35 Burst results for "Diagnosis"

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | 3 d ago

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

VA Greg Aaron Perkins Navy Greg Colton Will Simmons Gregg Golden Simmons Law Simmons Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | 3 d ago

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

VA Greg Aaron Perkins Navy Greg Colton Will Simmons Gregg Golden Simmons Law Simmons Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
Covid long-haulers turn to Seattle rehab clinic

KUOW Newsroom

04:53 min | Last week

Covid long-haulers turn to Seattle rehab clinic

"The corona virus arrived in the seattle area about a year ago. Some who got cova early on are still suffering. The people who still feel the effects of the disease months after their initial diagnosis are called long. Haulers reporter eilly show. Neil has more now on wear long haulers in the seattle area are turning to for care. Donna lawson is forty seven years old. I met her in the backyard of the house. She shares with her husband and teenage daughter in west seattle. I'm a designer artist. In a mother lawson got code back in march at the very beginning of the pandemic at first it seemed to be a mild case. But then things got worse in. May she was hospitalized for three days with low blood oxygen and when she got home she didn't get better. My legs feel like jello. All the time very very weak on really bad days and bad times. I'm trudging through. Concrete is what it feels like or like their cinderblocks literally on my feet or magnets pulling me to the ground. los and says she can't concentrate a remember things. She's tired all the time and no longer has the energy to make art or volunteer at her daughter's school. She says on a good day she's eighty percent of her old self for a few hours other days. She can't get out of bed. That gets me really choked up. Who knows if. I'll be myself again. I'm usually a pretty confident person. I really love helping people. And i love spreading joy. It's really hard to do that when you don't feel joy about ten percent of people who get covid still have at least one symptom two months after their diagnosis more women than men suffer from. What's being called locking cova. They have a broad range of symptoms from shortness of breath to trouble sleeping or concentrating to depression or anxiety. Lawson was never able to get a cova test because there weren't many available at the beginning of the pandemic so she says throughout her illness. Some doctors haven't believed that her symptoms are due to long cove. It when you have medical professionals poo poo what you're saying you can't help but wonder if you're crazy person. If the reason lawson and other long haulers have struggled to find care is that doctors don't fully understand long cove it yet when they run standard tests on long haulers most results come back negative exact mechanisms yet some of the basic science still pending and that will be helpful for guiding treatments. Aaron bananas a rehab physician at the university of washington's harborview medical center. He says researchers are still trying to figure out exactly what causes long cova loose suspicion that this may be a more of an immunologic response in patients or some of the micro-vascular pox insults that are occurring. Maybe causing some of the brain fog and other words long hunters immune systems could still be an overdrive or maybe their brains are still suffering from being deprived of oxygen pandemic worked with covid patients after they were released from the icu. But over time it became clear. It's not just the patients that have been hospitalized in who are very sick that are having long term symptoms and we're seeing this even in patients who may have been sick at home but now three months later are still struggling. That's why been now started a clinic. At harborview specifically serves cova. Long haulers. It's one of many such clinics that are popping up across the country to clinic. I if you want clinic part. Medical office part gym with treadmills parallel bars and other equipment to help patients build back strength and the ability to walk but now seems to know everyone here here he is. I've been good. How are you handsome every day. Now and his team are experts in rehab medicine. They help patients with their recovery and coordinate their complex care but now says his goal is to help his patients get back to whatever they were doing before they got sick. Got a law in our critical illness. Survivors that yeah. Their their heart is still beating and their breathing but everything that they valued and was meaningful in their life is now lost so i think our hope is that just wanna make sure were addressing getting or covert patients as much life as boston so far. This is the only clinic like this in the region. So it serves patients from oregon alaskan idaho as well as washington but now says at first. There was only a trickle of patients. But now the clinic gets forty new patients every week.

Seattle Cova Donna Lawson Lawson Aaron Bananas Vascular Pox Neil Harborview Medical Center LOS University Of Washington Anxiety Depression ICU Harborview Medical Office Boston Alaskan
Managing care During COVID

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

04:37 min | Last week

Managing care During COVID

"What's an average day like for you. Caretaking on a typical day to feel like you have things under control while. I'm going to answer the second question i do. I have things under control. Never never ever ever. It's like. I'm on this constant roller coaster of ups and downs Just one. I think i've got it under control. The rug gets pulled out from underneath me. So what is an average day like my kids are early birds and for the record i hard roll my eyes that anyone who says their kids are early birds and then proceeds to tell me that they're little angels wake up at seven. Am shut up. try waking up every single day at five. Am for six years to just energetic screaming. Demanding kids. I don't know why i was blessed with early birds but here it's not as if the universe looks at us. Ms like a handful. Move onto somebody else quite often the terrible things. Just keep happening. They just keep piling up and for so many of us were not just caregiving in a traditional sense. Were caring for the people in our lives. In different ways. We are blurring the lines of our relationships between being caregiver and being a mother being a daughter being a sister being a wife being husband. I don't know. I said all all female roles except that i mean we got a lot of women's voices in here. I am a caregiver to my son. Boden he is eight years old and has acute lymphoblastic leukemia. I think one of the interesting things about being a caregiver to your own son or child is it's hard to distinguish what is just being a mom from what is being a caretaker. I ended up spending a lot of thought cycles and kind of emotional energy taking of him in a way. That is different than the way i take care of my other children. I then have to work through and process. The guilt of that discrepancy knowing both that biden has kind of different story or a different journey than the other kids that i have. But also that i'm all of their moms and so how do you kind of identified the difference between where caregiving stops and where mothering takes back up. When i was reading through your questions when you said caregiver like Or what is a normal day of caregiving. Look like. I kind of laughed. Because i thought man i think from the moment i opened my eyes to the moment i closed them giving Once pediatric cancer is kind of rock. Your world. I'm not sure there's really a space outside of it. I'm thinking about things. Like why is he not hungry for breakfast. Why is he craving meat. Why does he not wear a jacket. Is it because of a side effect of chemotherapy. Why is he sitting on the outside. When i pick them up from school wise. He's sitting on the outside of the soccer game Is it because his legs hurt is it because of the neuropathy whenever he has trouble with his homework is at a side effect from the chemotherapy. Is it affecting his cognitive function. Is it just him. Being eight I think when your role as a caregiver is so interwoven with your role as another relation like for me. His mother is just hard to kind of tease out. What part is caregiving. And what part is just living with a person with cancer so the average day for me really changed a lot during the various stages of my mom's illness she had end stage breast cancer and in the beginning when the cancer i came back it caused a lot of fluid to build up around her lung and then her lungs to collapse so at that point. We really didn't know that it was her cancer that was back and we were dealing with a medical emergency so my mom had to undergo invasive tests and surgery and there were just days with a lot of uncertainty about the diagnosis and the prognosis. And i was travelling back and forth from durham to charlotte while also taking care of my own family Here in durham and and working fulltime

Lymphoblastic Leukemia Pediatric Cancer Boden Biden Cancer Soccer Breast Cancer Durham Charlotte
Writing About Illness Without Platitudes

The Book Review

05:03 min | 2 weeks ago

Writing About Illness Without Platitudes

"Silica. Juha joins us now from rural new jersey. Her first book is called between two kingdoms. A memoir of a life interrupted salako. Thanks for being here. Thanks so much for having me camera. So this book came out originally. I believe from a blog that you did for the new york times. Called life interrupted key. Start with how that blogger came about and what it was about through. I received a diagnosis of leukemia. Was twenty two and in those early weeks of being in the hospital and going q. I had all kinds of grand ambitions about whatever's going to do with the strange time on bedrest. I had packed a suitcase. Full of books including were and peace was on my bedside table but you know as the treatment can and and the side effects started to set an i had so little energy i never read a single one of those books and a kind of despair began to sink in as i realized that my life had bifurcated the resist before a diagnosis. This after and i really struggled to figure out what i could possibly do from the confines of a hospital room and so i returned to something. I've always leaned on in difficult times. Just keeping a journal. And i wrote every day. I had made this commitment to myself. An didn't matter how good the quality of the writing was or how long it was sometimes over a couple of sentences. Sometimes just a word occasional rain the f. word but i think i was trying to make sense of the circumstances i'd found myself an and over the course of keeping that journal turned a kind of reporters notebook. I'd had aspirations of becoming a foreign correspondent the for my diagnosis and blah. I couldn't travel or interview. Anyone really leave my hospital room bubble. I began to report from the frontlines of my hospital bed on a very different kind of conflict zone and that journal and became the source material for the life. Intrepid calm and i was interested not just in kind of excavating the experience of us but thinking through the way in which age impacts how we experienced major relation tractions for you at the time. Of course it was the before diagnosis. And the after diagnosis. Obviously from this vantage you've been healthy for about six years. It feels more like a between period. Thus perhaps the title of your book between two kingdoms. This idea of interruption was hopeful one. I had this belief that i needed to endure the treatments than once i was well i get to return to my life into the person that i'd been that that didn't happen. I very quickly realized. After nearly four years and treatment that i couldn't return to the person. I'd ben bc before cancer and that in fact the hard work of killing did not end with the cure. It was really where healing began. And i found myself in this strange of in between place. The title of my memoir between two kingdoms is a reference to the berlin susan song tag. Who wrote about how we all have dual citizenship and the kingdom of the sick and then Bell but even though i wasn't sick on paper anymore i felt as far as i possibly could her from being the healthy happy twenty seven year old woman that i had hoped to end the other side of this. And so you know. The book is an examination of this year's of and the impact that it had not just on me but on my family my entire community but really it's about aftermaths and why we do when our life is ended and we have to learn how to love again. Describe a little bit what you mean by the difference between moving on and moving forward so when i finished treatment i has a solution that i needed to move on from illness and i very quickly realized that moving on is the kind of meth and as much as i tried to do. Just it wasn't possible. And so i really needed to learn how to move forward with my illness and its imprint on my life on my body on my mind and to carry thought wreckage with me as i try to find my way forward.

Juha Joins Salako Leukemia The New York Times New Jersey Susan Song Berlin Cancer Bell
Former Sen. Bob Dole and Republican elder statesman, 97, announces he has advanced lung cancer

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 2 weeks ago

Former Sen. Bob Dole and Republican elder statesman, 97, announces he has advanced lung cancer

"Bearer is now facing a cancer diagnosis were long term Kansas Senator Bob Dole has announced he has stage four lung cancer that 97 Year old says he will begin treatment within a week. Dole was the Republican presidential nominee in 1996 when he lost to incumbent President Bill Clinton. Dole, who was badly hurt Did World War two was President Gerald Ford's vice presidential running mate in 1976 when Ford lost to Democrat Jimmy Carter Jim Krystle, a

Senator Bob Dole Dole Lung Cancer Kansas Cancer President Gerald Ford Bill Clinton Ford Jimmy Carter Jim Krystle
Could This Simple Hack Reduce Anxiety and Panic Attacks? with Dr. Kristen Allott

