20 Burst results for "Diabetes Cardiovascular Disease"

Why Is Obesity Such a Serious Condition?

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

02:00 min | 3 months ago

Why Is Obesity Such a Serious Condition?

"Today. We look at a condition that comes with a multitude of serious health issues. Obesity and we start with the best ways to figure out our optimal weight based on our height. We seem to become inured to the mortal threat of obesity. Go back medical issue. A half century or so when obesity wasn't just run of the mill. The descriptions are much more grim. Obesity is always tragic and its hazards are terrify but it's not just obesity of four million deaths every year tribute excess by nearly forty percent of the victim are just overweight or obese. According to two famous. Harvard studies weight gain of as little as eleven pounds from early adulthood through middle age increases risk of major chronic diseases such as diabetes cardiovascular disease and cancer the flip side though is that even modest weight loss can major health benefits. What's the optimal bmi The largest is in the united states and around the world found that having a normal body mass index a bmi from twenty to twenty five associate with the longest lifespan. Put all the best available stays with the longest follow up together and that can be narrowed down even further to a bmi of twenty two twenty two. that'd be about between one hundred and twenty four hundred thirty six pounds for someone who stands five foot six but even with a normal bmi the risk of developing chronic diseases such as type two diabetes heart disease and several types of cancer starts to rise towards the upper end even starting as low as a bmi one a bmi five eighteen point five and twenty four point five or both considered within the normal range but a bmi five maybe shared with twice the heart disease risk compared eighteen point for just as there are gradations risk within a normal bmi range their spectrum with an

Obesity Diabetes Cardiovascular Diseas Harvard Cancer Diabetes Heart Disease United States Heart Disease
The Functional Medicine Approach To Oral Health with Dr. Todd LePine

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:18 min | 4 months ago

The Functional Medicine Approach To Oral Health with Dr. Todd LePine

"People who go to medical school. We don't really learn much about the mouth gum disease or you can have sores in your mouth and we a few things here and there. But it's just amazing. How much of a vacuum and our education or health is but in the turns out it's been linked to everything from alzheimer's to heart disease to cancer and to autoimmune diseases and on and on and on and the question is you know what is going on with abs the connection between our oral health and overall so take us down that pathway. Then we'll talk about you know. Basically how to address dental health a functional medicine perspective. Yeah so mark Just a just a little bit of background. Probably have mentioned this before. But i come from family of dentists so my grandfather was a dentist. He went to the university of maryland in the late eighteen. Hundreds my father went to university of maryland. Nineteen four days. My brother went to u. penn dental school and then his two sons are dentists and my two sisters are dental hygiene. So this is a topic. That's near and dear to me. And i'm sure the black sheep of the family and we know that in functional medicine the gut is sort of where everything starts and it can either lead you down the path of health or can lead you down the path of disease and the beginning of the gut the mouth so as you mentioned you know in in medical school. We didn't learn anything about them out. That was like for the dentist. We'll just ignore that and the dentist just basically stay them out and they don't really realize that there's a whole body connected mild or some of the dentist don't and this is where i think. A lot of even functional medicine physicians and dentists really miss a connection. So unless you're working with a a holistic Smart dentist or a functional medicine doctor. Who's aware of the connection between on the mouth in the gut ends systemic the yoon system You're going to be missing a lot of things and and as you mentioned before You know there are a host of conditions including premature birth obesity diabetes cardiovascular disease rheumatoid arthritis inflammatory bowel disease and even dementia that are directly connected to poor or health.

Alzheimer's Mark Just University Of Maryland Penn Dental School Autoimmune Diseases Heart Disease Cancer Diabetes Cardiovascular Diseas Obesity Dementia
"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on WokeNFree

WokeNFree

05:20 min | 10 months ago

"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on WokeNFree

"Can help some preventive qualities against what you rate a mention type two diabetes cardiovascular diseases, and it could also even fight off. The against the onset of Parkinson's so those would definitely be reasons why people love it. But I I think my experience has not been people saying that type of rhetoric. It's mostly been home. I have no energy. I need energy my mom and dad drank it I drink it and they just kind of get on that bandwagon of like I can't live without this brown black substance. Yeah right now listening to walk in free free free free free. A podcast about being real and honest fascinating. It's a cultural phenomenon and most countries. I think very common just to offer someone a cup of coffee off. That's really that popular. Do you do you actually recommend folks drink coffee?.

