39 Burst results for "Developer"

Fresh update on "developer" discussed on Sound in Marketing

Sound in Marketing

01:23 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "developer" discussed on Sound in Marketing

"Thanks for having me. Excited to be here. I have wanted to talk to you for a while because I've been seeing you on all the socials and really enjoyed voiced in and I don't know if you've done voice talks yet but that sounded right up your alley as well. It was in the first one. Okay. That's what I thought. Really really enjoying with the voice community has been putting out there. With webinars and free events during all of this, it's been really really nice and helpful is kept me sane through all this to community you. It's great to see. The, inclusiveness and everyone come together even with. The stuff that's going on on social right now it's just it's such. vibe. Happy to be soup tiny part of it for those listening that don't know what in Alexa chief evangelist is could you kind of? What you do and what that title means I just happened to be the first person on our developer marketing team. I had a background as a developer evangelist at Microsoft for almost seven years going in really love technology love being part of communities. And I had the opportunity to just you know whatever needed to be done. So people who I've known for years. Now remember when I was the one going out and doing the Hack Affonso was. The first content to try and explain what this new world the voice was I started a podcast to kind of open the veil behind what was actually happening in. Seattle with Amazon that people could hear from other people besides me you know came up with the original. Original plans with a lot of teams. So like how do we certify skills? What is a skill I used to do? I started doing office hours, which were like, asked me anything's which were we still do because my my favorite just talking one on one with community. And then over time. It's been all sorts of different jobs both internally and externally, but it's basically whatever needs to be done. We have this electric celebrator program for people creating really unique things with invoice. It's part of the Alexa Fun and I was really really lucky to have been part of the finals and Kinda give a talk there and I I met someone and she said I'm an intrepid Moore and I was like what's that and she's like an entrepreneur but I work inside large organizations and I'm like that's me like I love. Being part of these.

Alexa Developer Moore Chief Evangelist Seattle Amazon Microsoft
E Ink demos a folding e-reader that can also take notes

Daily Tech News Show

00:15 sec | 23 hrs ago

E Ink demos a folding e-reader that can also take notes

"The windows team with the core development going to the cloud and a team Aka Azure and the front end of the team. Now under Panos Panay Micras. Now, moving the fundamentals and developer exterior team back underpants as leadership. The windows core engineering team will

Panos Panay Micras Developer
Fresh update on "developer" discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

00:55 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "developer" discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"So they're trying to get rid of it or was it incompetence manning that at some point some algorithm or some human decided to push a button and decided to talk to the developer about simply app just pulled out the rug from under it. So. This is a two prong sort of the story number one, that Oh God, when is apple going to grow up and allow these APPs to to appear these gaming APPs, and secondly this is all we could do an hour on the problems that apple has had or created for developers in maintaining the APP store it was inconsistent policies rules that make no sense to begin with with arbitrary changes that. Forced the developer to stop everything, they're doing to actually improve their APPS and change their APPs just to comply with a brand new rule it really is the one area in which you know and which apple I think is like classic Microsoft you know where as a kid we used to make fun of Microsoft saying, why are they so stupid why did they do such bad things and that's the one area in which I can say apple they got the they got some crazy crazy juice running through their veins. So Times as well. So India NOCCO as been on the Air Today College of the Holy Cross is the latest pronounce it. It'll be online this fall meaning lots of students college, and it looks like public, school kids or K. through twelve will be home to in Google is trying to help with that sounds like. Literally sounds like. It's kind of funny example of like little ways in which all these companies are trying to improve their products deal with all everyone who's home schooling. So if you have a Google Smart Speaker. You've always had the ability to say, Hey, set a reminder. Please remind me of this at this time. Now they've added a feature called the family bell that sort of modeled after school bill so that if you're, let's say your home, your kids are are studying at home. You can have their their little nest, a speaker or all the speakers in the house at eight. Am like ring a bell and say, okay, time for classes beginning. Bell, Rings Okay Time for lunch two o'clock nine percent and three o'clock. Okay. Class dismissed and and you can choose the time. So you can choose messages as actually. It's actually kind of funny and also as somebody who has been working from home like for like years and years and years I, wish that I had had this when I started. When I started out working from a Home Office because you really do need to have these like these these these flagpoles. That's okay. Not a clock you need to start working and five o'clock. Okay. It's time to stop working and go home and focus on reading your book and cooking your meals otherwise you you're eighteen hours of waking time. Just become one big sticky rice ball? Nation. Did Not go..

