17 Burst results for "Diabetes Community"

"diabetes community" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

02:14 min | 2 weeks ago

"diabetes community" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

"Thanks for joining me. I'm really excited to catch up and and learn. I'm stuttering because i can't believe this is the first time we're talking to you. But thanks for coming on. I'll thank you raviol- super excited before we jump in and start talking about a raza. Can you give us some perspective. Kind of dial back because mankind is not. It's not a name that came out of nowhere. There's really important history. Can you talk about that a little bit. I sure mankind comes from our founder named alfred mann and now man was a true innovator he started i think seventeen companies and everything from you know to cook lawyer. Implants to the pacemaker To insulin pumps that many of us know. Today's medtronic used to be called mini. Med and now man built on pumps over the eighties nineties and was very successful and sold that company to medtronic and then he took literally one billion dollars of his own money and invested in mankind and he had put this coming together Through three companies the on the technology to make a freezer would was was really combination of companies. And the reason he was so dedicated as he saw in the market which we now see today on c. gm was that the variability in mealtime control was so high and fluctuations. You see the influence takes about an hour and a half to kick in. And it's hard to get real time control if you can't get a fast acting insulin. And so he stood up to make a real thing. Insulin so president inhaled Monarch and that was really what the magic was in our technology making a dry powder was was if you heard different face cream. We have basically large dob machines and our our factory reverie free dry the particles to make a freezer and Under stabilized monomer form. So when you're inhaling you're inhaling informed that soon as it's in your blood active for when you inject it has its heck summer and has the breakdown about forty five minutes. And that's how you can make it stabilize in injectable form But it has to break down and then starts working. And that's why there's always dislike effect between you know we see jekyll. On inhaled also very different products were categorized with mealtime rapid acting but named mankind comes from alabama and guy who probably sixty people in pumps there pumpkin. He created so on amazing. Gentlemen huge contributions diabetes and people alive today because of his work and his generosity. Rovan take that forward here and kids and frozen hilton

diabetes fresno Benny rizzo sanofi dr mike Stagno asthma inhaler wharton school of business united states cvs Mike
"diabetes community" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

02:17 min | 2 weeks ago

"diabetes community" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

"Welcome to another week of the show. Always glad to have you here. We aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with the focus on people who use insulin. And this week we're talking about the use of the only inhalable insulin. My son was diagnosed with type one right before he turned to he is sixteen. My husband has type two diabetes. I don't have diabetes. At all. But i have a background in broadcasting and that is how you get the podcast. I have to say that personally. My family is very interested in fresno. Benny really would like to try this. Of course as i mentioned in that tees up there. They're looking at pediatrics. he is still under eighteen. So it's not approved for his age group but we are watching it really closely and a lot of friends. A lot of bloggers and people in the diabetes community have talked about this for years and some things have changed. So i wanted to have them on the show and find out more so little bit of background for you. If you are brand new to all this af- rizzo was approved in the united states in two thousand fourteen and the company that makes it is mankind for a while it was sold by sanofi then. Mankind took it back. It's one of those things. Where sometimes the business side seems to have gotten more attention than the product itself. So what is a phrase of it is a powder it comes in cartridges and you suck it in you inhale it with a special inhaler device to me. It looks more like a whistle than a traditional inhaler like an asthma inhaler. It's like a big tube. A link up some photos in the show notes also link up the fresno websites so you can learn more and see their information and my guest this week is dr mike. Stagno the ceo of mankind now. He has a doctorate of pharmacy. He worked as a pharmacist behind the counter for cvs at the start of his career but then he went back to school and he got an mba from the wharton school of business. He's fun to talk to. He doesn't mince words and he truly believes in this product. I do have to tell you that. Mike mentions mono merrick insulin a couple of times. I'm gonna come back after the interview and explain more about that. Give you a better definition. Oh you really need to know. Is that it's faster than how liquid insulin is made. And all of that in just a moment but first diabetes connections is brought to you by.

diabetes fresno Benny rizzo sanofi dr mike Stagno asthma inhaler wharton school of business united states cvs Mike
"diabetes community" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

01:58 min | Last month

"diabetes community" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

"So you know, in the middle of those fabulous, teenage years and he's using tons and tons of insulin. And it seemed to me that we needed an insulin duration of like two to three hours and when they switched it on tandem it's it's five. I really fought on that thinking. This is going to be a disaster and it was fine. It woke. Really well. So it's one of those interesting things once you get in an automated system and realize in this is my opinion. Once you realize how much work you were doing to try to stay in range. It's kind of nice way to let that system, take over. Once you trust it, and I would assume that. That's what you found in these studies. I mean, you mentioned that people spent more time in range, but let me give you the floor. Take the minute or two to talk about life in the studies that, you know, you've been kind of putting it out with different age groups over the last couple of weeks and months, to take a moment to brag about the studies. Yeah. Where, you know, so grateful to the diabetes Community who really gave this product life through our clinical studies. So I'm just deeply grateful for every patient. In fact, he took part in it cuz without them, you know, be a product, but it wouldn't be only pot five. And so it was really a ton of work that we I feel like has been many years. Thank you. Yeah, we've worked really hard on this algorithm to get it pretty much as good as it could be. And, you know, back in 2019 as we were preparing to do this clinical wage. I really wasn't sure that how our results would stack up, but I have to say that I'm completely blown away by how well algorithm has performed. So in the talk first about our 6 to 270 year old age groups, so the first lot of results that came out. Cannot much Choice. Yeah, we had essentially two groups that we had the children which were fixed to fourteen years of age..

diabetes
"diabetes community" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

01:52 min | 2 months ago

"diabetes community" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

"Tips and tricks especially as we get closer to school starting to find other families in your area all right before. I let you go if you've listened for this long as you are listening to this episode. If you listen as it goes live. Benny knock on. Wood should be coming home from israel today on the same taping. It's still a couple of days away but it will have been a month. And i should be picking him up at the airport as this episode is airing. I am hoping that after he sleeps and showers your sleep for a couple of days that he will do a debriefing on the show and talk to me about what it was like not just going to israel with camp for a month but what it was like doing all the diabetes stuff completely on his own at this point. I don't really know a lot. I've seen his numbers. And i think i know what's going on but i really want to hear it from him so couple of days left. I can do it keep breathing. Oh my gosh. This has been so stressful. And i will share more with you all warts and all share the honest story but not until he's back and home safe all right. Thank you so much to my editor. John buchanan audio editing solutions. Thank you so much for listening in the news. Every wednesday live on facebook at four thirty and then we turn that around into a friday podcast episode. Do not miss out in. The news is like six or seven minutes. It's real quick. I'm trying to get into five minutes. But i can't get into five minutes. It's always six or seven minutes long. There's just so much good stuff happening. And news to bring you from the diabetes community so join me every wednesday live for that or listen for the episode here. I will you back here in just a couple of days until then be kind to yourself. Diabetes connections is production of stations media. Alright to served or rungs avenged..

israel Benny Diabetes Wood John buchanan facebook
"diabetes community" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