Parkinson
"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

03:12 min | 11 months ago

"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Virus. We know that being obese increases the risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancer here. It's a particular cause for concern because in addition to those problems, this strong data, the chosen association between the most serious covert outcomes, including death Rhea Far vermin with the nonprofit, nonpartisan Trust for America's Health, says this is serious and data. We have to pay attention to because the U. S. Adult obesity rates the highest it's ever been putting 42% of all Americans at increased risk of serious complications, even death. Sabrina Cuba at 95.5 WSB largest school system in the country delays its plans to reopen schools on Monday in New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio blame shortages with staffing and supplies had really concerns about specific things that had to be done. Although they acknowledged that some real progress had been made that not enough had been made and more had to be done. Schools will open eight days later than planned. De Blasio says they're satisfied with the amount of peop E for staff. A federal judge rules cut back to the Postal Service were a political move. 14 states sued the Trump Administration and the Postal Service and Judge Stanley Bastian agreed. Calling the change is a politically motivated attack on the efficiency of the Postal Service before the November election, Jackie Quinn reports It also says he's concerned the changes made in the Postal Service could disenfranchise voters who plan to vote by mail during the pandemic. Wal Mart is raising the wages on about 165,000 hourly workers. It comes with a move the company unveiled by adding new leadership positions and cross training opportunities. Chief Operating Officer D. Cona Smith says the new programme gives workers more room for career and pay growth. Brian shook reports the raises will start next month. Hobby lobby also recently announced it's raising its minimum wage to 17. Dollars an hour WSB news time 7 49, WSB meteorologist Kirk Militia and his dependable five day forecast sponsored by Breda Pest management. They handle bugs and critters We're looking at near normal temperatures today. Then cooler than normal temperatures tomorrow through Tuesday behind a cold front with dry high pressure on the weekend, right on through next Wednesday on Ly a stray shower possible early tonight. Otherwise we stay dry the next five days today around an eight on the college mentor. Mostly cloudy to partly cloudy and warm, high round 80 low 63. Tomorrow cloudy, breezy times and cooler high. 72 Low's 54 to 58 Sunday Mostly sunny, breezy and much less humid, high 72 low 52. My exclusive five day forecast Monday and Tuesday. Mostly sunny to partly sunny, dry ear Monday. 72 Tuesday 74 close 49 to 56. Recapping the forecast for today run a NATO demolish meter breaks in the clouds and warm high near 81 Yesterday was 74 currently 66 Media Rogers Kirk, polished 95.5. 10 metres till eight time to check the morning drive again. Here's Mark McKay storm damage and no surprise that we'd be picking up the pieces from yesterday's storm action across north Georgia on the WSB champ Camp One lane open in each direction, North side,.

Postal Service WSB Judge Stanley Bastian Bill de Blasio diabetes Wal Mart Chief Operating Officer D. Con cancer America De Blasio Rogers Kirk Hobby lobby New York City Sabrina Cuba Kirk Militia Mark McKay Trump Administration Ly Jackie Quinn Breda Pest management
"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"The fact that the enzyme that makes him deliver is controlled by insulin. What we are seeing here is a effect of the fact that people who are insulin resistant may have more t._m._a. Oh that when there's more insulin there's more activity of f._m. Three those people make more t._m._a. Oh and and it's not the t._m._a. Oh that's causing harm. It's the insulin resistance. This is the pattern we see over and over and over is that things get called yeah problematic when in fact it's the underlying insulin resistance that we know is the problem if that's the case with d._n._a. Oh so it's reverse its reverse 'cause -ality in the study they did there. They were able to show that people with diabetes. Cardiovascular disease had higher levels of t._m._a. Oh and the whole association was a reverse 'cause outy meaning timoteo is higher because they have diabetes cardiovascular disease. It's not causing the problem. Are you listening stephen gunnery. He's he's a great guy and he's a guy tynan accomplished an accomplished physician and multi multi multi levels at once but yeah there are for some things that i don't agree with stephen on but directionally. I think he's he's got some good stuff all right. Here's what really mind blowing you go back to the cool factor the day about oh gee your gut bacteria sort of change every drug study but we can identify which gut bacteria <hes> make t._m._a. Oh if they make more team than your liver enzymes damn right so using my via m- test disclosure. I'm an investor an an early advisor and just big fan of.

stephen gunnery Cardiovascular disease diabetes advisor
A sugar tax on drinks in Canada? Would it even work?

The Big Story

14:44 min | 2 years ago

A sugar tax on drinks in Canada? Would it even work?

