23 Burst results for "Devlin Barrett"

People on FBI terrorist watchlist came to DC on day of Capitol riots

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

05:19 min | 9 months ago

People on FBI terrorist watchlist came to DC on day of Capitol riots

"Of the washington post this afternoon. The headline dozens of people on fbi terrorist watchlist came to dc the day of capital riot quote the majority of the watch individuals in washington that day are suspected wide supremacists who past conduct so alarmed investigators that their names had been previously entered into the national terrorist screening database. A massive set of names flagged as potential security risks. Now this is. This is not the no fly list that keeps people from boarding airplanes for one thing. This is a larger database of people People who are on are automatically barred from any public or commercial spaces but all that said it is still a sort of shocking revelation. Why exactly did they put people on watch lists. What's a watch list four. If it's not going to trigger any sort of alarm dozens of people who are on that same list all for the same reason all travel to convene at the same place at the same time. If that doesn't trigger the watch lists utility what does reporter devlin barrett and his colleagues at the post report tonight that current and former law enforcement officials are now arguing that the presence of so many watch listed individuals in one place without more robust security measures to protect the public is another example of the intelligence failures preceding last week's fatal assault that sent lawmakers running for their lives. Joining us. now is dublin. Bertie covers national security for the post. He's one of the reporters who broke the story earlier today. I should also note. That devlin had another big scoop earlier this week. Detailing an internal f. b. i. Report issued the day before the attack on the capital that warned that extremists were preparing to travel to dc to commit violence. And what they called. War mr barrot. I know it's an incredibly busy time given that this is your beat. Thanks very much for taking time to talk to us. Thanks for having me. There's been controversy. Over the years. In real civil liberties concerns and lots of glitches and worries about various. Watch lists that come to learn about as as americans particularly since nine eleven. What's this list that all of these dozens of people were on who ended up at the capitol attack the this list. The tst is shared primarily between the fbi and the department of homeland security. And it's it's very important understanding. This is sort of in. Some ways a throwback issue to post nine eleven era and a lot of people thought wash watchlist watchlists would protect them from everything and prevent Threats from from ever coming to fruition wireless our tool their information gathering tool and there are an analysis tool They're not perfect by any stretch. And you have to do a fair bit of analysis and understanding. And they're still not going to predict the future for you. I'll ever was. I think interesting about this this situation and the what happened with these people on this wash last is that it's part of a larger conversation going on inside the fbi some other federal agencies about whether or not or could and should have been done or january's well do the fbi and homeland security and whatever other relevant agencies may see this as their remit. Did they believe that they had set up systems. That would raise the red flag that would sound an alarm that would signal something that needed more attention from them. If multiple flagged extremists traveled from all over the country to the same place at the same time. didn't they think they had a system. That would alert them to that as a problem and it turns out those those alarms go off or did they know that. They didn't have capacity to monitor extremists. In that way well think two things happened. One it worked. In some instances we know that the f. b. i. Went knocked on doors before the event and to certain extremists that they have been sort of keeping tabs on interested in and gently suggested. You know it's not a good idea for you to go to washing. So we know it. Worked in some instances but it's not full truth. It's not her. And what we're told is a number of folks who are of concern to the government or happen of concern to the government traveled to this anyway. That's obviously a concern. I think there's going to be a number of discussions going forward about you. Know are we not combining this information fast enough. Are we not contemplating the degree of danger. That some of these people pose because look there's hundreds and thousands of people on this particular list. It is not practical to track them all all the time. Equipment so the important question for investigators. Which ones do we care. Most about that. I think is part of the conversation where they may they may ultimately decided to have to recalibrate that answer right and when they move in aggregate how can our systems be set up to let us know so that we don't have to be watching each one of them individually but when we see lots of them all move in the same direction at once. That tells us something. It's a it's a. it's a systems problem. But it's a fascinating. look at. how law enforcement approaches devlin barrett national security reporter for the washington post. Thank you for helping us understand this reporting. I appreciate it

FBI Devlin Barrett Mr Barrot The Washington Post Bertie Devlin The Post Dublin Washington Department Of Homeland Securit DC Government
"devlin barrett" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

08:53 min | 9 months ago

"devlin barrett" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Maurin bill bars last days and what his legacy is in the Department of Justice will speak to Devlin Barrett, National Security reporter at The Washington Post. We're told by folks on both sides of the conversation that he did resign and it was a his choice, not anyone else's. We continue to do reporting and ask questions, But both sides say, surly emphatically that it was an amicable parting that you know whatever. The president's complaints have been in recent weeks and months. That was not what drove this particular decision on this particular day, and that's all we have to go on. Really, though those kind of disagreements between the president and Bill Bar Bill Bar kind of made this splash on the stage right after Robert Mueller presented his report, and that was kind of the first big exposure that a lot of people had to build bar, at least in the Trump administration. And from then on, you know, Bill Bar had been kind of accused of doing the president's bidding on a lot of things. He was a very big supporter of him. But even still, when it came down to things looking into the Russia probe, the Durham report and even backing him on the election that the election was stolen. Those air big splits between the attorney general and Donald Trump. And you know, a lot of the president's complaints have been about things that bar essentially would not do for him during the campaign, meaning, you know, announced investigations or say that he had found significant voter fraud, though they're obviously very important things in the president's mind that bar different, but it's It's an amazing arc. If you think about that relationship Bar was for most of the two years you spend the attorney general, the president's most effective and most out spoken Cabinet member and You could really see it falling off in the relationship and the last month or so really, primarily because of the election. Is this safe for the legacy of Bill Bar as attorney general? I mean, it's just a weird situation. I get it. The administration is going to be ending pretty soon, but you can't hold out one month. I don't know that just kind of keeps playing in my head. Like what made it so urgent that you just had to get out right now. It's a great question, and I think part of what the curiosity is inside the Justice Department and even among you know, former Justice Department officials is what's going to happen at the Justice Department in the next month. Are there going to be a large number of pardons or parts of controversial cases like For example, the Russia investigation cases or other cases that would displease her anger. People of the Justice Department. You know, there's been folks advocating for a pardon for Julian Hassan's of Wikileaks. Advocating for a pardon of Edward Snowden, the former N s a contractor. And I think one of the big questions that remains to be answered is do we end up seeing the types of pardons that Will bar will be glad he Wasn't there to have to deal with or answer questions about because that's part of their obviously completely the president's prerogative. But we just don't know. And that's I think one of the big unanswered questions as we head into sort of his last month of the Trump administration. You're listening to the Daily Dive Weekend edition. I'm Oscar Ramirez and we'll be right back. Your locked on news radio 700 wlw welcome back to the Daily Dive Weekend edition. Finally, for this week, we'll talk about a new report on Havana syndrome, which dates back to 2016. When American and Canadian diplomats in Cuba started suffering from mysterious neurological symptoms, such as pressure on the head, dizziness, visual distortions. This was all after hearing loud noises. New report said that this was most likely caused by a post microwave energy attack. Once again, the Russians are suspected. But the report doesn't say definitively who is responsible for this. Arm or in what Cause of anise syndrome will speak to Josh Letterman National political reporter at NBC News, So when this first started coming to light in 2017, the incidents actually started in 2016 writers Thea Obama administration was preparing to leave office, but it didn't come out publicly into 2017 and a lot of the initial speculation. Because of the fact that a lot of these diplomats, spies and other U. S government employees had heard these loud ringing noises accompanying the symptoms that they had. The speculation was that I might have been some type of a sonic weapons, some type of an audio wave that was causing this damage. But as we and others started looking into that that theory was fairly quickly disproven and another theory that emerged fairly early on in 2017. Was the possibility of some type of electromagnetic frequency, which includes things like the waves that are used in your microwave to heat up your food about radio frequencies that carry sounds to your radio and other types of ways, including light, for instance, and lasers and for the last couple of years. It's basically been a dead end. As far as the invasion. We know the FBI, the CIA, the military and others have investigated haven't concrete hard evidence on the ground. But now, in the absence of any answer to that the State Department commissioned this research report from the national Academies of Science We've been working on For months and their conclusion. While they cannot definitively say what is causing these injuries, they do believe that the most likely cause is some type of a pulsed. Electromagnetic signals such as microwaves Now pulsed means that instead of it being a consistent, even signal that it was really, really, really quick fractions of a second Bursts of energy. And the reason that that maybe at play is that there's something called the Frey effect that's actually been studied for decades. Where if you use really tiny little bursts of energy, it can create tiny, momentary changes in the fluids in your brain that can then be perceived. By your ears as sound, even though it's actually not sound. It's it's a microwave, and that's one of the reasons that they think that this is the most likely thing that happened to the diplomats. But, as you pointed out, that still doesn't answer the key question of who or what might have been behind it. The diplomats that were targeted are affected by this had long term effects in some cases, not all of them, but some of them did. They said that it was consistent with brain trauma. Things like that. They heard the loud noises. They had pressure in their head, dizziness, visual disturbances all of this stuff, I think, even till this day, some of them still experience some type of actions like that, and it wasn't just in Cuba. This happened in China. It happened in Europe, in other instances, and I guess, at one point there at NBC News There was a report Even that said that Russia could have been a suspect. In this. There was all sorts of mobile phone data that they were using that place Russian intelligence officers that were working on this type of technology in the same places. Other CIA officers who were affected by this, so they became a player in this is well. Well, you're absolutely right about all of that. I spoke into a lot of these diplomats and other government employees who were affected by this and some of them. As you point out, have basically made a full recovery. The effects were short term. Others report to this day, ongoing problems with cognition with balance with memory and headaches. That kind of a thing what doctors saw on advanced Damaging of the brain was consistent with what we call mild traumatic brain injury, also known as concussion, but the pattern of what they call the constellation of symptoms is something doctors really have never seen before. The types of changes they were seeing in the brain and the pattern of it, and they've used that pattern to be able to now in a diplomat overseas, complains of an incident like this. They're able to take the scans of their brains, compare them to the confirmed cases and see whether or not it's consistent with that, or whether they might be suffering from any one of a million other reasons that we all get headaches or could have other types of injuries to the body or the brain. And as far as the other countries, the U. S government has only confirmed that there have been cases that have happened in Cuba. And one in China. But we know that the government has gone to fairly great lengths throughout this process of the last four years to keep a lid on a lot of this publicly to not acknowledge new cases until they're absolutely forced to And so as you point out, we do now have reports of cases. People who have complained of similar incidents and symptoms in about a half a dozen other countries, frankly, including here in the U. S, including in the U. K and Poland, and also in Russia, where as you point out, we reported a couple of years ago that the U. S intelligence community believed that Ma Scott was the most likely culprit, due in part to the fact that they are known to have worked on these kinds of technologies for many decades now. Well, I was such an interesting story, more clues to Havana syndrome, but still remains a huge mystery. Josh Letterman National Political reporter at NBC News. Thank you very much for joining us. Thanks.