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

06:16 min | 2 weeks ago

Could This Simple Hack Reduce Anxiety and Panic Attacks? with Dr. Kristen Allott

"Dr analogy welcome to the broken brain podcast. It's an honor and a privilege to have you here. Thank you so much drew. I am so excited for this conversation. I think it'll be just fine Back and forth to share information. Yeah i love what. You're bringing to the world in this topic of anxiety and i think that we zoom out in the context of the current world even prior to cove nineteen pandemic anxiety. You could see that. The instances and usage of the word in just general language newspaper social media is skyrocketing and you know languages so powerful and sometimes we really have to parse apart a word to really understand like what do we really mean when we're saying that because sometimes we say anxiety and we actually could be meaning something else when you talk about this world of anxiety and your new book which we're going to get into in a little bit. What do you really want people to help understand. What exactly is anxiety. Yeah so i think that's a great question. And i will just tell you how i approach that When i started in practice about fifteen years ago Because i'm a naturopathic physician acupuncturist decided to specialize in mental health. And people were coming in. And saying i'm anxious and and i just didn't think it was like so. How does that apply. Physiology was really the question that i was interested in and because some for some people it's stress for some people. It's i'm afraid to move forward and take a step forward for some people. It's a i'm overwhelmed like there's all sorts you know. It's a catch word as you say. And but there's also a curious about what the physiology of depression or anxiety or whatever these words were saying. And and so i. When i started in practice i literally in my on my living room floor. I had stock physiology textbooks a stack of neurology. Textbooks and the dsm and the dsm is the diagnostic statistical manual. It just describes. What the diagnosis categories for anxiety are and i was just like will. I think it's more than just an emotion like a candy but like the people were coming in with panic. Attacks like that is not an emotion that is a full embodied experience right. And and so i started just parsing out like what are the. What are the fizzy. What physiology causes these physical symptoms of shaky and racing thoughts and your heart racine. And maybe you're sweating and and all those symptoms that you know sometimes it starts small and Escalates to really big asu started to parse that out and then was like well. Once once i started to understand the physiology in the neuro physiology will. Where do we. Where can we intervene to help. People feel better and so answering your questions kind of copying out. But it's like. That's that's the approach that i took because so many people were using words and i was like i want a grounded in something concrete. Absolutely i mean if we look at the history and evolution of just anxiety and a lot of mental health. A lot of these things in early medicine were considered to be They're kind of in your head right like nothing else is going on right. We made a documentary a few years ago. Which then led to the name of this podcast. Broken brain my business partner. Dear friend dr mark hyman. We made a documentary called broken brain and the underlying premise. That documentary was what you do to your body you do to your brain. Your brain is not in. This isolated eight oregon that just as floating on top of your head. That's completely disconnected than the rest of everything. That's going on there actually an intertwined system and we have to understand that yes there can be. Let's call for lack of a better term emotional factors that are there right. Stressor is the complete driver of so many different things that we feel but let's also look at the physiology of what's happening underneath so when it comes to that topic of anxiety and the physiology gonna ask you a question which is a question that i came across a few years ago in a book by peter thiel little bit of a controversial character. But i really love this question that he had inside of this book. I think the book is called zero to one and he said what truth do you believe is true that other people disagree with in that category. So when you look at right what do you believe is true when you think about anxiety and physiology that people maybe traditional western medicine will say like. I don't know if that's true. Yeah so The one truth. That i see time and time again is it is really hard to have a panic attack. If you just ate. And i don't see panic. Attacks occur unless people are five hours from food or more at or they may have eaten some really sugary substance to at two hours ago. But if you had a real meal. It is really hard to have a panic attack. That's powerful right. There and people like that is not true and and the same applies to suicidal Which is know just part of the spectrum of people keep doing doing panic attacks they can get there and and and and the reason for that is that are i mean i can go into the physiology but but people don't believe that until they start looking mental health professionals or physicians and then when they want start looking at the pattern it holds true. Now there's always an exception to the rule ways but it holds like ninety five percent true

Pandemic Anxiety Dr Mark Hyman Drew ASU Anxiety Depression Peter Thiel Oregon
Sloan-Kettering Spin-Out Harnesses AI to Diagnose Cancer

The Bio Report

05:09 min | 2 weeks ago

Sloan-Kettering Spin-Out Harnesses AI to Diagnose Cancer

"Leo thanks for joining us. Thank you so much for having me. We're gonna talk about page. It's ai base diagnostics. And how digital pathology has the potential to change out cancer. Patients are diagnosed. Perhaps we can start with the need. What problem is pains trying to address their few different problems. We're building a portfolio of products. And those problems. Really fall into three different buckets. One is to provide more information to pathologists during their their clinical workflow. That will help them ultimately have real time. Quality assurance provide the more information during their diagnostic process as well as ultimately help them with efficiency in throughput. The second need that we're helping address is with our our viewer in our digital pathology platform which is allowing them to access historical images to share uh slides easily to get consultations as well as to be able to reference other digital images and slides during the course of their work and then the last set of needs is really around trying to look for new biomarkers that can help doctors on college costs ensure that the patients get the right treatment every time. And how are these tests generally perform today. How does pages technology change that. So in a clinical pathology setting What happens today is a pathologist or piece of tissue is taken out of a patient from a biopsy or surgery that tissue gets cut stained mounted on a glass slide. And then the pathologist is handed a set of slides to look at that patient at thaad will look at that slide and they may see something that they're not sure what it is. It may be a little unusual. They may ask a colleague. They may send it out for consultation. They may do an additional stain or send it off for some molecular testing ultimately. They're going to get all of that information back and they're going to have to make a call for that patient. What the right. Diagnosis is in a page world. That slide is not looked at under a microscope. Scanned and the pathologist is looking at a computer monitor and pages gone through those slides and matched each slide. The tissue content in that slide those patterns with a database of known tissue and diagnostics. And that information is made available to the pathologist during the course of their their clinical treatment so that they have this additional information available to them automatically forever case having to go through and take those other steps of consultation and sending cases out in additional testing in staining. They'll have that information at their fingertips so that they can get to that right. Decision faster and more standardized more confidently are slice prepared for a page test as they would be for a traditional test today yes exactly the same way in fact there's no additional Staining no additional preparation that's needed. The only piece of additional equipment is the side scattered south and is the digital. Ai system visually reading an image and is doing so in a way that's unique to the machinery somehow mimicking. What a pathologist is looking for. I think the best way to think about how. Ai works is. It's looking for patterns in data in this case patterns and tissue and so that machine is identifying these patterns matching those against database of of known patterns That have been either diagnosed by other sts or that have been results of additional testing like molecular tests or something like that to really match those patterns and then highlight that information to the pathologist during the course of their their diagnostic process as we think about going forward in that biomarker direction that i mentioned and that case These are patterns at just may not know about may not be aware about may not really be visible to the naked eye and yet the computer is able to sift through thousands ten two thousand hundred thousand millions of images and identify patterns that are signatures for treatment responses or other

LEO Cancer
Rush Limbaugh, conservative radio host, dies at 70

The Adam Carolla Show

00:35 sec | 2 weeks ago

Rush Limbaugh, conservative radio host, dies at 70

"Conservative radio personality rush. Limbaugh has died one year after announcing his lung. Cancer diagnosis who was seventy Limbaugh had been hosting the rush limbaugh show in syndication for more than thirty years. Who's republican party icon. A close ally of former president donald trump. He was awarded the medal of freedom during the state of the union address. Last year he was diagnosed with lung cancer in january. He shared last january. He shared his cancer diagnosis in february in an october. He announced that the cancer is

Limbaugh Cancer Republican Party Donald Trump Lung Cancer
Conservative radio personality Rush Limbaugh has died at age 70

Russell & Hunter

01:55 min | 2 weeks ago

Conservative radio personality Rush Limbaugh has died at age 70

"A one year battle with stage four lung cancer, he fought to the very end he broadcast until the very end and someone who Has spent time in several stations with Rush Limbaugh is our program director Aaron Tremor. I'm glad to have you here because your insight has been helping us through this entire day. Yeah, It's a, uh It's a strange day. Right? Um, you know, we've been talking about how do we do it? And we're all a little sad and and, you know, trying to be maintained an upbeat message, right? I mean, we we knew this day was coming. You know, Russia announced that he had stage four lung cancer. That is not something you typically recover from. You know, And every day we came in, and he was on the air in this past year. It was a blessing to us. And, you know, I've heard you guys mention it that the fact that he got that diagnosis and the Stresses that he had to go through to do a show for hundreds of millions of Americans every day fighting a terminal disease that was he even admitted a couple of times was kicking his ass. You know that he couldn't you know it was it was taking every ounce of energy. To do a show when he had the money had the prestige had the had earned the right to go out whenever he wanted to The fact that he fought through that for a year. It's like heartwarming and you know, I never met Rush. You know, blood in over two decades career listen to him almost every day of the week for over two decades in a professional environment, I felt like I lost the best friend Today. It was a gut punch when, like everybody else and just so well inside, right? We didn't know

Aaron Tremor Lung Cancer Rush Limbaugh Russia Rush
Rush Limbaugh, the incendiary radio talk show host, dies at age 70

Lewis and Logan

01:35 min | 2 weeks ago

Rush Limbaugh, the incendiary radio talk show host, dies at age 70

"Radio host Rush Limbaugh has died after battling lung cancer. His wife, Catherine, made the announcement on his show This morning. Last month, a seven year old announced that his cancer was terminal. But the upshot Is that I have been diagnosed with advanced lung cancer. Diagnosis confirmed by two medical institutions Back on January. 20th Limbaugh, a longtime cigar aficionado, is widely considered one of the most influential media members of the past 50 years and from 1993 to 2019 had a show right here on K O in his radio and most recently on our sister station Freedom 93.7. Long time Denver K Way host microbes and talked about Russia's influence on his career. There's some things that I picked up from him that I was able to use that fit my style and Russia was part of the same allegiance. Morning, Missouri in 1951 Limbaugh got his first radio gig at age 16, and he's grown into the most listened to radio show and the U. S. Limbaugh side of $400 Million.8 Year contract in 2008 on February 4th 2020 the day after he first announced the advanced Lung cancer limbo, was a guest of President Donald Trump of the 2020 State of Union address. Or he was presented with the presidential Medal of Freedom in recognition of all that you have done for our nation, the millions of people a day that you speak to and that you inspire and all of the incredible work that you have done for charity. Rush promised to stay on the air for as long as he could, and has been absent for almost two weeks again. Rush Limbaugh guys today at the age of 70. Advanced lung cancer.

Lung Cancer Limbaugh Rush Limbaugh U. S. Limbaugh Russia Catherine President Donald Trump Cancer Denver State Of Union Missouri Rush
Rush Limbaugh dies at 70 after battle with lung cancer

Dennis Prager

00:22 sec | 2 weeks ago

Rush Limbaugh dies at 70 after battle with lung cancer

"Radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh has died at the age of 70. His wife, Catherine, Limbo, announced his death at the beginning of his show Today, Rush Limbaugh announced his diagnosis of stage four lung cancer cancer a a a little little little little over over over over a a a a year year year year ago. ago. ago. ago. He He He He turned turned turned turned 70 70 70 70 in in in in January January January January in in in in his his his his final final final final show show show show in in in in 2020 2020 2020 2020 Limbaugh Limbaugh Limbaugh Limbaugh said said said said he he he he didn't didn't didn't didn't expect expect expect expect to to to to live live live live so so so so long long long long following following following following his his his his great great great great diagnosis.

Rush Limbaugh Lung Cancer Cancer Limbaugh Limbaugh Limbo Catherine
Extraordinary Boston Patient Offers Surprising Clues To Origins Of Coronavirus Variants

Consider This from NPR

03:54 min | 2 weeks ago

Extraordinary Boston Patient Offers Surprising Clues To Origins Of Coronavirus Variants

"Are trying to learn more about corona virus burien by studying the case of one extraordinary covid. Nineteen patient and this patient was a forty five year old man who admitted to a boston hospital last spring doctors at brigham and women's hospital treated him he got better and he was discharged but his infection never went away. This is a of an extraordinary individual who was readmitted over the subsequent five months for recurrence of his covid infection and severe pneumonia. Dr jonathan lee. One of the doctors who treated the man says he was not a so-called long. Hauler a person who clears their covert infection but has lingering after-effects sometimes for bunce. This man says had living growing virus in his body for one hundred and fifty four days. That is one of the remarkable aspects of this case and in fact he was highly infectious even five months after the initial diagnosis re spoke to npr science reporter. Mike lean duke left. Who picks up the story from here. These says the man's immune system wasn't working normally. He was taking any suppressive drugs for chronic illness. So his body couldn't fight off the virus very well but we also wondered if perhaps the virus was taking advantage of this unusual situation with so much time inside the man. The virus might have the unity to test out different versions of itself in find. More infectious versions. So lena's colleagues begin to examine the viruses genes. How shocked shocked because of virus was mutating very quickly inside the man's body these mutations allowed it to evade his immune system to escape detection by antibodies when i saw the virus and the viral sequence. I think i knew then that does that. We're dealing with completely different at a potentially important completely different because the virus had a whole collection of mutations not just one or two but more than twenty scientists had never seen this before during the whole pandemic. The in his team published the findings in the new england journal of medicine. The report didn't even make big news. That was november twenty twenty then about a month later a new corona virus variant causing international concern is. Npr's david greene reported. Scientists this past december detected new genetic variants of the virus one in the uk one in south africa and then later when in brazil guess what these variants have in common with the virus in the boston patient. A sudden collection of multiple mutations in a combination. That is worrisome. That's jeremy lubin he's a virologist at the university of massachusetts medical school he says these new variants look remarkably similar to the virus lee and his colleagues found in their patient. They the same but they share important characteristics. They both have about twenty mutations and they have ones that make the virus more contagious in so right now. Lubin says one hypothesis is that the new variants the one from the uk south africa and brazil arose inside. People like the boston patient people with these long term infections and who are immunocompromised because their immune system was not working and normally they could eliminate the virus and over time the first and acquired a collection of mutations that otherwise did not insieme. let's work in other words. The virus this long-term infection as a testing ground to try out different mutations in c which one's v the immune system become more infectious in eventually spread more easily around the world.