"It's sold to us, and it's been sold to us a few times by now as a health issue, but it always goes beyond that, especially in the minds of the people who'd be paying it. The World Health Organization is urging global action to reduce the amount of sugary drinks being consumed around the world. This suggestion is the by implementing a twenty percent increase on the retail price of sugary beverages. It would result in a substantial decrease in the amount of sugar filled drinks people consume. There is currently a movement to foot among some liberal MP's to add a sugary soda tax to the party's platform for this fall's election. And we have some questions chief among them is this, even if we ignore all the arguments that come up as soon as sugar taxes, raised about personal responsibility about freedom of choice about small business owners in about who this would actually hurt would it even work. What would this tax be designed to achieve? And is there any research out there supporting this approach Canada after all is not the first country to consider, and even implement? Attacks on sugary sodas. So let's go into this with clear expectations and a barometer for success before we asked Canadians to pay more for a coke. Jordan heath Rawlings. And this is the big story, Natalie read acre is a researcher at the university of Manitoba, who has been studying a sugary soda tax. I would it work would Canadian support it. What are the costs and benefits? Hi, natalie. Thanks for having how often do does this kind of thing, come up. I mean it seems it seems like it's something we hear about somewhere else in the world fairly frequently. I'll it's coming up more and more. Frequently a number of countries have implemented a sugar sweetened beverage tax over the last, I would say five years, especially and then in two thousand sixteen the World Health Organization, formerly endore endorsed sugar sweetened beverage tax, and so that kind of put it back into the forefront of public health officials and that resulted in more countries implementing such attacks. So what does excessive sugar intake look? Like in Canada. What are we struggling with well sugar intake in Canada is a bit of a moving target. Because it's always changing and changing over time as, as all food, patterns, do sugar intake in Canada has increased probably from about the nineteen eighties up until the early two thousands with sugar sweetened beverages, contributing the most to free sugar intake in Canada. However, since about two thousand four intake of sugar, sweetened beverages, like pop or Kool aid, or Tang, those types of drinks, have decreased over the last ten years, but the most commonly consumed sugar sweetened beverage in Canada is actually sugar, sweetened coffee, real nets in crew that's increased since two thousand and four. So that also includes drinks like Frappuccino or rapid. Closed. Those types of drinks, so, like anything, not just food. I mean, there's fads, right? And in the past, and I mean, people still drink pop up that tended to be one of the biggest contributors to sugar intake in Canada. So what would a sugar tax actually do in Canada? What would it look like? And I guess just based on the research you're doing what, what would that look like? Well, we don't really know what it would look like. And that's part of what my research is about because there are a lot of questions that are unanswered and kind of complexities around that. So one is I already talked about the different types of drinks. So some of my research is looking at what have other countries done in terms of which drinks are included in sugar sweetened beverage taxation, because there are so many drinks. Pacino's. I can't I can't. Well, that's an that's an important question. And the countries that have implemented that, you know, there's quite a bit of variation in whether or not Frappuccino are included. And what type of Frappuccino is because there are Frappuccino that are bottled and sold in grocery stores. There are also Frappuccino that are made on site where the sugar is added at the point of purchase, and then it becomes administratively difficult to decide, you know, what, what gets taxed in whether or not we added after, and how does that contribute, or like, look, according to what we're drinking overtime because anytime we're talking about public health policy were interested in population level effect. So who is it affecting? And if we don't include Frappuccino, or some Frappuccino is, you know, is that the majority of the drinks people are drinking now. So that's one aspect of what would it look like in Canada? What kinds of drinks, and if we don't. Don't include certain drinks. What does that mean for for different groups? I'm in, in the other question that I have is related more. So to the taxation aspect of it in terms of, you know, different jurisdictions have different laws like, whether this is a provincial tax federal tax, what could, or would that look like for first nations reserves, which are different jurisdictions, and how would that influence the purchasing environment related to sugary drinks? So that's another important question. And then the other question is about tax revenue, would that look like do we idea from places that have already implemented attacks like this? What kind of deterrent at has on the actual purchase and consumption of these drinks? Yes, there's been quite a bit of research. I would say while a growing amount and generally. So, for example, Mexico. They've seen an overall decrease in sugar sweetened Bev. Bridge purchases. But there's also been an increase in purchasing other nontaxed beverages. So it, it becomes really hard to assess what's really happening in what you're measuring is that what we should be measuring on. So one of the other places at a introduced the tax is Philadelphia, but one of the issues with implementing it in a municipality or a smaller geographic area is the Leif seen sales of sugary drinks decrease in Philadelphia. They've increased right outside the city. So what is the net game or net benefit? I don't we don't really know because it's so complicated. And then what is the other question is the revenue, you know, what else is happening to change intake like so, for example, in Mexico as a country that country had one of the highest intakes of sugary drinks? So there was probably only one way for it to go, which is down and in Canada. Our intake also. On down, but we didn't have tax. Is that just a result of kind of more awareness, more health marketing, I think so I mean in the research I've done so far, most people have heard that sugar is not great for their health. It's not a surprise to most people. They're they're quite aware. So I think that, that has contributed quite a bit probably to the decrease in consumption among certain groups, particularly the more higher educated, people have reduced their consumption in the response, either from people who kind of participate, or just from people, you end up discussing this with our people, generally for or against sugar tax because I'm fascinated by the reaction. Oh, I think I've heard everything what I say. Most people are supportive or unsupportive, I'd say it's pretty divided for a lot of different reasons. And generally, I'm pretty if people are just talking to me. I'm pretty neutral built my own feelings. So I think people are being honest. But yeah, there's, there's a mix there support, there's anger and everything in between. How similar would this be to the taxing? We do of tobacco. And do we have research that, that puts sugar kind of, in those categories or even a system like that already in place that we could use? That's a great question. A lot of people who support the sugar sweetened beverage tax have compared it to tobacco because there's a lot of the same kind of dynamics with industry and then you know, the tactics right, the tactic is the same taxing. I think there are a lot of lessons, we have learned from tobacco, which we should think about. And I mean, there are a lot of other policies that have targeted tobacco that are not taxation that contributed to changes in smoking rates. But then also how he'd be tobacco? So, yeah. Yeah. I think there's a lot to learn not just the success. So in, in the success is usually attributed to the decrease in smoking, we've seen over the last number of decades. But we also still see quite a number of people who smoke and yeah, so I, yeah, I think there's a lot to learn. Sort of the huge spectrum of responses both in support or against something like this, and given given our current political climate in which every party tends to be either for something or totally against it. Do you think there's any traction here, politically for this kind of tax? I think right now there's probably not a lot of traction discussion kind of heated up about this sugar sweetened beverage tax when the liberals, I came into government, and they were developing their healthy eating strategy, and it was considered, and then the government ended up deciding to go with different policies. So, for example, we got the new candidates food guide. They opt investments to nutrition, north Canada. And then there's also going to be a, a food marketing ban targeting children. So there won't be any marketing of unhealthy foods towards children, and that's going to be coming out in the next two years, or so, I think a lot of the discussion in the future will depend on how the next. Election goes because. Yeah, I think depending on which party gets in power that could shape whether or not this gets on the, the and then the other thing is probably the carbon tax, you know, just put in this carbon tax. So does another part does the party wanna put in another one. Here's a question without getting into because I know the freedom of choice libertarian angle of this is really an issue because people want to be able to choose what they buy and consume putting that aside would implementing attacks like this hurt. Anyone would there be anybody who would lobby against it from a business or health point of view? Well, there's already been lobbyists lobbying against it. Obviously, the big ones the beverage association and also small businesses, and I'm particularly interested in how this might affect low income groups people who are food, insecure or who struggle to afford food. Food tend to be higher consumers of sugary drinks. So I think when we're considering raising the price of a drink disproportionately consumed by people who can't afford food. That's an important ethical question. This is what we started to see now with tobacco, as you know, you're hurting, our punishing people for you know engaging in these behaviors. But there's not a lot of support for alternatives or, or in the case of smoking, smoking cessation programs or you know, in case of food, we haven't really done much to reduce food insecurity. You feel like we'll have a handle on the costs and benefits of this over the next couple of years, because, like I mentioned at the beginning, you know, this is an issue that sort of seems to pop up every year or two, and it would it would be lovely if we could figure out whether or not, this is a way forward for us, or we just have to stop proposing me, personally. Well, I think we need to kind of go back to what is the. The problem. And because this is a public health policy in my expertise, public health. I'm not convinced yet of what, what the problem is like to me, an and I'm interested in health equity. I don't see this policy necessarily promoting health equity or fairness. I mean we see the highest rates of type two diabetes, cardiovascular disease among low socio economic groups, lower income, lower education. And what we've seen with tobacco is the those are the same groups that continue to have the highest prevalence of smoking. So I, I don't see how that has could reduce inequalities I. Yeah. I think we need to get a handle on yet. What is the problem? I mean, are we going to reduce obesity nowhere? That's implemented this policy have we seen a reduction in obesity, which was theoretically, the main aim of this policy. Now. Yes. That now that would be the goal. We've Vilnai's food for a long time. That's been our ammo in nutrition, you know, meat eggs, don't eat saturated fat or any fat. And now we've just kind of villain is the next food hasn't made us healthier. I mean, people usually take up that knowledge in change what they eat. I don't see it necessarily changing a whole lot on the health front of populations. And I think I'm very interested in socially, how the tax might impact people because it's positioned as an obesity, reduction strategy in, we have a lot of weight stigma in Canada. And in high income countries where we shame and blame people for their weight. And this kind of just continues that same narrative. And I don't know that at the population level. That's all that help. Awful because there's been more and more research showing people can't lose weight. It's just almost impossible. So these are some tough questions, we need to wrestle with. We need to keep making people feel bad for the food that they eat.