Apple Developer Google Bell Home Office Microsoft Air Today College India
Explicit Heuristics and Cheap Tests

Developer Tea

06:10 min | 1 d ago

Explicit Heuristics and Cheap Tests

"Today's episode we're going to. Switch over and talk about explicit. Explicit ristic's and I'm GonNa give you one specifically that's been on my mind recently, I think you'll find it useful. You can imagine an explicit heuristic sounding like a proverb or platitude. And I'll give you an example of one of these that we've talked about. So many times on this show. The, heuristic of explicit. Here's stick of making things smaller. This is something that you can use as. A tool, it's not just a rule, but it's something that you can pull out of your tool chest and say, I wonder what would happen if I tried to make something in this particular situation that is currently bigger, right? It's say complex subject. What if they broke down if I broke it down into smaller component parts? What would that do? So, you can see that these explicit heuristic six differ from implicit here six in that you can kind of call them up on purpose. You can use them as a tool. Lynn's to see your problems with. So the new explicit heuristic that I would like to use today. Is Very simple and you can use this whenever you're wondering what's a good use of my time or how can I choose which direction is better and the explicit heuristic I want you to remember. is find cheap tests, find cheap tests. So let's expound on this explicit heuristic because it may not be immediately clear what exactly we mean by cheap or what exactly we mean by tests. When we are faced with difficult decision really any decision at all We have an endless number of possibilities in almost every scenario even if it seems like we only have maybe two choices we probably have. An infinite number or close to an infinite number, right? So. How do we make the right decision and how do we identify opportunities are better direction for us? Let's see you have option A. and option B. in front of you, and it's not immediately clear which of these options. Is. Going to be the most valuable they both cost the same to implement but. Option a is hard to test. It's hard to validate an early stage whether option a is a good idea option b. on the other hand. There is an easy test we can validate on in the very earliest part of the effort towards be. So. It. Makes Sense. Then if you present it this way than anyone rational would choose option B. that seems like. With the information we have that it's the most obvious choice and the reason for that. Is because even though they cost the same amount and they have the same level of confidence, we have a faster ejection from option B. if it doesn't work out if the test fails. So. This heuristic is. A way of kind of practicing in particular principle, validating your direction validating your direction. So what this means is if you're headed a direction, how do you know it's the right direction? How do you know that this implementation of these these large features may be a large set of features that is going to serve your users or it's going to kind of carry you towards the goal that you care about. Is there a way? To test that is there a way to validate that direction? Early as possible in cheaply as possible. So this is also a tool that you can use when you're trying to decide without knowing. Right, without knowing how easy it is to test, you can ask this question, which option can we validate the easiest? which direction could we can pull the ripcord on? The fastest. And here's the most important part of this heuristic, right because it allows you to make decisions more fluently a little bit faster. It gets you out of the blocks mode. When you're trying to decide between two things. That's a completely stalled scenario. But if you can make easy decisions in other words, if you can say it's cheap, it is very and of low risk to go in this direction because we know that we can test this direction very quickly and if we decide to change direction. We can do that right away. Won't the only way you can do that is if you can find a cheap test. I want to be clear about what I mean by the word cheap I don't always mean monetarily cheap. Usually what this means is that it's easy it's. uncomplicated. To check this particular direction and it can be cheap monetarily. Of course, we're not going to leave that out, but also it can be quick. Time is absolutely an obvious resource and so a test that is quickly done might be considered cheap and if you had two tests and one took twice as long as the other but they both they both cost the same amount of energy or effort or or money than you would go with the one that was faster. And again, what's critical about finding cheap tests or going directions that allow for cheap tests? Is that instead of thinking or trying to predict all the way through? Which decision is the best decision to make right option a option B. we're trying to predict the. End Outcome of a or the end outcome of. We can ask a different and easier question to ask can we check both?