president Russia Bill Bar Cuba NBC News reporter Justice Department Department of Justice Josh Letterman CIA China attorney Robert Mueller Donald Trump headaches Oscar Ramirez State Department Devlin Barrett visual disturbances Julian Hassan
More Federal Agents Could be Heading to Portland

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

03:22 min | 1 year ago

More Federal Agents Could be Heading to Portland

"U. S Marshal Service is sending more deputies to Portland. The Department of Homeland Security is also considering a plan to send an additional additional 50 customs and border protection personnel to the city. Devlin. Barrett is covering this for the Washington Post and spoke with Como's Jeff Pooja. All of this is in response to the rioting and protest ng that we've seen in the Northwest. And what's been the reaction from Portland to this new announcement. Well, Portland officials would very much like to stop the influx of federal agents. They've city and state officials have argued that These agents and deputy marshals are making things worse. Not better mean the conflict Larger, not smaller, So they're intensifying their demands that these agents go home. Not Ah, you know, send more. But so far, the federal government seems very determined to send more agents. In fact, we just learned a few hours ago that the Department of Homeland Security has agreed has decided. Yes. In fact, they are going to send us 50 agents. In Portland. Now what about the protests? How much have they been going on at night? And are they getting worse? Or better? What law enforcement officials tell us that I think some of the just public reporting from the scene confirms this is that Since this conflict became ah, more intense in the last, Let's say two weeks, the crowds have gotten bigger. Some of the clashes with those shooting fireworks at the building trying to, you know, break down the fences around the building. Those have gotten worse and more aggressive, and I've spoken to law enforcement officials who are very concerned that they feel a little bit outnumbered right now, and they're a little concerned that if things spiral Things keep heading heading in the path that they've been on in the last three or four days that it's going to get more dangerous and more likely that someone's going to get seriously hurt. Why target the federal courthouse where the protesters focusing their efforts there? Well, if you think about it, a lot of the argument in terms of the black lives matter movement in terms of the the protest against police brutality. Is that the federal government has sort of Failed to do anything about these serious issues and local communities. And obviously in Portland, there is a great deal of protest against the local police department. But Portland also has a history of Both voters and some of the politicians being very skeptical. Ah and distrustful of federal law enforcement. And in this instance what you've seen is like a nightly almost sort of a center of gravity to these protests around the federal courthouse itself, and when, when you talked to federal law enforcement officials, they're very adamant. They feel under siege. They feel like they're surrounded. And that's why you're seeing more agents being sent there. Now. Some of the video we've seen from the scene has been quite disturbing now. And there's also been reports of federal officers sweeping protestors off the streets. That was a couple of weeks ago has that continued. We haven't seen any new videos of that. But there's also still a lot. We don't know about that. Exactly how those were things were being done and why There's definitely huge questions that we still need answers to in terms of where these pallet arrests. Were there actual cases their suspicions behind these or or was it really just grabbing people to see who they might be? Which is what some of the civil libertarians argue, So there's a lot we don't know yet about everything the federal agents are doing, but there is already a great deal of criticism over what we do now. Devlin Barrett with the Washington Post. Thank you so

Portland Federal Government Devlin Barrett Department Of Homeland Securit Washington Post U. S Marshal Service Northwest Jeff Pooja Como
"devlin barrett" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"devlin barrett" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Thank you. But like another story that had a big development this week. Elaine Maxwell. She's the longtime associate and accused Madam for Jeffrey Epstein has been arrested on charges that she recruited and groomed underage girls for abuse by Epstein. The charges say that Maxwell would try to be friendly young girls by asking them questions about their personal life and taking them chopping and normalize the abused by discussing sexual topics and undressing before them and prompting them to give Epstein massages. For more on the arrest on charges that Dylan Maxwell faces will speak to Devlin Barrett, National Security reporter at The Washington Post. So when Jeffrey Epstein hung himself last year, a lot of his victims felt it was another way of him cheating justice and they feared that It would help. Some of his associates like Julian Maxwell also cheat justice. But what the indictment unsealed today shows is that prosecutors kept at it, and they have compiled accounts of three former victims who say that Elaine Maxwell essentially helped recruit and groom these young girls, frankly, to be abused sexually by Jeffrey Epstein, who was at the time back in the nineties. Dating join Maxwell. According to the papers that we haven't from court. They said that this was beginning in at least 1994 or two about 1997 or so at least where these charges they're kind of centered on. And what did they describe? How did Maxwell help groom the victims for Jeffrey Epstein? Well, she befriended them, You know. In one instance, Epstein arranged for a young girl to fly out to New Mexico, where he had a home and Maxwell NFC men took her out to a movie and for shopping and you know they're basically try to be friends with these young girls. And then, as has been alleged in other cases filed against Epstein, they would begin this pretty Twisted practice of essentially enticing the girls to give Epstein massages in various states of undress, and then that behavior would eventually escalate into just Straight up. Sexual abuse papers also said that Maxwell would try to normalize some of this abuse by discussing sexual topics. She would undress in front of the victim's also and be present for some of this stuff. So this is all kind of a way, Tio guess acclimating them to it so that Jeffrey Epstein could do what he wanted to do..

