35 Burst results for "Diabetes"

Joe Biden Claims He Talked to the Doctor Who Invented Insulin

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Joe Biden Claims He Talked to the Doctor Who Invented Insulin

"Hey, media. Why don't you cover Biden claiming he talked to the guy who invented insulin? Here's cut 13 listened to Joe Biden talking about insulin and the guy who invented it who just for the record died a year before Biden was born. How many of you know somebody with diabetes? These insulin. Well, guess what? And when Debbie and I pass this law, it included everybody, not just seniors. And so what happened was we said, okay, and how much you cost to make that insulin drug for diabetes? Of course. It was invented by a man who did not patent it because he wanted it available for everyone. I spoke to him, okay? I spoke to him, okay? He says that. I spoke to the guy. I spoke to him. He died in 1942. You think you're speaking at? Do you speak to him recently? This week? This morning when? When did you talk to, when did you have your conversation with the Doctor Who invented insulin? Doctor Frederick banting died in 1941.

Biden Joe Biden Diabetes Debbie Frederick Banting
McDonald’s to Face $10B Race Discrimination Suit From Byron Allen

The Officer Tatum Show

01:57 min | 2 months ago

McDonald’s to Face $10B Race Discrimination Suit From Byron Allen

"It says McDonald's will face a $10 billion lawsuit against them for not advertising enough on black owned media. Now, let me just explain who this helps in who this hurts. The fact that the plaintiff are the fact that and I believe it was a black man that did the suing. The fact that we're suing people because you're not advertising junk food enough on black networks. It's asinine to me. Now the people who are making money from advertisement who wants to sell out the black community because they don't care nothing about your health, you know, one of the leading cause of deaths for black people in America is heart disease and diabetes, hypertension, I mean, literally obesity is rampant amongst the black community. However, you get people who want to sue McDonald's because they don't spend enough advertising to black people. That's like saying, why don't you sell us more stuff to kill us? How dare you, not sell things that's going to destroy our community on our network. Why won't you sell destructive things in our community on our network? Why you just sell it on a white people network where black people ain't listening to? But no, it's about money. Says the federal courts this week ruled that McDonald's will have to face a $10 billion lawsuit allegation that is discrimination or discriminates against black owned media channels by refusing to advertise on them. It says media tycoon, Bryant Byron Allen, a company Alan media group, we're bringing the suit against the fast food retailer with the U.S. district judge for Nando, outgoing, all going, I think it's how you say his name. Clearing the way for Allen to attempt to prove his claim in court. So they're

Mcdonald Hypertension Heart Disease Obesity Diabetes U.S. Bryant Byron Allen Alan Media Group Nando Allen
Zuby Isn't Afraid to Say Obesity Is Not Healthy

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:55 min | 4 months ago

Zuby Isn't Afraid to Say Obesity Is Not Healthy

"So health is important to you. And you've written a children's book called the candy calamity. So, but let's talk about health for a second. When you I mean, the idea that you want to write a book for kids on health. How is it that we talk about health in this country? There's this new thing now where if somebody's really heavy, you're not even supposed to say, oh, that's not good. Your body shaming me. What are you talking about? If I see somebody who's like really pale or really this or that you just said, you don't look healthy. And you could say it in a mean way or you could say it in a loving way, but somehow there's this thing out there now where they're putting pictures of really heavy people on the covers of magazine like this is aspiration. I'm thinking, I don't know if that's aspirational. That strikes me as maybe a bad message. But what do you say? I agree with you completely, if anything, I think you've sugarcoated it a little. I think it's an absolute catastrophe. I think it's a complete inversion of reality. And I think on many levels, we're living in a time and in an age where emotionality is has taken over reality. Everything is about political correctness and being so PC that you never step on any toes or potentially hurt the feelings of the most fragile egos and people out there. And this leads to a denial or even an inversion of reality. Obesity is not healthy. It's really bad to be obese. It shortens your lifespan, puts you at risk of many, many diseases from various types of cancer to a heart attacks, to strokes, to diabetes. That's a huge statement. I know it's true, but I haven't heard this recently. Being overweight puts you at risk for a list you've just given us a litany of gruesome diseases. This is a fact. This is not your opinion. Yes.

Obesity Heart Attacks Cancer Diabetes
Dr. Joel Zinberg: A Lot of Mistakes Made in Our COVID Response

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:54 min | 6 months ago

Dr. Joel Zinberg: A Lot of Mistakes Made in Our COVID Response

"First part, do you agree with that that there have been a lot of mistakes made in our response to COVID and more importantly, number two, why is that? Was it incompetence? Was there a political agenda afoot? A lot of Democrat governors and mayors seem to like the power they got from COVID. What do you think is behind it all? Well, I think there are a lot of mistakes made for several reasons. Firstly, many of the so called experts were only considering the costs of COVID and therefore, they could only impose measures that they thought would limit the various and sundry health impacts of COVID. They never considered the other costs that are involved in those measures, the economic costs, shutting down the economy, the people losing their jobs and the health impacts that result from that. They never considered how shutting down the healthcare system would impact on other types of health conditions. And so we know we have excess deaths, do not only to COVID, but due to all sorts of other things where people didn't attend cancer screenings. They didn't go get their diabetes checked. They didn't refill their cardiac medicines. We have excess cardiac deaths. We have excess deaths from a lot of other causes because people didn't consider their cost to these measures. All they were concerned about was, oh, we have to flatten the curve. We have to lower the number of cases. And secondly, I think a big problem of people like Doctor Fauci and others hasn't been that they're evil, but it's been that they didn't trust the American people with the truth. In other words, early on, for example, when Doctor Fauci and others were saying, don't use masks. Right. They later admitted, well, we only said that because we wanted to preserve masks for medical

Covid Doctor Fauci Diabetes Cancer
Pizza Hut Teaches Kids America is Built on Slavery and Genocide

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:44 min | 8 months ago

Pizza Hut Teaches Kids America is Built on Slavery and Genocide

"Pizza Hut teaches America, kids America is built on slavery and genocide. A fast food chain claims that America was founded on genocide. From front, front page mag dot com, Pizza Hut unsatisfied with making kids fat also wants to make them racist. They have an empowering educated tool box presented by the Pizza Hut foundation. Urging teachers to tell students that everyone is defined by race, not everyone has racial identity. And that race defines American life. That's what they say. They say race defines American life according to Pizza Hut. They say here, quote, America is a country built on a foundation of slavery, genocide, and white supremacy, a pamphlet for teachers stamped by the Pizza Hut logo declares. They say this is so well written by front page magazine. They say this, they say, challenging conversation says that police force quote is the 6th leading cause of death for black men. Now, of course, they don't talk about how black men are getting killed by police because they're committing crimes and a lot of that is done in self defense, but actually it's front page magazine comes back beautifully. They say, actually, it's diabetes. But it's understandable that Pizza Hut which makes millions of dollars giving black men heart disease strokes and diabetes wants to blame the cops who are the only people keeping underpaid employees of their struggling franchises alive. It's David Horowitz's great website, the great David Horowitz. Having destroyed pizza and its own company, Pizza Hut now wants to destroy America. So every day we have new companies going completely woke, it's happening at a record rate.

Pizza Hut America Pizza Hut Foundation Heart Disease Strokes Diabetes David Horowitz
The Left Thinks We're Going to Get to COVID Zero

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:21 min | 8 months ago

The Left Thinks We're Going to Get to COVID Zero

"The left thinks we're going to get to China's absurd goal of COVID zero. That's what they want when you see somebody in a car, driving by themselves with the windows shut, and they have a mask on. And they're clearly afraid, and I'm not trying to judge them. I'm just observing. You could say it's nuts to drive around in a car with a mask on. There are people who are afraid. Of COVID. And we ought to have compassion for those people. It's too bad. But listen, I'm afraid of asteroids. That's just one of my irrational fears. Americans get to have irrational fears. Maybe it's irrational fear. Maybe you're a cancer patient. Maybe you're highly vulnerable. You have emphysema. You have diabetes. You have a loved one who died a terrible death due to COVID. I get it. But that's what they're hoping for. And I hate to be the bearer of bad news. If you're one of those people, we're not going to get to COVID zero. We're not going to have COVID zero. I'm sorry. It's just not going to happen.

China Covid Emphysema Cancer Diabetes
Dr. Sam Pappas Explains His Integrative Holistic Approach With People

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:50 min | 9 months ago

Dr. Sam Pappas Explains His Integrative Holistic Approach With People

"Different kind of medicine. And the first time I met you, we sat down, we spoke for hours, about all kinds of things, but it was a holistic approach that didn't say, okay, what's the one thing you're suffering from now oh here's a pill go off and see if it works. Can you explain what form of mets in that is? And why you think it's what we all should be practicing? Well, I like to say I kind of take the best of traditional academic allopathic medicine with health and wellness and an interest in the why. Allopathic means what? It means a traditional medicine where you're looking at diseases and asylum. You have a heart problem. You're attacking a problem one by one. Yeah, exactly. Kind of like a disease. But then also looking at this terminology called integrative, wellness, holistic, we're kind of asks, you know, what's the why of the problem? And I try to bring in my unique interest in biographies and people and I believe that each person is worthy of a personalized unique relationship. I think the doctor patient relationship is therapeutic in and of itself. Which is why I want to know how many books you've read on Odysseus as you told me. And of course in history and your goals and your interests. And also, your lifestyle, because you could have a proclivity to diabetes, or you could have issues with insulin and maybe it's a function of how much sleep you get. Which aren't usually questions. I think this medicine and your suppress that phenomena, but what if it's a lifestyle issue? So you actually, in a nice way, you interrogate your patients to see, okay, what are the many factors that could impinge upon this one thing we're seeing in, for example, you do extensive

Mets Diabetes
Is Vaccine Related Fainting Causing Deaths?