Lynn
Fresh update on "developer" discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

00:42 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "developer" discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"Customers because you have your, this is the way of you're trying to get around submitting each one of these streams. Games to us for vetting individually. Part. So for the safety of our users, we can't allow you to have this and it's the same they did with Google when they had their their game system stadia same thing they did with the Nvidia and it just doesn't hold water because they the. The the APP store rule that they're citing is almost exactly the same as having Netflix's like Netflix doesn't submit every single movie and every single TV show apple for individual review so We cut the incompetence in that they have this old old APP store rule that was made before streaming streaming game APPs were even considered. So out of date and if they were not incompetent, they say, oh, well, this rule doesn't apply anymore we should get rid of it or could be evil. Let's. Let's make sure. Because at the same time, they're all showing up on capitol. Hill this is happening. Should remind people because one very very credible interpretation is that they have their own streaming streaming APP service or excuse me their own service where you subscribe to a library of games and so you could say that they don't want these other systems to compete with Apple Arcade. The other thing is they're saying, well, that's that's terrible. Don't pay fifteen dollars a month have extra hundred games. What they need to what we want us to do is to buy one hundred games individually, and that way we get thirty percent off the top of every single one of those game purchases so. They're getting a lot of flak about this Microsoft they allowed to test the system. On Iowa just like any of the developer while they're Beta testing something they can have. Users that are allowed to use it now that they now that they've got the final no from Apple, they're closing down that that whole testing program and Microsoft is not being polite about about hiding that willing to hide baby in a corner they're willing to demonstrate that they really really steamed about this. So. So you're not sure if it's evil or incompetent, maybe a combination of both. Again, I'll give you another example from last week. One of my favorite favorite APPs they use it to it's sort of like a VCR for streaming streaming video like you know. Opera has one opera a day and sometimes mazing opera but I don't have two and a half hours. So there's this APP that I use. That will download that if it's not if it's not secure if it's not encrypted, it's not a Netflix literally just on the Internet for free for anybody to get. It will. It will find the original video source, download it that I could watch it at my leisure look at VCR, try to launch it last week in front of one of my again, an opera I, was really looking forward to as it. Oh, this this APP this map might be malware Mike Damage your. MIC damage your computer and we're not allowing you to launch it anymore and I was wondering, did they pull it because they don't like the idea of people downloading streaming video and check with the developer and apple just simply pulled their pulled their developer credentials meaning they're able to remove Lau make all of his illegal, not a word to the developer, not a word of explanation and at the end of the day he. Got His credentials back without again without an explanation. So that's probably that was another situation. Where are they being evil in saying that this is a completely legal, but they don't like it..

Apple Developer Netflix Microsoft Hill Google Nvidia LAU Iowa
Tips every Django developer should know

Talk Python To Me

04:50 min | 1 d ago

Tips every Django developer should know

"This first tip that have this is like one of the main things that I think of is like it comes with these building block pieces that say Flask Impure Pyramid and. Bass APN. What just don't come with like Admin back ends Yup. That's where we're going to start off. So Django clearly comes at batteries included and some people actually don't like that because they've under rule their own and they think itself. I happen to like their preferences and yeah, one of those well-known building blocks as the admin interface at and it's it's pretty impressive. But a few lines of code you. You can just add your model, an avid pie file, and you have to complete crowd interface, which is probably pretty end user. But as a maintain earth, this site it's it's pretty convenient and it's also very easy to extend it. So for example, taking admin class here, you can define some search fields. which makes those field searchable. You can have even have out a complete fields which they integrated the jobless Ritz. You can override to get crazy set and. Yeah. It's a nice way of inheriting from the Admin Dots Model Admin blasts Yeah. So it comes out of the box just. Kind of think of it as like. Google sheets or something for your database, right? Right. Where each table is like a tab or a sheet and sit in the workbook or whatever the terminology of Google sheets is. But the task. The bottom writes something I mean not necessarily stimuli. But that idea that you have like a grid over top of it. But what you're telling me is I can go into rive special classes that are tied to the various. Tables the models more specifically in it lets you search different aspects of it. Lets you cool. Auto completion. You could also say like limit how many items come back in your search results per page. So you don't get a million or something like that, right? Yeah. Do a list filter, for example, and then certain columns at the right side of the page. You can filter on them by clicking. Just. With one nine of coach. So this does raise some Cole functionality and I think, maybe in the show notes, we can link to a Django adleman cookbook, I use a loss which has like the hands. On. I. Might have mentioned before actually on pie down the vice then the umbrella from that book. That's like fifty pages and. Yeah Very. Workable. Super Bowl. Another thing you can do is you can write a function called get query set and actually do things like be joyner, do a joined queries against other things. Otherwise you may it up with like the N plus one problem of Orum's were doing queer than everything that comes back. You have to do more queries per item to try to fill out the details, I will talk about that in in one of the tips. Yeah. Yeah. Awesome. That's super cool. Let's see what else you want to say about that I. You know I was it. You think it might have been you either you or damn baiter. baiter from real python talking about using this to actually trigger events as you interact with this adman was that you think that was me. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So tell us that's like I. think that's pretty related. Tell people by the pretty. Cool. Right. We spoke about that on Python Bites Yeah. Thank God. We did was in one of the at model self variety safe method, and then the object plus created, and only then do a certain action. He likes emailing people in Hindsight. That's probably better to do it a salary task by it's an example how you can override those methods and do certain things. Yeah. Pretty easily. Yeah very cool. All right remember to or magic. Yeah. Well, Dan go comes with its own orem object relational napper and it's kind of a proxy today. So you don't have to ride s all yourself although i. Am such a fan. I'm saying, well, you worked at, Oracle, didn't you? Fan of orange actually or in the nurse sequel world maybe od M.'s or or some. are might not necessarily make sense, but you know there's so many issues you can run into if you don't use parameters, queries, little bobby tables, and all those issues and just like if you get the rock queries back and you pull different values sometimes you forget to convert this thing to an integer and it's just a string that has an energy in it that sort of. All these little weird edge cases right now you're as. With. Orum's at kind of. Like a layer that just separates like how your data should be transformed I. Really Love It. I, think it's great. I know one hundred percent work all the time. Right? There's places where it doesn't. But that's not as you know like most the time it's a it's a beautiful thing and it's it's a nice obstruction and it's way easier to use and more elegant.