Brigham And Women's Hospital Dr Jonathan Lee Mike Lean Boston Pneumonia Chronic Illness NPR Lena Jeremy Lubin David Greene New England Journal Of Medicin Brazil South Africa University Of Massachusetts Me UK Lubin LEE
S6 E4 - How do I use my Post-9/11 GI Bill? - FULL

Courage to Fight Again

21:30 min | 2 weeks ago

S6 E4 - How do I use my Post-9/11 GI Bill? - FULL

"Welcome to we served now. What were we seek to answer. The questions. veterans and their families are all ready asking. Don't today show. I want to share three things with you. Just three and here they are. I won't answer the question. Hopefully definitively how do you use post nine eleven. Gi bill number two. I will share with you how to maximize post nine. Eleven bill benefits and finally. I will tell you how you can buy side eleven. Gi bill benefits with another amazing benefits. That you've earned the most notable programs if you're interested in hearing more about that which i have to assume you are stay tuned and you are going to hear every single bit. Stay with us. Who am i. Why am i still here. How can i uncover you. I was meant to be during my own transition from the. Us army the wounds of war especially those not visible continued to play. I walked through the pain of job loss of ptsd diagnosis often crippling anxiety by finally discovered the reason. I'm here to earth. And i knew i couldn't keep it to myself. So i wrote a book simply titled resolve resolve is a book that is apologetically faith-based a step by step guide designed for maximum effectiveness in the context of a small group of other veterans resolve provides veterans everywhere with the tool to help you step into your new life a life full hope purpose and vision for the future to pick up your copy of resolve head over to courage to fight again dot com. That's courage to fight again dot com so today's question surrounds the post nine eleven. Gi bill as no doubt. You've figured out by now and specifically how you use it but the truth is if that was the only question i answered on today's show who would be a very short episode now using the post nine eleven. Gi bill is really really easy now. Of course. I want you to listen to this entire episode and if you do i have a special gift just for you toward the end of the episode. But i'll tell you right upfront. Using the post nine eleven she i bill is probably the easiest thing you will ever do when it comes to taking advantage of the benefits you've earned through your military service now before we dive in. I want to share some of my method with you kind of how we came to put this episode together posted a question on the courage to fight again facebook page. I shared that question on several veteran focused facebook groups and we got more engagement with this single question than with anything we've ever posted and the question was just this is what has been your experience with a post. Nine eleven jabil. We got over eleven hundred comments and i've read almost every single one of them and around ninety nine percent of those responses. Give or take. They were very positive in nature. Talking about how easy it was to us how it was the best benefit you can take advantage of and how to get the most out of the post nine eleven gi bill and not only did those who responded answer that question but they answered so many more as well man here. I am rolling right into the episode. And i haven't even introduced myself yet so if you were here for the first time you may be like. Who is this guy. Talking about. The post nine eleven. Gi bill well. My name is aaron perkins. I'm us army. Combat veteran husband to a beautiful wife. Daddy to amazing kiddos. I'm the author of resolve a step by step guide. That takes you the veteran through the journey of rediscovering purpose. Meaning and passion in your life after you've left the military and as you've probably already guessed on the host of this podcast so let's dive right in at the top of the show. I promise you three things. Let's tackle the first one. How do i use my post nine. Eleven gi bill. Now i'm going to assume you're already eligible for the gi bill. So i'm not going to dive into that part. But i will post a link in the show notes about your eligibility and how you can determine your eligibility in case you need to dig into that a bit more but step one is apply for the benefits on the va website. And guess what. I'll post that link in the show notes as well. You need a few things when you apply. Here's what you need your social security number your military history and that just basic military history. You don't need your full your your details of where you're stationed in when you were stationed there and all of that. He just need basically the years you serve and the date service egypt education history of the schools. You've attended other degrees. You hold things like that and finally basic information about the school or trading facility that you want to attend because you don't have to attend just a traditional community college or university or state scored like that. You can attend a variety of training facilities. Let's say you wanted to become an h vac technician. There are schools or training facilities that you can learn how to do that if you want to become a cybersecurity expert while their schools training facilities we can do that so again just some basic information about the school or the training facility that you want to attend now. You can do this by mail. Apply by mail using the va form or obviously the most preferred way is to apply online. That's going to be the fastest takes about thirty days or so for the va to verify eligibility. And that's it for step one. Step two you're just going to reach out to the school. the understanding. here's that you've already been accepted or you're well on your way to being accepted to the school. So you contact the school and request to speak to the va rep and these are your best friends in the post nine eleven gi bill business. Now i know i've heard some mixed reviews about. Va reps But they do know the school and they know the va. So they're going to be able to share some things with you. Some indepth information that you're not gonna be able to find him the va website. You're not gonna find on the school's website you're going to have to talk to them directly and step three. Follow the directions of your. Va school rep number. Four step four. Get your education. It's really that easy now. Look with nearly all things. Va there are multiple paths to get to the same destination but those steps has share with you apply online. Contact the school link with your. Va rep. That really is the simplest and most direct route to taking. Hold of your post nine eleven. Gi bill benefits. So if i would have had just a single question for this episode. We'd already be done. But i promise you i would share with you and the next is really important and that is how to maximize your post nine eleven. Gi bill benefits now. There are a bunch of ways to do this. And i'll mention those in passing and you can do your own homework and figure out if those are something you want or need to explore. But i want to focus on just two ways to maximize your benefit so your options. As far as maximizing your benefit goes find a yellow ribbon. School is one option tuition assistance. Top up that's another program that the va has. You may be eligible for you may need to look into There's also the option of a stem scholarship science technology engineering or math. If you're majoring in any of those categories you may be eligible for scholarship. Veteran education courses aka vet tech also tutorial assistance if you're struggling with biology or chemistry or calculus or whatever may be and you need a tutor to get tutorial assistance with the. Va actually pay you to go to a tutor. She can pass that course now here the two i want to talk about all the ones i just mentioned are in this section of the website that talks about the posting. I love jabil bill. But all the ones i mentioned in this section are in a section called additional information very simple and one of those is finding yo a yellow ribbon school. Excuse me and the second is not mentioned in that additional information but it is getting that monthly housing allowance and again. I'm going to dive into that but let's talk about the yellow ribbons school here for just a minute. So the yellow ribbon program can help you pay for hire out of state private school or graduate school tuition. That the post nine eleven. Gi bill does not cover so tuition might be higher than what the gi bill will cover or you want to attend a school as a nonresident student. Non resident of that state in other words. Another thing this is more of a side note. Not yellow ribbon schools specific. Your state may also provide additional benefits for you as a veteran. And that is something you should look into with your state. Truth be told your. Va rep at your chosen. School should be able to answer that question for you or at the very least be able to point you in the right direction. All right so that is the yellow ribbon school piece. I wanted to talk about and the other piece. That's not listed in additional information. section is section one. Oh seven sounds very boring but it's very very important. And that is the location based housing allowance the location based housing allowance. Now you will get a housing allowance for using the post nine eleven gi bill and if you attend all online classes this rate that it is set at is half the national average of an e five with dependence for their basic allowance for housing. So that doesn't change unless the national average changes. I know when i was taking a few online courses. It was eight hundred dollars a month. I don't remember the exact number but we're the location based housing allowance. Really comes into play is when you were attending in person classes. Now i want to set the record straight here then. There's this common misconception that your housing allowance rate is based on where you live. This is not the case. Your housing allowance is based on the zip code of where you're attending classes. I'm going to say that again. Your housing allowance is based on the zip code of where you are attending classes. Let me just share a little story from my own experience. I decided to take some undergraduate courses my undergraduate degree before went into the army. But i wanted to just take advantage of the post nine. Eleven she i built a little bit wasn't ready to work on my master's degree or anything so i was like you know what. Maybe i'll just take some courses. I know i have to take at least one of those in person. So i can get that in person Housing allowance right that location based housing loans. Well right up. The road from probably ten minutes or less away was a campus of the school. I was wanting to attend. They had multiple campuses all over the city and the housing allowance. Right there was. I don't know eight nine hundred dollars. Something like that. But if i would drive an extra seven or eight minutes i could get the location. Based housing allowance ended up being like eleven. Eleven sixty seven. Ninety i don't remember now. It's been a few years but i was like. Hey i will totally drive a few extra minutes to get the extra couple hundred dollars or so a month because to three hundred dollars a month because that just makes more sense because i want to get the same education and going to get the same course the same credit for the course. Why not just drive a few extra minutes so again. The housing allowance is based on the zip code of where you were attending classes. And i just mentioned this but keep in mind. You only need to attend a single class in person. that's it you can take the rest of your classes online and still collect the housing allowance based on the zip code of where you attending that one class. Now let's talk about kovic for a minute though we're we're still in the midst of this pandemic. I don't wanna say the middle. Hopefully we're nearing the end of it. But cova has missed a lot of things up our way of life our jobs our relationships a lot of things and it has changed the way a lot of schools do business and that is i'll say inadvertently affecting those of us trying to use the post nine eleven. Gi bill and some schools. They're not even holding in person. Classes yet and and veterans are facing this never before seen challenge and in fact. This was one of the concerns. someone maybe more than one person brought up when i ask about experiences with the post nine eleven. Gi bill. so. I just mentioned that you get paid at half the national average of an e five with dependence if you attend school all align. Let's say that's eight hundred dollars but if you attend at least one class in person you'll receive your housing allowance based on zip code of the school year attending so again when i attended in person. Who's eleven dollars a month so it made sense to at least attend one school. Excuse me or one class in person and this is where co vid really comes into play some schools. Excuse me some schools or universities that were previously holding in person. Classes do not even have the option to register for in person classes. Now which means that. If he veteran was attending in person in receiving that in-person housing allowance rate that housing allowance rate has suddenly changed to the online rate. And i've done a good bit of research into this. I have not found anything in my research for my conversations with veterans or anything social media no way to really get around this so to speak. So if you found a way to continue receiving the in-person housing allowance rate while attending only online due to covid. I would love if you would share that with us by reaching out to me at podcast at courage to fight again dot com. So i can send it out to the rest of our listeners. Finally and i'm really running low on time here but i promise three things at the top of the show how to use your gi bill. We cover that outta to maximize your gi bill. We cover that and now how to combine your gi bill benefits with another benefit. You may or may not have heard of and that benefit is vocational rehabilitation or volk rehab as it's often called now technically its known as veteran readiness and employment or vr and e but no one actually calls it that or at least not yet. It just hasn't a katelyn voc rehab. Though in fact is probably a better benefit than the post nine eleven. Gi bill pays for literally everything. You need special equipment for your degree. Plan pays for that. You have to pay for parking at your school. Pays for that. You'd pay for books pays for that pays for pretty much everything and just about anything you do that has to do with getting your education and i'm saying this because i want to reiterate it vo korea will pay for that and so it does seem at least initially to be a better benefit than the post nine eleven gi bill. But here's where you can. Combine them nate. Because you can't use them both at once you can use either one or the other because if you use vocal rehab or any it will cut into the total time you can use your gi bill. So here's the hack if you will if you use all thirty days of your post nine eleven gi bill and then apply for your vote rehab benefit. Frankly i'd opt for a bit more. Forty five sixty days. Something like that just to be on the safe side. But thirty days minimum is what i found volk rehab or vr knee or whatever. You want to call. It goes through a different process than the post nine eleven. Gi bill but leveraging these two benefits together is really the best of both worlds. And here's why. I say that because let's say you use just about all of your post nine eleven gi bill to get your bachelor's degree in psychology. But you wanna be a licensed professional counselor. Will you need at least a master's degree for that and you've used almost all of your jive. Ill what are you gonna do. Well then you go to your local. Vr knee or volk rehab counselor and say. Hey here's what i need to do. And then you move into the vote rehab program now again. Your mileage may vary. Because i've heard again a lot of mixed stories mixed reviews of working with folk rehab counselor but that is your process and again i will post a link to these processes or actually there's a few links but all these processes and all these resources in the show with that we have reached the end of season six episode. So what are your questions voice memo on your phone and send it to podcast kurds. Fight again dot com. So what's on your mind. What questions are you asking. What are your family members asking or join the post. Nine eleven veterans families facebook group and post your question. There have block of questions but the most important question we can ask ourselves. Is this have. I accept the forgiveness of sins. That only comes through faith in jesus christ well. I'll see you right back here. Two weeks from the day and the next veteran questions we'll be asking is this. How do i increase my va. Disability rating ohio and for the special gift. I promised every thursday evening is hosting a sous vide for justice guys who are veterans. Sorry ladies you're coming soon. The training for that. We will be walking through the resolved journey. Together get your copy of resolve for thirty percent off using the code asked and just head over to courage fight again dot com and click on. Get the book and if you like to join the group on the lincoln the show notes to let me know. And i'll be in touch tone next time. Thanks for We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

Jabil VA Aaron Perkins Va School Facebook Us Army Kovic The Post Egypt Cova Army Volk Nate
How COVID-19 has forced cancer patients and medics to juggle deadly trade-off