Jeffrey Epstein Elaine Maxwell Julian Maxwell Dylan Maxwell Maxwell Devlin Barrett The Washington Post New Mexico National Security reporter
Feds subpoena up to 20 officers at NYC prison where Jeffrey Epstein killed himself

All In with Chris Hayes

02:30 min | 2 years ago

Feds subpoena up to 20 officers at NYC prison where Jeffrey Epstein killed himself

"Sex offender jeffrey app scene was found dead in his federal jail cell nearly two weeks ago and we still do not have a good picture picture what exactly happened. We do know that scene signed a new will two days before his death. According to the new york post putting an estate worth more than half a billion dollars into a trust. I which almost certainly will make it harder for his victims to sue for damages we also know the department of justice was in charge of keeping him alive and the man in charge of that attorney general william bar said he's angry about epstein's death. He just removed the acting director of the federal bureau of prisons both the d._o._j. And the f._b._i. Are investigating up scenes death but there are a jail workers who are refusing to cooperate with investigators near times reports federal prosecutors have now subpoenaed roughly fifteen employees of the metropolitan correctional national center and according to the washington post. There were at least eight jail officials who knew epstein was not to be left alone in his cell reporter who landed that scoop devlin barrett. The washington post is here with me now. What do we know about what directions were given who knew what about the protection of jeffrey epstein inside that facility well what we're told is there's a key moment in this process where jeffrey epstein is taken off suicide watch. This happens on july twenty ninth and what we're told about that process is that it was very clear inside the m._c. Not just among lower level officials but their supervisors as well that there were things that were supposed to happen once he was taken off suicide aside watch one that he would be checked on every half hour. That's a standard in the unit. He was placed in into that there was an understanding that he would have a cellmate at all times the reason for that is you want another pair of eyes on him. Who could holler out if something's going wrong <hes> so that's what was supposed to happen in part of the concern and frustration by the attorney general now there's here is everyone seems to have understood what was supposed to happen and then it just did not happen. Do we know why didn't happen well. That's a great question so you know among the union officials. The union officials have argued that you know they are so short staffed in so overworked that something thing like this was bound to happen not necessarily with jeffrey in particular but something like this was always bound to happen in that place at this time with so few people working <hes> <hes> frankly there are folks in the justice department who think that's a poor excuse for for letting what's our you'll be the most high-profile defendant in your entire system kill himself but that is part of the conversation that's going on and

Jeffrey Epstein Washington Post Devlin Barrett Federal Bureau Of Prisons Attorney New York Metropolitan Correctional Nati Acting Director William Bar Reporter Billion Dollars Two Weeks Two Days
Mueller to deliver testimony tomorrow

Chuck and Kelly

04:55 min | 2 years ago

Mueller to deliver testimony tomorrow

"When former special counsel Robert Muller delivers long awaited testimony tomorrow about his investigation into president trump and Russian interference in the twenty sixteen election Democrats are hoping to coax from him the kind of dramatic moments that could galvanize public opinion against the president Republicans meanwhile are eager to elicit testimony that shows the investigation was biased from its inception Devlin Barrett national security reporter had the Washington post says those who know Mr Miller best are skeptical he will meet either side's expectations Dublin explain molar is a very reticent witness before Congress he doesn't particularly enjoy the process according to folks you've known for a long time that worked with him but he also has some interesting hello I guess you might say ways in which you can draw an answer out of him if you were a persistent careful lawmaker guard like how for example because you referenced testimony like twelve years ago right so there's a really interesting hearing that happened in two thousand seven in which lawmakers press him pretty closely on the substance of his private conversations with the then Attorney General and some other senior officials and they were really trying to get some answers about a standoff with the bush administration that it happened years earlier and what happens in that hearing is very interesting because more starts out saying he doesn't want to talk about his private conversations with senior officials but when lawmakers press and carefully politely and persistently he basically concede the point starts talking about those conversations and you know I think in an era when we see a lot of walk makers yell and scream and pound the table I think there's a clue there about how you know more might be able to provide some more information but maybe not at the at the pool at the edge of a you know angry Michael do we pound the table as much back in two thousand seven as we do today you know it's funny watching that hearing it really it's really striking how much calmer and civil rights it is even though they are arguing about some fairly intense issues such as government surveillance and problems and how the government did that as well as essentially struggles within a government over over some pretty serious spying powers so you know there were some tense issues on the table and there were some tense moments on the table but nothing like what we've seen in the last you know nearer to when it comes to the fights in Congress over the mall investigation over the justice department and the FBI you know it almost looks queen by comparison with those hearing from twelve years ago speak with Devlin Barrett national security reporter at The Washington Post is pieces called a hostile witness or Democrats hero molars past turns before Congress offer important clues I'm is there more on the line politically this time around then there's been in the past for Mister Muller on Capitol Hill I think so because I think in many ways this will be the defining case of his career I think a lot of people close to him what are you that whatever you think of the markets probably shouldn't be the defining case of his career but I think politically this thing has just been such a powder keg from the beginning that's probably inevitable and so I think Mahler's goal is to show that this work was done well and not get sucked into any partisan back and forth or finger pointing or at accusations but you know I think look to the lawmakers will be on display here too and I think one of the big questions is how the baby if they behave angrily and loudly you know that in the past that something that has really you know but straight should put Mahler and has made him shut down sometimes in a couple times he hunched back in those hearings when he's been yell that will be interesting to see what the overall temperature is because I think the overall temperature will say a lot about how forthcoming Miller is an adventure so you can't really say one way or the other if he is less likely to open up when pressed from hostile lawmaker than a non hostile lawmaker I think its track record is very much that yelling at him does not work but if you try to appeal to his sense of obligation to you know the way the government should work and how lawmakers need to know facts to make good decisions he does sometimes concede that point and agree to say more than he would otherwise say but you know yelling has never seem to have cracked him in any way and in fact he tends to clamp down when when that happens Dublin Dublin Barrett national security reporter at The Washington Post meanwhile a justice department memo yesterday told Mister Muller that his testimony tomorrow cold must remain within the boundaries of the public redacted version of his

Robert Muller President Trump Special Counsel Twelve Years
Robert Muller, Trump And President discussed on This Morning with Gordon Deal

This Morning with Gordon Deal

04:54 min | 2 years ago

Robert Muller, Trump And President discussed on This Morning with Gordon Deal

"Counsel Robert Muller delivers long awaited testimony tomorrow about his investigation into president trump and Russian interference in the twenty sixteen election Democrats are hoping to coax from him the kind of dramatic moments that could galvanize public opinion against the president Republicans meanwhile are eager to elicit testimony that shows the investigation was biased from its inception Devlin Barrett national security reporter had the Washington post says those who know Mr Miller best are skeptical he will meet either side's expectations Dublin explain molar is a very reticent witness before Congress he doesn't particularly enjoy the process according to folks you've known for a long time that worked with him but he also has some interesting hello I guess you might say ways in which you can draw an answer out of him if you were a persistent careful lawmaker guard like how for example because you referenced testimony like twelve years ago right so there's a really interesting hearing that happens in two thousand seven in which lawmakers press him pretty closely on the substance of his private conversations with the then Attorney General and some other senior officials and they were really trying to get some answers about a stand up within the bush administration that it happened years earlier and what happens in that hearing is very interesting because more starts out saying he doesn't want to talk about his private conversations with senior officials but when lawmakers press and carefully politely and persistently he basically concede the point starts talking about those conversations and you know I think in an era when we see a lot of walk makers yell and scream and pound the table I think there's a clue there about how you know more might be able to provide some more information but maybe not at the at the pool at the edge of a you know angry Michael do we pound the table as much back in two thousand seven as we do today you know it's funny watching that hearing it really it's really striking how much calmer and civil rights it is even though they are arguing about some fairly intense issues such as government surveillance and problems and how the government did that as well as essentially struggles within a government over over some pretty serious spying powers so you know there were some tense issues on the table and there were some tense moments on the table but nothing like what we've seen in the last you know nearer to when it comes to the fights in Congress over the mall investigation over the justice department and the FBI you know it almost looks queen by comparison with those hearing from twelve years ago were speak with Devlin Barrett national security reporter at The Washington Post is pieces called a hostile witness or Democrats hero molars past turns before Congress offer important clues I'm is there more on the line politically this time around then there's been in the past for Mister Muller on Capitol Hill I think so because I think in many ways this will be the defining case of his career I think a lot of people close to him what are you that whatever you think of the markets probably shouldn't be the defining case of his career but I think politically this thing has just been such a powder keg from the beginning that's probably inevitable and so I think Maulers goal is to show that this work was done well and not get sucked into any partisan back and forth or finger pointing or at accusations but you know I think look to the lawmakers will be on display here too and I think one of the big questions is how the baby if they behave angrily and loudly you know that in the past that something that has really you know straight should put Mahler and has made him shut down sometimes in a couple times he hunched back in those hearings when he's been yelled at really interesting to see what the overall temperature is because I think the overall temperature will say a lot about how forthcoming Miller is an adventure so you can't really say one way or the other if he is less likely to open up when pressed from hostile lawmaker than a non hostile lawmaker I think its track record is very much that yelling at him does not work but if you try to appeal to his sense of obligation to you know the way the government should work and how lawmakers need to know facts to make good decisions he does sometimes concede that point and agree to say more than he would otherwise say but you know yelling has never seem to have cracked him in any way and in fact he tends to clamp down when when that happens Dublin Dublin Barrett national security reporter at The Washington Post meanwhile a justice department memo yesterday told Mister Muller that his testimony tomorrow cold must remain within the boundaries of the public redacted version of his