The Cycling Podcast

07:21 min | 2 months ago

"diabetes community" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

"For success. Run some brand professional cyclist with team. Novo nordisk at the worlds first all diabetes professional cycling team twenty twenty. One is a huge Yeah fourteen gets the hundred year of the discovery of insulin. Obviously this year is a massive step towards the whole diabetes community around the world and we want to show what's possible with diabetes coming into the back end of the season. Now we've got tour of denmark and a main sponsor never notice danish show. That's a huge goal. Rose hadn't into twenty twenty. Two is is another huge air and we hope to capitalize on that for me personally in twenty twenty two we actually have the commonwealth games again so i hope be selected for the olive mon- for that for that race. You know we've got a huge wealth of talent cavendish mark christian whilst i represent the isle of man. I'm representing myself team. Novo nordisk and the whole diabetes community whilst they do that and then every single one of team novo nordisk wants to win. We want to win together. We want to do the best for each other for ourselves for the team. And for the whole diabetes community around the world. And that's what we show day inundate when we got on the bike we race to inspire educate empower everyone around the world affected by diabetes. And we hope that we can continue that through the rest of two twenty twenty one and throughout twenty twenty two. I headed to calendar. She's adopted home county of essex to interview him for a chapter of the cycling theology that ended up being called zen and the art of grandeur. Sprinting he suggested we meet a little bistro. He knew there early and waited. He arrived in a very small sky-blue jagua car and after each sat down. And we'd said hello. I took a challenge with a gentle junk nice. Colorado said is not team sky. Blue it french racing blue. He said which just the beginning of a snarl on his lips a snarl. I managed to defuse with a broad smile so he knew i was pulling his leg. We did something to eight. I chose the white bank which was served in a small flowerpot which he found amusing. I wanted to try to unpick the bunch sprint from the inside to learn about the chaos and choreography. The speed both of wheels and decision. Making the thing about speaking to kevin dish about this sort of thing is that only really have to do is lead him out and he's off plant an idea then pull over and watch him hit top speed. He started talking about his own physiology. Put me on regan the lab and he probably wouldn't even call me. Sprint tastes teams. Guys coach tim harrison told him during the twenty twelve tool. I find it harder to understand how you can finish the tool then do understanding how bradley wiggins can win it. Kevin talked about the makeup of the muscles. The perfect balance between fast and slow twitch muscle fibers slow twitch muscles contract slowly but can keep going for a long time so they could for endurance fast twitch muscles contract quickly they away the speed comes from but they also tire quickly having the balance between the two it. What makes kevin dish athlete. He is endeared. Cycling anaerobic says ninety percent of the road cyclists condu- the muscle damage track sprinters. Do track sprint. Chris hoy goes so deep so arabic that they destroy they muscles but they can't suffer for a long time like a road cyclist track sprinting. Pain road cycling is suffering being a road sprint. Suffering i but still being able to inflict pain on yourself at the end. People think that we lazy that we don't do a stroke of work into the last two hundred meters but we have to get their first. Then be able to out fifteen hundred watts. Whatever alex dowsett. Who's lead out man from obvious star now. Says he finishes his lead out and he's absolutely finished he said i can't understand how you manage to sprint off to that. The thing is we're tired but we can still find that acceleration when it matters. Perhaps it's all the talk about muscles twitching or maybe it's a salty white bank but while kevin dishes stood in full flow. I fail. And i'm mistake Pain in the back of my cough without even thinking about it. I'll give a little yelp and leap out of my seat sending my chair toppling backwards a. You okay off. Kevin dish cramp. Yes yes. I wouldn't put before mumbling rather pathetically something about it being a warm day an explaining. Ibm for three hour bike. Ride that morning when he stopped laughing. He says. Point your toes a need your muscle with your thumbs hurts. But it stops to cramp here and the lesson on muscles a later. The two thousand fourteen tour started in harrogate his mum's hometown somewhere combination. You well from child had holidays with twenty. Five states wins to his name by now. Join the third on your time list with andre luke. There was nevertheless a big hole in his list of achievements. Cavendish would yet to pull on the my joan where better to do it than on british roads. On the opening day of the tour de france. it was a chapter written in advance. Us ragged behind. They realize cancel. Our mayor of to the surprise is often five hundred. Cavernous go to comedies. Too far down here. Cancel all is not gonna make it get let out by deg all been a crash is gone down. The line took whales at the breakaway. Goes clear now. And he's gonna be the second catholic challenge. Cates tried to go for the line here. It's gonna be a desperately close but it's gonna be the same as last year. Baugh sell kindle takes victory on the line on a gain as a result as a crash and that is a terrible scene for us on the road to your wheels mark in all sorts of trouble when it should have been a day of glory for. That's so sad. There was the tuck to his elbows. Cavernous leaning on simon gerrans and then the earth gave away and they both went down on the floor. No i think the first thing to specifies marxism. He's admitted he made a mistake. Today went for gap. That wasn't there. And he's he's code or it's gonna cool guarantees to apologize. He is number of rental. But i don't really see it as as being the problem tonight. I think it has been a bit of a recurring theme marks created when he has been struggling and bothered accounts. He seemed very very good form. But when i say struggling. I mean i'm when he's under pressure and he's the under pressure at the moment. East anyhow something to prove consensus seems to be the capital has the edge on him now so when he sort of straining I've always felt that he's more liable to take risks sometimes irresponsible race the example. That always come on these. The period in two thousand ten just before the toyota franz particularly toured switzerland where he comes involved in sort of infamous crush with heinrich. How slow and that to me. That year was symptomatic of martin. Not being in particularly good form really struggling to find his best. And you know. I've always thought that the day that the mob becomes a really a good lose is day. He'll start losing his edge. And an and part of it is about refusing to lose. And you know. And.

diabetes kevin dish Novo nordisk cavendish mark christian white bank tim harrison novo nordisk alex dowsett kevin dishes bradley wiggins sprint Kevin dish denmark Chris hoy essex regan andre luke Rose
"diabetes community" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

05:43 min | 2 months ago

"diabetes community" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

"Discount g. Six right now. You've got studies that we presented at eighteen last week or that were presented by physicians. That were very well aware of the mobile steady which was for patients with diabetes. Who on basal insulin. Only you start a study like that. It's kind of risk because you ask yourself the question. What happens if it doesn't work. Will it works. And and what we learned is these patients. Even though they're not making a decision every four or five six hours for eating they are making decisions about what they do and how they exercise when they can see data and they can see the effects of what goes on in their lives and their time. It rained goes up significantly. If they can see what. They're timing ranges you know they've been operating in the dark and people would argue. They don't need it all the time like i do. And so that study we think is just Really good and we'll be the basis hopefully someday forgetting gm coverage for that group of patients and so we'll push on that one. There's another study we had last week or at. Att early in the month published in belgium where a coalition of diabetes gurus. I guess over there is best icon. It's really the leaders. In belgium. diabetes community took a bunch of intermittent see jam users and put him on decks g six for an extended period of time and then we looked to see what happened. And what we size on real time see. Gm patients have better in every category every single category. time range. Hyper hypo you name it. They did better so we really did. Validate the next equation. A over competitors with that study and we think it's important to realize real time. See jam it is important. It is important that they be accessible. And and and the alerts or something that you can use. There are other studies being presented by other people in the tactical arena. Kaiser's got a study where they show patients do well on duos got several studies. There across the board at the evidence is building for these other markets but it starts at the beginning obviously with automated hands on delivery and we work down. But we've had information presented across the board showing utility decks comment. If you've been to this study ten this many ten years ago..

diabetes belgium gm Gm Kaiser
"diabetes community" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

Texas Titans Podcast

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes community" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

"You know like your daughter like me in two thousand five. In two or three years is going to be very different. Yeah and I am excited about that outlook. There's a lot of different technology. There's things like continuous glucose monitoring things like closed loop higher hybrid close loop systems. There were coming along way insulin technology. There are certain challenges. Access being primary diabetes is expensive everybody needs insulin. But most people make it on their own and to exaggeratedly injected is very expensive and especially in the United States, there's a lot of. We have a serious problem. Yeah. So anyway, they don't tell you all those challenges on day one but. I have to say that relationship that I had given to me by doctors and supported by my parents which who I credit for basically everything great I've ever done. was essential to being able to tell the rest of the story that we're GonNa talk about today, which is my life since that diagnosis. Well, and there's one thing I want to cover with you too. So the audience knows because again, you know us us basically kind of swimming in the same soup of people that we listened to you know and looks like we we're always looking for a lot of. HACKS and Best Best Practices for life in general one of the things that Tanya can oval off you who is one of the that was our. Top One educator from J. D. R. F. That came over and has been a phenomenal friend ever since I need to stop you because I got gotta give Tanya. Shadow billboard. When I decided to do my podcast doing things and I wanted to get more involved with the diabetes community. One of those hacks I learned was to go on event bright find events that are related to what you WANNA do in email the the organizer. Tanya emailed at tiny responded. We had lunch at whole foods almost five years ago and she was GonNa come to my wedding. She is become a huge. Not only friend collaborator but has opened me up to so many of the opportunities that I've been given within jd F. especially without her. and. Just being Gung Ho and begin a credible person. Yeah. I just out mentally grateful to her shout to and I could not agree more and she's actually been on. She's a Texas Titan man look at that. He is Texas tied as is her partner Willie who also Rockstar Yeah I mean that's just proof that like there's someone for everyone willy is an absolute monstrosity of good. Young huge fan that dude a walking angel for sure. Well, one of the things that Tanya told us. Early on was that it may not happen in a week it may not happen in a year but at some point she's GonNa get angry because in again to to the listener you have to understand something. And this has happened. You know we've been at the beach and we walked down to a restaurant and abby forgets her purse you know. If it's her big sister rile and I said, we need your purse. You know you're not paying for it. Anyway. That's for sure you. I know but with with you guys, you forget your your con- your what are the things that you need to live? It's a little bit more calculation involved whenever you leave the House it's constantly is reminder and eventually. You Know Tanya told us she's GonNa get angry there will be a time and she may rebel..

