lithium, and from these two studies, it looks like patients are GonNa fare just as well whether the lithium is stopped continued, and they might even fare better if it is continued. We also need to keep in mind that patient's entire history, and how well they did on off lithium, and how high the risk of suicide is. The first step is usually to lower lithium as low as you can get it in someone with renal disease without getting their mood worse.

Lithium Kidney Disease Bipolar Disorder Dr Cussing Lars Tubul Dr Kessler Dr. Me Hawk Consultant Mayo Clinic Daviau Buell
Practice Guidelines and racial disparities

Second Opinion

03:40 min | 7 months ago

Practice Guidelines and racial disparities

"Delivery is racist in many ways from insurance to hospitals to admission rates, and in other ways through implicit bias this week. The New England Journal of Medicine Points Outweighs that Ray sneaks into medical practice in ways we don't even realize. Is Skin color really a proxy for health risk factors we'll. geneticists argue that racial background is important to identify specific genes that are associated with specific diseases. Social scientists argue that racial differences in diseases are not due to genetics or skin color, but due to social disparities and inequities. Well, let's look at one example. A study shows that black and Latino ex people with heart disease. We're less likely to be admitted. Admitted to the hospitals heart service than white people. Some doctors argue that those differences aren't really racially biased. Because doctors used a computerized flow chart to calculate a person's risk of death from heart disease, and so they did well. There are dozens of these flow charts for all sorts of medical conditions. Many share a common problem. Let's look at the one used to predict risk of dying of heart disease. You'll see that the practice guideline directs more intensive resources to white people then to black people the way the American Heart Association's guideline does this is by putting together a number of risk factors for heart disease, history of diabetes, hypertension, family, history, and the like. Each risk is associated with a point. When it comes to race. If someone is not black, they get three additional risk. points sounds like AAC. Good thing right? Blacks have lower risk. Right will what happens is the black person get a lower risk or so? They are less likely to be admitted to the hospitals, heart service, and less likely to get all the heart care they need why those three extra points well. Nobody really knows and this isn't the only example by far. There are guidelines for heart surgery. Dialysis, organ, transplants, vaginal births, lung, disease, and cancer treatments when any of these specific. Followed seems that doctors are directed away from providing people of color with the route to more aggressive care, so is the risk really skin color. What do we do with the risk factor for someone with one parent who is white and one is black. We know that people of Color have different health outcomes than whites and Asians, and for public health reasons it is important to keep track of data by race and ethnicity and other social parameters. Why well just look at the rates of Covid in different communities? Communities. We need to know this the difference though isn't about skin, color or race. It's about poverty and housing and education, toxic stress and type of employment. There are very likely examples of diseases that do track to certain subgroups of people, but let's look for the specific gene that causes the disease and not the color of someone's skin. We do need to look at racial disparities, but that's very different than using raised to develop guidelines for doctors to

Heart Disease American Heart Association New England Journal Of Medicin RAY Covid Diabetes
Did New York's Coronavirus Response Make the Pandemic Worse?

Steve Scott

05:55 min | 7 months ago

Did New York's Coronavirus Response Make the Pandemic Worse?

"Did new York's coronavirus response make the pandemic here worse the Wall Street journal talked to nearly ninety frontline doctors nurses health care workers hospital administrators and government officials and they learned that the response may have been off the mark way off the mark the response included missed warning signs and policies that many healthcare workers say they didn't agree with Shalini Ramachandran is one of the reporters who worked on the story I spoke to her earlier and asked if any factors led to the virus being worse here in the city then it needed to be and if that possibly lead to more deaths we definitely found evidence of that that could have been avoided so many healthcare workers told us about that of patients that Daschle could have been avoided interact one one healthcare worker at actually couple healthcare workers that elm Hurst one of the hardest hit New York hospital estimated that thirty to forty percent of patients who died there could have been saved with more staffing and better early on there were mixed messages being given out and so the city didn't really have a solid response as early as it could is that what your report found yes and it it you know in fact that few had anticipated view these impact happening including the federal government but you know once once there were missed warning signs that New York we're standing on it one of which is their their early finding the virus with arrivals according to arise in patients with flu like symptoms within hospital testing negative for the flu which we seem to have gone largely uninvestigated by hospital stay including official even when doctors were starting to raise alarms so for instance a doctor again at Elmhurst who who thought that they were early March you're worried that they're missing community spread of the virus and when they call the health department to get patients tested it rejected for testing even many patients who satisfy the criteria which is pretty restrictive at the time and it began and it would lead to like contracted an unproductive call the city health department that's just one example and and by the time the rhetoric from the New York leaders because we're well prepared I'm still there well prepared on March second Mister Lazio tweeted that people should go see a movie so the rhetoric with all you know New York has the phone control not no need to worry here you also found that the squabbling between the Cuomo administration and the Blasi administration between Cuomo and de Blasio actually did not help matters no I do not matter in those crucial couple weeks when leaders were trying to decide how soon to shut things down it also then it wouldn't help in actually helping court coordinate these sick patients from the harder hit hospitals to get to places where they were available beds and available staff so it's going to think that we found was that the city had reached out to the state to ask to create the centralized evacuation hub that had previously been use for emergencies like sandy Hooper storm sandy and twice the state department of health denied the request and eventually what the state does it does it gave the green light to creating how does only focus on the Javits center in the comfort navy ship which he could recall disappointed hospital executives because they weren't initially billed for critical care or to take coded patient but they're in the fact that there wasn't a coordinating government response to help public and private hospitals Courtney transfers and make sure the patients are transferred thankfully the end many healthcare workers I'll be going to that as as a major issue what else could have been done better or should have been done better healthcare workers were saying you know nurses respiratory therapists who are really the key people to manage patients with breathing problems were on Metalik they've been raising alarms for four years that that staffing levels were low in the hospital but had sort of always felt that they got a deaf ear and and then during a pandemic the hospital added hundreds of the intensive care beds but not always enough trained staff in the training staff is important because if you can't throw any nurse or doctor at a critically ill patient need somebody trained in critical care so what should have governor Cuomo mayor de Blasio healthcare officials here in the city what should they have all learned from this I I think like the big takeaway here are just unlock the real need for early coordination and planning with all the hospitals I you know even before the before a crisis hits I think I think the takeaways were leader should be don't just focus on that later get make sure your oxygen supply vital fine liners dialysis machines I need called make sure their stockpile of damage and also a reserve of train medical staff you can call on to help in disasters where you know New York what happened was there was a red tape put out by the hospital that led to the traveling medical staff when we arrived in Kuwait and so a disaster reserves the phone would be helpful to have so that you know slipped when they can bring in credential people that have been you know pre vetted and not an issue I think that it's also making sure that whatever the stockpile in your state should be tested and checked it constantly the city's public health said that many state metal layers were not ready to go and do that kind of thing definitely feels like a laptop that could have been