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:22 min | 10 months ago

Is Vaccine Related Fainting Causing Deaths?

"All sort of have the McDonald's the comedian faint on stage after bragging about being vaccinated and booster and Jesus loves her blah blah blah. Top of her game never looked healthier, boom. Faints really scary, cracked her skull in the hospital. A couple days later, we find that Bob Saget died of a brain bleed because he hid his head somewhere in the room, they don't know where their guessing, he hit it so bad that he laid back down in bed under the covers and thought he'd sleep it off and the brain bleed killed him. And I know a friend of one of my relatives died that way too, hitting their head the same way. So I'm not saying that's not true. But I'm wondering, I don't believe that Bob Saget hit his head on the headboard. Headboards at hotels are flat. It's not gonna hurt you. I think Bob Saget fainted also. I think you think maybe he had said on the bathroom sink, an end table. We'll never know. And maybe when he came to he crawled back to bed and thought, oh God, I'll just sleep this off. And he died that way. It's terrible news, but you know, both of them are vaccinated. And now there's news that Bob Saget had COVID and his repertory system. This is such bullshit. I'm not saying he didn't, but I'm saying, if he did, then why isn't his death being counted as a COVID death? Because that's what they did for tomb frigging years. Count everybody's death who had COVID in this system, even though they died of diabetes or strokes or cancer or heart attacks. If you tested positive for COVID, which they always give you blood panels when you enter a hospital, the automatically was a COVID death. And it was nonsense. So we've been lied to for a long time. I'm not saying co didn't kill a lot of people. It did, but it killed people as the CDC has admitted with as many or an average of four other comorbidities that they were living with. So I don't want to, you know, look, I just think that we have to focus on the fainting aspect here. And possibly if Helen McDonald was in a hotel and hadn't left her hotel, you had to go perform, she might have think of the same way. It's a matter of timing. She could have had a head on the end table of the coffee table and die the same way. So is there a connection with the faint thing in the vaccinations?

Bob Saget Mcdonald Heart Attacks Strokes Diabetes Helen Mcdonald Cancer CDC
Did Bob Saget Die From COVID or Its Vaccine?

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:28 min | 11 months ago

Did Bob Saget Die From COVID or Its Vaccine?

"Quick, Bob Saget, his death, we know about no surprise there. I was saying the other day on my show, why doesn't any report of find out when he was vaccinated? That can't be too hard to figure out with the right tools, the right people in place if you work in a newsroom or any kind of news organization, you can get that information pretty easily. No one's doing it. Nobody wants to know if it's too close to his death. He had COVID over the holidays. He said he was feeling okay but tired. He said on an interview for some other some other person's podcast, you don't want to get this. It's tough. I had a tough time with it. Okay. 65. I don't know if he has any comorbidities. I don't know if he had high blood pressure or whatever. Diabetes, he certainly wasn't obese. But there could be something else in his system. We didn't know about. But he looked generally healthy. He was very happy. He looked indecent shape for a man in his age. And now ABC News, I believe, was the first to report. Maybe I'm wrong that now people are thinking it could be COVID with bob sack. We need people to be a first. We all thought that immediately you can't be 65 and being good shape and not be a fat slob or these obvious comorbidities and not think that it has something to do with either COVID or the gem. So until we find that when he got the jab, I'm gonna stick to the fact is that, yeah, I think it was a side effect of the jam.

Bob Saget Bob Sack Diabetes Abc News
EXPLAINER: New easy-to-use COVID-19 pills come with a catch

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

EXPLAINER: New easy-to-use COVID-19 pills come with a catch

"New new the the infected infected covered covered nineteen nineteen patients patients now now have have two two treatment treatment options options that that can can be be taken taken at at home home one one from from Fizer Fizer called called packs packs loaded loaded and and one one from from Merck Merck mall mall new new pair pair appear appear both both were were shown shown to to reduce reduce the the chances chances of of hospitalization hospitalization or or death death from from covert covert nineteen nineteen but but the the pills pills have have to to be be taken taken as as soon soon as as possible possible once once symptoms symptoms appear appear within within five five days days of of the the start start of of those those symptoms symptoms that that of of course course presents presents a a challenge challenge to to get get tested tested a a prescription prescription and and start start the the treatment treatment the the pills pills are are intended intended for for those those with with mild mild or or moderate moderate covert covert nineteen nineteen but but who who are are more more likely likely to to become become seriously seriously ill ill that that includes includes older older people people and and those those with with other other health health conditions conditions like like heart heart disease disease cancer cancer or or diabetes diabetes that that make make them them more more vulnerable vulnerable the the antiviral antiviral pills pills are are not not authorized authorized for for people people hospitalized hospitalized with with code code nineteen nineteen I'm I'm Ben Ben Thomas Thomas

Fizer Fizer Merck Merck Mall Mall Heart Heart Disease Disease Ca Diabetes Ben Ben Thomas Thomas
"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

Diabetes Deconstructed

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

"Help <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Female> to take <Speech_Male> moisture away <Speech_Male> from the skin itself. <Speech_Male> And now some <Speech_Male> synthetic materials <Speech_Male> have been added <Speech_Male> into diabetic <Speech_Male> socks that <Speech_Male> can help to with moisture <Speech_Male> away as well. Moisture control is <Speech_Male> important in patients with <Speech_Male> diabetes because they are <Speech_Male> more predisposed to getting <Speech_Male> things like an athlete's <Speech_Male> foot or a toenail fungus. <Speech_Male> So those <Speech_Male> are really important. The <Speech_Male> other things that most diabetic <Speech_Male> socks will <Speech_Male> have a level of <Speech_Male> is a gentle <Speech_Male> compression which <Speech_Male> can help to assist <Speech_Male> with swelling of the legs <Speech_Male> and the ankles. <SpeakerChange> Patients <Silence> will sometimes experience. <Speech_Female> So <Speech_Female> it sounds like in general <Speech_Male> these could be useful. <Speech_Male> Is that right? <Speech_Male> Absolutely. I've never <Speech_Male> recommended against <Speech_Female> a diabetic sock. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> That's good to know. <Speech_Female> What <Speech_Female> about toenails? Is <Speech_Female> there anything about <Speech_Female> toenails as <Speech_Female> people are <Speech_Female> clipping their <SpeakerChange> own meals <Speech_Female> at home or <Speech_Female> do you recommend <Speech_Female> that they get a <Speech_Female> clipped by a podiatrist <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> that <Speech_Male> people should know about? <Speech_Male> Toenails <Speech_Male> can be very challenging <Speech_Male> to clip, especially <Speech_Male> in people who <Speech_Male> have thickening of the <Speech_Male> toenails, <Speech_Male> brittleness of the toenails <Speech_Male> or people <Speech_Male> with just can't get <Speech_Male> down to their toenails, have <Speech_Male> mobility issues and <Speech_Male> just can't get there <Speech_Male> the way they used to. <Speech_Male> The risk obviously <Speech_Male> would be injury <Speech_Male> to the foot itself. <Speech_Male> And the skin by <Speech_Male> trying to care for your nails <Speech_Male> at home. Now, <Speech_Male> as a rule, if <Speech_Male> you are a diabetic, you <Speech_Male> are <Speech_Male> increased risk of infection <Speech_Male> just by virtue <Speech_Male> of the fact that you <Speech_Male> have impaired <Speech_Male> blood sugar, <Speech_Male> but general <Speech_Male> nail care can be <Speech_Male> very safe <Speech_Male> if there's not significant <Speech_Male> deformity of the <Speech_Male> nail and appropriate <Speech_Male> techniques are used. <Speech_Male> So if there's ever <Speech_Male> question, I <Speech_Male> always recommend that my <Speech_Male> diabetic patients <Speech_Male> will schedule an appointment <Speech_Male> with their podiatrists <Speech_Male> just to go over <Speech_Male> appropriate nail care. <Speech_Male> Now, there are certain <Speech_Male> settings in <Speech_Male> which I will advise <Speech_Male> my patients <Speech_Male> not to care for their <Speech_Male> own nails at home, <Speech_Male> something like <Speech_Male> arterial insufficiency <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Male> decreased blood <Speech_Male> flow to the toes, <Speech_Male> something that <Speech_Male> if the skin were <Speech_Male> nicked when you're caring <Speech_Male> for your nails <Speech_Male> with the wound be able to <Speech_Male> heal or is it <Speech_Male> more likely to get infected <Speech_Male> and cause a problem <Speech_Male> in patients with <Speech_Male> that, I recommend <Speech_Male> they come visit me <Speech_Male> for their routine <Speech_Male> mail care so that <Speech_Male> I can help them with that <Speech_Male> procedure. <Speech_Male> Patients with neuropathy <Speech_Male> at the