Tanya Texas United States J. D. R. F. Gung Ho abby partner Willie
"diabetes community" Discussed on Fancy Free Podcast

Fancy Free Podcast

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes community" Discussed on Fancy Free Podcast

"Success in life whatever success is supposed to me and sure there's a lot of things his parents that we can do that are better than other choices we could make. But this idea of being perfect is such a myth and the diabetes community where there are so many numbers and there are so many hurdles and obstacles and choices to make the idea that if I only try harder or do it this way, it'll be perfect and then we'll be okay is really pervasive and so my whole philosophy has always been at, it's not perfect but safe and happy, and if I can get my kids safe and happy I'm doing a. Great job as a parent and it is okay to say I am doing great right we all have that mom fail you know the worst and it's fun and humorous and I think it's it's wonderful. It's a wonderful entry into the conversation. But but at the end of the day when you're sitting alone, it's okay not to be self deprecating and saying you know what I didn't read to my kids once today and they learned a little bit of self reliance or I've read six books to them because they just wouldn't go to bed but boy, that's a great memory. I'm going to enjoy believe it or not when they're eighteen. You know I always say that my kids they cured me of perfectionism because I I did suffer from perfectionist tendencies all throughout my life and it created so much anxiety and when I finally decided listen sister there's no way to achieve perfection here. I it was almost like a relief you know is a really I did something recently that I highly recommend I follow a lot of people on Instagram I don't know why follow half these people but I noticed that I was following people who were having these like spectacularly Lit Beach Vacations and immaculate kitchen shots and you know beautiful children who were not just beautiful but who were glowing Would've doing following these people who obviously have professional crew following them around. This is not making me feel good. This does workday. And these people don't care if I follow them or not. So I followed a bunch of your mom influencers and it just made me feel better because I wasn't getting what I needed out of their feed. Now, somebody else might someone else might be aspirational lifestyle. They might look at the artwork or the clothing or just make you feel good with their morning coffee to see those pictures but it wasn't working for me and I I on followed it I kind of felt bad like, Oh, I'm sorry. What do you does your phone for deal? Don't care. They don't know when you really start thinking about what goes on behind a lot of those photos in the work that goes in it. It's it's a little bit list to me. It's comforting because I don't have a camera crew and I have a lighting guy I don't have a hair and makeup dude one of the feeds that I recently started following when I went to. Look at her blog I learned this is her and her husband's full-time job right their house and their blog, and they're instagram and all that stuff. That's what they both do for living in..

instagram Lit Beach
"diabetes community" Discussed on Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes community" Discussed on Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

"I think these barrier systems are really important. There's three main barrier systems. We have skin than the the gut lining and the blood brain barrier. Those are really are three main walls if you will. To protect. Important areas and inflammation. Destroys them you know it it. chronic systemic inflammation tears, those walls apart, and that in turn leads to think much of the disease that we're seeing today. So you know a lot of people understand that. These are somehow connected inflammation, but maybe not exactly how and I think that's one of the main mechanisms is? That, inflammatory process there's collateral damage, and some of that damage is a breaking down these barriers, and when those barriers get broken down. You know now it's like you know. The walls are coming down to to the fortress, and the enemies are getting through. You know so and that. Can Happen in the brain you know and we see all sorts of brain issues. It can happen in the gut, which thing gets into our systemic blood flow, and can lead to problems anywhere a particularly vascular issues, and then you know the skin often times in the skins interesting, because you can use the scan as a diagnostic tool. You know when you see. inflammatory issues, rashes and pigmentation problems and just a lacklustre appearance of the skin. You know that. Those other barrier systems are probably damaged as well I add totally absolutely, and so ultimately you know looking at lifestyle we know sugar plays a huge role with all of this sugar, starches and whatnot, and so most people in our westernized countries were addicted to sugar. Starch should learn some strategies that you use with people are coming in. See You to help. Basically break those addictions in start transitioning night. I think that's really important in in the diabetes community. We see this all the time so i. were. November! Is Diabetes Awareness Month and Diabetes Day was recently and I'm reminded of this every year. Because the these diabetes organizations for whatever reason they love to put pictures of people with cupcakes and cakes and cookies up on Diabetes Awareness, day and for some reason they want to make people aware that diabetes is not caused by eating too much sugar. You know that's like their main push. They're they're very into like they don't want to kill people which I I understand, but I think it's unfortunately. It's not really a very good message because. I. Don't think those things are good for anybody and particularly, if you, can't process glucose properly. so I think the mindset is the most important thing and I and I like to get that really clear with people if somebody is, has sealy act disease and they're gluten intolerant. How much gluten should.

"diabetes community" Discussed on Stance

Stance

08:30 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes community" Discussed on Stance