Orum Google Django Adleman Ritz Joyner Oracle Cole DAN
Fresh update on "developer" discussed on BoomerBabesLife Podcast - The Wrap

BoomerBabesLife Podcast - The Wrap

00:39 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "developer" discussed on BoomerBabesLife Podcast - The Wrap

"I was fresh out of Germany I thought that would never be impossible in Germany. That's possible. Dot of the attitude of. You know I don't care how you learned it. I'm just interested that you know how do the job you know and that really made it possible to totally make that shift and and basically become a software developer not by ooh. Suited. T in because it had and also the the thing that I expected to be challenged because I wasn't really well, I wasn't sure what I want to work in an old male office which turned out to be not a problem at all but I also thought I had so much to catch up on that. I could never be good at this because the people I'd compete with I thought well, this little the little boys who'd been programming games from the age of fifteen. I ever catch up with that but. That didn't turn out to be a problem either and. Having the linguistic expect ground. Really gave me an advantage that I never expected because I was always the one who. would be on the same wavelength with the tech people but I talk to the client and the client would feel heard. And that was something that people. Weren't and Bob. Still on us to. So all of a sudden it put me into this. You know unique position that that. was. A lot of like was a lot of fun and I did that until I decided to to stock mound business and changed tack and and so. Now, it's comeback in especially now with with with this whole Kobe thing and everybody having to do things nine all of a sudden this has. Little. Shaft itself into the foreground again. I think it's really interesting with you. Sharing about how you actually got how your interest started to get into software and the Internet and what have year that. You made a good point there bat. Being A. Working with you know younger book like. You know young guys you know because it's it's almost as if that's the that's the thought process that we all have that anything to do with the internet or or in particular software development is more of a male dominated. Industry and so back then in the nineties, it would've been so sore. But now in in you know here we are in in two thousand and twenty. I think that there's there's a lot more of you. There's a little more women getting into it as well, but it still has that bit of a stigma to it. Doesn't it? You know sort of like Oh that's a bit too hot or you know kind of get my head around that Jesus. You find that with people that women that Absolutely yeah. It's usually only thing that ever gets in the way for them. It's that idea of like this is all kind of you know when. And classic example when somebody says all you know on this? Program and go okay. What happens I don't know I just sort of click this button and the never message comes up. Okay. What does it right?.

Germany BOB Software Developer
NCGOP alleges corruption on Charlotte City Council, files ethics complaints