New York Wall Street Journal
When ventilators break, iFixit can help

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:19 min | 8 months ago

When ventilators break, iFixit can help

"Hospitals ventilators dialysis machines and mechanical beds are more important than ever. Sometimes of course that equipment breaks down and some manufacturers restrict access to repair information or require that equipment be fixed by authorized technicians. Meaning that biomedical technicians working in hospitals. Can't just fix things themselves this week. Diy and repair site. I fix it published a giant database of medical equipment repair manuals to help address. That problem Kyle Wiens is CEO of. I fix it and has been leading the project. This is part of the broader trend in products for manufacturers have been locking down repairs. Apple doesn't want you to fix your iphone and medtronic doesn't want hospitals to fix their equipment. They would prefer them beyond service contracts and pay very expensive rates but the hospitals have highly qualified highly trained by medical technicians. Already on site that can do the work But you have this. Trend toward more lockdown systems manufacturers have been taking freedom away from hospitals. Is there any benefit to you? Fix It to do this. Just out of curiosity. You're not charging hospitals for access to this. We have no business while for this. This is this is maybe one of the stupidest business ideas I've ever had. We're not running advertising. We're paying for everything out of pocket. I took close to half of my team off of the normal work for the last couple of months to do. This has been an absolutely huge project larger than I think anyone manufacturer because they've done we have information on thousands of devices from hundreds of manufacturers all in one place and the biomed. Tell me that that's what they really need. They need a central easy to search repository. Not only are you not monitoring? Is there a chance that you will get some kind of trouble or get sued over this? I mean considering like you said these expensive service contracts that manufacturers would prefer to be selling. There's a there's a tension where manufacturers don't want to share the service information because it will enable competition and to that extent we are enabling that competition But I would hope the manufacturers see this as a service that we are providing we're better at hosting in sharing collaborative service information than a medical device manufacturer is so let us do what we do. Well and let them focus on on their work. Do the manufacturers have a point like they spend years of research and millions of dollars on these devices? Do they have a right to protect that intellectual property? Well we're not talking about just anyone fixing these. We're talking about bio medical technicians. The already doing this maintenance already doing this work. I if you talk with hospitals and you see what's happening day to day it can be life or death whether they can fix a machine fast. If you have a ventilator go down you have the option to mail it into a manufacturer for service. You have to fix that machine that day. This is really more about power dynamics and about trying to do is squeeze every last dime that they cannot have the hospitals by pushing them into expensive service contracts when the hospital is really are perfectly capable of doing that work themselves. The database went up earlier this week. How is demand so far? We're seeing really good reaction from from biomed technicians not just in the US around the world. I got a message today from technician in Uganda this hill. Thank you so much. This is going to be really helpful. So we're excited that this is going to be a resource that will be used for a long time to come separate for medical equipment. I see people doing projects all the time of various types. I wonder what sort of traffic you've been seeing on the site since people started quarantining. The traffic to self repair guides on the Internet is dramatically. Up during the quarantine. People are at home board. They're fixing things all things around your house on the honeydew list. They are getting done. Our fastest growing repair right. Now is the Nintendo switch. Nintendo's repair centers are shut down. There's a common problem with the left joy. Con The left joystick where it starts to drift. And it's very infuriating is you're playing games and there's a really really simple fix for it. So nintendo switch any other device repair manuals that are especially popular. We're seeing laptops across the board. All of a sudden every schoolchild needs a computer and that wasn't the case. I don't think six months ago we'd say oh. I need to get a laptop for my kid. Well maybe that's a very lucky kid back then. Now it's an absolute necessity. Every kid needs a needs a laptop. Doing school from home on the phone is not fun. And so we're seeing old laptops. Being pulled out of the jurors people are upgrading them with SST RAM to make them a little bit faster. And that's Great Kyle. Williams is the CEO of the repair. Site I fix it

Nintendo Technician CEO Kyle Wiens DIY Medtronic Apple Uganda United States Williams
"dialysis" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