"Am helping people to see things from plus it they find goal and make them happy. That's makes me happy. My name is mighty. SORTA know so I am from what a Lahar out. That's in Mexico and I. Am an English teacher, but right now my coordinator at a language center. I'm feeling a little bit stress. I normally work at enough face, but right now I have to do everything from home and I have all the students parents teachers calling me every single moment at thousand emails. But I am also happy because I have a lot of time for me. My life is not very social normally at I. do enjoy shopping so right now. I have to do it online, and it's not the same feeling, so that's the thing that I really means the most going shopping. Here. I have noticed it I am very organized. That's something that I normally don't use US an addictive to describe myself because I normally have things all over the place. Is kind of an organization because I can get everything done at the moment has to be done. Any doesn't have to be all in the order that someone else wants. It has to be in my order. Here in Mexico. Social contact is very very important. We are very fun of having people around as of making parties of. Going out of France in that something that we as a human context. We've just heard from Mirasol Rosarno Greta Lahara Mexico. You. Our Koha in some Paulo Brazil Maggie Chang in Hong Kong China Isabel Pittman in Drum France Sarah Pollen, who lives in you-you'd Barley and Grace Naballah in compiler Uganda thanks to all of you, and if you want to share a recording, these goto starts podcast dot com, the contact us page would absolutely love to hear from you. So across the world cove in nineteen is exposed racial inequality, which we knew is always there, but it seems to the first time we are seeing real time data is laying bare. The discriminatory effects black people face in the UK, and in the US now in the UK. We are four times more likely to die during covid nineteen, according to our own figgers at stones, you wanted to discuss the data with a UK focus and wanting to find out how it can inform decisions now as well as interrogate. What is she missing? I'm joined by SINEAD. Dennis, who's biochemist's journalist and campaigner. Campaigner she works in Healthcare Research, managing and setting up clinical research partnerships in the UK based in any hospitals. She's joined by Charlene. Prempeh who has worked at some of the top media and arts companies in cultural and digital marketing, including the Guardian BBC freeze, and she writes in a freelance capacity on black culture. Last year she launched Vibe Khoo teck to address the absence of black voices in technology conversations I started by asking them. If they're surprised to find that black people in the UK were four times more likely to die Toco vid nineteen as soon as I heard that before. I knew that this was come in like many of these is. That people are disproportionately affected, and when you look at the underlying causes of why that people have west help healthcare outcomes, and he's just been triggers for Covid, so for example, the mistrust between the black community and healthcare professionals, so actually not always believe in the message is that healthcare professionals are delivering or actually engage in any of information that comes from healthcare professionals was always going to be an issue in a cave nineteen, and that's something that we've seen in the leave his community in the sequel community. Community Diabetes Diabetes Community that the messages from healthcare professionals just didn't seem to reach these communities as effectively to get a bit more into that as well know why. It doesn't reach different communities, and if more communities are in quote to reach an all that kind of stuff and but Charlie. What do you think when you heard these stats? What? What were you thinking? So compete the same Schnee when I heard the stats, I I wasn't surprised at all actually initially, when as if you guys remember? At the end of March right at the beginning of this Kayla Williams. Passed away, and she was a black woman who was suffering from covid nineteen symptoms when she called the ambulance services. They told her that she wasn't a priority and that she should stay at home and just kind of self medicate. and. She died kind of quite soon after that, and soon as that happened I kind of just fell immediately that there was going to be a kind of train of black deaths, either going to be because we weren't being listened to in the right way, all kind of ideas that knaves just raised about the negative mistrust because I think they've kind of the multiple reasons. Why Black people dying more than other races as of nineteen and then not just at nineteen, but you said people die more. I should die more generally so. We audley there was a report that came out with few weeks ago, an ATS for Paul from Nuffield in Oxford's showing that black people just die more, and for some kind of slipped under the radar, and we all know that about black women and five times more likely to die in childbirth white women. So this is just another example of that. What sort of data you think we're missing when we're talking about black women and and pregnancy how we're five times more likely and tell me about that moment when you remember hearing that information and connecting it to yourself, so I've got quite still opinions about this. Because like I've been I've been looking into it quite adept so I go in terms of what kind of data we missing. Missing basically all the data that will help us understand the problem right now. We've got to quantitative data, so we know we know that statistic. We know that we're more likely to die, but we don't have any of the more granular information as to why that might be and that kind of information going to be much more kind of qualitative, so that I talk to people understanding what kind of care. CARE, they've had an understanding specifically, actually how that care differs to our white counterparts, and that's really what I think is the problem in terms of meeting data here as well as in other issues with lack health is that we've got the kind of top headline information, but we don't have any understanding of the nuances which making those things happen, and even when we controlled fins like socioeconomic disadvantage and education. Poverty, etc, we still don't have a clearer picture. What we need to do is speak to the community more as well as the people treating us to get a deeper understanding of what all the underlying issues are I luckily has about the statistic ofter attacked Lucky. Lucky my son, because I think if I'd have gone in to the whole process knowing the I with more likely to die. The stress. And anxiety that would have caused. Would been kind of awful. But when I heard it again, I wasn't particularly shocked like my interaction with the party to that for my own health or the health of family members. You kind of saw, there were kind of casual at credit. Casually racist moments in between all of that. We're though like assume you have high blood, pressure or seem. You have a bad diet that you eat too much salt, or they'll be tune in scientific way. It might speak to middle class. White person so yeah, it was. It was awful awful to hear, but it wasn't a shock, but as surely mistaken I was just him not alone, because this or things I considered matter before, and when we think about women to be more likely to die Intel. Breath again. We have these facts. We have these figures, but we don't have any evidence to support a better way, and that's what really worries me..

UK Mexico US Mirasol Rosarno Greta Lahara M Community Diabetes Diabetes Co Covid France coordinator Healthcare Research Vibe Khoo teck language center Intel Paulo Brazil Maggie Chang Charlene BBC Uganda Kayla Williams Dennis
"diabetes community" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

Charlotte Readers Podcast

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes community" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

"Never over. I mean you start. You get the diagnosis. And it's a lifetime and at some point. Okay this is a question That a friend of mine. I'll give I didn't come up with this but I think it's a great question. What are some of the positives for the parent and the Child of having this disease? What are the positives? The only positive. Well there's a couple I would say our relationship is wonderful in. We're closer you're physically closer when he was smaller. I mean the downside of this. We're physically closer. Could stab him with things but I do also think of the relationships. I've made the best part about the diabetes community. It is you just full of people with incredible empathy. Everyone is willing to help. Everyone seems to take on a role whether it's getting behind a microphone or connecting people. Or you're an engineer. So now you're gonNA hack white hat hacker code thing. That's going to help everybody else. Which is a whole other story altogether but everybody seems to really engage and take part. There's very few people in the diabetes community parents at least who do not raise their hand and step up and help other. People are saying that anybody would want us to be a couple of answers that heard at this conference. One person said it helps a child develop self reliance because at some point. They're going to leave home and they're gonNA have to take care of this on their own and they also learn how to eat healthy and learn other things that maybe some people don't ever so anyway So last writing life question. What has writing this book. Mitt to you and your personal journey Not just as a writer but For yourself personally. This might be a weird answer because obviously when we write we grow we learn we flex muscles that we haven't used before it's incredibly isolating but also rewarding but can I be honest and say it's also given me a weird legitimacy. I mean I'm the same person I was before I wrote this book but it seems I don't know maybe all authors think this or find this out and don't say this it's almost like nat. Now I know what I'm talking about. It's so funny because I had this information before I've been doing the podcast for a long time. I've been speaking but now that you have a book your legitimate which I think is really interesting. I don't know maybe for a whole topic I show for another time. But certainly for me it it allowed me to really crystallize some of my philosophies and help me. Look even look at my son's diabetes. Even now he's fifteen and largely self reliant in different ways and be careful and cognizant of helping him in ways that I couldn't when he was two years old and to see come on the podcast from time to time he does. He does He. He might have. I think you like you're gonNA find out. He listens to this if he does listen to this. I think he's just come on and say his piece. And so what's next in the PODCAST book world for Stacey Sam's Gosh? Isn't that the question? I actually have two e books. I'm working on on hope to be released this summer. When this fall and those are based on transcriptions from the podcast I'd have to separate projects. One is very general information interviews. I usually talk to people about their experience with type one but I did a bunch of interviews about basic information. What are key tones? What is low blood sugar right? How what are the? What's the newest Bola and I was trying to think? What does that just means giving medication? Look in dictionary accident. Get your book out to look and see a whole different language. You talked about the learning curve. The hospital for three days. It's crazy how much you have to learn so okay so you're going to keep keep on talking. I don't know that I could stop if I wanted to put it out every week. Podcast I guess this weekly. I started some shorter episodes this year. So it's twice weekly. We'll see if I can keep that up so any Any parting advice for a for parents who find themselves in the very difficult situation of getting a diagnosis whether the child is to five. Ten twelve whatever Any thoughts on on. What what to do I would say. Especially with diabetes. This generation is. I don't WanNa use the word lucky. But is luckier than previous generations. People were told in the nineteen nineties. You'RE GONNA have to drop out of college. You can't play sports. You know your life is over. Go home and wait to be blind. I know people who were told this in the ninety s and our kids are not told that they are told you. Because it's true you can live a long and healthy life with type one diabetes so my best appearances find the people who overcame those odds. There are people with type one diabetes and all it takes his Google who work at NASA who are Miss America pageant winners. Who are I mean? I just think about PODCAST GUESTS. Professional Athletes Actors. You know business people. You know there's a guy working a boring job in an office who has type. One was very successful life just as good of a role model as the guy who climbed Mount Everest with type one diabetes. Search those people out. But I guess that that's more for the parents because the kids today with type one diagnose generally unless we tell them otherwise. They're not slowing down. We as parents. I think need more reassurance. So we can give that to them but seek out those success stories and if you're hearing negatively or you're hearing fear don't go to facebook go to your healthcare provider and said. I heard this. This is worrying me. What is the real deal? Let them tell you don't let a well-meaning personal facebook scary good advice no matter what you're doing whether it's type one diabetes or some other chronic illness So Hey Stacy. Thanks much listeners. There's going to be information. The show notes the best. Ac and links To podcast into book and all kind of stacy thanks for being on the. Thank you so much for the opportunity. It was great to talk to you. Well that's it for today. Another fun author giving voice to the written work. Landis will be back next Friday getting under the covers with another interesting author but before then coming on Tuesday we'll have another long form episode with readings and conversations about the written word and the writing life of a local or regional author. Landis love helping authors give voice to their written words but he can't do it alone if you're a clown to help me help authors give voice to the written word. Please consider becoming a member supporter. We'd love to have you as a member. Now when you join at certain levels will give you access. Memorably content curated by the authors. Would you like to hear more from the authors? Perhaps a variety of presentations on writing craft or additional readings or tips on marketing and social media. Would you like some behind the scenes insights and reflections from me or some entity content from previous episodes without interruptions? You can find out more about these member only benefits and how to become a member supporter at Charlotte readers. Podcast DOT COM. Thank you for your sport and thank you for listening until next week. I'm Landis way for Charlotte Readers podcast..