Robert Muller Donald Trump President Trump Twelve Years
"devlin barrett" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"devlin barrett" Discussed on KOMO

"Updates at ten forty after Bill Swartz on the home of the huskies. Komo news. Bill nother update on traffic. Straight ahead deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein, turning in his long-expected resignation letter. He praised President Trump for the courtesy and humor. He displayed despite the two tumultuous relationship national security correspondent Devlin Barrett. Covering the story for the Washington Post and spoke with komo's Tom hutler. Earlier today how will history remember Rosenstein time at the department of Justice must by the word beside the word to use tumultuous, which I think probably captures at best. I think that he'll be remembered as someone who tried to navigate an walk very delicate line between working for the president and overseeing an investigation of the president. I think there's a lot of folks who had criticized. The some of the instances some of the decisions he made. But obviously, it was going to be tough to to please both sides in that in those circumstances. No matter what it seemed hard to define his relationship with President Trump was he an ally of the president. Or was he more walking the line of doing the job of the assistant attorney general his resignation letter speaks to what Rosenstein clearly the warm relationship with the president. He talks about the courtesy and humor they shared and the policy goals they shared so it's a fairly complimentary letter to the president resigning, and it's a little library. Just because you know, the president has been sharply critical of resign at times and even privately. So so I guess what's next for him and any word on who might replace him at the OJ successor already been nominated. Jesse Rosen is a lawyer at the treasury transportation department. And so he will the Senate is expected to. That nomination soon. So there's already a plan in place for placement. But that depends on the Senate, and as far as time goes, you know, the expectation is that he will eventually go back to private practices a lawyer. Although, you know, he's been in the government for so long. That'll that'll be somewhat of a new experience for him. All right. More could be read with Devlin's piece in the Washington Post, washingtonpost dot com. Thanks for being with us, Devon. And it's almost speaking with Devlin Barrett of the Washington Post a letter special counsel, Robert Muller wrote to attorney general Bill bar is criticizing him for the way, he summed up the Russia investigation. The Washington Post is reporting right now in the letter Muller. Complains that bars four-page memo to congress did not fully capture the context nature and substance of his team's work, and it says bars characterization cause public confusion about critical aspects of the investigation bar scheduled to appear before the Senate Judiciary committee tomorrow to answer questions about how he handled the Muller.

President Trump rod Rosenstein president Washington Post Devlin Barrett Bill bar Komo Jesse Rosen Bill Swartz Robert Muller Tom hutler Senate deputy attorney general Senate Judiciary komo department of Justice assistant attorney general Devon OJ attorney
"devlin barrett" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"devlin barrett" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Attorney general William bar is set to testify this morning on Capitol Hill in his first appearance before lawmakers since his summary of Robert Muller's Russia investigation, it's supposed to be about routine budget matters. But the special counsel's report is expected to feature prominently. Meanwhile, the escalating political battle over the report centers on reductions, Mr. bars redacting, at least four categories of information before issuing it to congress and the public Devlin Barrett who covers the Justice department and the FBI at the Washington Post says the fight over blacked out boxes is likely to lead to months of battles between congress and the Justice department devil, and what can we expect bar has publicly pledged to be as transparent as possible. Now, transparency is often in the eye of the beholder. The other issue is grand jury material can be interpreted different ways. I think prosecutors genuinely interpret the category, very broadly. But I think when there's this much attention on such a high profile case. Especially a case in which congress also has a vested interest in knowing what happened in the course of the investigation. I think there's some pretty good arguments to define grandeur immaterial material narrowly. But you know, we really don't know what's inside bars head as far as those specifics go, and obviously we don't know what's in the report. So we don't know what he has to work with. We've heard grumblings that some of the investigators on Mr. Muller's team or not happy with the way, Mr. bar has portrayed things through that summary will that have an impact here it could. I think there's a lot of angst and uncertainty as to as to what bars doing, and I think that sort of adds to the pressure on bar himself. I think he knows that his time in office may be defined by by this document, and how he handles his document. So I think there's a lot of pressure on him to be as forthcoming as possible. But you know, he also has some pretty strong views about executive power and about what congress should be able to grab. So it'll be. Interesting to see how those things play out in the final version of the document speaking with Devlin Barrett national security reporter at the Washington Post. He covers the Justice department Justice department in the FBI, he's got a piece entitled scrutiny and suspicion as mother report undergoes reductions what about the recent court decision. I think it was on Friday with regards to grand jury stuff is that a help or hurt to Mr. bars approach here. You know, it's interesting. They the Justice department immediately put out a statement saying that they were glad that the court recognizes the importance of grand jury secrecy. And you know, the case is unrelated and doesn't really speak directly to the issues in the report. So I wouldn't assume that that decision impacts anything to directly, but it definitely helps within within the Justice department. There are people who are arguing that essentially pe- we the people in charge to be more tightly controlled with the information that we should. That they should not just pump everything out and let the public sort through all the evidence at that would be a dangerous precedent to set. And for those folks inside the department, I think they they will take some more ammunition from that decision because it agrees with that general principle Beckham, there's been a lack of leaks for lack of better terminology here. I mean, something like this Shirley with so much at stake. Politically, somebody has seen something in would've called somebody like yourself with a little nugget of information. So I think there's two things one parts of the investigation. You can see by the folks they have interacted with and to you know, when when the special counsel's office was created the base. They basically stood up their own little mini US attorney's office and by separating themselves from the regular work of the Justice department that is conducive to preventing leaks. Generally the other factor here, though is just Bob Muller's personality himself. He's he's not a person who who has any patience or tolerance for that kind of stuff. And I think he has made that abundantly clear to the relatively small number of people who worked with him on this. So all those people who are impaneled on grand juries right in nothing from those folks either. Right. I mean, they haven't they haven't said word, I mean, grand juries tend not to to speak. I mean, it's very rare. When you see a grandeur as opposed to regular speak about anything because you know, the rules are explained very very clearly to them and most people follow those rules when it's Devlin Devlin Barrett. National security reporter at the Washington Post. It is fourteen minutes now after the hour.