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

Diabetes Deconstructed

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

"Be subtle when it comes on. Even things as simple as checking the feet wearing slippers in the house and not walking barefoot are basic precautionary measures to take even if you don't have complications related to your diabetes and you are well controlled because they're simple things that can be done that can prevent worse things from happening. And it sounds like those symptoms as you describe can deteriorate gradually. So you may not know as the symptoms of sensation that that's occurring. Yeah, that's exactly right, and that's exactly why I bring my patients back for a diabetic foot exams at regular intervals so that we can monitor these things for deterioration. For those people that do have neuropathy or poor circulation, you mentioned, in general, the importance of good fitting shoes. Could you talk a little bit more about what you mean by that? What kinds of specifications should people look for when they're buying their shoes? So a good fitting show is important in any patient with diabetes because if you aren't able to appreciate or feel the fit of the shoe as well and neuropathy does happen to occur in the toes more frequently than the rest of the foot. And if it's early, it will begin in the toes classically. The toes can be injured by the front of a shoe. If there's a seam on the top of the shoe, if there's any deformity, such as a bunion or a hammer toe that might rub on the shoe, or if the foot slides around in the shoe because it is not fitted well, it can cause irritation. It can cause ingrown toenail, which can then become infected. And it can cause friction injuries or pressure injuries that can lead to ulcers and infections. So an appropriately fitted shoe is critically important for those reasons. And often diabetic shoes, which is one of the programs that's offered by most insurance companies and Medicare for patients who have complications and need more advanced types of shoe gear. It's a benefit this offer to.

diabetes Medicare
"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

Diabetes Deconstructed

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

"We often say that diabetes self management really is the cornerstone for people with diabetes, managing what they eat, their exercise, their medications, all the things that go into good self management behavior. But I think that the emphasis on inspecting fee really is something that we could probably do a better job at relaying to patients. When you say inspect fee, what do you mean by that as a podiatrist? What would you recommend a person at home look for when they're looking at their feet? That could be of concern that they should then.

diabetes
"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

Diabetes Deconstructed

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

"Foot problems or is it only those that have complications like you described? Everyone at baseline does have an increased risk of developing complications by virtue of the fact of being diabetic. However, those who develop complications, whether they be a result of longer periods of hyperglycemia or the sugar's been high for a long time. Those are more likely to develop something like a foot ulcer or an amputation than someone who is very well controlled. And when you talk about foot ulcer, do you mean input infection? Also is a simple term that just refers to a wound or an open area of the skin on the foot. Roughly up to one in four patients with diabetes will experience one of those in their lifetime. Infection is an entirely different type of thing that can happen as a result of an open ulceration when bacteria get in. And that brings it up to a more serious event that requires more prompt management. You know, I often hear patients when they're diagnosed with diabetes for the first time. Worry about having an amputation of their limb or losing a toe. How commonly does that happen now in the United States? Amputation in diabetic patients is not extremely common, however, it is not unheard of happening, particularly in patients who have poorly controlled diabetes or patients who are not consistently caring for their feet in the appropriate recommended way or maintaining their appropriate follow-ups with their providers to help to keep their feet safe from complications such as all serving infection and amputation. Would you say it's fair to emphasize the importance of prevention then in trying to prevent foot ulcers and then prevent amputations in routine care? And how would you describe preventative methods for people with diabetes? What would you usually recommend? Absolutely. And I think with diabetes preventative measures are really the best way to prevent these complications from happening. And it can severely limit the risk of amputation infection ulceration just by following some simple guidelines to keep the feet protected from injury, especially in the setting of vascular disease or neuropathy or numbness in the feet. So some of the basic guidelines is what I kind of tell every one of my patients when I meet them for the first time when they are referred for diabetic foot exam. The first and foremost you need to check your feet every single day. That's something that seems very simple to do and is a no brainer, but you'd be surprised. There are some times when people want to unfortunately come in with an ulcer. And I will be the first person to see it and they will not even be aware that it is there because of numbness and other limiting factors. So checking the feet is really one of the more important parts of routine diabetic care. Always wearing a good supportive shoe to support the architecture of the.

diabetes hyperglycemia amputation infection ulceratio United States vascular disease
Daystar CEO Marcus Lamb dies after COVID diagnosis

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Daystar CEO Marcus Lamb dies after COVID diagnosis

"Marcus Marcus lamb lamb the the CEO CEO and and founder founder of of the the conservative conservative Christian Christian Daystar Daystar television television network network has has died died at at the the age age of of sixty sixty four four after after contracting contracting the the corona corona virus virus his his wife wife Joanie Joanie said said he he had had diabetes diabetes and and was was hospitalized hospitalized after after his his oxygen oxygen levels levels had had dropped dropped lemon lemon Daystar Daystar have have promoted promoted views views opposing opposing cove cove in in nineteen nineteen vaccines vaccines and and restrictions restrictions to to stop stop the the spread spread of of the the disease disease the the network's network's programs programs have have featured featured vaccine vaccine skeptics skeptics and and healthcare healthcare professionals professionals who who promote promote alternative alternative club club in in nineteen nineteen treatments treatments in in recent recent months months a a number number of of prominent prominent anti anti vaccination vaccination Christian Christian broadcasters broadcasters have have died died from from Calvin Calvin nineteen nineteen radio radio host host Dick Dick Farrell Farrell Phil Phil Valentine Valentine and and mark mark Bernie Bernie or or who who were were unvaccinated unvaccinated all all died died after after they they contracted contracted the the virus virus I I Walter Walter Ratliff Ratliff

Marcus Marcus Lamb Daystar Daystar Joanie Joanie Diabetes Diabetes Cove Cove Calvin Calvin Dick Dick Farrell Farrell Phil Phil Valentine Valentine Mark Mark Bernie Bernie Walter Walter Ratliff Ratliff
"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

Diabetes Deconstructed

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

"I believe ACD, yes, does the same thing. There are another accrediting body who they have the same feature. I'm pretty sure where you can search your zip code, and you can find out where you can go. For diabetes self management education and support, DSMES. Is that really only for people who are newly diagnosed with the disease or can those who've had diabetes for a while, also benefit at what point in the disease course do you recommend it? There are four critical times recommended by ACS, one of them being at diagnosis. So anybody who's newly diagnosed with any type of diabetes, I highly recommend that you do this because a lot of the questions that you didn't get to ask to your primary care physician, all in all likelihood, you're going to have an hour with this person. This educator, and you're going to be able to ask all the questions that you have. So I highly recommend it for newly diagnosed and you consider this. Even if you know people with diabetes, you have to remember that everybody's diabetes is different. If you're hearing things from people, you know, that might not kind of line up with what you feel might be right for you. This is definitely what you should do. Try to find a program and go. Other times, you could do this. If somebody's diabetes done control, the definition can vary, but what I would recommend if a if the A1C is over 8, I would definitely think about it. Just because your A1C is 7.9 doesn't mean you can't come. But over 8, I would definitely consider it you're new to a health system where you've recently moved. It's always prudent.

diabetes ACS
"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

Diabetes Deconstructed

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

"So the services are complementary, but they're similar depending on where you receive care. They might offer one and not the other, which can be confusing, what is nutrition? What is diabetes self management training, the things overlap? That's a lot of things that can be talked about. That's a really helpful distinction to make because I imagine that some listeners might be asking, well, I see a dietitian to really talk about nutrition goals and what I'm eating. Why do I have to have another appointment to see someone for DSMT? How would you respond to that? Yeah, well, if you're wondering that, you might be right. You might not. But if somebody has well controlled diabetes, they're doing a great job with their self management and they're working on their nutrition for any reason, whether it's weight loss, whether it's another condition or maybe they have a heart condition. They're working on nutrition for that. Maybe would benefit much from seeing somebody for DSMT. Totally possible. When somebody has uncontrolled diabetes, when they're working really hard on their nutrition. I actually see this kind of often. And they're diabetes still uncontrolled. That means there's some missing links somewhere. Somebody is not identifying. And that's really where diabetes self management training can come in clutch. Because you're going to get that in depth assessment. Their job is to find out what could not be right about your regimen or what's going on with you. That is preventing you from reaching your goals despite your efforts. When important thing to consider here is if a patient or participant is being asked to put in effort and they don't see a benefit, that's a tough sell. It's going to be hard to get that patient to continue to work towards goals. If they're trying and it's not working. I think if a patient or somebody listening to this is wondering, hey, I already see a dietician, do I need this? If your diabetes is not under control yet, then you should definitely think about it..