diabetes Landis Stacy Mount Everest facebook Charlotte engineer Mitt Stacey Sam Charlotte Readers Google NASA writer America
"diabetes community" Discussed on Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes community" Discussed on Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

"The science has evolved of flooding meditation. Then my treatment has evolved as well. I worked very closely with by healthcare. I'm a huge proponent. That diabetes is a team. Sport breaks a full team to successfully manage diabetes when it comes down to medical professionals for sure by chronology Dr Peters Diabetes Educator Donna. Working with the nutritionist. My exercise physiologist integrated that. But it's also my team at home. It's it's my wife. My parents my sister. My friends that I'm having a hard day on burned out. They're the ones that support me healthy and encourage me Even people the diabetes community are the people that understand what I what I go through every day and sometimes reaching out to ban and just talking through challenges they faced or how things have gone really well for the last couple of weeks Is I think that's an important part of vantage get talked about Managing Diabetes exported working within that team to continue to ask questions about what infringer available. What injection method allergies are out there? how how things worked for me? It find having problems if I have an issue with by JAB activity. Is someone else they that overcome that. I think that that dialogue is really important to keep getting better lie. I think families are really important component. My former husband is a type. One of forty four years and doesn't have any diabetes complications. And we're really good friends and I was meeting recently. Were talking about blood. Sugars new said. Don't you remember you know? We got married in her late twenties. I don't remember every time my blood sugar was high said. Don't worry it's GonNa come down and it really made a difference and I said I really said that he's like yeah and it helped so I really. It's interesting because even for me I you know having these conversations you forget that how important your family is. Because it's easy are they're that first line of support and and sometime. I definitely kill badly. That has to get the deal with my Mood swing by blood. Sugar Swing sometime and the Beeping of my my desk com g six bedside table in the middle of the night those sorts of things. I feel badly that when she's trying to sleep and especially at the moment she's pregnant and where Trying to make sure she gets arrest. And sometimes especially if I'm hovering around and alarm blood sugar and I've a glowing above the flow it It doesn't always wake me up because I I hear it. I understand by punchers. Okay right around that alarm number. I'm fine but it definitely wakes her up. I feel badly about. I think you know as you were saying. Family's really important but also diabetes is a family disease you know. Everyone learned to participate. I know for me when I got involved with my former husband. I was really impressed. The way he manages diabetes. He really was proactive. He wasn't embarrassed about it. And the way he modeled. It was the way I expected everyone to being than later when I start working in the industry I realized that not. Everyone's like that so modeling that in having the support and having your family support you know rather than publicly shaming you for example some people write me and say hey you know i. I dated someone and they tested their blood sugar at the table. Unite isn't that improper knows like I said No. It's not so so I think that's I think to me that's one of the great things about having worked with the race with influence program for the last twelve years is being able to green diabetes into the light a little bit too to kind of remove some of those stigmas that people talk about And I can't remember who it was. It was another notice patient lassiter and he was talking about. How is his grandmother had diabetes and and they didn't talk about it they said. Oh she she's got the sugar just kind of it was. It was just kind of a nord or almost minimized and now the conversation around diabetes has changed part of it is the growth of the the community wants. Take Two's And access all right access and communication. I think social media podcast boggs. Online interaction has really allowed the conversation within the diabetes community to to remove that stick by to to make it more of a interactive dialogue with all of the stakeholders within the the disease state from. You know medication. Companies to healthcare professionals to patients to advocates to passengers. There's there's there's this great continuing to grow as low energy of bow the conversation and and the future And then something that you know being involved with no one can being part grace within flip program. I think my rookie year in Indycar in twenty eleven in fact couple years before that has been a lot of fun to be part of and does the new team that you're racing with is something that they're learning about also taken it upon themselves. They know the difference between type one type two or do you feel a responsibility to them with that. Like oh it's funny. You say a responsibility to educate I think I see it as an opportunity to you educate The new team for me. It's really exciting on a professional level to raise for somebody like Aj four Aj for history with indycar racing thing within the Indianapolis Motor speedway general as a driver. He's one all over the world. Some of US psychotic races out there and touch was the first four time winner of the Indianapolis five hundred. That's pretty rarified. Air and he has his face on the Warner Trophy. Times fighting it out with five hundred in five different decades and you talk about that and how challenging it is to just make indy five hundred not only did he make it in five different decades. But then he went on to win it four times so his history as a driver. Is it Tommy? The whole team and a culture of the team the being able to to learn from him and and work with their team at at in the card every car race. This year is pretty exciting. I think it's it's early days within by awareness and education campaign within the the race team but there are a couple of team members mechanics team managers. But I've worked with at previous rates. So they're pretty aware and they're really excited to to continue to learn and and learn about the race with programming. Will THAT BE TRUMP? Let let me ask you with the decks COM G. Sex.

diabetes Dr Peters Indianapolis Motor speedway US Tommy Family lassiter Warner Trophy Aj
"diabetes community" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

The mindbodygreen Podcast

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes community" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