Justice department Justice dep William bar Devlin Devlin Barrett congress Robert Muller Washington Post Justice department special counsel Devlin Barrett Mr. bars redacting FBI reporter Attorney Bob Muller Russia Shirley US attorney Beckham executive
"devlin barrett" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"devlin barrett" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Attorney general William bar is set to testify this morning on Capitol Hill in his first appearance before lawmakers since his summary of Robert Muller's Russia investigation, it's supposed to be about routine budget matters. But the special counsel report is expected to feature prominently. Meanwhile, the escalating political battle over the report centers on reductions, Mr. bars redacting, at least four categories of information before issuing it to congress and the public Devlin Barrett who covers the Justice department and the F B I at the Washington Post says the fight over blackout boxes is likely to lead to months of battles between congress and the Justice department Devlin, what can we expect bar has publicly pledged to be as transparent as possible. Now, transparency is often the holder. The other issue is grand jury material can be interpreted different ways. I think prosecutors genuinely interpret the category, very broadly. But I think when there's this much attention on such a high profile case. Especially a case in which congress also has a vested interest in knowing what happened in the course of the investigation. I think there's some pretty good arguments to define Grainger material material narrowly, but you know, we really don't know what's inside bars head as far as those specifics go, and obviously we don't know what's in the report. So we don't know what he has to work with. We've heard grumblings that some of the investigators on Mr. Muller's team or not happy with the way, Mr. bar has portrayed things through that summary will that have an impact here it could. I think there's a lot of angst and uncertainty is to as to what bars doing, and I think that sort of adds to the pressure on bar and self. I think he knows that his time in office may be defined by by this document, and how he handled his document. So I think there's a lot of pressure on him to be forthcoming as possible. But you know, he also has some pretty strong views about executive power and about what congress shouldn't be able to grab. So it'll be. Interesting to see how those things play out in the final version of the document from speaking with Devlin Barrett national security reporter at the Washington Post. He covers the justify Justice department in the F B I. He's got a piece of dental scrutiny and suspicion as mother report undergoes reductions what about the recent court decision. I think it was on Friday with regards to grand jury stuff is that a help or hurt to Mr. bars approach here. You know, it's interesting. They the Justice department immediately put out a statement saying that they were glad that the court recognizes the importance of grand jury secrecy. And you know, the the cases unrelated and doesn't really speak directly to the issues in the report. So I wouldn't assume that that decision impacts anything to directly, but it definitely helps within within the Justice department. There are people who are arguing that essentially pe- we the people in charge should be more tightly controlled with the information that we should they. Should not just pump everything out and let the public sort through all the evidence at that would be a dangerous precedent to set. And for those folks inside the department, I think they they will take some more ammunition from that decision because it agrees with general principle. There's been a lack of leaks for lack of better terminology here. I mean, something like this Shirley with so much at stake. Politically, somebody has seen something in would have called somebody like yourself with a little nugget of information. So I think this do things one part of the investigation you can see by the folks they have interacted with and to you know, when when the special counsel's office was created they obey shit. They basically stood up their own little mini US attorney's office and by separating themselves from the regular work of the Justice department that is conducive to preventing leaks. Generally the other factor here, though is just Bob Muller's personality himself. He's not a person who who has any patience or tolerance for that kind of stuff. And I think he has made that abundantly clear to the relatively small number of people who worked with him on this. So all those people who are impaneled on grand juries right nothing from those folks either. Right. I mean, they haven't grand jurors tend not to speak. I mean, it's it's very rare. When you see a grandeur as opposed to a regular speak about anything because you know, the the rules are explained very very clearly to them and most people follow those rules established Devlin Barrett. National security reporter at the Washington Post. It is fourteen minutes now after the.

Justice department William bar Devlin Barrett congress Washington Post Robert Muller special counsel Mr. bars redacting reporter Attorney Bob Muller Russia Shirley US attorney executive fourteen minutes
"devlin barrett" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"devlin barrett" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"On Capitol Hill in his first appearance before lawmakers since his summary of Robert Muller's Russia investigation, it's supposed to be about routine budget matters. But the special counsel's report is expected to feature prominently. Meanwhile, the escalating political battle over the report centers on reductions, which lawyerly editing process, Mr. bars redacting at least four categories of information before issuing it to congress and the public Devlin Barrett who covers the Justice department and the F B I at the Washington Post says the fight over blackout boxes is likely to lead to months of battles between congress and the Justice department. Devon, what's up here? The attorney general is is looking at a number of different types of material that we would be redacted and what I try to describe in the piece was just how some of those categories are fairly flexible, particularly the grand jury material category. And we really don't know how he's going to. Decide those reductions, but because this is such a politically charged issue. It's just an incredibly tense and people are already accusing him of acting in bad faith before they even see what he's done. He's working with Robert Muller on this. Correct. That's right. And he's working with Robert Muller, and he's working with deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein, who's been supervising this this investigation from the beginning. All right. So I mean, this thing could come out and be virtually three hundred eighty eight pages are so out of the four hundred that are completely blacked out in theory. Right. A lot of grand jury stuff. I'd imagine this with all those subpoenas that were issued well in theory, but there's a couple of things to remember one bar has publicly pledged to be as transparent as possible now transparency is often in the eye of the beholder. The other issue is grand jury material can be interpreted different ways. I think prosecutors genuinely interpret the category, very broadly. But I think when there's this much attention on such a high profile case, especially a case in which congress also has. Vested interest in knowing what happened in the course of the investigation. I think there's some pretty good arguments to define grandeur material material narrowly,.

Robert Muller Devlin Barrett congress Justice department special counsel Washington Post Russia Mr. bars deputy attorney general attorney rod Rosenstein one bar
Political fight over Mueller report intensifies

This Morning with Gordon Deal

01:50 min | 2 years ago

Political fight over Mueller report intensifies

"Meanwhile, the escalating political battle over the report centers on reductions, which lawyerly editing process, Mr. bars redacting at least four categories of information before issuing it to congress and the public Devlin Barrett who covers the Justice department and the F B I at the Washington Post says the fight over blackout boxes is likely to lead to months of battles between congress and the Justice department. Devon, what's up here? The attorney general is is looking at a number of different types of material that we would be redacted and what I try to describe in the piece was just how some of those categories are fairly flexible, particularly the grand jury material category. And we really don't know how he's going to. Decide those reductions, but because this is such a politically charged issue. It's just an incredibly tense and people are already accusing him of acting in bad faith before they even see what he's done. He's working with Robert Muller on this. Correct. That's right. And he's working with Robert Muller, and he's working with deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein, who's been supervising this this investigation from the beginning. All right. So I mean, this thing could come out and be virtually three hundred eighty eight pages are so out of the four hundred that are completely blacked out in theory. Right. A lot of grand jury stuff. I'd imagine this with all those subpoenas that were issued well in theory, but there's a couple of things to remember one bar has publicly pledged to be as transparent as possible now transparency is often in the eye of the beholder. The other issue is grand jury material can be interpreted different ways. I think prosecutors genuinely interpret the category, very broadly. But I think when there's this much attention on such a high profile case, especially a case in which congress also has. Vested interest in knowing what happened in the course of the investigation. I think there's some pretty good arguments to define grandeur material material narrowly,

Robert Muller Devlin Barrett Congress Justice Department Washington Post Deputy Attorney General Mr. Bars Attorney Rod Rosenstein One Bar
"devlin barrett" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"devlin barrett" Discussed on Post Reports

"Sponsored by Deborah price. Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brain studio. From the newsroom of the Washington Post. Hi, there is the mayor versa. Lang with the Washington Post or to pick your brain on. Jennifer johnson. This is post reports I'm Marteen powers. It's Wednesday January thirtieth. The the tech giant at the center of US China tensions. The federal contractors who won't be paid back after the shutdown and the DC Straka. This week. There's a giant tech company in the news. Here in the US. It's not really a household name. But in reality while way is the world's biggest maker of telecommunications equipment. It has overtaken apple to become the world's second biggest smartphone maker. So it is really huge. And it does exemplify where the Chinese government wants the economy as a whole to be going into world-class technological titans. NF I filled report for the post from Beijing. And she says the company is known for sometimes pushing its employees to the stream they want their employees to be hungry like a wolf and in this context at Mainz kill obey killed. There's a real sense inside the company that they are involved in a battle force of evil. Seattle has returned an indictment that alleges ten federal crimes by two affiliates of telecommunications corporation, while way technology that's acting US attorney general Matthew Whitaker the criminal activity alleged in this indictment. Goes back at least ten years and goes all the way to the top of the company Whitaker and the Justice department say that while way employees have lied and stolen from American corporations to advance Chinese interests. But the view from Beijing is somewhat different. The Chinese government has bet Dopp while way, they have called this action against the company immoral and unfair. And they have viewing all of this. The trade war the actions against wow away as pot of this broader American effort to keep China down. One of the sets of charges accuses the company of basically lying. To hide the fact that it was doing significant business with Iran for more than a decade, but national security reporter Devlin Barrett says that's not all that while as being investigated for..