UN News

03:12 min | 3 weeks ago

How COVID-19 has forced cancer patients and medics to juggle deadly trade-off

"Covid nineteen has affected cancer care in all countries rich and poor. Say what should the advice be to cancer patients who still need diagnosing treatment and potentially a coronavirus vaccine to to get some answers and to highlight how health authorities have been ensuring continuity of care. I've been speaking to dr andre bowie from the world health organizations department of noncommunicable diseases in geneva the impact of covid on cancer care profound because it has impacted all dimensions of cancer control from diagnosis to survivorship care and in that regard it has been a high impact and unfortunately very challenging time for the most vulnerable cancer patient seven this is worldwide as it in rich and poor countries. This impact in both high income countries and in some countries is that the case that health authorities have scaled back their cancer care after reports that covid nineteen outcomes are significantly worse among patients with cancer. Most governments are avoiding this concept of. Let's reduce cancer care because we know cancer is a time sensitive disease if we in fact delay cancer care either because of a government order or because of patient choice or because of the situation in team the consequences can be detrimental and for this reason. We've seen governments spun favorably to the extent that they are encouraging cancer patients to pursue care right. So let's put ourselves in a patient shoes a cancer patients shoes so they should carry on going to the hospital even though they might have heard somewhere that if they catch kobe they have a greater chance of being at risk. Is that right. That is the first starting point. As you rightly point out is the understanding bed. Some cancer patients are at higher risk for covid related disability or death if they can track the virus but because it has to do with immunosuppression the exact mechanism for which the viruses causing this increased risk of death for the cancer population. We are still trying to understand from disease perspective but one of the primary drivers is weakened immune system and the likelihood that the virus will take a greater hold spread more rapidly within the body and by extend to cause greater damage. That is the hypothesis but we are also trying to understand which cancer patients are at greatest risk is not all cancer. Patients are experiencing you potential harm of covid and cancer to the same extent. For example you've noted at some cancer patients that have what we call blood cancers or human to logic cancers are those that are experiencing grizz as compared to solid or the oregon based cancers like breast colorectal that may be lower risk but the exact likelihood that each cancer type incurs greater risk is something that again. We don't have a clear understanding because the data are still not well available for us to understand who is at greatest risk. The general message though is we know as a general group that cancer patients are experiencing greater disability and death from covid and because of this there is a tradeoff at many cancer. Patients are making sometimes in isolation but importantly in discussion with their healthcare provider. Understand what is it the right course of action for treatment.

Cancer Dr Andre Bowie World Health Organizations Dep Geneva Breast Colorectal Oregon
What Happened To Connie Converse

Unexplained Mysteries

05:33 min | 3 weeks ago

What Happened To Connie Converse

"In nineteen twenty four elizabeth eaton converse was born into a devoutly religious family being by the nineteen forties. She changed her name to connie and moved to new york city to pursue music. She spent her twenties writing folk songs and rebelling against her traditional after little came of her musical ambitions in new york. Connie moved to ann arbor michigan in nineteen sixty where she took an editorial position at an academic journal by the age of thirty six. Connie was struggling with her mental health in particular and affliction she referred to as her blue funk. This was made worse. When in the early seventies connie received two devastating pieces of news. She lost her job and her doctor told her she needed a hysterectomy. After turning fifty in august nineteen seventy four. Connie converse said goodbye to her brother and friends packed up volkswagen beetle and drove away. Officially she's never been seen or heard from again in her final instructions to her brother. Connie asked philip to pay her health insurance up until a certain date. She never explained. Why but philip worried that something terrible would happen. When that day passed searching for answers. Philip found a filing cabinet that belonged to connie in his antics inside. He found old journal entries poems notes and a farewell letter addressed to quote. Anyone who ever asks it read. So let me go please. And please accept my. Thanks for those happy times that each of you has given me over the years. And please know that i would have preferred to give you more than i ever did or could i am in everyone's debt. Philip did as connie requested. He let her go for thirty five years. Never knowing if she was alive or dead always hoping she'd return but from the moment she laughed. Philip and connie's closest friends feared the worst they own about connie's blue funk for quite some time though. Connie was never officially diagnosed with clinical depression. So far as we know in her farewell letter she wrote as an over educated peasant. I've read a good bit about middle-aged oppression and no several cases other than my own. According to establish psychiatric consensus those who suffer from major depressive disorders tend to lose interest in activities that previously brought them joy in connie's case when she moved to ann arbor. She stopped writing music. But even while living in new york connie's lyrics described feelings of isolation in her song called. Sorrow is my name. She wrote from the perspective of sadness is self sneaking in and out of people's minds in the bridge of the song sorrow kroons. And if you fear me i will come in haste and if you love me i will go away and if you scorn me i will lay you waste and if you know me i will come to stay. Perhaps connie wrote from her own experience overcome by a deep unshakable sadness that she felt would live inside her forever. She certainly wouldn't be the first person to live with undiagnosed depression in fact historians theorized that many historical figures battled similar mental illnesses before they were ever fully understood for example. Both frankenstein author mary. Shelley and president abraham lincoln reported experiencing significant bouts of melancholy. They'd regularly fall into deep sadness often unrelated to the events of their day to day lives. Some scholars have interpreted these spells as episodes of clinical depression diagnosis. That didn't exist in the eighteen. Hundreds when both lived almost a century later as connie struggled with her blue funk there was still an incredible amount of debate surrounding what constituted and caused depression throughout the nineteen hundreds doctors around the world published opinions but the medical field never reached consensus early. Researchers like sigmund. Freud believed depression was the result of traumatic experiences of course psychologists today understand that the causes are much more nuanced and multifaceted. They include both genetic and societal factors and this understanding started to take shape in the nineteen seventies when clinician set standards for diagnosing and treating clinical depression then in nineteen seventy five one year after connie disappeared doctors. I coined the term major depressive disorder.

Connie Elizabeth Eaton Converse Connie Converse Philip Depressive Disorders Ann Arbor Depressive Disorder New York Beetle Volkswagen New York City Michigan Cabinet Depression President Abraham Lincoln Frankenstein Shelley
Episode 21: Noema, Basimglurant and a New Clinical Trial for Seizures in TSC - burst 2

TSC Now

01:33 min | 3 weeks ago

Episode 21: Noema, Basimglurant and a New Clinical Trial for Seizures in TSC - burst 2

"New partner of the s lions. Why have we started working with no ema. Thanks dan so what we realized very early on is that no ema is truly patient centric and what we mean by that is. They're really focused on having a positive impact for the individuals so they sought collaboration with the us alliance and people living with tse very early in the development process and so we connected when they started to design their clinical program. Not afterwards they invited. Tse scientific experts to their advisory board. They've proactively engaged with tse families. And you know. In that advisory board a contribution from a parent who was invited to the board was considered equally valid as important as those of the attending scientists clinicians and drug developer's synonymous collaborative approach focusing on the needs of individuals with tse aligns. Very well with the us. Alliances goals to provide early diagnosis and offer better treatment so that those living can truly live their lives to their full potential and now that new is getting ready to launch this clinical trial. What are the next steps. So new emas clinical study with their negative. Alastair modulator of five will start in the spring of twenty twenty one and will recruit participants across the us and canada the uk and australia's not mentioned so for information including the list of sites when those become available. We check the tsa lions or. You can contact joann. Nakagawa directly at the gas alliance at j. nocco gallois dot org or at our main phone number three zero

TSE Us Alliance EMA Lions DAN Alastair Modulator United States Canada Australia Gas Alliance UK TSA Nakagawa Joann Nocco Gallois
Jim's Recovery Story

Big Book Podcast

06:02 min | 2 months ago

Jim's Recovery Story

"I was born in a little town in virginia in an average religious home. My father a negro was a country physician. I remember in my early youth. My mother dress me just as she did. My two sisters. And i wore curls. Until i was six years of age at that time i started school. And that's how i got rid of the curls. I found that. Even then i had fears and inhibitions we live just a few doors from the first baptist church and when they had funerals i remember very often asking my mother whether the person was good or bad and whether they were going to heaven or hell i was about six then. My mother had been recently converted and actually had become a religious fanatic. That was her main neurotic manifestation. She was very possessive with us. Children another thing. That mother drilled me was a very puritanical point of view as to sex relations and as to motherhood and womanhood. I'm sure my ideas as to what life should be like. We're quite different from that. Of the average person with whom i associated later on in life that took its toll. I realized that now about this time an incident took place in grade school that i have never forgotten because it made me realize that i was actually a physical coward during recess. We were playing basketball. And i had accidentally trip to fellow just little larger than i was. He took the basketball and smashed me in the face with it. That was enough provocation to fight. But i didn't fight and i realized after recess. Why didn't it was fear that hurt and disturbed me a great deal. Mother was of the old school and figure that anyone. I associated with should be of the proper type of course in my day. Times had changed. She just hadn't changed with them. I don't know whether it was right or wrong but at least i know that people weren't thinking the same. We weren't even permitted to play cards in our home. But father would give us just a little tidy with whiskey and sugar and warm water now and then. We had no whiskey in the house. Other than my father's private stock. I've never seen him drunk in my life although he'd take a shot in the morning and usually one in the evening and so did i but for the most part. He kept his whiskey in his office. The only time. I have ever seen my mother take anything. Alcoholic was around christmas time when she would drink some eggnog or light wine. I remember my first year in high school. That mother suggested that. I do not join the cadet unit. She got a medical certificate. So that i should not have to join it. I don't know whether she was a pacifist. Or whether she just thought that in the event of another war it would have some bearing on my joining up about then too. I realized that my point of view on the opposite sex wasn't entirely like that of most to the boys. I knew for that reason. I believe i married at a much younger age than i would have had not been for my home training. My wife and i have been married for some thirty years. Now was the first girl that i ever took out. I had quite a heartache about her then because she wasn't the type of girl that my mother wanted me to marry in the first place she had been married before. I was her second husband. My mother resented it so that the first christmas after our marriage which was in may of nineteen twenty-three. She didn't even invite us to dinner. After our first child came my parents both became allies. But in later days after i became an alcoholic they both turned against me. My father had come out of the south and had suffered a great deal down there. He wanted to give me the very best and he thought that nothing but being a doctor would suffice on the other hand. I believe that. I've always been medically inclined though i have never been able to see medicine quite as the average person sees it. I do surgery because that's something that you can see. It's more tangible. But i can remember and postgraduate days and during internship that very often i'd go to the patient's bed and start a process of elimination and then very often i'd wind up guessing. That wasn't the way it was with my father. I think with him. It possibly was a gift. Intuitive diagnosis father through the years had built up a very good mail order business. Because at that time there wasn't too much money in medicine. I don't think. I suffered too much as far as the racial situation was concerned because i was born into it and knew nothing other than that. A man wasn't actually mistreated. Though if he was he could only resent it. He could do nothing about it on the other hand. I got quite a different picture. Farther south economic conditions had a great deal to do with it. Because i've often heard my father say that his mother would take one of the old time flour sacks and cut a hole through the bottom and two corners of it and they're you'd have a gown of course when father finally came to virginia to work his way through school. He resented the southern cracker as he often called them so much that he didn't even go back to his mother's funeral. He said he never wanted to set foot in the deep south again and he didn't i went to elementary and high school in washington. Dc and then to howard university. My internship was in washington. I never had too much trouble in school. i was able to get my workout. All my troubles arose. When i was thrown socially among groups of people as far as school was concerned i made fair grades throughout. This was around. Nineteen thirty five and it was about this time that i actually started drinking during the years. Nineteen thirty to nineteen thirty five due to the depression and its aftermath. Business went from bad to worse. I had my own medical practice in washington at that time but the practice slackened and the mail order business started to fall off

Basketball Virginia Washington Howard University Depression
"diagnosis" Discussed on American Greed Podcast