Financial Symphony

02:59 min | 2 d ago

NCGOP alleges corruption on Charlotte City Council, files ethics complaints

"Has filed ethics complaints against two City Council members. Dimple as Mira and James Smudgy Mitchell. And before we get everybody's reaction to this, Fox, 46 Charlotte's Rochelle are Metzger set it up pretty nicely, but I wanted to clear the Air. Charlotte City Councilman James Mitchell says he wants to clear the air about an ethics complaint filed by State Republicans, accusing the Democrat of using taxpayer money to visit Detroit sports facilities in November 2018 is the first time ever That that has been a test of my name and is truly follows. Mitchell says It was strictly an economic development trip to talk about a potential dome stadium for the Carolina Panthers and future facilities for Charlotte FC. But the complaint says Mitchell's former company stood to benefit from the trip. Bart Moloch was the stadium expert. I spent time with elected, efficient and instead of Detroit, Thomas Entertainment District. That was that true was about it, And so there was no way he benefited from politically no benefit from financially. That was me doing my work this chair of economic development commit. In a separate complaint, the state GOP accuses Democratic Councilwoman dimple as Meera of receiving campaign donations in exchange for a yes vote when re zoning issues came before the council in a statement. As Meera says, in part, these are active and traditional donors. Too many candidates. Most importantly, My vote can't be bought, and I have never received the endorsement of the prominent developer organizations. This is purely a racist, sexist and political attack, as Meera says the complaint is an attempt by Republicans to deflect attention away from concerns surrounding Republican Councilman Tark Bakari, whose company was given $1.5 million of city money for an advanced technology jobs program. That money has since been taken away to which dark Macari took to Twitter last night. And in a Siri's of tweets defended himself, he said, Among other things, if Councilwoman Dimple s marriage does not publicly retract this libelous statement and refrain from repeating this action in the future. I will be forced to take swift legal action. The Democrats took a cheap shot at the ethics of Tart Muk are very cheap shot the attorneys for the city Have basically cleared him of any wrongdoing. In fact, documents and videos of a previous meeting from weeks before showed that the Democratic Council members knew everything from committee meetings and even Complemented tart macari on his work. You wonder what the political rationale was when they all of a sudden voted. I think 9 to 1 to cancel a contract with dark, which he abstained from voting, by the way, which is by what the rules are now the GOP, I think, fired back and said, if you're going to take shots against AH, Republican, one of only two Republicans in the county. You might be living in a glass house. Well, Bret

James Smudgy Mitchell Meera Bart Moloch GOP Detroit Charlotte City Council Tart Muk Dimple S Democratic Council Mira Charlotte Fc FOX Twitter Carolina Panthers Tark Bakari Rochelle Bret Developer
Azure updates | Microsoft

Daily Tech News Show

00:27 sec | 3 d ago

Azure updates | Microsoft

"Two years ago Microsoft divided the windows team with the core development group going to cloud in Ai Aca the team and the front end in a team called the experienced team under what is now Panos Kanye's department Microsoft is now moving the fundamentals and developer experienced team back underpinned by the windows core engineering team will stay with Azure. Says his team will focus on growing the surface business

Panos Kanye Microsoft Developer
Los Angeles City Attorney Aims to Stop Development Projects Involved in Corruption

The John Phillips Show

00:22 sec | 3 d ago

Los Angeles City Attorney Aims to Stop Development Projects Involved in Corruption

"Los Angeles City attorney Mike Fairer, says he's giving the City council a proposal designed to revoke approvals of development projects if they are found to be involved in corruption and fraud. Former city councilman Mitch Angle under is pleading guilty to obstructing an investigation into whether he took cash from developers suspended. City Councilman Jose Huizar is pleading not guilty to taking over a $1,000,000 from

City Council Mitch Angle Mike Fairer Los Angeles Jose Huizar Fraud Attorney
Empowering Medtech with Anatoly Geyfman