"The control group. Just following standard diabetes care and the other group Got Standard Diabetes Care Plus Dietary Terry intervention which was very similar to our traffic light system. They are free living people just being taught how to eat. Show them the movie forks over knives to the all the carbohydrate Heidrich food you want all the potatoes all the fruits or wherever you want lots of Greens you gotta limit. The high fat foods limit the avocados limit the nuts and seeds. Keep your percent percent of calories from fat between seven fifteen percent. That's what they and so in this study. They reported the greatest weight loss of any Saudi ever published changed without calorie restriction and without exercise at six and twelve months so lost twenty six pounds at six months they also saw every single participant spent reduced their medication use. They saw a one. C value dropped from six point zero to five point five in the intervention group in the Control Group agency went up five point five percent to five point seven so they went. Doing Standard Diabetes Care became more diabetic. Moving into the prediabetes category. So it was great study and it just again illustrates. When you're eating healthy whole foods you genuinely can eat large amounts really is? It's the balked that gets you fall. It's the fiber plus the water that makes the food so satisfying. And by the time. You're like mechanically I. I don't even food. You haven't eaten that many calories. It's sort sort of naturally calorie restricting. You could adjust the calorie density if you want to either lose weight or gain weight all within the parameters of the green foods that we have listed in the book concerns. Okay the question is what are we going to be talking about six months from now. Yeah Okay here's what I think. There's a difference between what I want to be talking about what I think the world world is what I think the world is going to be talking about is going to be key Tokyo. Tokyo's can get it's GonNa get even more hardcore Kito and there's going to be a lot more conversation about is the Ketogenic Diet something. That's actually good for long term health. Because there's a substantial number of short term studies that are showing improvements in ten weeks or three months or six months but over the course of the time. We're going to get these studies. They're going to be two two years five years and beyond and I think that's going to be a big topic of conversation. Do I wanNA talk about that. Sure I think it's moderately partly interesting. I would rather talk about the true power of eating carbohydrate rich foods like I mean it's broken record. At this point I would love to see see more studies showing the true metabolic power of just like what rob you're saying of a diet that contains more fruits a diet that contains more starchy the vegetables with out calorie restriction. That's what I wanna see and I think that the evidence is there. The evidence has been there for a long time. I would like it to become more popular. I would like it to become more mainstream. Because that's where the true beauty of a plant based Diet lies and that's where the true I think a lot of science that's yet to be discovered lies but yet somehow the conversation is not really focused on that and the conversation has more in the sort of How do I eat more fat more bacon more cheese? Look I always go back my favorite quote about nutrition which I think describes my philosophy. Eh Michael Pollen eat food not too much mostly plants right it's pretty straightforward. Yeah I can do that yeah. It's a very simple philosophy. That's one of the things and we've also learned over. The course of time is that this world can get really really really complicated. And we can zoom down into tiny little details about arguing where the triglycerides entered word exited converted Yada Yada and Dino Valente Genesis here and there we can geek out on all that stuff is fine but at the end of the day again. What matters is the public health recommendations recommendations? What matters is what people are are actually doing in the real world and if you have a philosophy that's just that simple you know eat? The by the consensus here amongst many different types of researchers now is eat a diet that is mostly plants right small amounts of animal food. And if you do that you reduce your stress levels you exercise frequently bone. That's the one more thing that people are going to talk about in the world of diabetes health specifically sure it'll be like ahead of the curve because this this is going to become a big deal going on the record on the record. The diabetes world is going to get fascinated with the concept of time in range and that is basically a metric where we're using continuous glucose monitors which measure our bug because every five minutes and again these are becoming a big deal type twos as well with the freestyle. Lebron some measure of how much time are we spending in a specific range and the diabetes community specifically for type. One have said that the goal range is between seventy the and one eighty he wanted to be there for a minimum of seventy percent of the day. Okay now you don't WanNa be low which is below seventy for any more than four percent of of the day and then above one eighty minimize as much as possible and unfortunately the type one community at large. We're not doing well. So people who are using a multiple daily injections or decks COM G. Six they're getting time in range. Roughly between fifty sixty five percent people who start using an insulin pump. They get a little bit improved time in range. Maybe closer to seventy percent people who use a closed loop system where continuous glucose monitor talk to the insulin. Insulin pump and sort of acts as a pancreas a calling. An artificial pancreas is a recent study. Just come out came out. In Two Thousand Nineteen New England Journal of Medicine. They found people are getting closer. To the seventy five percent time and range that was the average and so this metric people are going to talk about as being more important than a one-seat especially with type one because because the criticism is that if you have a lot of low blood glucose readings that's GonNa change the average and you can get a artificially low A.. ONC- like you you really going up. and down spending a lotta time high but because if you have enough lows that average will come out good and you can get solid one-seat so we've decided to start really paying attention to this and really be able to address that concern so I personally have been monitoring my timing range very diligently and I'm happy to report that following this method outlined in the book Oh my time and ranges ninety one percent which is really high really good. My low percentage is three percent and then my high is like six and the less than fifty five is less than one percent. So I want people to know that when you're eating these carbohydrates we've been talking about all day long today. They do not cause insulin spikes they're not gonNA cause this crazy volatility in your blood glucose so these devices also measure your average blog macos than you can imagine the standard deviation from Davidge Baku coast. And you're supposed to be that average. The standardization should be no more than three times. But to that average more than one third but the one thing I was messed it sadistics aspects is a funny so I'm happy to report. The mine is one fourth so again. There's not like these crazy crazy. Fluctuations so and people living with type two diabetes the freestyle published data on five hundred thousand people using the device and even then the only people that got close to seventy percent where people who are scanning fourteen times a day. Because it doesn't talk to your phone directly you have to scan. So it's really the diabetes community like we're struggling in that area area and we want to show people how they can absolutely improve and use technology. So the technology's crazy Jason. I WanNa have some fun here. Can I talk to Siri sure. Hey Siri what's my g. It's one hundred. Forty one and steady last check two minutes ago. The fact I'm I'm living with type one diabetes for twenty years and the fact that I can ask my phone. What my bug because reading is is mind boggling? So what we've done as as far as technology is great especially for people living with type one but of course we want people with pre diabetes type two diabetes. Let's let's make it a thing of the past. Let's you insulin sensitive..

Tokyo diabetes Dino Valente Control Group New England Journal of Medicin Michael Pollen Lebron Davidge Baku Jason
"diabetes community" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes community" Discussed on Ologies

"That's correct I I I have so I have an insulin pump. I have something called the. CGM Am I see GM Continuous Glucose Monitor and my insulin. Islam pump basically has a reservoir of insulin that I change out every four to five days and it automatically will pump in. What's called the Basil rate into me through a subcutaneous little Caola Aniela suicide note a subcutaneous? Kenya's just fancy talk for tiny house that goes onto your skin and then every time. I have something to eat as carbohydrates. I have an estimation mation of how many carbs at his I have an insulin. Capriccio plug that guy into my pump and get a Bolles Vincent and hopefully cover that meal and who is a good it candidate for that because that seems way better than poking your finger and and poking yourself with all right no it does. I mean it doesn't it doesn't so it's interesting. A lot of type. Ones prefer her to not have the pump. So you have to be attached to it all the time. It's kind of annoying the main question you get asks like what are you doing. I'm in sex single dangling Mike. Pack or something exactly is like I mean you haven't ever had sex before but when you do those things Ashley Plug for your sexology episode. What does a person with type one diabetes do about having an end right? I mean when I was first diagnosed. A lot of these technology didn't exist so I would use syringes and and so the technology has come to be so that the disease can be very well managed and hopefully kind of fall into the background a little bit and the pump allows a lot more of that. And so now we have this. What's what's called a closed loop system so my continuous glucose monitor which I have on my arm? It sits in the interstitial space. And it's detecting. This kind of flux walks of glucose across cells. Why so meaning is because it's given me a sense of the direction of where my blood sugar's heading before it gets there? So if I'm on my way down or on my way up I can kind of take care curve that before it actually hits and my pump has now the ability to say. Oh you're going up. I'm going to give you a little more incident with having to do anything which is like phenomenal. Yeah it's not a good candidate for a pump so really expensive to it is is. It's crazy expensive so thankfully I have insurance but I think about this often as well as more recently with the you know the Crazy skyrocketing price of insulin. It's ridiculous that what is causing this insulin. Search what's the deal who I oh boy howdy. We're going to get to the cost of insulin in next week's part too but you can start right now just practicing screaming then with rage if you like but at this moment back to the pump. Oh my God so many things so so just real quick with the pomp. So who's a good candidate for the pump. So if you're type one you know you have to demonstrate that you have you still the pump not autopilot. You still need to be cognizant of how to take care of yourself and how how to troubleshoot and it's also a machine which can have its own issues which I've dealt with as well so if you've proven to your your endocrinologist who you're diastolic. Just that you have have a good sense of your disease you know how to handle it and you know what to do in case of emergencies and troubleshoot and you really want to try and find tune then that would be a good thing for you a. c. g. m. on the other hand I think every diabetic should should have priority. GM It kind of feels like you're flying an airplane with a blindfold on you test your blood sugar. And that's one point in time you don't know if that's a one hundred and it's going up we're going down. You have no idea. So the only way to combat that as you test your blood sugar. Twelve Times a day and connect the dots which is a pain in the ass right. Yeah it sucks. Does it hurt too perky finger. No no I mean. I don't think so. I think anything that you do every day for X.. Amount of years like you just kind of adapt to but even when I was diagnosed picking your fingers like Nothi- walk doc in the park. Yeah what advice we give someone who's just been diagnosed. Who took a question? I think it's important to recognize that. It sucks I think oftentimes when like bad stuff happens to people and people who have experienced with it like. Oh it's not that bad or whatever I think it's okay to Kinda Kinda get down on their level and be like this sucks but just because it sucks doesn't mean that your life is over and it doesn't mean that you need to alter everything in your life it means so you can have to make some changes and you're gonNA have to adapt but it's adaptable and it's doable so adaptable and it's doable. especially with all the diabetes and charities working to further outreach and research and for each episode we donate to a cause of the logistics choosing and for part one one diabetes doctrinaire chose an organization called beyond type one and beyond type one is uniting the global diabetes community and providing solutions to improve lives. Today it was founded in two thousand fifteen and they focus on education advocacy and the path to a cure and their site is awesome. It has everything from equipment information to to die at Info to Dad's AKA diabetic alert dogs and it was a great resources. I was researching this episode and it has wonderful links for patients patients in for newly diagnosed folks. So that's beyond type. One with the numeral one dot org so that.