American Greed Podcast

07:46 min | 4 months ago

"diagnosis" Discussed on American Greed Podcast

"She really lived that way. In Northern Virginia Keisha Williams has employed Arthur Robinson as her own private security detail most days, he's fulfilling the role of quiches, driver and errand boy. What I did Kisha. Should be more like what I didn't do. I drove around carried shopping bags. Cut Grass war-scarred. Everything you name and I did it aren't there doesn't recall any trips to Austria during this time but Kisha gender girlfriend are taking plenty of luxury vacations trips to Italy. Or a borough and Miami. At the Cavalier Hotel in Rome Kyushu Williams complained in a text to friends that the Mercedes that pick them up was too small and not her style. Everyone. Knew from general manager to grounds keeping and she was sitting at the pool. They just. Cater. Tore. Spend seventy five thousand on the surprise trip to Jamaica for Daniel's birthday. And Sixteen grand staying at the four seasons in Palm Beach. Florida. According to Art Robinson Kisha found ways to keep the party going strong at Home Virginia to. Kisha Danielle. Enjoy going to strip clubs that was their thing you because. In particular. So we get to this case. and. When we get in there it is. Laid out with liquor and gases, and Sofas, and then I'll see these two girls come in both these stacks of one dollar bills, each oth-. Kishi open stacks of one in grab a stack like this. In The air and I'm thinking Oh my God I know she didn't just do what I thought. She just did. And then Dana over one it. was so much money that you literally could not see the forward. because. They were just Rica grab a handful and just and everywhere exactly what you say make it rain whatever it was snowing for real. Kishan Williams. Display absolutely no empathy whatsoever for victims on the positions that she had put them in. It was a lack of conscience that was version on sociopathic. Shas pulling the wool over the of investors. He runs an entirely different play on Arthur Robinson. It was always we as black people don't stick together and we have to together. And she was real big on that. In the winter of two, thousand, sixteen takes Arthur out to dinner and they've party it up with Sushi cigars and Bourbon. While they celebrate Tusha asks are to help her out of a jam. Listen. I loan these guys, millions of dollars to start a hedge fund. And I can't get my money back. I said, well, I tell you what the guys names give me a couple of days wanted to do some background these guys before I even talk plus I've been drinking. But later that night Kisha calls one of the men in Californian and she adds are there in three way call are just him as an FBI agent? Was this agent Robinson because I I know be approximated federated. It's a federal crime and it's a felony. Over the next several months are the Robinson uses his military background to pressure the California businessman. I'm a very stocked protector of women and kids. And she she knew that because that's what Do you take the women folk in your in your life. He contacts both men by phone and via text messages in an attempt to demand more than fifty, four, million dollars money that Kyushu insists they own her. She knew our Robinson had this background in law enforcement and I think she just knew that he was very vulnerable. In Northern California and Christian Dion Broadway has resorted to his own desperate measures. He begins to live and new investors about where the money is going and how quickly it will be paid back. Mislead people. Not Intentionally I did it intentionally because of my back was against all solid twenty, four, forty, eight hours gotta come up with money Justice Christie Andrade starts to run dry Kyushu find another willing mark with connections to a fresh pool of investors. She was just going to keep going from person to person ringing them completely drive resources and then moving onto someone else. By two thousand seventeen, the well is running dry with Christy Andrade and his circle of trusting friends. Kushtia Williams has devastated their savings. One of victims she knew to have stage four cancer. And this woman could not afford Christmas presents for her grandchildren. Another victim texted her that he was unable to buy milk for a his baby because of all the money that he had taken out four Kishan Williams and even though Christiane drought areas defeated broken demoralized Kisha still has on a string. She tells them they've reached the finish line and the John Texas billionaire has finally come through. Qisas telling Chris that this money was actually sitting in an account at Bank of America and that the fifty eight million dollars had actually come in from John but that it was stuck and it was stuck in this ghost account, I worked in banking before I had never heard of a ghost count. It's a classic fraudster move to keep moving the goalposts to keep investors hoping that their returns are just around the corner that if they don't put in a little bit more money that everything's going to be lost. The FBI wise to Qisas game they just needed enough evidence to convict her. Bank records showing how much money Kisha was getting, what she was spending on and we had Joe Sander statement. What we were lacking was something from Kisha either in writing or on a recording. That's when FBI special agent varinder Singh asked Joe Sanders to introduce him to Kisha as harassing. I need to figure out what persona portray in meeting Kisha, what I decided on was to portray myself as a wealthy investor. At the same time, FBI agents flight or northern Californian to speak with Christian De'andre in person. It wasn't entirely clear. So we wanted to establish does he actually know what she's doing? So. I calling me. At. Hardly didn't get a parking ticket. By calling me. Meeting with Chris, it doesn't take Asian bureau long to realize if he is oblivious Dakota's lies. He said I trust her with my life. And we were just so taken back by why he would trust this woman so much and. We got to a point where we asked Chris. We said Chris where do you think he show was last week? He. Thinks she's in Vienna. Fat after every day. According to Kisha we had everything done. The money was GONNA be release. That next Monday. Asian Vera breaks the bad news. We.

Art Robinson Kisha Arthur Robinson Kisha FBI Kushtia Williams Chris Virginia Rome Kyushu Williams Miami Jamaica Austria Cavalier Hotel general manager Justice Christie Andrade Christy Andrade Italy Danielle Palm Beach Northern California
"diagnosis" Discussed on News O'Clock

News O'Clock

08:12 min | 5 months ago

"diagnosis" Discussed on News O'Clock

"General Dynamics has supported our nation's exploration of space for the last sixty years. Now, GDP is combining the latest technology innovations to deliver enterprise scale IT systems for a new era of space missions. We secure today imbedding resilient cyber solutions into every aspect of the mission, and we prepare for tomorrow to preempt future risk digital modernization, network, cyber, shared services, and artificial intelligence. GD. Propelling the art of the possible visit DDAT DOT com slash space. Welcome back last night trump return to the White House and we still don't know how sticky was here via phone with the latest on Moby know and what we very much do not know is buzzfeed new science reporter Stephanie Leigh Good Afternoon. Stephanie. Hi. How are you guys? Not Too bad I feel better if I knew more but that's where you come in right now. So let's start with the big question. What do we actually know so far about trump's diagnosis and the symptoms he's had. So we know that the president was diagnosed or elite team made his diagnosis publicly known just after midnight last Friday according to his doctor. He has had a a mild cost, some migo congestion and Teague, and we have some signs that it's a severe case of the coronavirus. We know for his doctorate bad. His Oxygen Saturation Wall had at times shopped below healthy levels that we don't know exactly how low and in response he got at least two doses of supplemental oxygen over the weekend. we know that he's being prescribed drug bats amended only first of beer to critical cases of covid nineteen which either means that he is safe of your case. Sore. He's getting it unnecessarily at of today he has discharged from alternate medical center news back at the White House his doctor says, he has no symptoms. Any is doing quote extremely well. Trump is not exactly young. His case so far compared to others of people his age. Yeah. So this is what's concerning about him at the patient. We know that people who are older and he's in his mid seventies who are male and who are overweight tend to have complications from virus attend to have higher mortality rates than those who are younger, and so these are all reasons to be concerned as far as we know, he doesn't have any other underlying conditions like diabetes or heart problem. So that's good. For him help lies, but we don't know yet what the full scope The need is going to be like and how it's GonNa compared to other folks I'm glad you bring that up because over the weekend journalists were frustrated by the lack of answers that Dr Shawn Conley the White House physician gave to them. So what are some things that we still don't know that would be really helpful considering it's the president. Yeah. So this is the health meter, the free worlds. It'd be great if we had full transparency about how he's doing but unfortunately, DR Congo not proven himself to be trustworthy towards him information, which is troubling released even said at one point this weekend that he didn't answer a question because he was trying to reflect the attitude that the team the president has had about his villainous. So that raises a lot of questions as to whether the doctor telling us the full picture and is being honest. So that said there were a few things that were explicitly act rapid. He did not answer and one of those was. Damage has been done soon, the president's logs in terms of pneumonia inflammation. This is a big consequence of having the coronavirus as respiratory illness. And the doctor did not answer questions about his chest. Ganske said quote there were some expected finding but nothing of any major clinical concern and point blank with asked we showed us the scans and you know he he declined. So that's. During. We also don't know how low his oxygen levels have been again related to the respiratory condition that this is another indicator of how much damages longtime endured, and the most that the doctor God was saying it was below ninety four percent. It wasn't down into the low eighties or anything. Generally, a healthy person has in the ninety seven to ninety eight percent. Oxygen level. We don't know exactly when he was infected that would be helpful for knowing not just you know who else he may have exposed to virus point seems like a lot of people connected to the White House are getting it. So it'd be helpful for for that but also just happened to know where he is in the course of His Holiness he told the world on twitter Friday after midnight. But the wall. Street Journal reported that he had taken a test earlier that Thursday. That also said he was positive, but he just didn't tell anybody and his doctor has been asked pointblank. One of the last time you took a negative test about would help. Piece together, the timing a little bit better as well. The doctor has not answered that either that's a lot of question marks Dr Calmly said, some of the questions that were being asked couldn't answer because it would violate trump's privacy under hippo why why would that actually stop him from telling us the American people about trump's illness in short wouldn't or shouldn't hit by it for those not familiar. That's short for the Health Insurance portability and Accountability Act. Basically, it protects sensitive patient health information from being disclosed without the patient's consent. But being cited in this case is highly questionable because a patient can waive their hip productions to let their doctor speak openly about their care and Dr. Conley had shared a lot of information about the president's health notably positive information. So it doesn't make sense that he would sight hit by to say he couldn't disclose things unless perhaps some information but bad news. So yesterday at the press conference he was asked. About the lung scams that we talked about as well as what's the state of his lab tests and he cited tip in both cases but had no problem talking about so many other aspects of how the president was doing while trump is on a few medications right now according to his doctor that start with antiviral rim disappear and the antibody cocktail from regeneration. What did those drugs actually do? Yeah. So Genetic viral like we said, it's made by Gilead Sciences, and it basically interferes with the creation of new viruses by inserting itself into new viral genes. Originally, it was tested against Ebola and hepatitis C. didn't work out there but have had this new life with the coronavirus and in the spring and got an emergency authorization from the FDA that let's be used in hot relies patients with Kobe. But that is not the same the full FDA approval that would require full clinical data showing that it's Safe and effective and her research that's been done received that year seems promising though governance is mix it has now become a pretty standard therapy for hospitalized patients. It is more surprising that he is taking the second drug, which more precisely this antibody cocktail treatment developed by generation, and these are lab nate antibodies that are synthetic versions of the attackers in your immune system against foreign invaders and. The one dose kind of treatment, and there's been some very very early data suggesting can help be helpful when given on early in an infection but we just know that from a press release that the company out which is not considered full evidence by any means by the scientific community and it's not available widely like the way that severe is it's very experimental. So the president was given. The treatment through what's called Compassionate use exception for emergency cases but they're people in the world have gotten this and that's pretty exceptional. So there's also the steroid that trump is on decks and methods. What.

president trump White House Stephanie Leigh Dr Shawn Conley General Dynamics FDA buzzfeed diabetes twitter Teague Moby reporter Gilead Sciences pneumonia Dr Calmly
"diagnosis" Discussed on Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