Washington Post US Chinese government China Deborah price Matthew Whitaker Beijing apple T. Rowe Jennifer johnson Lang Iran Devlin Barrett Mainz US attorney titans Seattle Justice department
"devlin barrett" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

13:17 min | 2 years ago

"devlin barrett" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Trump could open with the words, I hereby demand and still be so lazy as to add. But I'll do it tomorrow. Wow. Wow. Wow. That would that further discussion not an inch. To be a joke. I think was a joke. Alright. A joke of a joke. So there was a guy informing back to the FBI hanging around the Trump campaign, and you either see that is scary or you see Trump wanting to investigate. That is scary seems to be you're in one of those two camps. So we now have multiple investigations and some investigations of those investigations going on meanwhile investigating those. All right. Well, I wish you well in that endeavor. Devlin Barrett is a reporter for the Washington Post who focuses on national security and law enforcement and joins us now to discuss the multi-layered inquiries and controversies Hello Devlin. How are you, sir? Hey, how are you? We're we're finding dandy. Although we what we try to do around. Here is trying to figure out what's actually going. Are you aspire your reporting back to the FBI everything we say? No, not at all as opposed to pitching, a monochromatic partisan point of view and. I think an honest person that has to admit there's at least a lot of danger where a Justice department decides to investigate a political campaign of the opposite party. Right. And that is you know, the concern. And frankly, the accusation that a lot of Republicans are are raising. And and what they're arguing about. Now is exactly how that investigation was done. Whether it was done fairly are justly. Obviously, the Republicans are making a lot of accusations and for the Justice department. It's a tricky situation because this investigation isn't over, and it's it's very unusual to sort of show many cards while you're still in the midst of an investigation, but that's the sensually what some members of congress and the president want done because the Trump administration is demanding to see the evidence used to open the investigation and or plant to this chant from Cambridge. Is that right? Yeah. It's essentially they wanna see the files related to a person a Cambridge professor who essentially tried to gather. Some early information for the FBI in the early days of this investigation. Back in the summer of two thousand sixteen. Do we have any idea how common that is? I've heard people say it's unprecedented. I've heard people say it happens all the time. I really think when you ask the question of lawyers lawyers will say, well this happens all the time because it is true that in any investigation one of the very first steps, you take would be to find what's called a confidential human source. You know, some people are sometimes they're informants. Sometimes they're just people who like to help the FBI essentially what they do what they call a brush up. Meaning you go talk to them you go sorta field them out on a topic or two and see if there's a reason for the FBI to be alarmed that is very common in FBI investigations. And in fact, is allowed even before they formally opened an investigation, but here, obviously, the concern is well, if you're doing that against someone in the political space is that fair and the right thing to do so much of what's being discussed in these multi faceted investigations there is a smallish legal question and a very very large political question. Well, right. And I think a lot of what you're seeing is illegal. Investigation. That's being that that's going on that. We don't know a ton about in some ways. But the folks who are under investigation and the allies of those folks are fighting back essentially on on political terms. It's a, you know, the Trump and his supporters often seem to be looking for a political answer to the legal questions. And so that is what is happening. I think that's part of what you're seeing here. And I think that's what you see exactly doing that that can work. I mean, Bill Clinton did have legal problems. But as a political matter he was fine. But the public was not that worried about it. Well, in the Trump people's defense, if they perceived that the Obama administration was hell bent on their destruction and was just searching around for some sort of legal pretext to destroy them. You know, I get that that's defensive right? And there's another way to think about what Bill Clinton dealt with Bill Clinton had plenty of people who fought the the Ken Starr whitewater investigation for him. Bill Clinton didn't really engage in that personally himself. I think the difference here is that the president is personally engaging in that fight and in in some days leading that fight that is different. But that's more a different tactic. That's not a different instruct difference in strategy. Wilson I would advise them differently myself. But he's not listening to me. Devlin feel free to quote me in the Washington Post, but to our response to many questions and accusations about things that the president says is Trump says all sorts of crap. And you just have to take it in a way, that's very very different than previous presidents, very scientific analysis and suspected true. So I get most of my legal information from TV lawyers in one of my favourite TV lawyers Jonathan Turley yesterday said he can't imagine the Justice department. Why would sign off on having this informant in the Trump campaign again, it gets to the some people? See this is unprecedented. Some people see this is routine. Yeah. I'll be honest. Most of the folks I speak to who are former just sin. FBI officials see the use of an informant in this way, they use of a source frankly, in this way, is is not that unusual. Obviously, it is a big step to investigate people around the presidential campaign. No one is arguing otherwise. But if you were going to do it, this is how you would do it. The brush up term is new to me. That's interesting. Yeah. That's an old. That's an old spy term it. It's sort of, you know, it's, you know, a lot of times what intelligence assets do as they go out, and they try and make new friends, and they try and learn what their new friends are up to a lot of time the targets of those brush ups don't really realize that it's it's a bit of a game. And it's a bit of a manipulation until much later. So Devlin Barrett of the Washington Post is on the line. I understand you're not an attorney are you? I don't think so, sir. Now have won many prizes, including the Pulitzer. But you are not an attorney. But if I were to suspect that my partner, Jack here is running for the Senate, and I've heard he's selling coke to finance his senatorial on. And the FBI says. Wow. That's that's insane. And they just go to one of Jack's workers and say, hey, if you hear anything about people selling coke to finance the campaign, would you give us a call that doesn't require a warrant or any big official paperwork that sort of thing. No, no, it doesn't. And that sort of thing is really not that uncommon. What what is uncommon, and this is where it gets a little complicated down in the weeds is that sort of thing is supposed to stay tightly tightly under wraps, especially during a campaign now after the fact if charges are filed or or if the case is dropped that's a different matter. But you know, a big part of this process. Is it supposed to say secret during the campaign? Right. Can you imagine if it was disclosed that a candidate was under investigation during a campaign that would be outrageous? Sometimes it does happen. You know? I mean, look at look at what happened. I'm I'm giving you a serious answer to a sarcastic question. I mean, it does happen, and they tried to prevent it. But they know it can't always be prevented. Are we gonna have can? I think we're gonna end up with very paranoid campaigns in the future. If we if we're all coming to the agreement that this team. More than we've ever had. You might have a circle of the five friends you've had for twenty years, and you won't let anybody else in any meeting because you feel like everybody might be with the FBI. My little rant is that the mixing of intelligence and politics is a really bad combination. It's a toxic combination. It breeds distrust, not just between campaigns, but within campaigns within agencies just within the government and everyone who's supposed to work together. Amen, brother. It is a bad combination overall. But that's where we are now. Hey, an opinion question for you and feel free to pass if you prefer not. Is the incredible level of leaking out of the White House right now. Is it because of the the somewhat odd complexion of the Trump White House in the team, or do you just think in the decade of look at me? Look at me social media that sort of thing will continue to be on the rise. It's a really good question. I mean, first of all I I'll have punt which is to say, I don't cover the White House. So the simple and clear answers. I don't really I can't really speak to the White House piece of it. I I will say that. I think social media, and the sort of perpetual, noise that is you know, sort of news, and Twitter and Facebook and everything encourages that sort of thing. But I also think you know, what people call leaking, I I tend to think of his talking, and I just think that's a part of human behavior. I think it rises and falls. But it's it's like the ocean that comes in waves, and it will always come. Why we have corporal punishment around here for anybody who leaks any of our secrets by knowing what you're talking about running knowing what you're talking about might be a standard at the Washington Post. But it's not here in talk radio. My friends so feel free to speak on anything. Authoritatively as you want. Yeah. That's interesting. You know, Trump is obviously different than woman. Anybody we've ever had. But he was the right man for the right times in terms of social media, and people feeling like all secrets should be out there and all that sort of stuff that was in the air, even before Trump, right? And he he engages in a direct way that is, you know, something we haven't really seen in a long time from from certainly presidential candidate or president the fact that, you know, he leads with tweets is still something that I think the country in the press and the governor the rest of the government are adapting to Ryan that's a tactical advantage for him. I think I think it is too. I don't necessarily love it all, but I can picture a more dignified sort getting absolutely steamrolled or avalanched by less responsible media slash social media, sending their message out zillions of times a day while he sits and waits for the slow moving the reliable. Mechanisms of democracy to work, blah, blah, blah, like Jackson. I think Trump's more suited to the current battleground, Dev, what are the Iranians Iranian leader put out a tweet yesterday. You know, a strong reply, and I thought wow, now, they're responding with tweets two things. The president says that's just the way it works. Now. Yeah. Maybe we have more in common with Iran than we thought. Devlin Barrett reporter for national security law enforcement issues for the Washington Post, always enlightening Devlin. We sure appreciate you taking a few minutes. Sure. Thanks. Thanks a bunch. Yeah. That's interesting stuff. I don't do. I don't actually know. But Jonathan Turley we played the clip later. He he said, it's unprecedented. And he said it's highly troubling, and he can't imagine who signed off on allowing this to happen. Devlin says he's talked to a whole bunch of people say, it's not unprecedented. And it's not that big a deal to sign off on it. They just heard that they were talking to the Russians a lot and asked one of their guys. The you hear any scuttlebutt about. Pretty uncomfortable booth. People pretending to be something else in informing back to the FBI. How would we feel if somebody did that in the show? Would we feel like okay? That's you're you're just trying to stop a crime for the old brush up. I gotta go guys. I left the irony. Yeah. I just I don't like it at all. No. That would be a grave grave of betrayal. And it's something. You think, you know, he he laughed at my idea that campaigns are going to get more insular, but they are going to get way more than they even had a Lou at the heart of this. And this is not said often enough, in my opinion, if Donald junior had met with the Russians fifteen times to say, listen like during the transition, we ought to have better relations. Let's talk about what we can talk about. Or anything short of espionage to advance the causes of Russia is merely a political matter and the vote whether they thought that was a good idea ill advised, which the guy who was elected ran on. I'm going to have better relations with Russia and with don't do respect. Joe Scarborough, for instance, in Mika Brzezinski is near or Gaz make use of the term collusion. It's just it's not a thing. Els morning. Joe segment was really funny this week. I missed it that that woman is so good at her Mika Brzezinski. She has her soul down, so funny. Anyway. One five two nine five F T C. You can Email mailbag Armstrong and Getty dot com. What do you think of this mass? You're listening to the Armstrong and Getty show..