14:43 min | 10 months ago

"dialysis" Discussed on Conversations

"In this little community which is just a few houses. There's this became more. And there's a couple of fellas trying to help me and I'm running after this by camel trying to stake a great big antibiotic Natal and it's us and it's mum doesn't lightly so there's a couple of fellows who are hanging off his mother. Who's trying to buy may arm trying to stick a needle in in the past and it's like why would you WanNa do? You didn't get a toot on that. You know there are lots of things that I've done these. I think. Cloudy Nursing Colleges and just no preparation podcast broadcast. You're listening to conversations you can hear more conversations and he found out more and to ABC's dot net slash conversations. Sarah how'd you feel if you've got kidney disease? What are the symptoms? One of the problems as the lots of paper white feel crooked court crook but in general as PAYPAL's kidneys file. They suffer from not being able to get rid of as much fluids before. Say you might say people with really swollen and cools or Gercy Chase. You know that noisy but all sides I build up toxins in the blood and so they might feel court tired but people can be I- symptomatic until the KNISH neely bogged. But then once people have had to stop dialysis thou feel much better. What DOES DIALYSIS DO? It does the job of kidneys. It cleans the blood. So your kidneys a cleaning your blood all the time getting rid of rubbish from infections you know the stuff that same way and extra fluid cy. He kidneys doing that all the time. When kidneys stopped working. Then you need a dialysis machine to do that in a burst. So generally people are on dialysis for four or five hours every sick and die for the rest of their lives and so in in this context it means it well it meant before they was Dolla Song communities that people had to move from the families and the communities to come to Alice Dow and all wherever to go to hospitals right arms awake. How common is kidney disease in? So you're the territory. We sitting in the dialysis kidney disease epicenter of the universe in his S. That's a big question. If you think one of the communities that our directors the fromm Kyrie corre paper walked in in ninety ninety five naked having never say what people before to survive in the days set as hunters and gatherers. Iva Generations the people who survived with people who are really good at storing. Didn't have fridges. You can carry food with year. You might kill a kangaroo once awake or united might be a time when you went getting many began animals at all and sai what you do is you'd see a need eight as much as she could. And there's actually would pinto beef a passionate down because you needed to survive through periods of fast and so people went from being chained for hunter gatherer lifestyle to sitting next to a shop. Full of cholera may pause live not ammo tell stories of banging papegna and in the sixties and seventies and lining up for their rations of flour. Sugar tinned back. I so really really rapid change and then childhood infections being born prematurely. If you born to sane you're born with smaller kidneys with less filters spotlight China. Clean US swimming pool with upon filter so hall hypoth- things but it is certainly a disease that's linked to disposition poverty palace. Nece tell me about this place called Kuntoro Wade people from there have to go for dialysis. I came toss five hundred fifty. Kyw's west of here and it was one of the first communities that I went to win always wick for Petula and papal got back out to Kim tour. So they leave their traditionally had been rounded up and brought into Papegna in the sixty seventies had been desperate to get home Sirkin tour. That started painting when they're in Papegna and started Papegna Tula Isis. They're Cinta got back in nineteen eighty one out to Kuntoro really happy to be back on the country and then in the nineties for the first time. People started to get a diagnosis of kidney disease. And we're told that have to come to Alice now Alice Springs. These are in the country. Traditionally Pinto Paper wouldn't visit this country without asking permission. Sorry that idea of being somewhere where no one spiky language where you Pin To be person living in Shaima on someone else's country nick. Stahl Asus die. Whining would people have to move. He permanently get your dial us so it's seven house. Dr King Tour dolls is every second die. People didn't have reliable vehicles and big budgets. Few and size the patent in those early is was paper. Would move and try and reestablish themselves. They've by themselves or with some family in town and really struggled to make a home that made any sense to them here because all their identity all their relationships were based on this country so far away and so then what paper would do is that they get terribly hyme seek hop in a car. That was hitting it. Kuntoro hide out from the clinic. Get really seek and then get evacuated into hospital. I see you more dialysis looking for the Knicks car. Two Go hyme. There was only Dallas in the hospital in Alison dowling and there was a community later. Mr Zimmerman who started knocking on doors saying walkout we have a machine and cantor and the government told them he was straining. Well that is. The general thing was that wouldn't work in the days that it wouldn't work without the infrastructure of a hospital that if you're gonNA have a nurse attached to this machine then you wouldn't get dialysis nurses working in remote communities so when the government said nothing doing. What did this community and Kim Todo? So what they did was they got together with punishable. Artists the art center with Haiti Perkins. Who's dead? Charlie Perkins was on dialysis at one stage and had a transplant. She was Curator of average lot at the gallery of New South Wales at the time they Got Hold of Sotheby's auction half and a fellow called Colin Levity who was Very Rich Man from New South Wales who own Leviticus pathology at the time they all got together and paper from Kuntoro and Kyrie co-pilot some big clubs paintings and friends of the pinch be denied paintings from the collection. Aboriginal op from alive Australia and what they did was the heads an auction at the art gallery of New South Wales Roy Nights Jay where the action is and they raise the million bucks in one night. Wow Yeah it was international news here. These people from the poorest part of Australia. The mushroom ipod of Australia is the million bucks and what it was was. It was independent money. So government couldn't cyanide paypal anymore so they formed a kidney committee and they started to raise it to work at what they need to do to get this machine and for the hospital to hand patients over to them to dial is seven hours drive from the nearest hospital and when you got involved so I was actually the nurse on Cape Barren all and the truck. Tom which is a little aboriginal community in the best strike. I was giving my kids some time by the beach. I swam all through a Tasmanian winter. Everyday you have never seen kids go so blue and I always dreaming of the desert I just and they asked me if I'd help and I just couldn't resist. Did you know much about on? Dial nothing about Dala. Sokaia remember sitting on the beach rating everything. I possibly could about als but I think it helped that I didn't and that they didn't 'cause we I mean we. We had to work it out eventually but we just saw as a machine. You know it's a bit like Toyotas A to getting people out for sorry business and hunting. The dialysis machine was going to be a tool for getting people heim so yeah started in January two thousand three so my first jobs were a constitution and a separate bank account and charity status. This working up the corner avail lantern. Tell me about that. What was were you working conditions like in early. Well WE'D MONTHS. We bought a flat when we're at harts range because we had three small feral children so if I ever did get awakened off from hats range. They might tells weren't an option. The damage is is take been a rockstar. La Damage Bills. Were just too hot. So we bought this little two bedroom flat in in Alice. So when we came we're in that PSI it was may three kids and the dog one bedroom and John and the other because he was working in child protection at the time. We thought he probably needed some sleep and I had a dais got the corner of the room and was going out from the tramway cat how we were going to do. This was the first patient from Kim tour to get dialysis. Sip TIMBER. Two Thousand and four before we did effort style says Saif fourteen years guy. She was a gorgeous woman. Called AIMING IMP Jim PA with started the house which became poeple that stage. It was a gray house. Did it become so? It was a little territory Housing House that we rented so we realized that we had the sickest must unstable dialysis patients on the planet. And that we if we're GONNA take them seven s drive from the nearest hospital. We needed some way in Tam where we could do. Some dialysis for people and get them really well before it took them high and then people just started to come to. Kangari tiles and do they washing ring. They family might wish medicine than it's gonNA grind organically from them. We got money to buy cars to cows. We've had no cars to Lynn one of them. We still go and we had money left over and we thought we'd paint the front of the House. 'cause it was great break and we've sitting around the kitchen table and I said Nimba had a shot and I said we've gotTa Cheese Caliph of that front will ask what you reckon and she just went this one and it was purple. Now we've got purple houses in the Purple Track much plan. Everyone saves me purple things. I think a lot I mean it works really well. Our our official title is wasted as it. Nantapol Chapelle Jackie Taku Original Corporation. I'm glad I could just introduce you. See the pope is not allowed to resign until I consi- a spell it so they all stay forever that their retention policy in the nutshell. So you have this beautiful woman. Amy Who chose chose Purple and she's supposed patients so she flew back and what. How did it go? What the hull of Kim was outlier stripped to welcome. Heim it was just gorgeous. We'd manage server the eighteen months to think of every possible thing that could go wrong and nothing went wrong. And then what happened was that we started tonight as the attendance rights and the blood results and everything of the people who are getting home and even the people who were on the list to get started to improve. Bush. Telegraph meant that other communities heard that control more. We're getting family hyme. So they started touring Nas for help and directors bless him who didn't have because they are my bosses from a variety of wisened is communities so even though I didn't have Dallas in all their I in communities we now the communities rang for help they said postings doesn't matter if you wall Prio Pinjarra whoever our family were all in this together if we can help we will and Si- Today we're in fourteen communities and the purple track which has been on the rightful last seven eight years. What does it do? So it's it's a two chair Mobile Dialysis Unit Got Beautiful Papa initial paintings that were in show in New York in two thousand and one big stickers and it's got a purple cab and it can go to the communities where we haven't got permanent Dallas and give people some time hyme so it got gum Shia and Is currently in Kakadu and getting people from Jabari in the top in time for the first time ever so. It's just turned into this big beautiful thing. Which is about dialysis. But it's primarily about Nora country won't Cha Family Giacosa dreaming and Corny compassion and the directors brave and thoughtful and share their resources and makes me cry all the time and It also means the contact our holiday and we've created this spice in.