08:35 min | 5 months ago

"diagnosis" Discussed on Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

"A Tracy Carnesecca recommendations were in for a treat her ladies and Gentleman Perry strong. Hey, thanks for having me guys. Thanks. Thanks for having me. I'm excited. That video one, hundred, eighty seconds. That's that's going viral. Everybody's loving it. I loved it and congrats. Thank you, man Yeah it's. It's more than I expected. I'M NOT GONNA lie I was like I think we got something good here you know and then Leslie shared it Leslie from Saturday night live Liz Jones You know and that started one thing, and then now you know casting networks did our feature profile on me in the movie and it's yeah on a first name basis with Lesley, Johnson I mean we. Can just move you from out of the last name syndrome. There you go. That's it. It's funny. I knew her before but like not just acquaintance comedy like Hey I know you you're awesome. Look Plan I plan on calling Andrea Andrea. Allen. For the rest of her life. No matter how she gets just to yeah just to make. Now, let me ask you this period because I'm meeting you down for the first time. You don't have to say of course, but have you decided who you're going to vote for Oh God. Yeah. Of course, Joe Biden. Yeah come on. Could you imagine now? I'm bringing this up the other day and bring it up every four years. These people that are are undecided. Are they lying for the attention? Yes that I mean everyone you know come on let's to be right just like you know when you meet someone if you WanNa sleep with them, you know you know that quickly you're just like all I'm in you a minimum out. That's it. You know. I saw a the onion article headline Kamala Harris admits she only supports Biden because she hates trump. This is where we're at. The other day of course, you know, let's see. Let's get everybody up real quick as if you don't know it was. That Donald Trump pays paid seven hundred fifty dollars federal taxes each year for the last two years. And by the way, a listener, a disabled veteran Maya says, yeah I pay more in taxes how how is this right and is that gonNA come up during the debate it does of course, he says, he paid more than that in federal taxes we know, of course. That's a lie, but look, it's racially. So I suppose what overshadows that is when trump is asked can you denounce white supremacy and trump 'cause I had? Just. Say you denounce White Supremacy I. Tell them whether these this what. Who are like you have to name them like these looking for like the Bob I don't know what he's looking for. Shouldn't he be like I'm the best at denouncing Roy. Like no one has denounced the KKK a more, and then I love the argument of which one of US did better for black people and just it's so embarrassing like just I can't imagine watching that as a black person going like a you are you guys going like? No, they're my best friend not my best friend. It's the most American shit ever too old white guys talking about who treats black people better it's like it's old that's from slavery today sadly is like well, I, treat my niggers better you know you'll like. God Damn and come on. Can we can we change this? It's the same the same players it's all the same players in the same house to be. If you're GONNA ask an actual debate question, the man got to ask four or five questions right? There were rules and one of the questions was an official question. Will you denounce white supremacy in the KKK? That's a question. The same question is you know, how do you feel about healthcare? How do you feel about the pandemic? How do you feel about White Supremacist KKK members? And five stuff. Tripped you up? Okay. Well, not even sidestep he So they what do you mean whites? It's such a vague term right? White people taking over it. So vague if only it happened before and we had a point of reference. and. Biden says, okay. The probe boys piece of shit about that because okay. Proud boys stand back and stand by pro war what now when you hear that as a black man Perry. Is Is there anything different to you too it's out there and I'm white this just in. But to me, it felt different because this was the super bowl of talking points and people might think it's not as blatant as it is any difference to you know I gotTa. Tell you man it's crazy like all of this stuff's th that's happened this. Year from a Aubrey forward, George Floyd there's no for the black community is no new information. There's no everything's the same as it's always been. It's just nice to see you know the other side the other sides are all seeing. Now it's like you guys are getting the information and you got it before but it's like now it's like Oh shit that's. Real. Oh, while we're seeing this Lake Oh, they've been saying that they've been getting hunted by by cops and slavery let out. We thought they were just complaining these damn black seir just wine and and it's like man that that's you grow by the time. You're four years old you know cops hunt you and racism surreal it really shit ever in NFL. Embarrassing to listen to rap and hip hop songs and stand up comics from about twenty thirty years ago and they are articulating this so well, and we're like, yeah, kill cops sure. That's what you guys do on were bouncing in our cars like we're special and now looking back just like Oh my God. You were writing essays in rhyme form and. Ooh darasing here's the thing. I would see these black comedians get revved up but then the bill comes my twelve dollar beers at it up and I have a whole bigger problem. That is to focus group. So of course, they talk about. All right. Well, this last debate we people Americans are embarrassed considered a disaster with everybody yelling over each other we're going to have finally implement. New Rules and trump tweeted out saying. Why would I let them change the rules now I won the debate obviously. Few hours go by and that's when it makes the news that Donald Trump and his wife of course, have the corona and how wouldn't they good see how they have. Now, is it a trick? So, that he doesn't have to do any more debates, that's what I was thinking I, but then I think they him and his people know it's a headline culture meaning hey I have the virus. Oh, people are GonNa Think is Oh, this is absolutely real. The virus not necessarily all the trickery. What do you think Perry Strong I think that I bet he had before but didn't say it 'cause it would make him look weak. And now he's using it. You know what? I'm saying I, bet he had it I feel like i. feel like everyone's been exposed to it to some degree. You know whether antibodies are not. They're still figuring this opening out But yeah, I think I mean obviously dropping it now is a great reason to step. Aside he looked like a savage animal up there for ninety minutes and people are like not do that again though it's A. You got covert. Go Go. You know we'll. We'll. We'll see how this plays out without you. You guys think this is fake like. The timing is fake or the actual him having it as fake. I think there's a convenience to win. It's being admitted that he hasn't. I think there's a chance think there's either a chance he had it and they just held off when they were like we can use this when we need it or he doesn't have there's nothing trustworthy about this person or the people around, but it's hard to believe that you. Can. Cover up a positive COVID test only because like you when you're positive people start fearing you for at least two weeks you know. So I don't know that people could just kinda sit by just as human beings with the same flesh breathing your air new refuse to wear masks I feel like it would kind of at least be rumored. Again Jab at like he he doesn't have to do these other debates again, the first thing I thought about but then again, he can't go on the campaign trail and you know the elections coming up right I don't know that it would be for his benefit to be sick right now the only benefit I know I know the people saw that he got it and got excited but it's a little worrisome because it's if he has it and pushes through. I mean if he has it. Yes..

Donald Trump Joe Biden Gentleman Perry Andrea Andrea Tracy Carnesecca Lake Oh Leslie Liz Jones US Kamala Harris NFL Allen Maya official Roy Lesley Johnson George Floyd Aubrey
"diagnosis" Discussed on The Bipolar DM

The Bipolar DM

05:30 min | 6 months ago

"diagnosis" Discussed on The Bipolar DM

"One. The things that you had problems with your diagnosis what other things kind of causes problems with.

"diagnosis" Discussed on The Bipolar DM

The Bipolar DM

12:18 min | 6 months ago

"diagnosis" Discussed on The Bipolar DM

"D m. I am your host Jason. This is an irregular podcast about Dungeons and Dragons and deriding and living with a mental illness particularly bipolar disorder off borderline personality disorder and major depression. And today's episode we are going to be doing an interview with one of my friends Jay. Are are we discussing living with a diagnosis dating with a diagnosis and relationships? All right. This is the bipolar diem and have here with me my friend J R. And once you go ahead and just tell a little bit about yourself. I'm autistic off along with side of ADHD. Yeah, major depression severe social anxiety. I was born before their wage mm. So I was in my mid-forties before I got diagnosed. I thought I was just kind of a weird person my whole life and now at least I have an explanation for the way the quirky and odd behavior. Yeah. So how did you adapt to the diagnosis? I mean, especially such a low wage it was it awesome because it actually explains a lot of things. Yeah Faith explained why I had extreme interest in certain things and why I just really didn't like other things and wide berth. a I had the attitude I had around people you just explained a lot and it gave me the answers that I had been looking for. So I could finally kind of relax and go. Okay, cool. It's no big deal. Yeah, I have to agree that with me. It took me a long time to accept it. I yeah ejected from years and years finally accepted it cuz I was like, yeah, I'm bipolar and but once I accepted it and started educating myself on the illness, it wasn't so freaky to me. Yeah in mysterious and scary. You know, I was the worst thing when I was in the Army and first had my episode was bipolar and I had no idea what the hell was going. Yeah. Oh I did that back when I agree with you when you said it took a long time for you to accept. Yeah. It didn't take long for me to accept life, but it took a while for me to be able to admit it or talk to anybody about it or write say anything about it was just something I kept to myself for a long time. Yeah. Yeah, and like like you said, you know, you're before the Spectrum and you're on the very high-functioning, I would yeah, I've got Asperger's Which is higher functioning and I was out of high school for thirteen years before they even started diagnosing kids in school age with autism. So I went through what should have been College age and everything without Any diagnosis without knowing why I couldn't learn. the way other people learned right, so You mentioned learning as.

Jay ADHD Jason J R. Army Faith
"diagnosis" Discussed on The Journey

The Journey

06:01 min | 7 months ago

"diagnosis" Discussed on The Journey

"Then I was able to move my daughter into the school where I worked and Katie ended up. Up being my own student in my own PPC de classroom, which was just such, an answered prayer, when Katie got rejected for the last time in Mexico when I said this is the last rejection I wrote down in my journal, and it was really interesting. I never paid any attention to it. Until later I was leafing through and I was just writing. I was venting I was praying, and that was talking to God and I was saying you know she keeps getting rejected. Rejected! These people don't know how much she's overcome. They don't understand. They just keep labeling her. Keep judging her. They turn her away and here's one more school that turned away so I m just going to assume that until a school takes her in that I'm supposed to be Katie's teacher. And I prayed to have all the wisdom that it took in all the preparation that it took to become Katie's teacher, and to be the best that I could be for her. which turned into like a really symbolic kind of journal entry because I mean not even a year after I had written all that down, I was literally Katie's teacher. But before that I, was also Katie's assistant teacher, so I never stopped teaching my child I never did and I just got the blessing of being able to not just teach my own child, not just learn, but to work with so many other children who just need a boost to just need an adaptation who just need understanding who just need a different way of communicating each child so unique so different so wonderful and so special, and I was just so blessed to be trusted to work with these kills. That brings us to today two thousand twenty, the year of the corona virus pandemic. We're all changing our lives dramatically. We're all having to find new ways of doing things. We've done all the time and me as a teacher. I had to find new ways to do things, too..

Katie Mexico
"diagnosis" Discussed on The Journey

The Journey

05:56 min | 7 months ago

"diagnosis" Discussed on The Journey

"We need to have some early interventions. Not Remember. We were in Mexico and. We could not find a school that would take her in I. Tried I remember I tried sixteen schools, and it was always the same thing well. We are not prepared to have a child like yours We don't work with special needs children. We don't have the staff. It was stuff like that and I remember I finally found in mazing beautiful private school and they said. Okay, we'll let her come to class with us, but you need to. You need to bring your own private duty nurse and she's going to be the one working with her with your daughter and also You're going to have to pay tuition and I remember the tuition per month was more than like the rent that we were paying, so it wasn't even an option like we couldn't afford it. Are Missionaries. Okay? We didn't even know. When our next check would come or where our money would come from, because missionaries don't have that financial security and that was where we were, we started thinking a lot about what was best for our family, and we decided that Katie really needed. To be included in two schools and education, and we needed to expect more, so we decided to go ahead and pack and move back to the United States and we did. We are all US citizens so the transition back into the united. States was relatively a breeze and we ended up. Getting Katie evaluated right. She qualified for Special Education services, and we enrolled her in a program for children with disabilities called PPC D which stands for preschool program for children with disabilities one. She was enrolled. I needed a source of income. We all needed to find new jobs because we were no longer missionaries. In Mexico now we needed to find like. Like civilian jobs I guess you would say and I thought that if I could only work for a school then I could keep kind of same schedule, and I could take care of Katie, and I can have the same kind of you know days off vacation days all that Kinda stuff, and so I applied for the school where she was enrolled in, and I was hired I was hired as an instructional paraprofessional, which has just like a teacher's assistant and. They moved me around a bit because I honestly was awful. I didn't know what I was doing. My background wasn't television and radio, and there is no training, just kind of like jumped in, and I wasn't the right fit for a couple of classrooms and looking back on it. I can see why, but I didn't know back then what I know now. Anyway this to say I ended up getting moved around, and they ended up putting me in a p. c.. D. Classroom in that school, which was not Katie's classroom. Katie's classroom kept growing and growing the got so big that it had to be split into two classrooms, and they had to get another teacher, and so they put me working as a teacher's assistant, but we got to share a lot of the same of schedule, so like the playground schedule the PE schedule the lunch schedule so inadvertently. ended up sharing a lot of my work time with my own child, which was incredible and weird because I felt like people thought maybe I was policing her or that. I had. Signed up to work where I worked. Just so I could keep an extra close, wise and. That was not the case, but that's how it ended up playing out well about six months into it I thought you know. Why don't I just?.

Katie United States Mexico mazing
"diagnosis" Discussed on The Journey

The Journey

02:09 min | 7 months ago

"diagnosis" Discussed on The Journey

"You buy protein. Things taste bad and I gave Katie the formula, and she immediately rejected it I was crushed. They talked about well. We gotta get this in her purse. or how about a G. Tube? which is like a tube that you put it in the stomach I might know and I started force-feeding Katie and I did that until she finally accepted. The formula took about eight months. We started therapies She needed physical therapy so that she could learn to sit up which she learned when she was about. Fifteen months independently, and then she had learned to stand and to crawl. She started crawling when she was. She was a year and a half, and finally they said well. Let's see. Maybe she'll walk. Maybe she won't when they first diagnosed her, they said we don't guarantee that she will ever walk. The damage has been pretty extensive, so my husband and I were. Aching to see her walk I can't explain to you. The bitterness I felt just watching parents raise their children and their babies just did stuff. Their babies just walked. I remember one time I was walking on the street and I saw a stray dog I mean. My thoughts went dark places dark places. I saw stray dog and the dog was walking and I remember being. Bitterly Jealous that a street dog could learn to walk. My daughter did not have that guarantee, and it just made me so angry and hurt, but eventually after lots and lots of therapies one Katie was just a little over two and a half years old. She took her first very wobbly steps and I cannot tell you how. Much. That meant to us that she was going to be a walker that she could walk. And we were over the moon. Where like okay in just like? A few months we've made some recovery's. We made some recovery so when she turned three years old I thought. I've got to get this child of mine in a school. She needs to get socially adopted..