diabetes
"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

Diabetes Deconstructed

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

"You have D and T, DSMES, one stands for diabetes self management training. The other stands for diabetes self management, education and support. They mean the same thing. They're interchangeable. The DSMT is more of a Medicare definition and I believe. ACV is going with the DSMES because it kind of outlines more as to what all the service can and tail. Diabetes education, diabetes self management training is a lot of ways you can praise this. I think it is important to think about the way that we label this because there's a lot of inputs that can be taken. Hoping that we can get more into the details about in the podcast about the way you explain it and then what the patient thinks, et cetera, participants. Yeah, that's really helpful for our listeners. This might not be something that they've heard of before. Is this the same as diabetes education or diabetes education classes or is this something different? The phrase diabetes education. I don't feel that strongly about it. For this reason, it implies that the person attending is possibly not educated or not educated enough, right? Or needs to go to a class. So DSMT, DSMES, what actually is it? The best way that I can describe it is it's a one on one visit initially with a certified diabetes care and education specialist. That person could have a variety of professional licenses that person could be a nurse. It could be a dietician. Could you be a social worker? If there were certified that means that this person has been trained to be an expert in the variety of content areas related to diabetes self management. That could be glucose monitoring. That could be medication management. That could be nutrition. It could be healthy coping. There's a lot of different content areas that can be included with DSMT, DSMES. It's not a class. When somebody goes to a visit like this, the initial visit is a one on one visit with a certified individual. Our program is set up in such a way where we want the patient to be able to choose how they receive care. If you want to come back and participate in a group discussion, you are welcome to do that. If you don't, then our goal is to have you not do that. There are some insurance nuances, right? Some people are covered for different types of care, depending on the insurance somebody has. It is really individualized in the sense that somebody's benefit may dictate what they can receive. One important thing to know about DST DSMES is it's a benefit that renews annually. Maybe is it a long time ago, and it wasn't that great or you didn't have a good experience that you moved or something. You have two years every year. As long as you have diabetes, it's never a bad time to try again. This pluses and minuses to the benefit. Well, that's really great to hear that everyone should have the opportunity to have at least two visits a year. So if it didn't work the first time, they can try again. Could you tell us a little bit more about what exactly is included? So if a patient comes and meets with you, what kind of topics do you cover?.

diabetes DSMT
"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

Diabetes Deconstructed

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

"Thank you very <SpeakerChange> much. And <Silence> we do our best. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Leon, thank you <Speech_Female> so much for <Speech_Female> sharing your <Speech_Female> experiences with diabetes <Speech_Female> self <SpeakerChange> management <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> how that's changed <Speech_Female> over the <SpeakerChange> 40 <Speech_Female> plus years that <Speech_Female> you've had diabetes <Speech_Female> and especially <Speech_Female> benefited not <Speech_Female> only from your close <Speech_Female> relationship <Speech_Female> with gene and <Speech_Female> the diabetes coaching <Speech_Female> have received there, but <Speech_Female> also with the new <Speech_Female> technologies that clearly <Speech_Female> have also <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> helped as <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> well to manage <SpeakerChange> your diabetes <Speech_Female> at home. <Speech_Female> You talked about <Speech_Female> the emergency kit <Speech_Female> and I just wanted to elaborate <Speech_Female> on that <Speech_Female> being the glucagon emergency <Speech_Female> kit that we <Speech_Female> often recommend <Speech_Female> for people with insulin <Speech_Female> just in case <Speech_Female> of low blood sugars <Speech_Female> at home, <Speech_Female> we do have a video <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> on the website about <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that for anyone <Speech_Female> else that is interested <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> in learning <Speech_Female> about that. I <Speech_Female> did just want to <Speech_Female> ask you one last question. <Speech_Female> For <Speech_Female> those people who <Speech_Female> are newly diagnosed <Speech_Female> with diabetes, <Speech_Female> who are <Speech_Female> overwhelmed <Speech_Female> and concerned <Speech_Female> about what a life <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> will be like <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> living with diabetes. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> What advice <Silence> <Advertisement> or <SpeakerChange> words do you <Silence> have for them? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> My advice, <Speech_Male> those <Speech_Male> that are just <Speech_Male> becoming aware <Speech_Male> of that <Speech_Male> being diabetic <Speech_Male> is to <Speech_Male> pay attention. <Speech_Male> Listen, because all <Speech_Male> this is a part. <Speech_Male> Pay attention and listen <Speech_Male> and understand <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> importance of <Speech_Male> following directions <Speech_Male> and understanding <Speech_Male> what diabetes <Speech_Male> can do to <Speech_Male> you to the extent <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of having <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> problems if <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you don't do <Silence> <Advertisement> what is required. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I would say <Speech_Male> to those <Speech_Male> that are <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> diabetic smell <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and maybe <Speech_Male> apprehensive <Speech_Male> of working <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> with <Speech_Male> the endocrinologist <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> educator, <Speech_Male> I was <Speech_Male> just saying, <Speech_Male> do the best <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you can <Speech_Music_Male> listen <Speech_Male> and follow <Speech_Male> instructions. <Speech_Male> It's <Speech_Male> one thing <Speech_Male> that I learned a long <Speech_Music_Male> time ago, <Speech_Male> and I'm a take you back <Speech_Male> a little bit. My <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> mom used to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> say, you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> have to be in a <Speech_Male> house at 9 <Speech_Male> o'clock. Well, <Speech_Male> sometimes <Speech_Male> I playing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and I <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> forget that it's not <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a crime. So <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> when I go back home, <Speech_Male> my <Speech_Male> mom would say, <Speech_Male> I told you <Speech_Male> to be <Speech_Male> in a house <Speech_Male> at 9 o'clock. <Speech_Male> It's at the 9. <Speech_Male> It's a <SpeakerChange> minute <Speech_Male> after 9. <Speech_Male> So you <Speech_Male> are late. <Speech_Music_Male> So <Speech_Music_Male> you have to follow <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> instruction <Speech_Male> from what <Speech_Male> my mother told me about <Silence> being on time, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> that stayed with <Speech_Male> me, all of <Speech_Male> my life, and even now, <Speech_Male> when I went <Speech_Music_Male> to high school, I went <Speech_Music_Male> to school. <SpeakerChange> You had to be <Speech_Male> at school at 8 o'clock. <Speech_Male> Not a <Silence> minute after 8. <Speech_Male> When <Speech_Male> I joined the military <Speech_Male> and navy, <Speech_Male> you have to <Speech_Male> be on time. <Speech_Male> So I say <Speech_Male> all that to say <Speech_Male> to you, my <Speech_Male> new family members <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> have diabetics. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Pay attention. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Be on <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> time <SpeakerChange> and <Silence> <Advertisement> follow instructions. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> I just hope that <Speech_Music_Male> problem what <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we gather here <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> will help <Speech_Male> other diabetics <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> understand <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the importance <Speech_Male> of what we <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> have to do <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> farts managing. <Speech_Male> This is what it <Speech_Male> is. It's managing <Silence> Thank you <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> for those <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> final <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> wise words and <Speech_Female> your mom sounds like an amazing <Speech_Female> woman as well. <Speech_Female> I'd like to thank <Speech_Female> you, Leon for <Speech_Female> sharing. So <Speech_Female> candidly, your <Speech_Female> patient journey, <Speech_Female> we truly appreciate <Speech_Female> it and thank you, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Jean for your <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> exceptional care, of <Speech_Female> Leon, which he clearly <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> appreciates and for <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> all so sharing your <Speech_Female> insights as a diabetes <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> educator. <SpeakerChange> Thank <Speech_Music_Female>

diabetes
Trees Could Be a Mental, Physical and Climate Change Antidote

Environment: NPR

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Trees Could Be a Mental, Physical and Climate Change Antidote

"Is well known. The trees help counter climate change by soaking up carbon dioxide. Now there is a growing body of research to point to many ways of dose of trees can improve our mental and physical health. Here's martha bebinger member station. W. b. you are on how and why the tiny sapling robin williams planted thirty years ago towers above her boston home. I raise this tree when i raised my children and look at this look at that. She says there's something about being near this tree. It makes everybody a little bit happy around here when you're looking for strength you can't do better than looking at a tree and there's evidence williams may will be gleaning any number of direct or associated health benefits a longer life. Bitter birth outcomes lower stress levels lower risk of heart disease. Dr howard lumpkin. Is it the university of washington school of public health. Lower risk of diabetes reduced symptoms of adhd proximity to trees is associated with a ridiculously broad range of health benefits. I wish we had pills. That were this good for health. A few countries notably japan and south korea have invested in a practice known as forest bathing which is spending time among trees as a preventive health measure but prescribing time in nature is still pretty far outside mainstream medicine in the. Us from can says that. Maybe because there's a lot we don't know what doses needed. Do you need to walk. Among trees is sufficient just to look at the trees from outside your window. Do you need big trees or do small trees do the trick we you know. We're not able to tease the forest from the trees. Peter james at harvard medical school aims to answer a lot of those questions. He's merging health data captured by phones. Real time surveys about wellbeing and mood and street. View mapping data to dig into. What's exactly within view. Is it trees. Is it flowers and how those things are related to help behaviors and health outcomes.

Martha Bebinger W. B Dr Howard Lumpkin University Of Washington Schoo Robin Williams Boston Heart Disease Williams Adhd South Korea Diabetes Japan Peter James Harvard Medical School United States
Is There a Link Between Certain Diets and Depression? With Dr. Neal Barnard

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

01:43 min | 1 year ago

Is There a Link Between Certain Diets and Depression? With Dr. Neal Barnard

"Barr thank you very much for joining us to be with you. You ready for question number one. You bet all right this one comes to us from each four and a tour rights is a junk food diet more likely to cause depression. Well it's a great question. And and historically people have drawn a division whatever's below the neck. That's where i could have an effect but above above the neck no couldn't have any effect. Well the that foods might affect depression impressed in a favorable way through the right foods came to our attention as an accident. We were doing research study with geico insurance and the reason the reason we did this study and check you and i talked about this before the geiko national headquarters is about three or four blocks from her office and so they were really interested in the possibility that a plant based i might help them where they had employee wants to lose weight or get diabetes under better control so we instituted a program at geiko of a vegan diet both in the cafeteria and a weekly class for anybody who wanted to actually jump in and so although the purpose of it was to look at way changes and to see how he does. Diabetes might improve. We saw something else and that was depression. Started to lift. And you can do this subjectively where where you have. Individuals fill out a paper and soul questionnaire of specific symptoms. Are you sleeping. How's your mood. How's your appetite a whole bunch of indicators of depression and what we saw is that quite steadily. They were improving over the course of his site.