Kim Todo kidney disease Kuntoro Dallas DIALYSIS Papegna Australia chair Mobile Dialysis Unit PAYPAL Kuntoro Wade Gercy Chase ABC Sarah cholera Alice Dow Charlie Perkins Asus US New South Wales
"dialysis" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

12:21 min | 10 months ago

"dialysis" Discussed on Conversations

"This is an ABC podcast on conversations. Today my guest is Sarah Brown a nurse. I met when we were in Alice Springs in two thousand eighteen. If you leave in the remote desert of the northern territory you're a very long way from hospitals and this is a real issue for many indigenous people who need to stay on country so that they close to family and culture. The Purple House was started back in two thousand and three to bring dialysis to these remote communities in the years since it's about a revolution in healthcare and life expectancy to people living in the desert. The Purple House is run by an aboriginal board but it. Ceo is a white filler. Sarah Brown well business cod says. Ceo But Sarah describes herself as Chief Hedge in plaza and turn Ou- cut up show also share a meal of feral cat. If that's what's required Sarah's a knows who spent many years working in remote communities doing everything from delivering babies to injecting sick camels. Sarah thanks for making time for conversation. Thanks for having me. You live in the territory now but you actually born in the UK. What's Lee stood as your what was listed as your home on your birth certificate. Tuzi Caravan Parks I. I really am trailer trash. Why were your parents Ravina? A Caravan Park well. My Dad was working as a teacher and my parents had no money and teaches. He was working pretty rough schooling London. Doing lots of jobs on the side and my parents couldn't afford anywhere else. They had a little caravan and I slipped in a draw. They were worried about me. Falling out of the drawer because it was under a wind. I and so they had me in Hyannis and one day I actually deed that are crawled out the window with suspended at the we in this on. This is an interesting Howard. I remember a lot of that thankfully saw someone saw you when you were outside. I've never wanted to Bungee jump. That's why with AK to Kobe to Australia Well soon after that my dad got a job as a placeman which was not really personality at all and we lived in a lovely little village called kin vine the Midlands and I remember a the hunting grounds and the squirrels and the daffodils and blue bells going are went to school there But I was still really struggling and by that stage the they have my sister to. I think they really wanted to go somewhere. Warm and somewhere along way from their relatives and they wanted to give it a guy's making their own lives you know so we were incredibly lucky and I mean I think now about Had difficulties for people to move to Australia but they really did appreciate the chance that was given to them and once your family arrived in Australia. How did you find out where your dad was going to be posted as a teacher so we? We knew that we can't be somewhere in Queensland so I was six. My sister was four two suitcases and six hundred quid. Which M my parents had collected by selling all their belongings and we arrived in Brisbane and had to wait around in in the education diploma. Whiting to hia and eventually they said We think we'll send you to marlborough a hang on. We'll just why maybe we can do better than that for you and my parents went and looked not look. These kids are exhausted. We'll go moore bar and I can remember. Well they tell the story of looking on a map trying to find somewhere. Which of course was mayor Barbara and eventually we were put on the Sun Linda to go out very slowly on the train up to Mary. Barra and arrived in the remember arriving and stepping out of the railway station and it looked like John Wayne should be walking up with a straight like was almost like tumbleweeds. You're talking about my birthplace. So you know well it was nine ten seventy four and the just been a big flat. Where did you find a live there? They really struggled to find some way to win. And a lot of the places I went to say with full of mud so they thought a house on stilts might be a really good idea and so they rented this half a house on these great big highs. Stilts neither refi and board a COUPLA mattresses and a couple of camping cheese and when we came out. It was fabulous. Did you guys get a car when you arrived? Yeah it took a while to save up. I can remember walking to school and we were walked past the carver that had been earmarked in our heads as it was a little white hillman. Hanta and with satellite with every morning on the way to school sciatic right exciting times. I couldn't understand a word anyone with saying to me. I always these pile little kid with pigtails. Sticking out the side of my head and this really thick Midland's accent. Do you still find yourself dropping into that accent sometime? I still say grass them bath in Yoga vitamins. And if I hang around my mom for a period of time my kids tell me on standing Palmy but in general you'd have to say our sound freely Australian Miramar acclaimed. You still just a kid in Maryborough Sarah you joined the MIRA. Historical Society prompted that. That is a peculiar or particular interest for kidding. Cow Was a peculiar. I think looking back at one of the things was early on. Always trying really hard to fitting and CY. I thought I'd better learn everything I could about. Styling he's stray. And I got the kind of standard history at school about Captain Cook and Matthew Flinders and all that sort of stuff but I knew they had to be more than that and I also. I started drawing the lovely old houses in Mara so I was sitting enjoying these houses and wondering about the people who lived there before and I called it. The historical society and I was the youngest member by at least fifty years. And I win time and I told my mom kids and clubs and getting driven around. The place in Maribor wasn't too bad because you could just hop on your bike and go places. I said I've joined the historical society and now need a uniform and she's like another bloody uniform. What