Katie
"diagnosis" Discussed on The Journey

The Journey

05:18 min | 7 months ago

"diagnosis" Discussed on The Journey

"He said your child is having infantile. Spasms was going to try to get. To the source of the problem and we are going to try to solve this problem, so my husband and I thought Oh the words Passi-, no big deal We're going to make them stop, so we went back home I remember we put Katie to bed. Maasmond fell asleep and I just laid in bed and I thought. Just like so many of you guys. Let me, Google, infantile spasms and I went to Google and I typed infantile spasms. And my world started spinning out of Control. This was the moment where I was like. I still don't know how I made it. To where them right now, because what I read was so devastating every single thing I read about infantile spasms. Known as West Syndrome otherwise known as say severe form of infantile epilepsy, and what I read, said ninety percent of infants who suffer from West, syndrome, or these infantile spasms turn out to be severely intellectually disabled and I. Remember Literally Just my world just spinning the. Feeling in my gut cannot be described just like a big heavy stone was. Pulling down at my stomach, and I was so scared I was so terrified. That I was dizzy with fear. I was holding onto the desk and I felt like I couldn't get enough air. I cannot describe I cannot describe, but if you've had your child diagnosed, you might relate I remember just thinking. Can Somebody please fix my baby? I couldn't believe that happened to our Rabi. We were the parents that wanted a child. We were the parents that were ready. We were the parents that were missionaries. Why you know those thoughts came to my head. Eventually. Started, poking and prodding Katie to try to figure out what was wrong, we couldn't find. It couldn't find it eventually they did. Do a metabolic exam, and when Katie was thirteen months so just one month over a year, she was diagnosed with something called phenyle Ketone Oria..

infantile spasms Katie Passi Google Maasmond West
"diagnosis" Discussed on The Journey

The Journey

03:47 min | 7 months ago

"diagnosis" Discussed on The Journey

"I remember there. Is this man okay? It wasn't even a woman. It wasn't a mother. It was like a guy and he freaked out. He saw Katie and he he's like pointing to her and then telling me Hey, look your child. Look your child, your child. Something's wrong with your child and I looked at him dismissively. We're used to seeing these kind of spasms, so she was very small and I, said Oh. Don't worry is just a little reaction that she has, and he did not look a piece with my answer. He kept looking at her and he had like this alarm. Stare is like he wanted to do something and when I think back I still kick myself I'm like. So many so many signs and I thought she was okay. Because my pediatrician told me she was okay at every month checkup, so time went on, she was eleven months old and we took a trip. We took a trip to Cancun yeah. Without sleeping through the night. With all the spasms, I was trying to be as normal as I could and I. Honestly thought that I just sucked as a mom. I thought I can't hold it together. I can't just get used to this I am not understanding how to parent, and this is just I suck at being a mom and so. So I decided I was going to go ahead and take this trip to Cancun I went with my mother-in-law, and it was for women's conference, so we were surrounded by women who were already mums, too. Many of them had already raised their babies into teenagers or even adults and I got to share a lot of space with these ladies. You know like hotel, rooms and lobbies, and so they got to see the specimens themselves and they got to see how often it happens so not just once or twice, but they got to see it and then. I remember. That would just gather around and they're all very alarmed and Michelle. This is this is not normal. She should be I. She should be able to stay awake for more than two hours. Which Katie would fall asleep by the way she would get these spasms. KNOCKER super tired. She would fall asleep for a little bit with..

Katie Cancun Michelle
"diagnosis" Discussed on The Journey

The Journey

05:47 min | 7 months ago

"diagnosis" Discussed on The Journey

"Metabolic testing that is much more extensive, or you could have blood cord banking, which is like for Cancer Kenneth. Situations so you could preserve that in my husband, said well. What's this metabolic thing in? The nurses reassured him that a very very. Very rare percentage of people ever have this metabolic condition, and that he should have nothing to worry about so Isaac went ahead and just got us a nice comfortable room, and then went upstairs to see His baby born now when Katie was born, she was born just wide awake. She was looking around making eye contact everything was wonderful and in that hospital she was engaging and just being uniformly. The doctors released us. Everybody was healthy. We're good to go. Now as we went home, the days progressively started getting harder and harder, so Katie could not latch on for breastfeeding and there was this never ending crying now. We knew to expect exhaustion. We knew that sleepless nights were coming. We knew that we were going to be interrupted, but Katie never actually rested like she would fall asleep so lightly, and she wouldn't go into deep sleep, and she would cry and cry. There was no sleep, and by the time she was ten weeks old. She got incredibly sick. We hospitalized her found out that she had a respiratory infection and she had a intestinal issue rotavirus. She was super sick. It was intense. And so my husband and I were thinking. You know what she just a newborn. We're going to get through this. It's going to wear off. Will it wear off? Four months Katie's four months old things are not getting any easier. She still acting like a newborn. She's still not resting sleeping. Her eyes were turning purple from being so exhausted, and she was never happy or content or it piece. There were no smiles we mentioned it to the doctor in the doctor was like Oh. You know. It's Golic. Don't worry about it. You're a first time. MOM, trust me. He will say we decided okay this. Let's do this fun. Thing less introduce solid foods, but. He I remember my mom sent us. My mom was far away in another country and she shift us. A high chair and I I felt weird, because that highchair seemed so inappropriate, for Katya, was really fancy. Nice high, but Katie wouldn't sit up or hold her trunk or or hold her head hardly up. Enough. SLOP over and I had to I. Remember that to introduce her solid food. I had to lean that high chair. Way Back so that she was kind of..

Katie Cancer Kenneth Isaac Katya
"diagnosis" Discussed on The Journey

The Journey

04:02 min | 7 months ago

"diagnosis" Discussed on The Journey

"Okay so. What is going on with Katie? Let! Me Tell You. Katie suffered brain damage as a baby, and this happened as a result of metabolic condition, because of this Katie developed some significant cognitive. Is Cognitive so like anything that we have to perform whether it be. Mental or physical, it's just all challenging for Katie. She also has autism like characteristics She's got the adhd she's got things science a. she has sensory processing disorder. All those kind of things that make up what normally gets categorized as autism. She has social deficiencies. She has pretty significant language delays, and while we just call it autism, so that way people understand Katie has epilepsy, and she's had it since she was an infant like a little baby, and it's just things. She's always had to battle with so let me walk you through from conception to birth and let me back up a little bit, and tell you a little bit about myself and my husband. Husband, so my husband and I were married in December of nineteen ninety nine. Yes, we got married a few days before the turn of the Millennium, so we got to live through the whole Y2k experience, and literally turning a Millennium, and we were married and working and going through college in about three years after we had been married, we decided that we were going to go work with my husband's parents, who were missionaries and we moved with his family to Mexico, and that's where we were working doing All sorts of stuff I was working in multimedia. My husband Isaac was doing a lot of like International leadership courses things like that. Hey, but we have been married three years and we were ready to have kids, so we wanted kids ready I was ready and we found out that we had infertility. And so we continue to. Try for a bit to have babies, and eventually we just said. Hey, you know what let's go. See a doctor and turned out that I had infertility shoes, and he had infertility issues, and so it was a double whammy, but finally after a lot of fear and a lot of tears we found out in. January of two thousand five that we were expecting our first child and we were over the moon. We were adjust so ready. So the the nine months sworn along, and I had a scheduled c-section, and here's how it. We got to the hospital. We drove up. It was a schedule C. section because I have several complications and maybe I'll go into it another time. When I got to the hospital, the nurses took me put me in a wheelchair took me up into the elevator, and they started doing the prep for the c section, and then they left my husband alone pain. He was in the lobby and he ended up doing all the paperwork stuff now in Mexico. You have to pay for your birth ahead of time. So if you're going to have a baby you start making payments and you have to pay in full by the time you are going to deliver your child, so you have to make sure that you have full payment for your birth before you actually give birth. We had already paid wedeman paying every month during my pregnancy, and while I was getting prepped for the C-section, the nurses there started walking my husband through the options for the packages. And so some packages were like okay. You can have this sweet with You know the extra space available for the spouses sleeping, or you can have.

Katie Mexico adhd Isaac
"diagnosis" Discussed on Start Here

Start Here

07:15 min | 10 months ago

"diagnosis" Discussed on Start Here

"Off on having to respond to his civil lawsuit brought by Paula Jones. Until he's done with his presidency so in both cases the courts. Say Sorry. You're the president but you're not above the law. Some special accommodations might be required. But you have to respond to basic requests now. Those cases were different in that the Nixon case involved a federal grand jury subpoena and that Clinton case involved a federal civil lawsuit targeting. The president is a violation of the constitution but the basic principle that the president is not beyond the reach of legal process would seem to be helpful to those requesting the president's records in these cases the president to have to respond to each and every state district attorney he would hire. You need hire a lawyer to list. What the burdens are. That wouldn't take a lot of time in particular because these subpoenas actually didn't go to the president they went to these. Third Parties May Czars deutchebanks capital one these institutions at have the president's financial records. So what these requests are saying. Is that the President. Doesn't have to do anything at all to comply with these requests. He just has to stay out of the way to address this question. I think in Clinton and concluded that a president can't realistically be shielded from every sort of private distraction including some forms of legal process especially in our modern age the criminal subpoena in New York. But then you got the the congressional subpoena in Washington where Congress can ask you for Steph. Let's talk about that. What were the conservative justices looking here? Because it seemed like were kind of at odds with the person representing Congress. Yeah I think that some of the conservative justices seemed concerned about this kind of boundless congressional power to just ask for any document under the sun and if they can point to implausible law they might consider passing that was connected to that document that the Congress would have carte blanche to get that material itself has said Congress's power to legislate is extremely broad. Especially when you take into account appropriations so the end result is that there is no protection whatsoever. Justice Alito was concerned about requests for all the financial records of a presidential candidate or the the medical records. You're under medical records to the president. Would I think almost always be not pertinent valid legislative purpose on the other hand. Can you believe they they certainly would be pertinent? I think the lawyer representing the House really struggled to identify limiting principle. And I'm not sure. The justices came away satisfied that they understood where the limit lies it. Presidency is being harassed and undermine with improper project process that issued in our view for legitimate reasons to last case out of New York involving that grand jury subpoena. I thought the presence lawyers had a rougher time of so they were pressing the argument there that the president has basically absolute immunity can't even be investigated by state authorities even if they might have some good reason to think that there some wrongdoing maybe even violations of law our position is that the constitution itself both in structure and text supports the position that the president would be temporarily immune from this activity from a state proceeding. While he is the president of the United States censor the justice were very receptive to that kind of absolutist argument interested in whether or not you can point us to some expressed language at the founding during the ratification process that provides for this immunity so in that case it may be that a state prosecutor has to make a heightened showing if they want information that involves the president. But I think that this Manhattan. Da is ultimately going to get the information involving trump org and the president's financial history sooner or later just a question of how exactly they're going to get there in that case you can kind of imagine a scenario where the documents do get turned over but the behind closed doors grand jury. We don't actually see them. The rest of us don't see them certainly not before the election. Keisha fast just fascinated. Hugh the justices. It mccrone voices in real time. Thank you so much. Thank you Brad and one last thing. We talked about travel earlier. Let's a clear loser industry in Pandemic Life Right. There's no travel company doing better because of all. This food is more complicated though. Because everyone's still got eat. Just a question of what so on the same day that the burger chains steak and shake said it's permanently closing more than fifty locations. The chicken finger chain raising cane's says it's expanding now if you're looking for a job raising cane's hiring in the restaurant is looking welcome. Five thousand new members in part of this is supplying demand certain cuts of meat like ground beef or seeing shortages as processing plants. Change how they operate but there are bigger issues at play here to take buffet places. Beloved restaurant chain will not reopen up to the corona virus pandemic force it stores to close the San Diego Union Tribune now reporting the company. That owns sweet. Tomatoes is closing all of its restaurants. They restaurants could suffer the biggest long term consequences of cope. Nineteen people touching the same pencils breathing on the same glass but remember they were already having trouble as customers. Choosing Higher End Lower Calorie options corona viruses just launching these evolutions in hyper drive but really the biggest development this week supermarkets because it turns out. He's not just you. Grocery bills are quickly becoming more expensive. Labor Department reporting overall prices rising two point six percent in April. That's the biggest one month increased nearly fifty years and it might make sense that meat fish eggs or more expensive for the price of Rockley rose in April sort of oatmeal and cereal. The entire supply chain is all out of whack and now everyone is paying the price. Tuna fish is costing more to like who you maniacs buying up all the tuna fish because I wanted to make some pasta salad but the shelves were bare. But like I'M NOT GONNA go out of my way for. Jeez start here tomorrow. The scribe if you haven't already worn all these stories. Abc News Dot Com or the ABC's Brad Mielke tomorrow No there's not a person in America hasn't been impacted in some way by the corona virus pandemic but in every community. There are pockets of people who suiting up every day. Last seventy stretch drop off produce for one of our tenants. These are America's essential workers. The people who are keeping our world moving. I've turned into a home school mom and now a new podcast from ABC News. You're going to hear from Dallas their own words. I I actually went back to my office on crime because it's just not fair. Our community has to eat sell. Thank you Moraine. This is the ascensions inside the curve from the emergency room to the police cruiser to the checkout line. You'll hear what this pandemic sounds like to. The people putting themselves in harm's way always the risk and I could bring this home to my kids or my husband's parents. Listen to the essentials inside the curve on Apple podcasts refit podcast APP..

president Congress New York Clinton Paula Jones ABC News Brad Mielke Justice Alito Nixon Washington San Diego United States cane Keisha Dallas Manhattan Hugh
"diagnosis" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