Canada World Health Organization Natalie University Of Manitoba Jordan Heath Rawlings Researcher North Canada Philadelphia Mexico Pacino BEV Vilnai Twenty Percent Five Years Ten Years Two Years
"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Oncology, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and much more. And every week on the harmony with food show. We talk about how we talk about the crap in our food. We talk about nutrition we talk about what we're gonna do how we're gonna make a stance about how we want to live our lives, and I want all of you to live happy healthy lives. So I'm here today to talk to you, not only about the crap in our food and other things that were not really maybe not so aware of I want to let you know that the first step to make an exchange say every week on the show is awareness. So today, I have two very special guests. Jessica Gonzalez and Sherry poignant. And we're going to talk about the chemicals that we use and our households and how we can change that. And not only can we control what we're eating right? We can also control what we're putting into our bodies. Maybe it's something like, you don't even think about it. Maybe it's a hairspray. Maybe it's a cancer sheet that you put in the dryer. Maybe it's some kind of oil that use on your hair, and we're gonna talk we're going to start talking about that today. We're also going to talk about a lady who died from using a natty PA and not using sterile water. So let's get the show started. I'm going to introduce Sherry is gonna talk about her business. What is your website? Welcome Sherry, and I'm so happy to have you here. So tell me about what you guys are doing the name of the product your website, and we'll get rolling great. Thank you so much for having us here on my. My name is Sherry on the first thing I do want to say is that I'm not a doctor. I'm not here to diagnose treat or cure any diseases, but we're here to educate you and bring you awareness as Meg said, I am a health coach for families. I'm also a certified early childhood in elementary teacher. So I have a lot of education background, and I am a distributor for young living essential oils. I teach women to take care of themselves. I in power them with the knowledge that they need to take care of their health and wellness and to live as stress be life as possible..