what's his son and I said and they looked twinset and Pearl. Did you get a different sense of the history of the place through and and one of the big things for me? Was that hidden history of Marrara which was about aboriginal resistance. Watchlist taking over the joint and also All the Sassy Islanders. How did you see that in town? It was the legacy of that so the legacy was in the graveyard. There was this saw the graveyard. Sit Out in Religion so all the Catholic church England in the Anna and these these big patch of Kinda lumpy ground with nine headstones at all and I actually got to look at the map and realized that it was a huge area of unmarked graves for aboriginal paypal and people who were slaves really and helped America's become rich and prosperous which it was in the lead. Is you studied no seeing after school? How was your first PRAC? What was the social lifelike? Started noticing in material and because on she did lots of practice in a variety of other places so I got to travel around quite a bit and go to places like vegetable Creko spital and out to Moray Moriarty go out with three blocks in a way. That was pretty good con. How does that happen? Was a hairdresser. Virtually just he's just found me on facebook. We've been having a good chat. Was that a reflection of your Your specific charm or is it more that you have fresh meat in Mauri. Well you know I think for me. It was staying in a new town for a limited amount of time and not having any money so anyone who wanted to tighten up the D. Now with this but I think yeah there was certainly a shortage of women and more the time then when off to Sydney. Was that a big moment going to smoke. It was huge and I can remember. I caught the train down from Amadeo. My Mom Limb Mia suit which we thought was the right thing in the eighties wearing to an interview. You remember would look like yeah Well I could have got mistaken as a slightly feral houses my base and I went down on the train. I've not gone to see me. Have you ever been before? Hadn't ever been the biggest place I've ever been to Brisbane. And unbeknownst to net made the previous day that Bena big hail storm. So I arm coming into the train as it's getting like I'm Gonna. Throw these suburbs with all these breaking windows. I'm thinking Farella Spain Orion. I stayed YWCA. I am I can remember kind of scarring up Oxford straight before it got dark with my bag clutched in front of me to find something to eat before. I went to sleep in my bed in the YWCA. But anyway I must have done an sort of job but the interview. Because I got the job and moved down the looking after in that job. Sire I was twenty because queenslanders finish school e Si- I was quite young. They give me a why. Why uniform and told me I was a registered newness and Marcus Ward was described or co Cameron. One and Cameron was the place where people got sent if they didn't know where to people so it was kind of a mixture of but he mian old ladies from the cross who was still living in a little flat. Above King's cross with too many cats and fellas who were shooting nothing like would find up their arms and papal just a variety of fights and I just completely loved it loves sitting and hearing people's stories and getting to know people boys in trouble for being light and not knocking off on time and and going to people's funerals after they died today. I didn't get in trouble for that but it was a nice thing. Today after Sydney moved to Adelaide to work as a community nursing an aboriginal health center where you living when you're an Adelaide so the interesting place I lived was above a tattoo parlor in Hanley Straight So Hanley Straight. It's kind of right in the middle of town and it's where on a knock clubs a- and I rented this building which this room in a building at Bena Coffee Palace and underneath rural these shops. They were adult shops than a tattoo parlor and grateful for all show and then nightclubs although Iran so I had a long room in this all building looking Iva Hanley Straight and then I had a lou so I didn't have a share and I didn't have kitchen. I set up a camp share with an inflatable kids widing Ponderosa Becker and I just I'd out lots but the noise from the nightclubs with loud. That the floorboards vibrated and I had lots of visitors..

Sarah Brown Historical Society Brisbane Australia Ceo Sydney Purple House Alice Springs ABC UK London Marcus Ward Bena Coffee Palace Maribor Palmy Chief Hedge Queensland Ou Maryborough Sarah
"dialysis" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"dialysis" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Dialysis when the call was made for a donor Alex stepped up I mean not everybody can donate part of our then it's really complain I need sometimes saving a life as a result of quick thinking and a gut feeling Melissa bell runs a home daycare and one day one of our kids had a life threatening seizure Mullis's instincts and training kicked in reporter are for about five minutes Melissa made a chain of decisions that kept the boy from suffering any serious medical concerns the little boy's mother says Melissa saved his life I don't know what would happen if she and then there is a hero can also change a person's life like Cain X. zero Anthony battalion Anthony's engine manager in Orange County in one of his members as Lorenzo our guy act was born with special needs Lorenzo uses a bicycle to get around and when his bike was stolen one day Anthony immediately reached out to buy him a new one I just automatically knew like I got to help them out I love him very dearly he's part of my life my family and we just care about a lot I care about heroes can also inspire us to do great things when Anthony McLaren's father passed away from Parkinson's Anthony decided to do something in his honor so he embarked on the seven summits challenge to raise money for Parkinson's research at CAC USC in less than two years into the climb the tallest mountain peak on every continent in fact just a few weeks ago he claimed his final summits Vinson massif in Antarctica completing a feat that less than a thousand people in the world has ever done I know that my dad would be very touched.