Outcomes Rocket

05:12 min | 3 d ago

Empowering Medtech with Anatoly Geyfman

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Sal Marquez here and today I. Have the privilege of hosting on a totally gave man. He is the CEO and Co founder of Care Avoidance, a healthcare sales enablement solution for life sciences that is doing extraordinary work for drawing out value propositions. Companies Looking to express that clearly anatoly came to work in healthcare early in his career, starting off as the lead engineer on one of the first hip compliant benefits, communication products for enterprises, he continued to work with large healthcare data sets and HR soft before. Before becoming the chief architect at Ambra. Health a cloud based medical imaging company. It was there at Ambra that Anatoly saw the need for high quality data to inform sales execution which germinated. The idea for care voyage were thrilled to have him on the podcast today, and it's such a unique platform that they're using to reach customers and for sales teams to reach their customers in a clear way Donatelli. Thank you so much for joining me today. Thank Salty. Got Be. Yeah. Absolutely. So tons of great stuff being done by your company. And so before we dive into really the meat bones of what you guys do there, I love to first arc and find out more about you and one inspires your work in healthcare. I appreciate it, and so I started working in healthcare actually when I was still in high school. I just happened to luck out and find on an internship working on one of the first hickory maple insisting that for human resources management. So that really starting my love for working with large data sets and working with privileged data, like that I continue dot read some other gigs on signatory around Maple imaging on, and that's really where I started learning about. About, the difficulty that companies have selling in healthcare. So with my may imaging gig on I, I was the chief architect company called Ambra Health on big digital medic rummaging Bloomberg, and then I switched over to more of a developer evangelists than sales engineering role, and that's where I really started looking at how companies that produce the rate products go to market. And what inspires me a about healthier? Specifically, my little corner of healthcare is helping innovators, take their market big their products to market. I think there's a lot of great innovation that's happening right now. especially with digital innovation machine learning ai off care. But I think that the past to a successful product is still at I. It's still very hard to navigate. So that's what inspires me getting these products so. So, writer audience and getting patients right treatment at the right time, eventually through through the use of our product and obviously great innovation. Yeah. You know it's That's so great, and there's so many opportunities for companies and you know the people leading them, the teams that are representing the great work that you know I mean many of these companies we have on the podcast a totally you know the. Great Work and they have great products and services and the pathway to get there. The go to market strategy isn't always super clear, and then on top of that, it's not easy to sell inside of our healthcare system and it takes forever so. All of those things are true own. Yeah, and I think that there are a lot of products that end up failing because the products and successful and because the greater market strategy is maybe not very well informed their beats not very well executed, and so if I can do anything to help that and that was where I decided to spend, my time is opening entrepreneurs with way to go to market I. Think it's great and in our vertical or our economy or health care economy, it's so necessary. So tell us a little bit about what you guys are doing. Doing at care voyage to add value to the healthcare ecosystem of innovators. Yeah. -solutely. So you know I'll start with a problem I. think the really big problem right now, the REC- at least in our little corner of the healthcare economy is data symmetry It's you know everyone makes decisions or everyone strives to make decisions in a data driven way the acquisition of data to make those decisions, your go to market or even your your product strategy is still not democratized Jesus, sometimes available and very regularly available in. Thanks. It's not available at all on companies like care. Where we're trying to do. At least off the for. Right now, we're trying to do is we're trying to democratize access to this information whether it's you know information about who's doing, what types of services takes a physicians practicing the type of and your are devices best for or on that you're pharmaceutical product is best stations for it. I think a lot of like data's available, but traditionally, it's only been available to the wealthiest layers market and so our goal is to democratize access to that. So even startups that may not have the backing of the largest feet from on me, not how hundred million dollars in the bay and can't get access to it and really execute a great girl market.

Anatoly Ambra Chief Architect REC Sal Marquez Ceo And Co Ambra Health Lead Engineer Founder Writer Bloomberg Developer
My Best Programming Tips with Jason Swett