Sherry Jessica Gonzalez Meg
"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"On both the business and consumer side works on mobile every mobile device as well as on the web all of that was being built and so when public we had a pretty hefty cash burn going on and the market was not thrilled with that the second thing was this perception that small businesses are tough to scale a company on its up to bet on and i think many companies have proven that wrong today not just us but you know shop by and wicks for example are just great cloud base offer companies built on small business we are looking at this sort of expansion of wellness as a phenomenon but also a business why do you think it is so popular right now i think there's a couple of reasons first and foremost of course we have a massive health crisis in our country and franklin every developed country in the world in many ways we've never been healthier in terms of ability to live longer i'm out in medicine erico but in other ways we've never been less healthy basically adult onset diabetes cardiovascular disease or just rampant what's interesting to us is that the affluent professionals get it and perhaps those folks we are are healthier than we've ever been much healthier than our parents and grandparents generation because we really take the time to care for ourselves and get it or can afford it can afford it you see and there you go there's this there's this widening chasm in so many ways in our society and one of them is in wellness and if you look at the folks who don't have the pocket book to pay two or three hundred dollars a month for these experiences their health and wellness as an aggregate has never been worse does that way on you as a ceo because i look at the list of services or companies that i can go to on mind body and a lot of them are thirty five dollars a class that's a lot of money it is do you think about that do you think i'm making inequality worse with my business i am deeply concerned about it and we as a company deeply concerned about it because our purpose isn't to connect the effluent world wellness the entire world to wellness and so coming up with ways in.

franklin ceo three hundred dollars thirty five dollars
"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"And you haven't had it for the whole year but the constant exposure to all the sugar and miss high glycemic index and causing what was called glad constellation from sugar in the body causes chronic inflammation and those we know clarity associated with cancer with diabetes cardiovascular disease with alzheimer's and the numerous foods that we eat that perform the causes inflammation is half of our problem so it's not most this big bone thing is not really what it is it's a family of eating bad i'm glad you now because people get upset when i come but it's like it's not healthy you could die i want you to be skinny in that be healthy but that shoe but the reality is most of us one on one is to i always say that right so even when i have patients and i'm really i'm brutally honest right because i want to support people in in dancing around the issue with us in terms of what we need to do because dot com issue people forget when when i see i did residency and you see that person that's in the hospital and or their family mortified the kids the grandchildren because the person had diabetes and they're getting their foot amputated and then they're going really upset and the question is they go have a big dinner well that's all on because she is brutally honest and i love it i hit it the other day and i was like i lost fifty pounds but you ain't got no avs though i was like all right getting them in this really needs to be because this is not a joke we as a culture take this thing as a joke is eating eating properly and trying to decrease inflammation was too many people i have sat at nights as a resident in my training looking at people more than quiet losing firearms because they just didn't eat right and that was the source of the issue and people say is expensive to eat right but so is two hundred dollars of insulin every month and if you add that up it's not re it's cheaper.

alzheimer diabetes two hundred dollars fifty pounds
"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on WLAC

"Try to chem comm nearing diety so it was so struck in turn sleep into a thirty to forty billion dollar industry according to a twenty seventeen report from mckinsey holy cow does some people must admit though that that actually itself adds to the stress no no you mean the fact that you're not sleeping adds to the distress sending all this money on it just thinking come on twenty five pound blanket make me fall asleep sooners totally i mean what's interesting it's interesting 'cause sleep reputation has changed i mean sleep is once for losers who couldn't cut it in the hard charging business world i mean you have all these people saying oh i only see four hours a night but now it's like sleep is the new mba but it's state to see sleeps new status as a sign that society has recognized the need to slow down it's the opposite sleep is actually popular now because we now know that arrested employees is a better employee was that thanks to like cdc warnings about the dangers of lack of totally yeah there's so many problems i mean it actually is kind of scary there's just i mean people you can lead to all types of chronic diseases and conditions including diabetes cardiovascular disease or depression but actually if you were pointing out mental distress can also come from wasting money on free bates don't work and consumer reports recently cautioned readers twenty sixteen about an industry that was just basically waiting for its moment coaching coaches charge up to one hundred dollars an hour and they analyze diet and veteran virement but as an spokeswoman for the academy of sleep medicine pokes consumer reports there's little evidence that people who hire these coaches actually sleep better.