Alex Melissa bell Mullis reporter Orange County Lorenzo Anthony McLaren Parkinson USC Vinson massif Cain
"dialysis" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"dialysis" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Dialysis when the call was made for a donor Alex stepped up I mean not everybody can donate part of South then it's really complain and leave sometimes saving a life as a result of quick thinking and a gut feeling Melissa bell runs a home daycare and one day one of our kids had a life threatening seizure Mullis's instincts and training kicked in reporter are for about five minutes Melissa made a chain of decisions that kept the boy from suffering any serious medical concerns a little boy's mother says Melissa saved his life I don't know what would happen if she and then there is a hero can also change a person's life like Cain X. zero Anthony battalion Anthony's engine manager in Orange County in one of his members as Lorenzo our contact was born with special needs Lorenzo uses a bicycle to get around and when his bike was stolen one day Anthony immediately reached out to buy him a new one I just automatically knew like I got to help them out I love him very dearly he's part of my life my family and we just care about a lot I care about heroes can also inspire us to do great things when Anthony McLaren's father passed away from Parkinson's Anthony decided to do something in his honor so he embarked on the seven summits challenge to raise money for Parkinson's research at CAC USC in less than two years into the climb the tallest mountain peak on every continent in fact just a few weeks ago he claimed his final summits Vinson massif in Antarctica completing a feat that less than a thousand people in the world has ever done I know that my dad would be very touched.

Alex Melissa bell Mullis reporter Orange County Lorenzo Anthony McLaren Parkinson USC Vinson massif Cain
"dialysis" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"dialysis" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Is a patient at for serious kidney care in Richmond Indiana every night if you go to a little thing to get the get the machine all set up twenty minutes a half hour to do that dialysis is for people who have kidney disease and to have lost a great deal or all of their kidney function it can be a consequence of having had diabetes for a long time and it can be a consequence of other conditions that cause kidney damage the basically with the the Virginia on dialysis port it in that's in him me had a surgically with that he just work yourself up to the thing and the machine does everything there's a lot to wash your hands or wear masks there's a lot of that to make sure you don't try and get the port in fact it or anything because I because all kinds of problems but it's after that is that the machine to do its work the process itself takes nine hours give or take that means father Morris is hooked up to a hose for nine hours every night that hose fills his belly up with a solution that filters and cleans the blood basically doing the job of urination and then drains back out maybe some people who have never really heard about what dialysis is maybe don't know this but do you still you still yearning when you're on trial yes I do yes I do and you know that's one of things actually in the kidney disease I will stop doing that but I haven't had a problem with that yeah individuals some patients continue to yearning for years and some patients lose that function pretty quickly you just have to look for when you're out is often I guess is live the good point of that Angie Thomas the dietician at presenting us Richmond she says people on dialysis have even more limitations than people with Josh diabetes restrictions for somebody on kidney dialysis just in general in general all of our dialysis patients are falling at least a mild fluid restriction because they're not maybe they are so you're needing not hearing as much as someone who can either working hundred percent so they can't drink as much they're on a sodium restriction restriction which is probably healthy for everybody whether on dialysis or not art dialysis patients need to eat more protein foods you know which is a big crane right now everybody's doing Atkins diet keto diet it's a protein so everybody knows what protein as it used to be you have to explain that the ask me you know eggs fish Turkey so the more of that because when we do dialysis and we clean.

Richmond Indiana kidney disease diabetes Virginia father Morris Angie Thomas Richmond Josh Atkins
"dialysis" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"dialysis" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Three times a week dialysis can completely replace kidney **** can completely replace kidney function. is difficult to understand at best and what we do see is a few things number one we see that if patients get care early in the course of their kidney disease we can slow down the progression of that kidney disease and that is huge implications many of our listeners may of us seems a bit of news over the past three weeks where the administration the current administration wants to reduce the cost of kidney disease and also improve the outcomes of patients with kidney disease by moving towards transplantation options and home dialysis options as a better way to improve outcomes and for cost Medicare bears the brunt a lot of the cost of the kidney disease condition and population. as we go back a step getting care early in the course of kidney disease is essential. it has the opportunity to identify the cause of the kidney disease which many times can be diabetes and or high blood pressure as well as to slow down to slow down the progression of that kidney disease thereby preventing the complication of needing dialysis we understand in health care that prevention is so important prevention from a standpoint of what we can do as people for our own health in terms of exercise in terms of diet in terms of not smoking take a minute here to talk about smoking we understand through many out and news outlets that the risk of smoking and lung cancer smoking does something else which I think is a little bit more subtle and I want to talk with.

kidney disease Medicare three weeks
"dialysis" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"dialysis" Discussed on KCRW

"Dialysis also the payment incentives as they are now really fever doing dialysis in in center dialysis facilities also education for patience is still evolving for them to learn about home dialysis how do you do home dialysis basically what your kidneys do is to on a regular you know twenty four seven basis clean the body of fluid and and waste and that's basically what you're you're an **** and so when you're doing home dialysis you have machines that are actually doing this for you so you're connecting to this machine at its removing fluid and waste from the body just as your kidneys would do and this and this works overseas this works incredibly well countries Guatemala Mexico Hong Kong have the majority of their patients using some type of home dialysis I noticed some medical sources this week in response to the president's plan said look what we have is working now why in danger that the question is who is it working for it was working for the patients and we have a resounding response from that and that that's what the case is then by all means we should reconsider and and look at things very closely but that's not what research has shown and that's not what my experience has been in and many others in terms of caring for these patients it's quite a burden to do things the way that they have been doing which is most of the patients going to dialysis are receiving their dialysis in a facility the administration wants to double the number of kidneys available for transplant how do you do that part of what he was describing was incentivizing donors paying them for lost wages and childcare that they may have to use after doing the surgery I think a lot of the time there's a focus on the recipient because they have this chronic disease and they're getting a fresh new kidney and and great for them but I recently had an experience were I spoke to a altruistic donor so a person who just decided to donate a kidney out of the goodness of their heart and she really remarks you know tearfully how difficult the post operative period wise and how she really wasn't prepared for how long she would be out of work and you know how difficult that was and so I think actually educating donors in providing these ascent incentives will really make a difference do you think the executive order signed this week is going to has the hope of improving life for kidney patients in a couple of years absolutely this this was of a phenomenal kind of monumental time for the field of mythology and for patients with kidney disease if the goal is to have eighty percent of patients with end stage kidney disease to be on a home dialysis modality or to receive a transplant that's a really big change and so we know that quality of life will be it will improve our patients will have kind of more choices in terms of what is best for them it's really an exciting time Dr amok in nine yeah NFL adjust with Penn medicine university of Pennsylvania thanks so much for being with us thank you so much a moment now to remember a woman with a truly remarkable voice died in New York hospital on July seventeenth nineteen fifty nine one just forty four years old when your heart liver failed after years of drug and alcohol thousands of people went to her funeral two years ago we sent in pairs Elizabeth Blair to visit her grave at Saint Raymond.