Depression Geico Insurance Geiko National Headquarters Barr Diabetes
We Need To Come to Terms with America's Obesity Epidemic

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:19 min | 1 year ago

We Need To Come to Terms with America's Obesity Epidemic

"One of the main reasons why we are seeing the dramatic escalation in certain areas struggling with the chinese corona virus in addition to monoclonal being suppressed and in addition to ivermectin and hydrochloric. Quinn is how overweight our countries and again. I say this is someone who has my own health problems. I don't get enough sleep if someone is overweight. You should look have a health problem. Don't try to own it. They'll be like oh. Yeah i'm fat and proud like that's actually really creepy. And it's not the way it should be. It's not good for you. it's not good for your joints. It's not good for you could get diabetes and so what we have here. Amazingly is to governors. That i think are that actually. That's not true. Jay pritzker is actually fatter than these governors. So jim justice. I don't know who's who is bigger. Jim justice or jay pritzker. That's tough tie again. I'm not fat shaming okay but at some point when you get to that level it's just a lack of will. Do you know what. I would love to eat out. Love to eat anything i want. Okay but it takes discipline. It takes order take self-control

Jay Pritzker Quinn Jim Justice Diabetes
Our Fear of Death Should Be Driving Us to the Church

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Our Fear of Death Should Be Driving Us to the Church

"Do we balance not not having on because air subtle talked about having having the moderation of all things right so you don't want all of a sudden kind of drive on one hours of sleep and not wear your seat. You wanna be reckless right. And how do you balance that. Yes first of all this is good warning. How many people in twenty twenty and twenty twenty one of died of artifacts bronchial infections diabetes. We don't know. I've got doctors who've told me we don't know because everything has been labeled and wrapped around cova for example that fear factor has skewed everything we've had scientists tell us we won't know the data regarding the future. It messes up everything but having said that what are we afraid of. I'm afraid of getting it. Are you afraid of getting diabetes. Do you watch what you eat. Are you afraid no no afraid of those things it has been so talked up and i'm not look it's a. It's a very very serious illness. I get it but it's not the only illness that's out there. The point that i think has happened across the nation and around the world is people all of a sudden became very very fearful of dying and my argument is this. You're gonna die sooner or later. Do you know jesus christ. This fear should be driving you to church not away from church jack. A love of the world or for the world yeah. That's what i'm saying. Is that like for example. Bob in the nineteen sixties. We had a pandemic and we handled it totally differently. Do you think people are more attached to the world. Then word yes. That's one of the reasons we reacted the way we did. Yes absolutely and it's it's sad and it's sadder when it's manifested in the pulpit and then the ministry where that's where the leadership should come from wishes steer them through the waters of crisis

Bronchial Infections Diabetes Cova Diabetes BOB
Study Reveals the Secret to Longevity in Japanese Centenarians

Ben Greenfield Fitness

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Study Reveals the Secret to Longevity in Japanese Centenarians

"To ancient things. A new study is pop. The is a japanese study and his japanese study was looking at a group of japanese centenarians. Who seem to have these seemingly magical powers. They have an average age of one hundred seven amongst the healthiest longest living humans on earth protected from chronic diseases that that inevitably haunt a lot of the rest of us as we age like obesity and diabetes hypertension and cancer. But what they found these people that really stood out was the trillions of microbes that lived in their gut It wasn't the amount of the microbes but it was. It was the composition of those gut bugs. The composition of those gut bugs basically. They had a bacterial signature. Those similar to the strains of bacteria in in each and every single one of the centenarians but a lot of them had a very similar microbiome in one strain in particular stood out and it was type of bile acid. Okay or is it a bacteria that synthesizes bile acid now bile acids what you might know. Is this kind of boring bodily fluid that's commonly known for digesting fats. But it's now being called as a class of entering hormones hormones that go beyond their classic role in fat digestion and absorption. So what they found. Is that these bile. Acids helped to protect sensitive gets infection and other environmental stressors. So it's really interesting because we know that that the gut bile acid content to decrease a little bit as one ages in the secondary by lasts a really powerful so they've done studies in mice before they looked at the these these microbiomes humans and they found that the gut bile acids to regulate immune cells and prevent some dangerous microbes from taking over the gut. And what a what they looked at in the seniors a particular group of gut bugs called or owed oral back to rasaie adora backdoor and that turned out this little bile acid called eyeso- aloe lithocholic acid or eyeso- aloe

Hypertension Obesity Diabetes Cancer
Apple Cider Vinegar: Supporting Liver and Gallbladder Health

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

02:24 min | 1 year ago

Apple Cider Vinegar: Supporting Liver and Gallbladder Health

"Bile is also important for blood. Sugar metabolism so actually helps to activate the fx are in the t. g. five receptor sites. That helped to modulate needs a ride. In the tarot sites the intestinal cells and that helps to modulate our blood. Sugar metabolism so helps keep blood sugar under control. Insulin release under control so may poor bile flow. Were more likely to develop high blood. Sugar diabetes insulin resistance issues like that of course helps sweep these water. Soluble toxins out of our system. As well and big issue is a lot of people end up getting calcification of very sluggish bile flow and they'll end up getting calcification and bile stones that will end up in these ducks that you can see the image. They're now a couple of things that really helped with this help to dilate the bile ducts and help to reduce the stag necessity. The bile help to thin the bile so it can flow. Well one is apple cider. Vinegar huge fan of using this great idea to put this on your food. Drink it before. Your meal seeking actually put some in water and drink it mixed with soups and stews. And you can use it as a morning primer as well as put in some water and drink it. I do that in the morning pretty much every day. Very good the malic acid. That's narrates very good for dilating the bile ducts apple cider vinegar. Also when you put it on food helps to pre digest the food so the acids in their help to stimulate your own digestive juices so your stomach. Acid your bile pancreatic enzyme release but then also when he put it on the food because it's acidic. It's actually helping to break down the protein. The carbohydrates things like that if the digestive process started before even put it in your body so really good idea now. What i don't recommend is Drinking this straight you wanna really dilute it if you drink it straight. It's going to be very harsh on your esophagus. And that's not healthy. Offer some people. You might gargle with it. You know if you have a sore throat. In order doubt sterilize and kill bacteria that might be damaging your throat however in general on a day-to-day basis. You wanna make sure you're deluding this. Pretty well I would say at least four. Ounces of water per tablespoon of apple cider

Apple Diabetes
Is Thinning Hair a Sign That Something Else Is off With Your Health?

Ask The Health Expert

02:45 min | 1 year ago

Is Thinning Hair a Sign That Something Else Is off With Your Health?

"The first thing. That comes to my mind when i hear about thinning. Hair especially with women is that That could have a potential thyroid problem and generally. It's going to be hypothyroid where they don't have enough thyroid. Hormone the way that you would test for. That would be a thyroid blood panel. That's one of the symptoms that you'll find with somebody who doesn't have enough thyroid. Hormones is hair loss so that would be definitely something that i would want to get checked out right away. Usually there's going to be other symptoms associated with that things like fatigue weight gain and such but certainly place to start in addition to that though there are other factors that are actually probably more common that we see in my My health health clinic when my in my coaching program and that is going to be things like stress we have. We live in a stressful society. Right now and no doubt. It can be accumulated stress that can create that it can be sudden stress. Even i've a story about a young lady who works for me who began working out and she really went from zero to sixty overnight with her workouts and she noticed one of her symptoms from that was hair loss. So any kind of stress. It doesn't have to be emotional. Stresses the way that we think of but also a bigger issue is going to be what. We call hormone resistance. You can have adequate levels of thyroid hormone about fifty percent of the people who have thyroid. Problems will actually test normal if they went actually in and got that blood test. But what's happening is the hormone itself while it's in the blood it's there to be tested and it's you know they can read it as normal but if it's not able to get into the cells of the body then it can't do its job and that hormone resistance. People have heard of insulin resistance as it relates to diabetes. A lot of people have heard of that. it's not just insulin. it can be thyroid. it can be. Estrogen can be testosterone any type of hormone that is being resisted at the cell. And a can't get in and do its job. You're gonna get symptoms like you don't have enough of those hormones The the reason that we have that is because the cells become damaged and when they become damaged because we eat too much sugar. We have too many bad fats. What i would call denatured fats Too many toxins in our life too much stress not enough quality sleep nutrient deficiencies these type of things that i would associate with western lifestyle if you will. They can damage ourselves. When our cell membrane becomes damage now it becomes inflamed when it becomes inflamed. It can it can actually create a barrier where the hormones cannot be. They're not able to get into the

Insulin Resistance Diabetes
"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