Ruby on Rails Podcast

08:19 min | 5 d ago

My Best Programming Tips with Jason Swett

"I think it's easy to fall into the trap of wasting time by just like. Chasing this rabbit, chasing this rabbit, and if you step back and say if somebody came and looked over your shoulder and asked like hey. Are you actually trying to do right now? A lot of times. If you don't have an answer to that question, then it's like, what are you even doing so like? Anytime. You're coding and you're feeling like lost like you're just flailing around it can be hopeful to step back and say hang on a second. What am I actually trying to do right now and I catch myself doing this when I'm just like messing around and not getting anywhere I'm like hang on what's my goal again, and often the problem is that I don't have a clear goal and so just saying what it is that I'm trying to accomplish is so so helpful even going to the extent of writing down. Can Be really helpful because then it forces you to really be clear. See I read this one in terms of a group contacts or a context where I'm given a ticket that might be fairly vague and so when I look at the taking I, don't know what I need to do here and so I have all these clarifying questions that I need to do and when I try to do is once I can get those into a more technical format I liked to rewrite the ticket with the product managers you know. Acceptance on that so that way I can clearly articulate that goal. Yeah. That's interesting. If I saw a story that was too vague I would look at the story and say, this story is not what a call shovel ready. So shovel ready just means that it's Ready to begin work on it. And throughout my career I've I've had a lot of instances of the of the challenge where I get a story and it's not shovel ready. And I think a that's kind of the role of a scrum master. If you're working in agile methodology to go through the stories before they get to the point of being assigned to developers and making sure that they are sufficiently crisply defined to actually be worked on one of my tests that I that I do on stories when I when I look at him as I asked if we. gave this to an external qa person would that Qa person be able to read what's in the story and know what manual tests to be able to perform perform to know that this story is done and if that's not possible, then it's very likely that the story needs to be made more crisp, including a very clearly laid out definition of what it means to be done with that story. That's great. So moving onto the next tip, keep everything working all the time, and this is one that I have definitely failed to do before we have had to do a massive ru factoring and I realized halfway through that the behavior of my code has changed tests or failing I'm not sure which part of the code I've changed has caused this issue and I ended up having to kill the branch start all over again. So what's your tips around that? Yeah, that's painful. I've definitely had that experience myself a lot of times in the past, and that's why this is one of the one of the top tips in the sequence because in in my career, this one, his burned me a lot of the time. So there's not much to say about this other than like keep everything working all the time, which means like make a small change and then test everything. It is really helpful in these cases if you have good test coverage on your entire application, because what I will do is make a small change a very small commit maybe it's even just a one line commit. And then I'll push my commit up to Ci and I'll let the tests run on the whole application. I don't necessarily always wait for the whole entire test suite to run before I, continue my work because with my application right now, my test take like twenty minutes to run and I'm, not gonNA. Just sit and wait for twenty minutes while that's happening but I'll make a small change push up to see I make a small change push up to ci there's a little delay but that way at least if things start breaking, I know the exact small change that made things breaking so I can So I can know what the culprit is and then also in addition to the CI thing because that's a little bit peripheral. I will make a small change go into my browser and manually test. I'll make a small change and then run the test case that tests that exercises that line of code, and if that passes, I'll run the test that the whole test file that tests that whole class and stuff like that. Because yet, if you if you work for like hours or days and let things stop working, it's so much harder to go from not working to back to working than it is to keep everything working all the time I completely agree and this actually touches upon the next one. So the other day I googled the concept of atomic commits and you might know this but you are the number one result on Google search exciting. So Jason, could you explain what an atomic commit is? Yeah it's a commit VAT is only one thing. So. This is interesting I I, find myself wanting to read my own blog post so that I can answer this question more more intelligently I'll explain how I do my own commits. I don't usually do more than a few minutes at a time worth of coding I don't usually do more than. A few lines well, maybe like five to fifty lines is the average size of of my comments and I try to stay more toward the like ten or twenty lines into the spectrum per commit not that lines is like a hard metric that I adhere to. That's just how it happens to work out. and when I'm when I'm coding in front of people like when I'm teaching a class or something like that, the students are often surprised by how frequently I commit like sometimes, I'll just change one character and they'll commit and the they'll be like isn't that like so much overhead compared to the amount of work you did. But. No. What I'm doing is I'm keeping my commits atomic because like for example, if I change a piece of configuration in my application. And then I work on this unrelated feature and I spent like. Twenty minutes, and then I commit that thing I commit the feature change along with that unrelated configuration change. then. What if that configuration change causes a problem? Later, I might be doing my debugging research and discover that this commit introduced problem. But to me looks like this is this feature that I added. But really it's this configuration change that's buried way in it. That's really not obvious and that's unrelated to all the other code I changed. So makes that debugging lot harder. So when I commend I'm not necessarily always committing for the sake of the change that I made I'm committing for the sake of whatever changes I'M GONNA make. I want to keep this small change separate from whatever change comes after that so that each commit is only one thing. So again, that makes the debugging easier, and if you ever need to roll something back I had to do this just the other day where I made a change that my boss asked me to do. But then the next day my boss said actually can you put it back to the way? It was before because my tom because my commit was Atomic. All I had to do was revert one single commit and it was super easy to roll back.