depression bates mckinsey forty billion dollar one hundred dollars twenty five pound four hours
"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Some of these same trends are happening in the food industry as well and we should figure out what it looks like in the long term how it affects consumers how it affects particularly poor consumers that may not have quite the access that the more affluent consumers will have that's a big change in the business that's happening the third change has to do with nutrition and i have thought for some time that the relationship between diet nutrition health and agriculture had been four stove piped industries neither none of which have kind of worked together to blend to figure out how one relates to the other so pretty soon the dietary guidelines are going to be coming out actually twenty twenty i see kathy will tech in front of me she was involved in those things when she was at usda and usda hhs are just beginning to seek input and priority topics to be covered under these new rules and advisory panel is going to be appointed chosen soon and they're gonna want recommendations relative to sugar sodium dietary fibers and other basic nutrition items and you can be sure that every interest group every commodity group in the world is going to want to try to influence these things but people fishes dan glickman former agriculture secretary eating habits are changing and more and more health is becoming a bigger factor in what people are eating i know there was a french philosopher who said you are what you eat and one trend as i mentioned is the growing relationship of diet nutrition medicine health and agriculture and here are the facts obesity among all levels of populations is not coming down now among school age populations there was some leveling off of trends towards higher obesity but just recently there were studies that showed that obesity is in fact going up the fastest growing part of the federal budget by far in a way is healthcare costs medicare and medicaid costs along with increased on the national debt and it looks like the defense budget are driving about ninety percent of the budget of the united states of america and those healthcare diseases are largely chronic diseases diseases like type two diabetes cardiovascular disease some form of cancers arthritis and and so they're caused this is this epoch of healthcare problems are caused by lifestyle changes obviously exercise but a big giant part of it is diet has to do.

obesity united states kathy usda secretary america ninety percent
"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Some of these same trends are happening in the food industry as well and we should dan glickman former agriculture secretary looks like in the long term how it affects consumers out affects particularly poor consumers that may not have quite the access that the more affluent consumers will have that's a big change in the business that's happening the third change has to do with nutrition and i have thought for some time that the relationship between diet nutrition health and agriculture have been four stove piped industries neither none of which have kind of worked together to blend to figure out how one relates to the other so pretty soon the dietary guidelines are going to be coming out actually twenty twenty i see kathy will tech in front of me she was involved in those things when she was at usda and usda hhs are just beginning to seek input on priority topics to be covered under these new rules and advisory panel is going to be appointed chosen soon and they're gonna want recommendations relative to sugar sodium dietary fibers and other basic nutrition items and you can be sure that every interest group every commodity group and in the world is going to want to try to influence these things but people's eating habits are changing and more and more health is becoming a bigger factor in what people are eating i know there was a french philosopher who said you are what you eat and one trend as i mentioned is the growing relationship of diet nutrition medicine and health and agriculture and here are the facts obesity among all levels of populations is not coming down now among school age populations there was some leveling off of trends towards higher obesity but just recently there were studies that showed that obesity is in fact going up the fastest growing part of the federal budget by far in a way is healthcare costs medicare and medicaid costs along with interest on the national debt and it looks like the defense budget are driving about ninety percent of the budget of the united states of america and those healthcare seizes are largely chronic diseases diseases like type two diabetes cardiovascular disease some form of cancers arthritis and and so they're caused this is this epoch of healthcare problems are caused by lifestyle changes obviously exercise but a big giant part of it is diet has to do.

obesity united states dan glickman secretary kathy usda america ninety percent
"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"The diet and lifestyle bear upon people becoming overweight or obese and this epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes that are that running off the rails worldwide is because of diet primarily followed up by that and then supported by lifestyle and error it's taking i use toll on human life and it's costly and whatnot high cholesterol most of its a diet related problem now there's some people that just produce a lot of it and that's a different issue i could go on you get you get the point since you were a kid i will bet a buck you've parents said the eager vegetables mmhmm each year vegetables each of fruit it's good for you and apple a day keeps that dr where i could go all these cliche sayings then maybe they're not so cliche there is a body of scientific work to support what our parents told us and our grandparents in our great grandparents and so on there are this business about apples the health benefits of apples in this one article that i'm looking at another article came out in two thousand four apple phytochemicals in their health benefits by boyer and and lou that article they they warship through the literature pointing out the health benefits of apples and the epidemiological evidence related to cancer for example a diabetes cardiovascular disease as month pulmonary function our weight loss let me quote t r summary from this article were they they they sum up what i just said there and they said that based on these epidemiological studies it appears that apples play a large role induce reducing the risk of a wide variety of chronic disease and maintaining a healthy lifestyle in general of the papers reviewed apples were the most consistently associated with reduced risk of cancer heart disease asthma type 2 diabetes when compared to other fruits and vegetables and other sources of.

obesity boyer lou apple diabetes
"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on WDRC