Diabetes Deconstructed

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

"Mean <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> I'm gonna lose <SpeakerChange> my foot. <Silence> How would you respond? <Speech_Female> People <Speech_Female> with diabetes <Speech_Female> are at risk <Speech_Female> for decreased <Speech_Female> nerve <Speech_Female> sensation in <Speech_Female> their feet over <Speech_Female> time in people with <Speech_Female> diabetes who may <Speech_Female> not have blood glucose <Speech_Female> at goal <Speech_Female> when complication that <Speech_Female> we work out for <Speech_Female> is decreased sensation <Speech_Female> in the feet. So <Speech_Female> that can put a <Speech_Female> person at risk <Speech_Female> for injuries in their <Speech_Female> feet, but wounds <Speech_Female> or ulcers <Speech_Female> that could <Speech_Female> result in complications <Speech_Female> such as <Speech_Female> such as imputation, <Speech_Female> but generally <Speech_Female> to avoid that <Speech_Female> we recommend that patients <Speech_Female> look at the bottom <Speech_Telephony_Female> of their feet every day <Speech_Telephony_Female> or if they're <Speech_Female> unable to to ask <Speech_Telephony_Female> a family member <Speech_Telephony_Female> or a friend in the <Speech_Female> patient visits <Speech_Female> for diabetes <Speech_Female> clinic, we do <Speech_Female> for exams <Speech_Female> regularly. So <Speech_Female> those are kind of measures <Speech_Female> that we take to <Speech_Female> avoid loss <Silence> of a person's blood. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Do you <Speech_Female> recommend that people <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> with diabetes <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> inspect their <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> own feet at home? <Silence> <Advertisement> Yes, <Silence> <Advertisement> absolutely. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> Yeah, I think <Speech_Telephony_Female> that there are many <Speech_Female> things that can <Speech_Telephony_Female> be done at the <Speech_Music_Female> home that seems simple <Speech_Telephony_Female> but really can <Speech_Music_Female> lead <Speech_Music_Female> to important <Speech_Female> prevention of <Speech_Female> complications <Speech_Female> in the future and <Speech_Female> it's really important <Speech_Telephony_Female> to hear about <Speech_Female> that information. <Silence> It's <SpeakerChange> really great <Silence> to hear about <Speech_Female> doctor <Speech_Female> sarko and other question <Speech_Female> that we often <Speech_Music_Female> get or something that can <Speech_Female> often be very <SpeakerChange> frustrating <Speech_Female> for patients <Speech_Female> is sometimes <Speech_Female> the medical <Speech_Female> language that's used <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> during the <Speech_Female> healthcare visit. <Speech_Female> Can sometimes <Speech_Female> be confusing to understand <Speech_Music_Female> just <Speech_Telephony_Female> exactly what <Speech_Telephony_Female> your healthcare provider <Speech_Female> is trying to tell you, <Speech_Female> what advice <Speech_Music_Female> do you have for patients <Speech_Music_Female> that <SpeakerChange> find <Speech_Female> that a challenge? <Speech_Female> I think <Speech_Female> in diabetes <Speech_Female> treatment is so important <Speech_Female> for patients <Speech_Female> to be informed <Speech_Female> and aware. And <Speech_Female> so anytime, <Speech_Telephony_Female> any word or <Speech_Female> term is used that <Speech_Female> a patient <Speech_Female> is not sure what it means. <Speech_Female> I think it's important <Speech_Female> to always ask <Speech_Telephony_Female> the provider <Speech_Female> if it's possible <Speech_Telephony_Female> to bring a family <Speech_Telephony_Female> member or friend to help <Speech_Female> advocate, that's <Speech_Female> always great too, but <Speech_Female> you know I think it's important <Speech_Female> for this <Speech_Female> to be kind of a team <Speech_Female> partnership to <Speech_Female> help treat diabetes <Speech_Telephony_Female> between the provider and <Speech_Female> the patient so <Speech_Female> it's important for <Speech_Female> someone with diabetes to feel <Speech_Female> comfortable with the words that <Speech_Female> are being used <SpeakerChange> in <Silence> understanding to <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> ask. <Speech_Female> Are there <Speech_Female> any resources <Speech_Telephony_Female> that could help <Speech_Female> with patients who are <Speech_Female> trying to understand <SpeakerChange> <Silence> these medical <Speech_Female> terms? <Speech_Female> So our website <Speech_Female> has a glossary, <Speech_Female> which <Speech_Female> helps explain <Speech_Female> the terms in <Speech_Female> language that hopefully <Speech_Female> doesn't include <Speech_Telephony_Female> any jargon or <Silence> complicated terms. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Doctor <Speech_Female> sarkar, thank you <Speech_Female> so much for <Speech_Female> your time today <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Music_Female> for your <Speech_Female> great expert input. <Speech_Female> We <Speech_Female> are really thrilled <Speech_Female> to hear <Speech_Female> about some <Speech_Female> of the latest and <Speech_Female> greatest information <Speech_Female> on diabetes <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> really thank you for your time. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> So thanks so much <Music> <Advertisement> for joining us today. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Great. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thank you. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I'm doctor Rita <Music> <Advertisement> Kayani and you've <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> been listening to diabetes <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> deconstructed. <Speech_Female> We developed <Speech_Female> this podcast as <Speech_Female> a companion to our <Speech_Music_Female> patient guide to <Speech_Female> diabetes website. <Speech_Female> Our vision <Speech_Female> is to provide <Speech_Female> a trusted and <Speech_Female> reliable resource <Speech_Female> based on the latest evidence <Speech_Female> that people <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> affected by diabetes <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> can use <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to live healthier <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> lives. For <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> more information, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> visit Hopkins diabetes <Speech_Female> info dot <Speech_Female> org. We'd love <Speech_Female> to hear from our listeners. <Speech_Music_Female> The email <Speech_Music_Female> address to reach <Speech_Female> us is Hopkins <Speech_Female> diabetes info <Speech_Female> at my <Speech_Female> dot <Speech_Female> EDU. <Speech_Female> Thank you for listening. Be well and see you next time.

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

Diabetes Deconstructed

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

"Diabetes, what you mentioned is the more common one, about 90 to 95% of cases, the numbers seem to rise. Is that right? What are the future projections? Is it going to continue to rise or what do you think? Yeah, it is pricing, and it's risking the whole world and it's become also an ongoing issue in low and middle income countries that we're seeing the prevalence of obesity and diabetes and other related diseases are increasing. So just shifting gears a little bit to type one diabetes. You mentioned that the mechanism, the physiology is a little different. Do we know what the risk factors are for type one diabetes? Yes, her family history is irrespective for type one diabetes. There's some association with geographical location. And then there's thought to be some environmental factors, but those have not really been well understood as of right now. When we talk about type one and type two diabetes, it helps not only to distinguish the types just to have the diagnosis, but it impacts the treatment as well as in that true. How do the treatments differ between the two types of diabetes? So for type one diabetes treatment is insulin because that underlying issue is people with type one diabetes can not make insulin in type two diabetes. People with type two diabetes generally can make insulin, but it's not as much as they need in the second issue, oftentimes with people with type two diabetes is not being able to respond as well to the insulin that they make. And so oftentimes for people with type two diabetes oral medications are an option. You know, sometimes people will come in and say they have a touch of diabetes or a borderline diabetes. What are they really talking about when they talk about that? Yeah, I mean, I think it's a spectrum. And so we think about people who don't have diabetes and there are people who are at risk of developing diabetes. And that can be ossified based on what recurs as well as a blood test called a hemoglobin A1C, which is really a test that measures or gives us information about the average blood glucose over three months. Is this the same as pre diabetes, what you're talking about? Yeah, and there are different forms of prediabetes one way to diagnose prediabetes is based on fasting workers. So fasting glucose is a certain level on two different tests or on the same test in two different occasions, second indicate prediabetes may basically telling a patient we know that person is at risk of developing diabetes. One of the things that we often talk about as well as prevention and screening for diabetes. So what do you think someone who may be concerned about their own risk for diabetes? What should they do? What would you recommend? I would definitely recommend talking to that person's primary care provider and then also giving their primary care provider information about their own family history so if there's someone has a mother or father or brother or sister with diabetes that's important for that person's primary care provider to know also that person's personal history. So does someone have a history of gestational diabetes that certainly can put a person at risk of developing diabetes in the future. So these are kind of important things to know and that history as well as examination of patients age and weight can all help our primary care provider know when to screen and how often this group that I do. So does everyone who develops prediabetes develop diabetes? Great question. So not everyone with prediabetes develops diabetes and absolutely there are things that people with pre diabetes can do to prevent developing diabetes. Those include lifestyle interventions. So if diet and exercise are important in some people, medication can be used to help prevent diabetes. What happens if someone does develop a diabetes, but they don't take care of it? Why does it even matter to take care of your disease? Yeah, so I think about complications as there are short term and long term complications. So long term we worry about the health of organs in the body so the brain and the heart, kidneys, short term complications can be increased urination, increased thirst, weight loss, fluoridation. In the long-term complications, how long do those usually take to develop over what time are you talking about? Because sometimes when you're taking care of your blood sugars, it can be really hard to link good blood sugar control with the risk of complications down the road. Yeah, this complication generally takes years to develop, so they don't occur immediately. That being said a lot of people with type two diabetes probably don't get diagnosed at the time of the diabetes start. So that's important to know that in many people with type two diabetes, you're probably diagnosed possibly years later, unless they've been screened racially over a period of time. And when we talk about the complications it's diabetes, the eye disease and heart disease, the kidney disease, the heart disease, the things that you mentioned are those things that will happen anyways, irrespective of whether a person with diabetes takes care of their disease or can they actually prevent those complications? Yeah, so we know that blood glucose control is really important to helping prevent those complications. Kidney disease, the nerve disease and the risk can be greatly reduced by blood glucose control. In addition, there are other things that are really important to vessel blood vessel health and heart health and brain health. And those are controlling blood pressure, oftentimes high blood pressure can be seen in people with diabetes and the other part of it is cholesterol. So those are all things that are kind of managed as part of a person with diabetes treatment to help of the whole body. It's been really enlightening to hear about all the different ways that someone with diabetes can really reduce their risk, developing complications. You know, one of the questions that often comes up is can a person with diabetes eat sweets? Can they have desserts? What do you think? Yeah, I generally, my own patients and nothing is really off limits, but it's important to know that sweets can affect blood sugar. I think quantities important. So just keeping in mind everything in moderation in frequency is also important. And not all people with diabetes are the same. So sweets can affect one person may be differently than another person with diabetes. And what are some of the diabetic emergencies if you will that caregiver or loved one should be aware of? One important one is low blood glucose or hypoglycemia and people at risk for this are people who are on insulin or some specific oral medications that are known to cause low blood glucose. And generally, we teach our patients to look out for signs like sweating, feeling irritable, maybe feeling their vision is becoming dark, tremulousness. And if that happens, if they're able to check their blood glucose right then, that's great. If not, they should just treat that symptoms as a low blood glucose. And we recommend drinking a half cup of juice or regular sodas about 15 grams of carbohydrates or taking four glucose tablets and then repeating what glucose check in about 15 minutes. Well that's really great information, especially to know if you see someone or know someone with diabetes and they have an emergency low blood glucose on how to support or assist them. What other resources might be available for patients with diabetes, we have our patient website for diabetes. That's a great resource. What about organizations or other resources you might suggest that someone with diabetes or a family member with diabetes might seek out? One resource is the American diabetes association website has a lot of great facts and also one of great advice on foods like diabetes friendly foods that people diabetes can enjoy. The American Heart Association is also another great resource because so many people with diabetes are also at risk for heart disease. So that one also can be helpful for people with diabetes. Another question that we often get is if I have diabetes doesn't.