GM Kenya Caola Aniela CGM Bolles Vincent cure Mike Nothi
"diabetes community" Discussed on Hanselminutes

Hanselminutes

16:29 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes community" Discussed on Hanselminutes

"Something that can be taught we take we. My wife and I are Kinda deep in the middle of the tween years might have an eleven year old and a thirteen year old. And and you know at this moment in time I love my kids. But they're just jerks Just just awful awful little people you know because they have zero empathy Z.. Of any kind. And I'm you know in your book. You actually call out three types of empathy emotional empathy cognitive embassy and empathetic concern. They effectively have none of these things. Except maybe They can manipulate US using amphitheater. Like a tool. What we're looking for them to really have is primarily cognitive empathy which you say is perspective taking in unfortunately as you point out in your report That's the kind of empathy requires work and little boys don't like Jordan Yeah I mean The research shows that like a lot of these things things we're talking about you know now like aren't just in Herrin and if you think about it you know like we're sort of Of A inclusionary like we are protectors of ourselves and our ch- triads sides and so in phased with an outsider. We're not like attempting to like understanding then it's almost like a fight or flight sort of action and so like his a skill that you know the vast majority of us the capital scores of learn as we go and we have to sort of take. It's time to really cause to really think about you. Know where other people are coming from and and killing filling the gap fill in the gaps of the things that we don't know or or he just Kinda you have to accept like that we don't have all of the context and you have to assume that other people are coming from a good place. It's all of those. Things are not things that are in the herons in us and so it does as of require some Trial and error and a whole lot of work on. Fortunately I never really thought about the idea that it isn't intuitive to some folks because it may be evolutionary not a beneficial thing like it depends on the world you live at if you are in a cave and your focus is three people in your space than yeah. You should be apathetic towards those three people in everyone else's an enemy but in a in connected global world is actually quite useful to instantly when a world of social media being empathetic towards people. Only good thing. Oh for sure or I mean especially now when we're constantly bombarded with all kinds of news and all kinds of contents and all kinds of opinions a lot of those opinions just like I don't agree that I how am I supposed to you know like he'll like with these feelings. I mean I feel like we've gotten to a point where like if we're confronted. The person who liked has an agreed thus on you know like a few obvious topics. Then we just don't want to talk to them at all and that is the complete opposite You know trying to pursue understanding and like trying to get inspected We live in a world like that makes it empathy incredibly difficult. And so you know we have have to work Quite a bit harder in order to achieve our goals of like truly connecting with with people especially if we his agree with them the hoping that the boys are GonNA learn embassy on their own. But I'M GONNA keep trying to explain it to them. I don't think having them read your research. Paper is going to work for an eleven year old. But I'm going to do the. We may assign this his homework. In fact I think that's it's a great idea. Why not you know you might as well get them started young? I'm sure they would love that. Well you call it out right. It's learned it's not. It's not innate like some empathy is built into our brains but the most of it is our learned that it's difficult if you've been if you've had a tough life in your life has beaten you up. I'm sure that would probably holy beat the empathy out of you or I mean like it could do the entirely. You know a opposite thing and and forcing foreseeing can be incredibly pathetic. I mean I know people who Stutter who kind of view new fluent people as like. Wow you know like tore. Life is slow easy. How can you ever be uncomfortable talking on the phone? I'll never be uncomfortable getting up on stage age. Unlike you guys hold on like these things that we're doing like me every time I get on stage. I'm not just concerned about stuttering. You know I'm concerned about about the content. I am delivering right. Like I mean every time like I have to hop on like a conference call. I'm you know of course risk concerned about stuttering but I'm also concerned about you. No kidding across my point and convincing clients is that the thing that God I WanNa do for the company is going to work for them and so I mean I mean I think it depends on you know who that person is either. They're going to be like. Wow your life is really easy. And you don't have any problems or it's going to force them to sort of take a step back and say like hey like I kind of understand you know how you could feel that. This is an uncomfortable situation. And I can empathize with that. Yeah I think one of the important things is that I. I always encourage people who try to avoid playing the oppression Olympics. This is not a point system term. I'm going right. Yeah I mean okay so like I have type one diabetes. Okay so what you're right. Yeah exactly well. But here's the thing right but we we are are in a in a country that can support us. We're in a time that can support us. I mean you WanNa talk about who would be a lousy caveman right Lazic I would be the blind diabetic eating eating lettuce in the back of the cave. You know throw so. We're very lucky. I think that empathy is also applying these things to yourself. Everybody's everybody's got something in. What a wonderful time? It is that we can We can all just survive together. One thing that you you said there I had not heard that term. you called us the fluent. I've called people to normally sugared or just the normals someone at work. Can you eat that cake. And it's just like oh you normals yeah create off my lawn. Exactly I know that there are people for example in the in the deaf and hard of hearing community. who have some kind of feeling about Someone who might get a cochlear implant. Are there things in the stuttering community that can Heard about hearing hearing aids the talk back into your ear. Is there a push button and fix it option and is that considered a good thing about thing. Well so I know that there are idea hearing aids And I know that those do work for some people however I've heard that like after a certain time period like they stopped working But other than that I haven't heard that. There's any cure for it and Tom. I think that people are like trying to find a cure. I was actually saying a therapist. WHO said that he helped you know? One of his clients cure stuttering daughter in by like complete accident and he did it by Putting them on some sort of like anti-anxiety Miami pills and then the client has also smoking a lot of a medical marijuana and so that combination. Shen actually cured stuttering for him now the therapists we look. I don't stop jest going out and getting a lot of read and smoking it but I'm just saying there's a way that we could help you stutter. Less and those the side effects though I mean who knows exactly. You've been no but I mean I think that I think that the community is kind of Split. I mean so he we have this conference It's called the National Stuttering Association conference and it's every year around the fourth the fourth of July and so like a lot of the people that starter like they kind of come from all over the world to sort of just connected. electons a totally different shops in here hawks in you know like all of that stuff and so There are people there who say like I would take a pill and then go away and then there's a lot of other people there who are like I would never take a pill because stuttering is the best thing that's ever happened to me now. I'm a person who could probably say that. This is the best thing that's ever happened to me. But if I could take a pill to maybe like knots daughter like ninety eight percent of the time I would consider taking that pill I mean I just think it makes my day to day life way easier however I mean I kind of like can't imagine me personally like my life about stuttering. I mean I don't know where era I would be so It depends on who you talk to scam. People are like I'm going to start it for life and others are like just give me the federal so we we always talk about this diabetes community like they cured me tomorrow. I would still be picking my fingers and checking my blood sugar because I would not believe it was true. Yeah diabetic at heart. I would eat cookies and then I would Just check my blood sugar. It'd be like that's amazing. Amazing look perfect for all the time. So wh You have a company called Communal log and you do basically tickly. Empathy can such empathy consultancy. Are you giving workshops and traveling around to To companies people can hire you talk about these things. Yeah yeah so I and again as a speaker and so you know I was talking about You know Improving communication empathy. And then it kind of just shifted shifted in going into companies and working with a huge like either their teams or Or Ewing like breakouts at their Like internal company events like where we have these Scott around I'm like how to engage empathy at work in an impactful way and so I work work with companies on sort of improving communication collaboration. You know through upper `rational leising empathy on their teams and like in their apartments and in their organizations as a whole and so New Breakouts got some do arm. It's Weena Sixty minutes in three hours and so We hard to get a lot done and I think that the thing that I've learned the most I mean so I am coming from like a a speaker keynote sort of background. And so you know I only have like Hardiman. It's forty five minutes. Had liked doing these workshops. I didn't realize just how has spratly he bowl in you know. Companies in the corporate's space are just trying to like have conversations around empathy and in securities and owner ability. I mean you know your employees wants talk about these things. So I'm the person that accompanies during into sort of create space to they have those conversations. The thing that I thought was the most powerful or kind of surprising about what you just said would you operate op. Yeah it's hard to say for anybody. Forgive me made that word up. I think it's pretty awesome operationalizing empathy because you're not just coming in and saying. Hey let's talk about squishy things you're saying let's optimize business outcomes and like being pleasant and facilitating conversations around. Empathy can actually help your business. Shocker shocker Walker I know right A lot of people like don't believe in it are just like well. How is this going to help my business? Well do you want your teams teams to collaborate. More he wants your teams to be more productive while they're not going to be highly collaborative or productive if they don't get along well or even if they like completely can't stand each other like they have to respect each other other and empathy you know is going to increase all of those things and it's just going to help collaboration communication all of those good the things it's just going to help it. Just go much smoother if you ever come into a company and presented this information to them and they just sit there with their arms crossed and then just storm out at at the end like yeah okay. I just did this workshop so it actually happened one time and it wasn't that a company is at a conference and so I have to give you like a little bit of background on this so it was the first time I had given any sort of content like this It was all day and it was an as stony So every possible hairier. I could have to slip seating. I had it and long story short here. It did not go well at Paul and I remember calling on my other consultant friends and being like. I can't do this like I'm not good at this. I'm just going to stick took canines. And she was like okay. Look calm down like let's talk about like who you are like what you bring to the table and what you who well and it turns out you know all of the answers to that. Those questions are all of the things that I did not do when I was giving this like full day workshop to a culture that's completely different from mine and so yeah. Yeah I mean like after that first time of you know learning like look like I'm not gonNa tell you anything that like you don't already know. Oh all right like I am here to Create space for conversations. I'm not here to teach you anything like I want. You guys is to be able to solve your own problems. I'm not the problem solver. I'm just the vehicle and so after I got down. Yeah can't it was fine..