"That's pretty easy demonstrated a forty two percent in a diseasefree survival and a fifty seven percent improvement in overall survival and these were people with stage three colon cancer and so they broke down further in his will watch what type of nuts make a difference are peanuts okay and further analysis revealed that disease priest rival increased by forty six percent among the subgroup of nut consumers who eight just tree nuts rather than peanuts it's peanuts sir they're not really nuts their legumes and they have benefits but for greater benefit 'certain biting things like walnuts uh potassium those almonds pecans uh these are the nuts that may uh these big clint caches among these uh these are the nuts that are particularly protective against cancer will why should that be will offer one eating nuts uh tends to produce a tidy it alleviates cravings for carbohydrates and x says carbohydrates are known to be prime fuel for cancer growth and a really is an insulin connection to colon cancer and many other cancers and so therefore uh it suggested that uh nuts can stave off carbohydrate craving allow patients to eat less carbs but perhaps there other a natural constituents of nuts that may have cancer protective effects so the many studies that suggest that um nuts uh reduce insulin resistance reduce the risk of diabetes cardiovascular disease uh even brain disease uh and this is an amazing study out such as simple intervention uh so much so that uh the lead author of the study uh a doctor uh charles.

"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on KTRH

"Dot com center newsletter and find out about what we're talking about tonight and as many of you know from listening for all these years obesity and obesity related diseases and complications are so much of what we talk about not because i like it but because this is what is being researched and the public health problems that we are facing every single day and on the line it's a it's an absolute expert edward you he's a doctoral candidate at the harvard chan school of public health in the wonderful city of boston massachusetts edward welcome to the program tonight i want to commend you and your colleagues for the great article that was published in a great journal the annals of internal medicine a few weeks ago welcome to your health first argue with great to be here well you know as i said we gravitate to discuss obesity a lot and when i saw this article about wait history and all caused mortality it it caught my eye and reading through it i thought it would be interesting to share with with the audience tonight but before we get into some of the details on on the article in the research you doing tell us about yourself in and the research you're doing in harvard in obesity and and just bring us all up to speed what you're interested in so i am a doctoral candidate in nutrition epidemiology at harvard i am actually a biochemist by training a hut i am interested now in obesity diabetes cardiovascular disease i'm looking at biomarkers and actually aspects of diet that dickey's alka well now with obesity uh how did this particular article come to be with your colleagues in boston to write about this looking at uh who is it that dis and and why being overweight is not good for us so before the publication uh the consensus was that opec was harmful but there was always the nagging doubt that overweight may or may not be harpool for individuals early debt so quite a few reports published um reported that overweight people seem to have paradoxically a lower risk of death compared to normal weight people who want to say normal weight i mean uh a body mass index in the range of eighteen point five to twenty four point nine overweight is twenty five to twenty nine point nine and obesus thirty robot so you can take your.

obesity edward massachusetts harvard dickey boston opec body mass index public health harvard chan school of public annals of internal medicine
"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And so there's a lot of complexity how they operate and what we saw was a lot of complexity and no system available to help them they the only soffer relevant at the time was health club software and that's that's a breakage motto says i'm gonna sign up for membership in helping will come to often because we live in a stare masters in ellipticals by if you're going to apply these are giro class like you do or you're gonna spending class or yoga bar class or across fit workout um that's consumption economics they only make money when he showa when you think about the past couple of years you guys when public we didn't do as you if dane you had a bumpy hereafter that we did yang while they were two things that were going on their first of all the market a kind of soured against these fast growth tech company as it were burning a lot of cash and we had our foot firmly on the gas of both growth uh and developing additional software a lot of things that are on the market today the new mind body out uh the dynamic pricing system on the introductory offer system is built into the up the fact that the software on both the business and consumer side works on mobile every mobile device as well as on the web all of that was being built and so when we were public we had a pretty hefty cash burn going on and the market was not thrilled with that the second thing was this perception that small businesses are tough the scale a company on the tough to bet on and i think many companies have proven that wrong today not just us but you know shop of i uh wicks for example are a great cloud base offer companies built on small business we are looking at this sort of expansion of wellness as a phenomenon but also a business why do you think it is so popular right now i think there's a couple of reasons first and foremost of course we have a massive health crisis um in our country and frankly in every developed country in the world um in many ways we've never been healthier in terms our ability to live longer i mean out in madison yariko but in other ways we've never been less healthy i'll be city um adultonset diabetes cardiovascular disease are just rampant um what's interesting to us is that.

dane tech company mobile device madison yariko
"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:31 min | 4 years ago