diabetes obesity Kidney disease gestational diabetes heart disease eye disease hypoglycemia American diabetes association American Heart Association
"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

Diabetes Deconstructed

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Deconstructed

"Welcome to diabetes deconstructive, a podcast for people interested in learning more about diabetes. I'm your host, doctor Rita Kayani at Johns Hopkins University school of medicine. We developed this podcast as a companion to our patient guide to diabetes website. If you want a trusted and easy to understand resource for diabetes, or to listen to previous podcasts, please visit Hopkins diabetes info dot org. That's all one word. On today's podcast, we are excited to look at the basics of diabetes with doctor sadi sarkar, an assistant Professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins, and the director of the inpatient diabetes management surface at Hopkins as well. Doctor sarkar received her MD from the Yale school of medicine and completed her internship at residency in internal medicine at the Yale New Haven hospital and fellowship in endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism at Vanderbilt university medical center. She received her masters of science in clinical investigation, also from Vanderbilt. Doctor sarker has led outpatient and inpatient diabetes services at both the Johns Hopkins hospital and Johns Hopkins baby medical center, and now serves us the director of the inpatient diabetes management service at both locations. Welcome, doctor sarkar. Thanks doctor Kelly for having me on this podcast. Doctor sarkar, just wanted to ask you a few basic questions about diabetes. Here are some of the types of questions we often get. Could you tell us what exactly is diabetes? To put it very concisely or simply diabetes is really when person's body can not either make insulin or not make enough insulin. And there's more to that, that's kind of the main issue that I think of when I think of what diabetes is. And there are different types of diabetes, type one and type two. Can you tell us a little bit about what makes those types of diabetes different? People with type one diabetes generally can not make insulin. So in type one diabetes is considered what we call an autoimmune disease where the immune system actually targets the pancreas and that's why a person with type one diabetes may not be able to make insulin type two diabetes patients with type two diabetes tend to have a difficult time making enough insulin for their body and in addition, those patients may not be as sensitive or respond as well to insulin. We hear a lot about insulin when we talk about diabetes. Can you talk a little bit more about why insulin is such an important hormone in the body? Without insulin glucose, which is a type of fuel that our body needs can't enter cells, so cells can't get the fuel that they need to make energy. So insulin is really important to get glucose into cells. Are there any other hormones in the body that lower blood glucose or is insulin the only one? There are other hormones that work to increase insulin made by the body. And those can be made by the body in response to food. Yeah, it's so interesting, isn't it that there's multiple hormones that can raise blood glucose or sugar in the body, but really only one insulin that can lower our blood sugar levels and the reason why it's so important to me imaging people with diabetes. Why is it that some people get diabetes and other people don't? They're probably a lot of factors that contribute to why someone might have diabetes and in another person might not. So those can include things like family history, having family members with diabetes, other things can be the environment and that can include just level of activity, food, and then other things can be age. So there are factors that can be outside of the control of a person who has diabetes. So what are the factors that people can control? When we talk about preventing diabetes, what are the factors that someone could work on to produce their risk? There are things that people can do to help reduce their risk of type two diabetes. That includes diet and exercise, so those are kind of the pillars of diabetes prevention. Healthy diet and also regular exercise. You know, it's often one of the questions we get from patients with diabetes is, is there a diabetes diet or what really can I eat in one of the biggest struggles that often patients share that they deal with in their day to today lives? What do you tell your patients in terms of what a healthy lifestyle means? Something that depends on the individual person. I mean, for some people, exercise could be limited because of other factors like joint pain or just pain that prevents them from maybe walking or running. But as tolerated, I tell patients to try to walk or do another type of exercise if they don't do any exercise maybe just starting off at one or two times a week and then kind of building up this air able to exercise. For diet, the American diabetes association doesn't recommend a specific diabetes diet. I generally tell patients kind of a balanced diet. So keeping an eye special on carbohydrates because carbohydrates can raise blood glucose. And so in our clinic, we generally say carbohydrates are not the enemy, but just being mindful of how carbohydrates can affect blood glucose is important for people with diabetes. Weight loss is often something that people talk about as well, having to lose weight. Why is that so important? What is the link between diabetes and obesity? Yeah, it's an excellent question. So obesity is associated with diabetes and generally weight loss helps the body respond better to insulin. Definitely seeing people with diabetes losing weight can help them respond better to medications in just correspond to insulin better. Now, we talked a lot about type two diabetes. I wonder if we could briefly talk about type one diabetes. First of all, can you tell us how common diabetes is in the United States and perhaps around the world with some more common type and how many people are we seeing in the United States with diabetes? So the prevalence most recently is about 11%. So in the United States, a little over 30 million Americans with diabetes including type one type two take two is more common and it's been increasing in prevalence. Not only in the United States for worldwide for many years. And that includes people with diagnosed diabetes in the United States so that around 30 million or a little bit more than 30 million people with diagnosed diabetes, but also includes people who don't know that they have diabetes. In type two.

diabetes sarkar Rita Kayani Hopkins diabetes sadi sarkar Yale New Haven hospital sarker inpatient diabetes Johns Hopkins baby medical cen Johns Hopkins University schoo Yale school of medicine Vanderbilt university medical Johns Hopkins hospital Johns Hopkins Vanderbilt Hopkins autoimmune disease Kelly American diabetes association obesity
"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

"Many people think <Speech_Music_Female> kobe is working. More <Speech_Music_Female> cases of all <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> types of diabetes. <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Before <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> i let you go <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> take a moment <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to check out our <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> youtube channel. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> We are getting a lot <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of engagement there. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I've got the in the news <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> episodes over <Speech_Female> there. So if you don't <Speech_Female> know that we have <Speech_Female> a youtube channel it's <Speech_Female> just diabetes connections <Speech_Female> on youtube <Speech_Female> and all the episodes <Speech_Female> are there <Speech_Female> if you prefer to <Speech_Female> listen to podcasts <Speech_Female> on youtube. <Speech_Female> Which many do <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> most of them are. not video. <Speech_Female> podcasts. It's just <Speech_Female> audio. But <Speech_Female> a lot of people like <Speech_Female> that platform <Speech_Female> also the newscasts <Speech_Female> though <Speech_Female> are video so <Speech_Female> if you wanna see me <Speech_Female> playing anchor lady <Speech_Female> you can head <Speech_Female> on over there and i'll link up <Speech_Female> in the episode as well. Please <Speech_Female> subscribe <Speech_Female> if you head over <Speech_Female> there. You know very simple. <Speech_Female> Click subscribe on <Speech_Female> the on the youtube channel. <Speech_Female> Thank you <Speech_Female> as always to my <Speech_Female> editor. John buchanan <Speech_Female> from audio editing solutions. <Speech_Female> Thank you <Speech_Female> so much as <Speech_Female> you listen <Speech_Female> next week. We <Speech_Female> are likely going <Speech_Female> to air the a frizette <Speech_Female> interview that i <Speech_Female> did over the summer. <Speech_Female> Still working on a <Speech_Female> few things but it looks like <Speech_Female> that one is going to come <Speech_Female> through for next week very <Speech_Female> excited to get an update <Speech_Female> from them. They've been <Speech_Female> around for a while <Speech_Female> but man. Are <Speech_Female> they making push <Speech_Female> ahead. They have more studies <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> more studies <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> with children <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> coming up and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> lots of interesting <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> stuff from freezer <Speech_Music_Female> and of course the newscast <Speech_Music_Female> wednesdays <Speech_Music_Female> at four <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> thirty <SpeakerChange> eastern <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> time live on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> facebook. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm stacey since. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'll see a backyard just a <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> couple of days <SpeakerChange> until <Speech_Music_Female> the kind to yourself. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Diabetes <Speech_Female> connections <Speech_Music_Female> is a production of <Speech_Music_Female> stacy's media <Speech_Music_Female> all right through <Speech_Music_Female> served <SpeakerChange> all wrongs <Speech_Music_Female> event.