National Stuttering Associatio US Herrin Jordan Olympics marijuana Shen consultant Paul Tom Hardiman Ewing Walker Scott eleven year ninety eight percent forty five minutes
"diabetes community" Discussed on Mile Hi Radio

Mile Hi Radio

06:30 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes community" Discussed on Mile Hi Radio

"In Boston Massachusetts. All right. Which of your talent is responsible for connecting the specific time history. Yes. So we ended up, connecting I I have a passion for diabetes. And I know that your wife has a passion for educating people on the topic of diabetes as well. And I think that that's really how are our paths costs. He definitely a needed. Scenario because of this epidemic that's going on OBT easier. So tell us a bit more you help people. My son was diagnosed with type one diabetes when he was nine years old, and it was very Mutua sweet, we certainly were not exposed to diabetes in our family, so we will little bit blindsided, but of course, after the diagnosis you become very educated in a wear and through the course of adjusting to our new lifestyle. That was a missing component in his testing team. And that was to clean and simple way to remove the excess blood when he was done taking his blood sugar levels. So I realized that there was this missing component and I wanna hit and I created diabetic dabs, which are booklets of absorbent wipes that are placed into the testing kit. The. Those that live with diabetes, and, you know, my goal is to provide value to people that are living with either type one or type two and becoming a member of the diabetes community kinda seeing what life looks like living with a chronic disease you become very passionate to, to help in any way that you can't to that was kind of my contribution is to provide a product that would kind of simplify and make their testing Latino a little bit more convenient is that something you did before create a product. This is the first time this is the first time that I, I actually in a previous life I was a financial adviser before I had children. And then when I have four boys when I had my children, I became a stay at home, mom, and then, of course after his diagnosis in. Kind of this missing component at this was an opportunity to give back to the diabetic community. So this was my, this is my first time around creating a product for where did that come from ability to innovate? I believe passionate inspiration. I think that when like I said, when you, you see what life looks like living with a chronic disease, and how these people they're resolves. It just very, very inspiring. My son was a huge inspiration and the community as a whole was an inspiration. And I just think that, you know, the saying goes where there's a will there's a way using procreation and all you've done included promotion is a ton of work diving into that and being able to do what you've done. Congratulations, well done. Who do you think he learned that from like that ability to get things completed like the gophers and get it done? What did I learn it where? But who who did you? I have unfortunately, I lost my parents, but I had terrific. Parents triptych role models. Both of them taught me the importance of not giving up and persevering. And I think that I would have credited to my parents. It's amazing. So where's the best place if you go to find out more about the dubs? Yep. So we have a website. I'm very excited which is created and launched a new website in that the U R L is WWW dot gotta get dad's dot com. Cricket dot com. Tell me one of the things that he done consistently the last three years. Please. An avid reader. I think that reading is very important. I love nonfiction kind of inspirational books and I would say that I do that a very consistent basis. What does it make you feel to see all that? You've read when you look on the counter the shows the book showers, make you feel to see what you've accomplished over these years. I think. It keeps you keeps you going keeps you motivated, and I think it's important to always be learning and always trying to improve yourself. So I, I find joy -ment with reading, and your for boys, do they read, well, probably not as much as I think they should they're still young. So I'm hoping that, that will change as they get a little bit older net to say that there's a lot of people that are very young. Do I understand that? But I would think that my boys, probably need to help aboard a little bit more when it comes to reading, but hopefully I'm sending an example, and they know the importance of reading as they grow up that was wonderful have one more question around the boys. Like I mean home schooling for boys, what has been like. Yep. So I don't home school. I don't home. Okay. I'm sorry, sorry, you just said that your work at home. Mom, you didn't say that you home school. Prior to my business. I was a stay at home. Mom, you got it. So I wasn't working prior to starting my business six years ago. But no, I did not school may all they all go to school here. The only thing you didn't do. There's crazy adult home school. All of the. Exact-. I might be crazy but not that night. That's wonderful, again amazing Elizabeth circle. You can connect with them as she said, gotta get dot com. She has Pete if you want to. Diabetic jobs and just an amazing story about how you can create something from a need someone every day, need, and then create an easy way out, so projecting stuff Elizabeth, switch gears. Let's gifts for movement. Let me know.

diabetes Boston Massachusetts Elizabeth circle gophers Mutua Elizabeth Pete three years nine years six years
"diabetes community" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes community" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"And let us know what you think love to hear from you all without further ado, I want to introduce my outstanding guest. Dana Lewis, she is the co founder of open APS, and she is been in healthcare for quite some time looking to apply the best of analytics data and programming to health care. So that we could leverage these technologies to make healthcare better. Dana I want to welcome you to the show. Thanks for having me. Absolutely. So maybe you could round that out a little bit better and give the audience a better understanding of what open a PS is. And what you are focused on in healthcare. Sure. So open APS is the open source. Artificial pancreas movement, which is led by patients like me who have said we're not waiting for commercial technology to come to the market and a couple of years. And so we've created DIY technology, whether it's remote monitoring or artificial pancreases and are using open source principles to make the code better to share it with other people and to bring other people into the community, and that's one big focus of my work. But the other thing I'm working on is how do we scale what we've done in the diabetes community to other patient communities, and I'm actually now the principal investigator on a grant funded by the Robert Wood Johnson foundation in order to study this work, but also figure out how to leverage it and scale it to other patients communities, I think what you're doing is so awesome. It's sort of like at the center of the patient as CEO I had a Robin farm and farm in on the show, and you are literally doing just that Dana. You're you are the patients CEO representing for all those with diabetes it, which is so cool and opening up the floor to anybody that wants to collaborate and innovate. Yeah. I think it's really important that we have a lot of flexibility and providing opportunities to patients, there's some patients who want to do more, and they're just not able to. But not everybody needs to create a nonprofit or create a company or truly be CEO all the time. So one of the things I'm very interested in doing is exploring. What are the many many different ways? Patients could be involved when they have a spur our during the week where they want something longer term and really being flexible and adapting to people at all levels in all parts of the world. However, they can some people can take time off of work to do stuff. Some people can't. So we really need to think about what are different ways, we can engage patients at different levels of activity. Now, that's such a good call out and Dana. What would you say the turning point was that got you into the medical sector? So I was diagnosed with type one fifteen years ago this weekend actually at age fourteen in high school, and so that really was my first twenty point of deciding I was going to do something in healthcare, and I really wanted to figure out how do I help as many people as possible? I thought about going into medical school becoming an into chronology chronologies decided. That wasn't the way I can make the most difference, but I've really focused on using communications throughout.

Dana Lewis CEO Robert Wood Johnson foundation principal investigator co founder diabetes one fifteen years