forty four years eighty percent two years
"dialysis" Discussed on The Moth

The Moth

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"dialysis" Discussed on The Moth

"Sentence I need to spend as much to enjoy my mother, as much as I can because she doesn't have much time left to I want to enjoy my mother because I love her. And so once we driver to dialysis, and that doesn't sound like much fun and in some ways, it's, it's not. But the great thing about it is that I get to have all these hours to talk with her, and it's just made it so clear to me and reminded me that the thing that I think, is so amazing about my mother aside from all the other things is that she is the kind of person that you cannot you cannot sit down next to her without telling her everything that's in your heart. You see people at a party in mama sit down, and they'll say hi, I'm about to get a divorce. It's like they can't mom just this. Okay. And the other day I went over, there was a snowstorm and I was I spent the night at mom's house, and which is the house, rope in and my son, my husband took the kids home. So I'm there with my mom and my dad and we're in the stove room, which my dad put together in the seventies, and my mom's in her blue chair that she likes to sit in, and I'm on the couch dad's a rocker and mom, and I start talking dead goes to sleep and. We started talking. I was telling her about how, you know, I just I see all these other mothers who are so good with their kids, you know, they're so patient and soft, and she said, you're a great mother. It's just you have your talents are different special. Got us to talking about marriage and raising boys and then that got us into fixing up old houses and men. We got on our favorite topic, which is psychological disorders, and who has them, we can talk about for our. And then it was two in the morning. And I go mom, I gotta go to bed like I have to drive you to dialysis tomorrow. So I go to bed and the next day driving. And I say to mom, I can't believe how late we stayed up last night. Mom goes, I know I feel like a schoolgirl. I felt like I was in college and I said, I know that's how I felt too. And it, it made me think all that time, I was worrying about her what I meant was don't die. I don't want you to die because if you die who will be the person that I will just be able to sit down next to and say, whatever, in my heart do that. Don't go stay as long as you can. And I didn't say that. I said, why don't you try water aerobics? Which is not the same thing. So. But I can see it now. When you go, I will miss you so much. But you're here and I see your brightness, and it's so beautiful it lights up the room. That was a very Rebecca is an artist creative coach and the author of two books recipes for beautiful life and later at the bar, she's currently working on illustrated novel in stories for children based on a letter subscription service. She created called Veronica cat as of this recording thrilled report. Differ, mother is still alive and in good spirits Rebecca tells us that she still drives her mom today Alice's once a week, and it's completely transformed their relationship. She writes, we've gotten to know each other much better as women the other day, I was dropping off at the house. I grew up in and I realized the mom, and I are friends it felt like a small slash big bag. -nificant gift. A man raised by a mother, who doesn't believe in cuddling babies figure out what kind of father. He wants to be that's next on the moth radio. Hour. radio hour is produced by Atlantic public media in woods hole. Massachusetts and presented by the public radio exchange PR x dot org. This is the moth radio hour from PR ex I'm Kathryn burns in this hour. We're hearing stories about how our families can influence the way we see the world. Our final story was told on stage of the beautiful majestic, either during the scamming Tony book festival..

dialysis Rebecca Alice water aerobics Massachusetts woods hole Kathryn burns
"dialysis" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"dialysis" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Lines above Bellevue. And there was no other cars on I five at all. I mean behind me or in front of me, which was very very odd. Anyway, I get to get to the kidney dialysis center. And I I I'm watching these black lines crisscrossed lines. Spread out and fall towards the ground as the as the might is also coming up, brighter, and it's eliminating these lines. And as I get to the kidney dialysis center downtown Bellevue. The. Those the lines were then gray, but spread all the way out. You know, when I got out of the bus they missed. Dark gray mist covered my windshield. And as I got out I felt the the mist on my face. Okay. And then I took the gentleman into the today Dallas center, and I came back out at my best and and going towards my next client. I got down about a block and a half from from the freeway, and.

kidney dialysis center Bellevue Dallas center gray
"dialysis" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"dialysis" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Four. Yeah. Buses for the disabled, and I was picking up client very early in the morning to take him to kidney dialysis in in Bellevue. Wa. And I hate I got the gentleman on board, then a wheelchair. I mean, not a wheelchair. But a yeah. Yeah wheelchair. That's what it was. And anyway, it was as I was driving from woodinville to Bellevue, I could see in the sky high up in the sky the sun was. Was lightning. This guy way up high. You know, the Scott stars were fading out. And but you could see sixteen black crisscrossed lines above Bellevue. And there was. No other cars on I five at all. I mean behind me or in front of me, which was very very odd. Anyway, I get to get to the kidney dialysis center. And I I I'm watching these black lines crisscrossed lines spread out and fall towards the ground as the as the might is also coming up, brighter, and it's eliminating these lines. And as I get to the kidney dialysis center downtown Bellevue. The the those the lines were then gray, but spread all the way out. You know when I got out of the bus. They missed. Dark gray mist covered my windshield. And as I got I felt the the mist on my face. Okay. And then I took the gentleman.

Bellevue kidney dialysis center Wa woodinville gray Scott
"dialysis" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"dialysis" Discussed on WLAC

"Morning to take him to kidney dialysis and would in Bellevue. Why? And. I I got the gentleman on board is in a wheelchair. I mean, not a wheelchair. But a yeah wheelchair. That's what it was. And anyway, it was as I was driving from woodinville to Bellevue. I could see in the sky high up in the sky. The sun was was lightning. This guy way up high. You know, the Scott stars were fading out. And bet you could see sixteen black crisscrossed lines about Bellevue. And there was no other cars on I five at all coming behind me or in front of me, which was very very odd. Anyway, I get to get to the kidney dialysis center. And I I I'm watching these black lines crisscrossed lines spread out and fall towards the ground as the as the might is also coming up, brighter, and it's a luminated these lines and as I get to to the kidney dialysis center downtown Bellevue. The. The those the back. Lines were then gray, but spread all the way out. You know, when I got out of the bus they missed. Dark.