youtube diabetes John buchanan stacey facebook
"diabetes" Discussed on Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

"How does millet come to the help of diabetics a substantial portion of the starch in millet is resistant starch meaning resistant to digestion are small intestine so providing a bounty for the good bugs in our colon all way more than more common grains like rice or wheat but pro-seoul and kodo millet lead the pack. What's going on the protein matrix in millet not only access a physical barrier but actually also partially sequester. Is your starch munching enzyme. In the milit- polyphenyls can also act as starch blockers. In and of themselves mill also has remarkably slower stomach emptying times than other starchy foods. If you know white rice boiled potatoes or pasta your stomach takes about an hour digestive before starting to slowly dump it into your intestines in two or three hours to empty about half way whereas you eat sorghum or millet and stomach emptying doesn't even start until two or three hours. I may take five hours to empty even half way note. This was for both thick millet. Porridge or just like millet couscous. So since the non viscous millet couscous meal was also equally slowing emptying. this suggests. There may just be something about millet itself that helps slow stomach emptying which should blunt the blood sugar spike bud. You don't know until you put it to the test and indeed millet cost about a twenty percent lower surgeon blood sugar than the same amount of carbs in the form of rice. Remember how excited. I was to show you how it only took the body like you know half the insulin to handle sorghum. Compared to a green light cornwell millet did even better give a group of pre diabetics about three quarters of a cup of militant day within six weeks their insulin resistance dropped so much. They're pre diabetic fasting. Blood sugars turned into non pre diabetic. Blood sugars this so called self controlled clinical trial the same subject before and after as just a sneaky way of saying on controlled trial. There was no control group that didn't add the militarize added something else. And we know just being in a study under scrutiny can cause people to eat better in other ways so we don't know what role if any the mill itself played. What we need is a randomized control. Crossover trial were the same. People eat both millet containing and non containing and which works better and here we go randomized. Crossover study having hundreds of patients. Both doing american diabetes association type with or without about one third cup of millet every day and the base that lowered hemoglobin a. One c levels meaning in improvement in long-term blood sugar control of side benefits like lowering cholesterol. The target for good blood sugar control recommended by the american diabetes association's and they wanna see less than seven now. They started out at an eight point. Three seven after a few months on millet drop to an average six point seven seven is just because they lost weight or something no suggesting that was in effect specific to the millet but they didn't just give military mix the millet with split black lentils and spices and we know from dozens of randomized controlled experimental trials in people with end without diabetes that the consumption of pulses meaning beans split peas chickpeas or lentils can improve long-term measures of blood sugar control like a one c levels so other researchers conclude that militants have the potential for protective role in the management of diabetes. More accurate conclusion might be.

diabetes american diabetes association
"diabetes" Discussed on Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

"Your host dr michael gregor today. We look at the best way to control diabetes. Starting with a remarkable results of crossover study randomized hundreds of people with diabetes to one and a third cup of millet every day. How does millet come to the help of diabetics a substantial portion of the starch in millet is resistant starch meaning resistant to digestion are small intestine so providing a bounty for the good bugs in our colon all way more than more common grains like rice or wheat but pro-seoul and kodo millet lead the pack. What's going on the protein matrix in millet not only access a physical barrier but actually also partially sequester. Is your starch munching enzyme. In the milit- polyphenyls can also act as starch blockers. In and of themselves mill also has remarkably slower stomach emptying times than other starchy foods. If you know white rice boiled potatoes or pasta your stomach takes about an hour digestive before starting to slowly dump it into your intestines in two or three hours to empty about half way whereas you eat sorghum or millet and stomach emptying doesn't even start until two or three hours. I may take five hours to empty even half way note. This was for both thick millet. Porridge or just like millet couscous. So since the non viscous millet couscous meal was also equally slowing emptying. this suggests. There may just be something about millet itself that helps slow stomach emptying which should blunt the blood sugar spike bud. You don't know until you put it to the

diabetes american diabetes association
"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

"Cg that's on the right any purple insulin pump if you look closely where the purple arrow is you can spot it. Maybe an older model medtronic. Now i've been looking into this. And i heard from a source at pixar with type one. Who says this is absolutely on purpose. Quote it is definitely intentional to include better representation of the real world whether it is wheelchair users crutches pumps. Cgm's hearing aids and more this initiative is largely creditor or characters art and crowds departments. I am working with the pixar. Pr folks at. I hope to have more information may be an interview as the movie gets closer to. Its release a class of drugs. Widely used to treat heartburn and stomach ulcers improved blood sugar in patients with diabetes when added to their usual treatment. these drugs are known as proton pump. Inhibitors include pilots and members all they suppress acid and affect certain hormones that are important glucose regulation they did not prevent diabetes but these researchers save. Somebody's already on a p. p. i. and they're doing well it might also be helpful for their diabetes those with higher a. one cs benefited the most more to come. But i i want to tell you about one of our great sponsors helps make diabetes connections possible inside. The breakthrough is a podcast that mixes historical wisdom with modern incite. It is a science show. That's also very entertaining. I love it. They cover everything from accidental discoveries to famous names in science too old myths about handwashing and even the horse poop crisis in new york city. Luckily averted and all of this actually does relate to diabetes. Listen to inside the breakthrough. Wherever you listen to podcasts. I knew attempt to climb k to the second highest mountain on earth. Something accomplished only one person with type one diabetes before right now jerry gore diagnosed as an adult is acclimating at the base. Camp gore is sixty years old. He's been climbing for forty years. He hopes to raise money for his charity. Action for diabetes which provides health care and support to disadvantage. Young people with type one diabetes in southeast asia and congratulations to sebastian cecil who just bite across canada in fifteen days. We told you about this trip when he kicked it off two weeks ago. I don't think anybody expected the weather to do what it did. Canada broke several heat records. There storms a lot of wind sas villas with type one. He did this to raise awareness for access to technology. He has climbed everest and has completed several grueling extreme racist. He posted this on his instagram. This was the hardest thing i've ever done. I could not have done it without the crew. They kept be safe and alive. I will be forever grateful. We did it. Boys chase life experiences and create memories with people. You love that as my best advice for a fulfilled life. Congratulations to sebastian. And crew and that is diabetes connections in the news. If you like it please share it and feel free to send me your news. Tips stacey at diabetes dash connections dot com. Please join me wherever you get podcasts. For our next episode. Coming up on tuesday a conversation with just a great guy. He is eighty one years old. He's lived with type one for more than sixty two years. He has an awful lot to say. Thank you so much for joining me. And i will see you suit. Diabetes connections is a production of stacey media. Alright deserved all rungs avenged..

Diabetes pixar medtronic Cgm jerry gore Camp gore sebastian cecil aids new york city asia canada Canada sebastian stacey
"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

"Hello and welcome to diabetes connections in the news. I'm stacey sins and are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days as always. I'm going to link up my sources in the facebook comments where we are live. And in the show notes at diabetes dash connections dot com. When this airs as a podcast. So you can read more and then follow up when you have the time in. The news is brought to you by inside the break through a new history of science podcasts. Full of digital stuff. The top story this week one step forward one step back on a lawsuit involving all three insulin. Makers a federal judge dropped antitrust claims but the case will move forward under federal racketeering laws. That means eli lilly. Novo nordisk and sanofi face organized crime charges. The judge says the plaintiffs plausibly alleged schemes of unlawful bribery and mail and wire fraud the other defendants in this case our pharmacy benefit managers express scripts. Cbs health and united health lily. Novo and sanofi are accused in the lawsuit of inflating the official list price of insulin..

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

"That i do every conversation that i have and i worry sometimes that it will dilute down to just be being diabetic when i like i said i am so many other things as are pretty much every other diabetic out there are more than just that disease and so i do think about it also for me fiction to such a wonderful escape. I don't write books because i have to. I write because. I love writing books especially for young people and i think that for me. I love that escapism of it. I love that. I am not having to figure out characters blood sugar situation. I've already. I've got enough doing that for myself so i don't know i think about it. Maybe as the years go by maybe in a few years all engage it They would have to be a really good idea. It wouldn't just be. this character. Has been diagnosed with diabetes. There would have to be more play for me. So i think about it. Never say never but if someone else wants to do it go for it. It's it's funny. I don't wanna put too fine a point on it but the first part of your answer there which is didn't want to be defined by diabetes is really what stacey story is all about to. Yes and i think that's why we like it so much. Because that's how almost everybody i know with any kind of diabetes feels right agreed. I think anybody with anything like that. It's very easy especially in sort of these wild modern times to focus on. Maybe what is unknown or scary or you know. People don't understand it. That's what they kind of go to first. But that's just not how i view and that's how i view being diabetic is just so. It's just a thread that's woven into my life. Know i it will always be there. It's something i will always manage. But it's so inherently me. I don't want someone to pull that threat out and only look at that rather than the bigger picture..

diabetes stacey