FBI Trump Devlin Barrett Washington Post president Bill Clinton Justice department Jonathan Turley Trump White House Mika Brzezinski reporter Jack White House Cambridge Joe Scarborough Russia Armstrong
"devlin barrett" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"devlin barrett" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"The president michael cohen talk about this at any time during the campaign or their after not that i'm aware of refer to michael have michael cohen address any specifics regarding this ad s michael cohen about the specifics once again i would refer you to the president's out cassette council i would refer you to michael cohen earning to have to ask michael ceo ceo h c c o h e n call mike when it comes to questions about the president's alleged relationship with adult film actress stormy daniels and the hundred and thirty thousand dollar payment michael cohen says he made to her right before the election the white house response the president's response personally has been to tell reporters they need to talk to the president's lawyer call michael cohen we're not answering ask him well today as cohen's office and hotel room were raided by the fbi caroline tom hamburger devlin barrett at the washington post were i report while the fbi did today sees records related to that payment to stormy daniels what the fbi was after appears to be much broader than that quote michael cohen the longtime attorney of president trump is under federal investigation for possible bank fraud wire fraud and campaign finance violations fbi agents today rated cohen's manhattan office home and hotel room as part of the investigation seizing records about coen's clients in personal finances investigators took coen's computer.

michael cohen president daniels caroline tom hamburger devlin fbi attorney wire fraud coen ceo white house washington manhattan thirty thousand dollar
"devlin barrett" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"devlin barrett" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"Dimmed to fire the special counsel robert s muller mr began never released a statement later had to remind the president that he had indeed asked mr mcgann to see that mr muller was dismissed the people said and the other episode mr trump asked his former chief of staff reince priebus how his interview had gone with the special counsellors investigators special counsel's investigators and whether they had been nice according to to people familiar with the discussion so trump is asked is talking to people who have been interviewed by moeller about what muller ask them unbelievable there was also breaking news from the washington post surrey horowitz and devlin barrett right that robert muller has quote gathered evidence that a secret meeting in the seychelles just before the inauguration of donald trump was an effort to establish a back channel between the incoming administration and the kremlin apparently contradicting statements made to lawmakers by one of its participants according to people familiar with the matter in january 2017 eric prints the founder of the private military company black water met with a russian official close to president vladimir putin and later described the meeting to congressional investigators as a chance encounter that was not a planned discussion of usrussia relations a witness cooperating with muller has told investigators the meeting was set up in advance so that a representative of the trump transition could meet with an emissary from moscow to discuss future relations between the two countries the post goes on to note that an associate of eric prince lebanese businessman george nader attended and helped organize the seychelles meeting nader for himself has testified before a grand jury and is cooperating with the muller investigation sounds like a bad skying a spy movie doesn't it this meeting in the seychelles by the way eric prince who's the was the head of black water is.

vladimir putin horowitz washington muller chief of staff robert s muller eric prince george nader moscow emissary representative president official founder kremlin donald trump seychelles robert muller devlin barrett moeller
"devlin barrett" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"devlin barrett" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Gatien is is really rough the fbi the justice department even congress to some extent you're seeing some real you know breakdowns in terms of relationships and trust and i think whatever the shortterm impact is the longterm impact of that is is may be very intense all right well that's devlin barrett he's national security correspondent for the washington post devlin thank you so much for joining us today thank you and josh gerstein senior white house reporter for politico thank you as well for your time much appreciate having thank you anthony great beer all right well joining me now from philadelphia is claire finkelstein she teaches law and philosophy the university of pennsylvania school of law and she's director of the center for ethics and the rule of law and clear finkelstein welcome on point it's great to have you thanks for having me anthony also jonathan turley joins us from washington he's a constitutional scholar he teaches a public interest law at george washington university school of law jonathan turley many thanks to you as well for coming thank you anthony so let me start if i could with you claire you know i was reading a a recent peace by journalist him wigner who writes about the fbi and the justice department and he said something that was where he wrote something that was very striking where to tweets away from a constitutional crisis do you agree without first of all an input and if so what kind of constitutional crisis are we talking about we've repeatedly been close to a constitutional crisis in the last year with this president so for example uh with his executive order regarding the travel ban it could have been the case that the white house decided not to follow the ninth circuit decision invalidating the travel ban were always on the edge of our seat wondering when the rubber is going to meet the road in terms of an actual showdown and i think we are now at a place where we we may be getting to that point because this the what it seems to.

travel ban executive george washington university s jonathan turley university of pennsylvania sch reporter josh gerstein congress white house Gatien president washington anthony claire finkelstein philadelphia devlin barrett justice department fbi
"devlin barrett" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"devlin barrett" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"From washington is devlin barrett he covers national security for the washington post devlin good to have you thanks for being with us i anthony and josh gerstein senior white house reporter for politico he also covers legal and national security issues josh good to have a good to be with you anthony at high devlin so gentleman a devon i'll start with you let's talk about this memo republicans voted to release this memo alleging fpi missteps in surveillance of a trump campaign operative let's start with that so this comes from the house intelligence committee they voted yesterday devlin what's what do we know about what's in this ma'am well we know it's a nearly fourpage memo describing what in essentially talking point form what uh the republicans on a committee believe are abuses of surveillance authority by the fbi and the justice department in faisal work faisal being the foreign intelligence surveillance court and what the pieces that we've heard about in the memo basically say that uh the fis application regarding a trump to do surveillance on a trump as former campaign adviser uh did not include key facts about where the information was coming from some of the information i should say or what the possible political motivations of that person might be um you know there's there's there's two ways to think about the memo one is a political uh framework for understanding the politics of argue about the memo and then there's frankly the legal framework which is very different and and may be essentially irrelevant to the legal process but i think it's very rare.