"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on WDRC

"And harmed is being demonstrated across the board in terms of the effects of sugar duchess dawn of peace city bid on diabetes cardiovascular disease the sugar industry just like the tobacco industry undertook a campaign of deception to divert people's attention from the harmful effects of sugar and put the blame on fat and even paid off of academics in the 1950s 1960s to emphasize research that show that fat was bad and that sugar gotta pass and the other piece that's falling into place is that sugar like tobacco is highly addictive and this is one of the things that nailed the tobacco industry because he was demonstrated that while tobacco executives raised their right hands and swore before congressional testimony that they didn't believe that their products were harmful or addictive that actually in their files in their research uh they're scientists had demonstrated the tobacco was both addictive and harmful and that in effect cigarettes were delivery system for something highly dangerous and addictive that promoted getting people hooked and they knowingly did so while the same could be said for candy the same could be said for sugary beverages and all manner of foods to which we to which we add superfluous ingredients like highfructose corn syrup they're designed to get people attracted to them and then the harmful effects kick in and so uh i'll share with you something that i didn't even include in the article that appears in earn newsletter you can find it at dear hoffman dyakov you don't subscribe or newsletter though you're missing out because so you get great information every week of for me and others uh who write for newsletter this item is from this week scientist reveal the relationship between sugar and yet another disorder which is cancer we know that there is a relationship between obesity and cancer what's the biggest driver obesity in his country was not fat sugar and refined carbohydrates an accord is research.

diabetes sugar scientist obesity hoffman
"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

02:58 min | 4 years ago

"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"About the health risks of sugar sweetened beverages at enormous costs to their communities and k to complaint filed the dc superior court on behalf of the pastors and the praxis project a public health grew alleges that coq in the aba ran an in tension oh campaign to confuse consumers about the causes of obesity now when i saw this i thought okay let's take a step back because you don't know much about me but i really do put a lot of thought sometimes you can't tell but i do put a lot of thought into some of these topics in how i feel about these topics because i want to be fair and so when i think about this lawsuit filed by lamar and and coats i thought i wonder if they have a point are these soda companies targeting these particular neighborhoods and every time i i i go back to their lawsuit and the premise of their lawsuit which is the fact that this soda companies are deceiving customers about the health risks of sugar sweetened beverages i go to google and i google does soda make you fat friends i got like hundreds if not thousands of responses from google and every single response was basically yes so you can't tell me that common sense in america today dictates that soda makes you fat at abundance of soda makes you fat and so if you're somebody who is inclined to go into your local whatever and by boatloads of soda will then you know the consequences if you don't know the consequences well i dunno to tell ya the blood darwin take its course i mean no offense but if you don't know that drinking you know biggie size soda causes obesity hypertension diabetes cardiovascular disease lower extremity amputations well then you your i mean no offense but your brain dead i mean you really are if you don't know and you don't have the common sense to know that soda causes obesity and all these other things and so the pastor's pointing out that all of these are far higher among people of color than among whites these communities also drank more soda and are exposed to more soda advertising okay they're making the choice to buy those sodas are they not so oh how i would answer that accusation that they are.

public health aba obesity lamar google darwin america
"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

AM 570 The Mission

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

"In the dc superior court on thursday on behalf of the pastors and the praxis hub project the public health group alleges that coq in the aba ran an intentional campaign to confuse consumers about the causes of obesity now this goes on and on into this rather extensive story about what causes obesity hypertension diabetes cardiovascular disease all these diseases that high sugar content diets do in fact cause but i'm wondering if the pastors are not addressing it completely backwards from the way they should in this is indicative of what i've noticed sometimes when people don't take personal responsibility we want to blame others for the choices that we make insee cabot these diseases these are serious in this passers tired of god go into these funerals and i get all of that but has he preached as was seriously against the consumption of sugar from his pulpit as much as he has about how he's going to take down the big commercial coca cola company see because no matter how much coca cola coca cola makes it will never killed anybody that doesn't drink it on capitol hill hi dr carry score ski here are you concerned about your health are you concerned about the way look well summers here and this is the perfect time to get healthy and look great how'd you look and feel in just forty days.

aba obesity public health capitol hill forty days
"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:50 min | 4 years ago

"diabetes cardiovascular disease" Discussed on KTRH

"And so inflammation is as i have said many many times and all of you should be familiar with this inflammation is the root of all evil in the human body anywhere there is inflammation there's going to be tissue damage oregon dysfunction and the likelihood of progressive the disease and so what they're trying to say he is that with yoga and mindful relax eishin the mind body connection you can alter the amount of inflammation and thus reverse the molecular signature of the affects of chronic stress chronic stress leads to inflammation so there's no doubt that the more hyped up we get we're excited were under stress were were operating on out on on a on a on fumes here these are all situations that promote disease promote illness things like cancer diabetes alzheimer's heart attack stroke because of the inflammation and by really trying to get in touch with your body in your mind in controlling this inflammation and calming down as the ability to to help yourself out and then last article he real quick this out of the new york times magazine losing fat gaining brainpower on the playground this basically reiterates the and i must say it is once again the word inflammation is in this article what they're saying is that young children that are not exercising enough are getting fat we know that we've been talking about this a long time but it is the fat around the midsection that belly or visceral fat a type of tissue that deep in the abdomen and we know without a doubt that this is actively secreting hormones a lot of people think that that visceral fat that belly fat really should be considered another land just i the firewood gland your adrenal gland visceral fat is a gland because it is increasing inflammation throughout the body and as i've said before and none of you should be surprised with this at heightens the risk of diabetes cardiovascular disease even in children and so what they showed is that young kids they did a study young kids that exercise the lot.

the new york times magazine