12:46 min | 1 year ago

"diagnosis" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"We're talking cancer with Khloe. Once you hear the word she thinks. This isn't good in twenty seventeen. Khloe Dixon was extremely tired. After the birth of her baby girl I she thought nothing of it but it kept getting worse than I start having these headaches and that was like an elastic band around my head. So then I thought right I better go to the GP blood test revealed. Khloe had chronic myeloid leukemia or C. L. Which is a type of cancer that affects her white blood cells? I'm talking to Khloe about her cancer but particularly her diagnosis. What does it feel like waiting for the news? How do you tell your family? And how does having cancer affect your daily life was horrific? I mean holding my girl and thinking I'm not saying thanks year. Awful plus later in the podcast. I'll be having coffee with Dany. One of Macmillan's fantastic professionals to give her thoughts on what to do when someone says those three fateful words you've got cancer you could actually have a conversation with someone and even if they seem silly questions to you. The professionals at the end of the line will not mind in the least women melon and we're talking cancer lowy. Hello.

cancer Khloe Dixon Macmillan
"diagnosis" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"diagnosis" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Entire clinical team including the pathologist radiologists surgeons and nurses them meet to discuss each patient and the best way to manage their case. It depends on the biopsy type because if it is transparently biopsy we take more samples so that take long to expand if it is translated told standard by up say it usually take ten days and then be discussed the case in multi disciplinary team meeting. And we see the patient and gave that assaults and stage. What do you say to the patients? Or what information can you impart to them? And what's the next step so in duracell clinic? We will have the information about the biopsy yourself better. It is a cancer or note if it is a cancer what grade of the cancer and we would have discussed what treatment option is available for patients so when we see the patient be will discuss the findings of the biopsy say advance stories a locally advanced or early prostate cancer and we discussed the treatment options with the patient. We can now worker with quite good accuracy. Where the likely prognosis meeting to see the outcome is with or without treatment. And that's what we use together with the patient to work out what to do next. The first thing to know is that there is absolutely no evidence that rushing through a diagnosis of prostate. Cancer has any impact and survival. So it doesn't really matter how long it takes. The key thing is that he's done well in general terms from the minute somebody presents to say the hospital for investigations to get Anne Marie. Scan to be seen to have a biopsy and get a diagnosis. We try to do that within two or three weeks and then we can make decisions about what to do next. Some people listening to this may be wondering why it is that we have screening programs for certain diseases. But we don't have one for this given that you've said that eighty percent of men aged eighty may well have prostate cancer which argues perhaps would be worth looking for. It's it's therefore very common condition. Why is there no screening program for prostate cancer so the problem screening in prostate cancer is not the fact that it isn't save lives because he does the problem as that he picks up a lot of disease which is treatment and that over diagnosis can also lead over treatment because of poor understanding of the natural history of disease sort of instinct treat rather than monitor and if you look at the statistics as well is very hard to justify so for example in prostate cancer terms the lifetime risk of developing prostate? Cancer is nearly ten times risk of dying of it. You have to find an awful lot of men to save a single life but problem with screening is that its tended to rely on a single test at a single point in time and the test is in good. Psa Like I said is a nice test but it's just not good enough and so a lot of our work. A lot of work of others is actually trying to do two things. Define what is the right time point to pick it up and secondly trying to get a better test to pick it up. Are you having any luck? Yes there are actually a number of tests out there which already better than the pse. The problem is that the cost more as well. We are very interested in actually binding better tests with a much more evolving way of looking at this because the way we see it is that each man's risk changes with time and how put together as what we are exploring at the moment but. I do think we have the tools to be able to better detect Kansas which are going to spread for example and actually intervene enough and would that translate into a saving? And that's exactly what the Holy Grail is. Because in the end of the day screening low early detection for cancer actually has converse side which is not picking up things that you don't want to pick up and that in itself is a goal which I think is worth doing because if you can reduce the number of people you're going to be looking for something that means you can get your resources redirected to finding the ones which are important. Most of the time we're so fixated on finding and more and more cancers that's what we WANNA do. We forget about the fact that there's a lot of people who are investigated who turn out not to have chances And that is actually a big burden for the health economy for the individual and ultimately if you do diagnose something which too early you you do. Condemn someone to be monitored for something which didn't know about. It's a little bit lake saying if we started do genetic testing birth everyone what it tells us a potential. You might get something rather than you will get something and then you're going to end up stressed body for all your life and.

Cancer Anne Marie duracell clinic Kansas
"diagnosis" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"diagnosis" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Major groups of dinosaurs have this what it suggests what the most reasonable assumption. Then is that this is really something. They acquired early on in their man. Central Trading. If it's representative of the whole group Dawson speaking with Adam Murphy. There and that work. She did while she was at Yale. University has just been published in the Journal. Science advances. Finally the British government has just granted. It's communications watchdog off com sweeping new powers to police social media. The announcement is linked to the death of teenager. Molly Russell who took her own life in two thousand seventeen whose instagram feed was later found contained. Graphic suicide related content. Ofcom now gonNA Target Violence Cyber Bullying and child abuse. How effective can they actually be with us? Is Peter County our regular tech correspondent and local Angel Investors? So first of all. What a rough come gun do before we do that. Can we just be background? So what we have here is a spectrum between clamping down completely therefore removing the possibility of tragic case of Molly Russell. Full freedom of speech. Now we know is not a good idea to clamp down completely the other end this positive benefits for be able to communicate. This has been a problem for some time. Now for many years and the government published a white paper called online harms last year. The put it together. Some rules and the The moment the same things like Scott proportionate and risk-based who's got to rely on the platforms to self police etc. How forceful is this going to be there? Because the issue is that if I'm tech company and I am hanging out in the back of beyond somewhere and I got servers which are not located in the UK. I don't really care will often say well. The German system has fines of up to fifty million euros. We get it wrong. I don't think that's been invoked yet. But there's things they can do. They can switch off the domain at the ISP that can they because the thing is the domains are registered not in the UK. Some of the molly some of these domains are actually held in seven America. So you'd have to have some kind of bilateral relationship with the Americans is how WanNa turn facebook and then America. It might have antibodies about that and say no. That's not quite true because China manager. Isn't it with ten thousand estimates but China has this sort of firewall infrastructure in rusher? Talking about having one as well aren't they were basically? There's a ring fence on the Internet around territorial geography and they control and potentially probably inspect everything that's going backwards and forwards across that firewall. So they could just turn off talking about there for the Internet. Was this amazing free. Throw for many years. Are we now talking about carving it up exactly? I don't know I think the most likely going to have some forces to have a named individual who is responsible and they know guys ation who wants to put the handout within say facebook. Uk and say you know me out. This is imprisonable offence effectively. That will trigger some change intended because in the end. Switch you off the debate as you say is too extreme. Well let's say off come. Can these rules from the company's then say instagram or facebook? To what extent are they already set up such that when you look it a certain type of content the Algorithms? Then give you stuff. That's very related to the stuff you're looking at. They say. Oh you like this. We're going to give you more of that. To what extent are if they're trying to regulate certain types of content they fighting against their own internal exactly. So that gives you what you've got to look at is the problem that we don't know whether that content providers or just platform content from other people. They clearly are editing content coming. I mean I didn't even notice but today Mark Zuckerberg in Switzerland at. She said something he said. They have thirty five thousand people working on this problem causing five billion dollars a year the switching off a million accounts today at the moment so obviously trying to do something but clearly. How can they do enough presumably? That's one of the ways in which this problem can be solved because algorithms can be written to spot the very things that enable these sites to bring people together who have common interests and beliefs that whole technology could be turned to find the very things that we decide know an interest of an individual. It's already been done. There's no way a million accounts can be switched off by thirty five thousand people. They can't retail and easy to read it. How do you interpreters human being the problem is an? I've run into this where Google has decided certain pages on the naked. Scientists contain graphic content. And actually when you look at it because we're a medical side we've got pictures of bits the Bolton now now then they're not necessarily naughty bits of the body. There was one page the other day that Google had condemned. It was a wound being sued. It was very informative but they decided the image was not in the interests of people to see and in fact it was fundamental to explain. Lavelle speech again. And that's what I'm saying. I think there is a danger. We're going to take the wrong things down three of us in the studio all have our own views about this and all your listeners will have their own views and who how can we expect the government in whatever form to get it right. We can't but they must do something to prevent the sort of things that are causing harm and suicides. Lisa thank you very much. I guess that's one which will have to return to. Thanks very much Peter. Kelly and if you'd like to find out more about the new stories we've discussed the links to each of the referenced. Papers are on our website. Www dot naked.

facebook UK Molly Russell Google America China British government representative Peter County Ofcom Mark Zuckerberg instagram Dawson Adam Murphy Scott Peter
"diagnosis" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"diagnosis" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Sorry to Button Katie here from the naked scientists. Did you know we make other naked to the fraction of all humanity? Who has actually gotten a chance to see their own? Brain is very tiny and you are welcomed to that club. So if you enjoy musing over the mind reflecting on thought ought frankly you feel bamboozled by the brain checkout naked neuroscience blow? My face hurts now. So we don't go down into the creepy seller and turn the light on exactly access the full archive by a naked scientists dot com slash neuroscience subscribed to naked neuroscience. Wherever you get your podcast on the way new powers for the UK to regulate social media and our in depth look into prostate cancer now from very high altitudes to very high energies. Scientists have unlocked the next stage in the cutting edge that is experimental physics. This is an to facilities like the large Hadron collider where beams of tiny particles race around nearly the speed of light and then smashed into each other to reveal what they're made of the results shed light on the fundamental nature of the universe. The experiment is next step. Though is to up the ante using mules. These are essentially heavy electrons. Which can be collided at even higher energies but these have been very hard to make into a focused beam now. An international collaboration has managed to create that beam in what they call them you on is Asian cooling experiment or mice. I got some concise mice advice from research leader Chris Rogers. We've demonstrated a technique whereby we can take him of particles called Megan's we can squeeze them right down and accelerate them to really high energies because of the unique properties of millions. We can actually explore physics. Which is even beyond the scale which is available in the large Hadron Collider. Wow this is real futuristic. Yeah right that said An. No-one's developed a technique like this before which can really be used to handle moonbeams what exactly is immune to start with so it is like a really heavy electron have meals going through you pretty much. Every second of every day which come from cosmic rays. I've immune to me right now. That's pretty much right. What do they look like? Just like electrons except for a couple of special properties one. Is there much heavier than electrons. Almost two hundred times heavier than electrons and the other one is that they decay radioactively so they only live to millions of a second. That's bizarre. How'd you even deal with them? We have a special trick. Us leave if you accelerate particles to really high speeds as the particles get closer and closer to the speed of light. They live longer and longer. His Einstein's time dilation phenomenon. How do you make them you on your lap? We take a beam of protons accelerate those protons and then bash them into a target all sorts of other particles. Come out and some of these particles immunes and how have you been trying to deal with them in this particular experiment because the first time you've managed to get them into a beam correct? We've had millions in a beam before but we've never really managed to prepare a beam so that it would be suitable to accelerate them much more like a laser beam. If you like. We passed that meal and beam through absorbing medium and as the mules go through the absorb. They lose energy all of that hot gas slows down as it goes really absorb so then. We need to accelerate that being back up using a conventional. accelerates technique. What's this material? You're filtering them through. Is it something special in strange? We use I. The liquid hydrogen cooled down to a few tens of Kelvin always lithium metal with hydrogen embedded into the metal. Those are strange and weird. They're pretty cool. Bits of kit which we used to do it. Why does win? The meal ones go through the absorb they not the electrons of the atoms and when we not the electrons off the millions lose energy. That's what's called ionization. And that's why the techniques called on is Asian cooling. Now there's another thing which happens. They bashed into the center of the nucleus. And they scatter off flying off in all sorts of different durations. Now we don't want that so we have to pick special materials where the nucleus of the atom is as smooth as it possibly can be. Hydrogen has the smallest nucleus of any material and lithium has a pretty small nucleus as well. Is that why? It's taken so long to figure this out because you're trying to get materials with small enough nuclear nuclei nucleus Ukiah Nuclei. It's not just the material which we have to consider. We have to combine that with a possibly accelerator. Lattice and combining those two different things into one experiment was really tricky. What did it feel like when you finally managed it for the first time it was pretty cool? In fact we only cooled the beam by about ten percent of the full cooling channel which you would need a real meal collide facility but that was pretty cool. I'm what does this mean for physics? Is there really exciting? Science coming up that could potentially use. Mu On beams. The aim of our experiment then is to take this technique and then put it into a single immune collided where we collide beams of meals together. Mueller light is a really exciting because they let us reach much higher energies than are available using even existing facilities like large Hadron collider sern a large Hadron collider upgrade. It would be a large meal and Kaleida Large Mu on collider. That's cool should be. We'll have to wait and see what happens. When they try it Chris Russo from the Brotherhood appleton laboratory discussing the experiment. They call mice and which was published in the journal Nature. We're heading back in time because Adam Murphy's been looking at some cracking cutting edge science using eggshells to take a dinosaurs temperature Jurassic. Park is.

UK Katie Chris Russo Chris Rogers Brotherhood appleton laborator Megan Kelvin Adam Murphy Mueller Einstein