washington devlin barrett politico house intelligence committee fbi anthony josh gerstein white house reporter faisal
"devlin barrett" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"devlin barrett" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"That that makes that testimony even more kind of defiant and courageous if the tire if the meeting with trump is after it think how uncomfortable that must have been for the new acting director having just gone up to congress and publicly contradicted the white house tuesday then have the president of the united states ask him whom he voted for and harangue him over his wife's political affiliation and campaign contributions fund a question for you been do you think moeller will want to talk to any mccabe given the fact we know he is actively looking at the question of obstruction so i assume look there with the obstruction investigation there are four bodies of information one you there all the people at the fbi who know anything andy mccabe is certainly one of those people number two there's all the documents that the fbi number three there's all the people at the white house who know any ranked number four there's all the documents at the white house those who your four bodies of information and i assume that that bob muller will be exhaustive in examining all of all four pieces of bodies of information and that would mean at some point interviewing andy mccabe all right devlin barrett who broke that story in bed with of law fair many things to broach still ahead chuck schumer takes the wall off the table sort of a mix metaphor in any deal with donald trump and how the democrats may have grabbed the political highground on immigration for the oncoming daca fight we'll talk about that.

acting director president united states fbi andy mccabe white house bob muller devlin barrett chuck schumer donald trump congress moeller
"devlin barrett" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"devlin barrett" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"There's been a lot of pushing of that sorry if you watch trump tv today there was about the tax between to investigators who are having an affair 'whoa what are you where do you think that is going well it is an endless circle of attempts to distract from the issue you know it's sometimes it's text messages and sometimes it's the steel dossier and sometimes it's the new nasr memo which nobody's actually seen or lease the underlying information and sometimes it's you know pizza gate it it see it's this random collection of things that may distract some very large number of people from the actual issue at stake which is a very serious said of investigations of the president's campaign of its interactions with a foreign intelligence actor that does not have us interests at heart of the criminal behaviour of certain people associated with the campaign and the administration and of the president's own interactions with his law enforcement and intelligence apparatus of which this latest disclosure about his conversation with andy mccabe is the latest example i want you if you can stick around been i want you to bring in one of the washington post reports actually broke that story that we were just talked telling you about on then acting director andrew mccabe a devlin barrett who joins me by phone devil i literally you published at the moment i was getting on air a few moments before so can you tell me the the timing in the circumstances under which mccabe gets called to the white house in this and this meeting happens sure so it it happened did it really time in in the court and of course of events last year and that's shortly after uh james comey fired as the director of the fbi and mccabe goes to the white house we're told that he speaks to the president in the oval office and in that conversation in uh one of the things that the president asks his who did you vote for and we're told mccabe demure on that and says i didn't vote in the last two and then the president proceeds to essentially uh speak critically of mccague's wife who had run as a democrat in a in a state uh legislative race uh in 2015 and that's always bothered the president he is he has complained about that since the campaign and it's you know it's clear that as as tenses.

text messages president law enforcement andy mccabe acting director devlin barrett fbi mccague nasr washington post andrew mccabe james comey mccabe
"devlin barrett" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

Anderson Cooper 360

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"devlin barrett" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

"Support for anderson cooper 360 comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans changes are you're confident when it comes to your work your hobbies and your life rocket mortgage gives you that same level of confidence when it comes to buying a home more refinancing your existing home loan rocket mortgages simple allowing you to fully understand all the details and be confident you're getting the right mortgage for you to get started go do rocket mortgage dot com slash ac 360 equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states nmlsconsumeraccessorg number thirty thirty well there's more breaking news side the washington post is now reporting that after the president fire james comey he some of the acting fbi director andrew mccabe to the white house asked him who he voted for invented angered him over his wife's politics join me now the phones washington post reporter devlin barrett devlin thanks for being with us so explain what happened this is after colmey has fired andrew mccabe who is that point is the acting uh fbi director goes the white house what went on so andrew mccabe is in the oval office where told us and uh essentially it's a very touchy time for everyone involved andrew mccabe spa someone who's very loyal to jim colmey has just been fired by the president and the president frankly has long distrusted in disliked andrew mccabe did dating back to the election and what happens we're told uh by multiple people is that the president asks mccabe who he voted for and mccabe basically ducks the question by saying i didn't vote uh in the last election and then the president uh offers uh frankly a critical commentary uh the caves wife who had run in 2015 in a democratic as as a democrat in a uh virginia state election.

anderson cooper 360 director white house reporter andrew mccabe president washington james comey fbi devlin barrett jim colmey virginia
"devlin barrett" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

Anderson Cooper 360

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"devlin barrett" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

"Support for anderson cooper 360 comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans changes are you're confident when it comes to your work your hobbies and your life rocket mortgage gives you that same level of confidence when it comes to buying a home more refinancing your existing home loan rocket mortgages simple allowing you to fully understand all the details and be confident you're getting the right mortgage for you to get started go do rocket mortgage dot com slash ac 360 equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states nmlsconsumeraccessorg number thirty thirty well there's more breaking news side the washington post is now reporting that after the president fire james comey he some of the acting fbi director andrew mccabe to the white house asked him who he voted for invented angered him over his wife's politics join me now the phones washington post reporter devlin barrett devlin thanks for being with us so explain what happened this is after colmey has fired andrew mccabe who is that point is the acting uh fbi director goes the white house what went on so andrew mccabe is in the oval office where told us and uh essentially it's a very touchy time for everyone involved andrew mccabe spa someone who's very loyal to jim colmey has just been fired by the president and the president frankly has long distrusted in disliked andrew mccabe did dating back to the election and what happens we're told uh by multiple people is that the president asks mccabe who he voted for and mccabe basically ducks the question by saying i didn't vote uh in the last election and then the president uh offers uh frankly a critical commentary uh the caves wife who had run in 2015 in a democratic as as a democrat in a uh virginia state election.

anderson cooper 360 director white house reporter andrew mccabe president washington james comey fbi devlin barrett jim colmey virginia
"devlin barrett" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

Erin Burnett OutFront

02:12 min | 4 years ago

"devlin barrett" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

"Yes we are told that the investigation into obstruction of justice began days after former fbi director james comey was fired burqa and that was a night so that's would be an early midmay uh the president is then under a personal investigation okay so now let's talk about what you just said is that it has expanded expanded to what can you explain a little bit more we know that within days as early as this week a special council moller is going to be interviewing several key intelligence officials one is dan coats the director of national intelligence the others mike rogers admiral mark rogers who is the head of the national security agency the nsa and his former deputy richard leggat what's important about that is shortly after coats was confirmed for his position he was in the white house he had a conversation with the president and the president said can you do something to get fbi director colmey to back off on the investigation of former national security director flynn this is something also the komi talked about in his testimony that the president had expressed to him that he wanted him to back off that so this is obviously going to be a crucial part of the whole question of obstruction of justice now you also report i wanna be clear here you and your colleagues including devlin barrett adamant us ellen nakashima are saying a five people briefed on these requests so when people come out and criticized for sourcing i just want to make it clear you have five sources who who know what's going on here let me ask you because you also report in this article something that i think could be very crucial for those trying to understand what the president of the united states is actually under investigation for tonight and you say this the interview suggests muller sees the attempted obstruction of justice question as more than just they will he said she's he said he said dispute between the president and the fired fbi director so to be clear your reporting is this isn't just an obstruction of justice question about whether the president asked jim colmey to back off of flint or anything about a loyalty pledge but this is now bigger than that because of the involvement of codes rogers and budget.

james comey president moller director mark rogers richard leggat flynn devlin barrett ellen nakashima united states muller jim colmey obstruction of justice fbi mike rogers