Bellevue kidney dialysis center woodinville gray Scott
"dialysis" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"dialysis" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Democrat Elaine Loria for congress, Elaine is a former navy commander bomb and small business owner governor north of and I are both supporting Elaine Loria because she's the partner we need in congress to help create jobs, improve our schools and protect our civil rights vote for democrat, Elaine Loria for congress. I'm Elaine Laurie and I approve this message. Yourself. Now back to profiles on the voice of Saint Louis. Wax. I saw the flyer on Facebook. It's like pastel colors beautiful flyer and a picture of a face that I have known for two decades, and it said on on Facebook still there Charlotte Otley needs a kidney donor, please pass this on hashtag kidney for Charlotte STL, and there's an eight hundred number one eight hundred six three three nine nine zero six extension for I called the number yesterday. And Charlotte is with us on kmox profiles, she has kidney failure. And you know, some some real questions here. What happens? How how soon do you need a kidney yesterday? Well, you know, what I'm humble when I say, I know that there are people much worse. But I need a kidney. Now before I get even more worse because you're not on dialysis on dialysis much to some doctors chagrin because they thought you'd be on dialysis and I should be. But I'm not at that.

Elaine Loria Elaine Laurie Elaine Facebook congress Charlotte Otley Charlotte STL Charlotte business owner Saint Louis two decades
"dialysis" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"dialysis" Discussed on Here & Now

"He is the director of market development for the dialysis company for sunniest medical care the company runs and supplies dialysis clinics all over the world including the one in st thomas fresenius recently finish construction on a brand new clinic just outside miami and was about to start the certification process on average it'll take about ninety days after we notify him that we're ready but with eighty nine new patients on their way to miami government regulators work to get the clinic operational in under a week relocating dialysis patients in an emergency is a race against the clock mr poignant's with the artificial kidney can quickly 'cause fluid buildups an organ damage several south florida counties include dialysis representatives in their emergency response coalitions but not all of them deal in many ways the hurricane response for dialysis patients has been driven by dialysis providers it's a big logistical chessboard kenny gardner is a regional vicepresident with the debris dialysis company it only goal is to try to do as many treatments is possible that we're going to be safe pre storm gardner says patients across florida who evacuated were sent to clinics elsewhere and the company hired fuel tankers to fill generators for its facilities and employees did vida operates a clinic in key west it's the only outpatient dialysis center in the keys after hurricane erma the clinic closed for about a week it wasn't damaged in gardner says the clinic was prepared to operate on generator power problem was it couldn't reopen until it had a steady supply of clean water dialysis is a procedure that relies on us moses between a person's blood and carefully titrate it electrolyte fluids so that water the fact that it's a big part of that component in our acting their blood become supercritical the keys dialysis clinic has since reopened in miami alvin joseph says he's especially grateful to the volunteers who heard about the dialysis patients from st thomas and brought west indian food.

medical care kenny gardner florida vida alvin joseph st thomas director of market development st thomas fresenius miami ninety days
"dialysis" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"dialysis" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The people of puerto rico drastically need help you have a people that are in buildings and they're sort of becoming caged in their own buildings all people retired people i just don't have any 'electricity taken thirty seven people out in the last two days from retirement some of them have been left to die they have no dialysis or nothing of the sort the white house is giving chief of staff john kelly authority to sign off on government travel on government owned rented liestore chartered aircraft correspondent jeff zeleny reports the change comes after tom price resigned as health secretary over his costly travel the president is making an example of tom price here in fact he told us earlier when he was a leaving the the a white house that are there would be no more a private of flights at all he added a caveat he said if you can afford your own plane then that's fine the superintent into the air force academy preparatory school did not suppresses anger over racist slurs left on the message boards of five black candidates lieutenant general j silvia let it be known that such behaviour will not be tolerated if you can't teach someone from another gender whether that's a man or woman with dignity and respect then you need to get out if you demeaned someone in any way then you need to get out president trump talked up his new tax cut plan at the national association of manufacturers explaining an overseas tax will be implemented with the new plan we will impose a one time low tax or money currently parked dover shoes so it can be brought back home to america where it belongs the us has warned americans to stay away from cuba in his ordered more than half the us diplomatic poor to come home over those mysterious acoustic attacks i'm barbara kusak we're clearing out summer inventory of a yellow ted clearancesale at lumber liquidators take twenty bersanov would.

jeff zeleny tom price secretary president trump us cuba barbara kusak ted clearancesale puerto rico chief of staff john kelly air force academy lieutenant general dover america two days
"dialysis" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"dialysis" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"Harvey has strained the healthcare system in houston as well aside from attending to the injured there are also lifesaving treatments needed by patients with chronic diseases one of those is dialysis to make a weatherspoon from houston public media visited the devito medical center dialysis facility and filled me in a little while ago to make a thank you for being with us first off just give us an idea of how many people were talking about here well when we arrived they were operates at at least one hundred people in the clinic when i was talking to some of the volunteers sat there they were saying 1800s hundreds who had come in during the storm they were only closed for one day in that's just because sunday was horrific for anybody trying to travel but other than that they've been open and they've been seeing patients and getting quite a bit of overflown try to give us an idea of how serious this problem is to be if someone mrs a dialysis appointment that's a big deal isn't it two huge steel honestly if you miss an appointment his these treatments of regular and scheduled for reason it's deadly it's potentially deadly as potentially fatal if you don't receive these treatments dialysis itself is to clean out the blood so a certain types of liver and kidney diseases their unable to do that so it's it's really critical that they're able to get these treatments i talk to a doctor dr alexandra at this at the clinic and he was just telling me how his staff is working nonstop pretty much to administer these treatments to all of these people.

Harvey healthcare system houston devito medical center one day