CI Google TOM Jason
The Critical Importance of Labels

Developer Tea

04:25 min | 6 d ago

The Critical Importance of Labels

"We've gone off on a little tangent out what it means to have a dynamic meaning forgiven word why language is so important. A broad scale but how does this impact our code after all? If I have a variable, that's named X. or variable that's named y. how much meaning can I really pack into? You know a given variable name, a given function name. Why does this matter to me as an engineer? Here's what's critical. Okay. Even in those scenarios for have a variable named x variable named why you're making an assumption, you're making assumption about the future reader of this code. In? Particular The. The use of the variable x and y assumes that someone is. Familiar with the contract with, for example, an X. Y. Axis, the graph where it has an X. axis going left to right in a y. axis going. From bottom to top or at least familiar with the concept. And if someone isn't familiar with that, well, it turns out that those variable names they might be familiar with them from. But they may not necessarily know the underlying implication there. Now this isn't a strong offender. Right is this isn't going to cause a major issue in your code necessarily in this is something that's easy relatively easy to teach. But what about much more culturally rich naming structures? For. let's say you have special object types and you call them something we'll give it the name Fu. And foods have a lot of cultural context within the organization. There's a lot of experience and a lot of meaning when you say, Fu, around the people in your company. Oh. Food doesn't have any meaning to somebody who is new WHO's a newcomer to the company? and. Just carrying over the meaning from within your company means that the connotations that may go along with that code. Could change the way that we treat the code like give you a little bit more of a concrete example. How would you treat? A variable if it was named Password. And how would you a variable if it was named? Image. In the first scenario, you might be actually afraid to work with a variable named password. You don't WanNA accidentally reveal that password, and so in some ways, this is actually a functionally useful reality that the words that we choose have a lot of meaning and they can actually shape the way that we treat that code and the future. In fact, that's the whole point of choosing good names. We want someone to be careful with password. But on the other hand if you have something named image You may not necessarily know how to treat that is that a file is it a disk image? There's a lot of ways that you can parse the word image. and. So it makes sense to be more specific with our naming structures. Additionally, it makes sense to consider the extra cultural meaning that we bring to the table when we're working with our code. For example, many teams including the team that I work on are changing their their get branch names, their version control brand names from master to main. This is because of the historical context of the word. Master, when you hear the word master, you may not bring any context to that at all may not be in the forefront of your mind, but it's very possible that the word master carries connotations that relate to slavery. So it's important that we recognize that these contexts are not just our own home. That, we should be thinking about others when we name our variables whether it's for simple and practical reasons or if it's for culturally sensitive reasons. We shouldn't assume that everyone has the same meaning for the words that we choose to use as we do.

FU Engineer
Amazon Alexa Quick Links

Voice in Canada

01:26 min | 6 d ago

Amazon Alexa Quick Links

"I want to give you a little update on something that was announced. Just recently on the Lexi live Online conference for developers. And I think this is a great feature. And I just want to basically heads up about this because I think you're going to be seeing this more and more on a lot of LEXI skills you know. One of the issues with skills is remembering the invocation fray. So what is it that you say? In order to get Lexi to open a skill and Amazon has just released at least in Beta form. Something called quick links and what this is is the ability to click on any link that you see really anywhere on the web on social media in taxed wherever you see hyperlinked that we're so used to now you click on that and what that does is it automatically launches a skill on Alexi device of your choice so you click the link. It will then open up a browser or a a window. Depending on what device you're on Alaska device you want to enable the skill and Lexi just starts playing that skill very cool as I mentioned. This isn't a Beta version right now. So you're not going to see this yet but I can imagine that they're going to be lots of great use cases for this coming forward and I think it's A. It's a very very neat innovative idea. That Amazon has compass so. But I tell you that it's interesting news and being look up for some of these new skills that are gonna be taking advantage of quick links. Help US launch these skills and get into these experiences Much more quickly than we can currently

Lexi Amazon United States Alaska Alexi
Open Source NLU - Alan Nichol, Rasa

The Voice Tech Podcast

04:18 min | Last week

Open Source NLU - Alan Nichol, Rasa

"I mean what we're trying to build with Raza is the standard infrastructure for conversationally I. So the same way that you have these. have no brainer technology choices, right? If you're adding. Search to your stack, you're gonNA use elastic search. If you're working with containers used docker similarly, if you're building conversationally, I use Raza. That's where we're headed. That's what we're aiming for, and of course, if you want to be that level of standard, you'd better be open source, right? So that's in a nutshell, the way it started was that my co founder, Alex and I. Were, building a few assistance ourselves. We had the first couple on the slack platform. We had some people bang for them. And just realize that the developer tools were lacking in. So many different ways, right. So we were using the tools that everyone was the time with a I was big than dial. was called API. Time the review others. And? While we kind of came with his controversial statement, right? So two thousand, Sixteen Fiscal Messenger Platform was opening up. And there's all this high. You know such an Adela, saying the new APPS and I go all this kind of. Rhetoric. And the day before that announcement from facebook, we wrote a posting. We don't know how to build conversationally I yet. Right? Like nobody knows the tools aren't there and this isn't GonNa go very well. And I think that has sort of played out kind of as we predicted, which was that the push came from people wanting to users through messenger APPs right because APP downloads or difficult to get. Wasn't because all of a sudden. We'd stumbled into a great new piece of technology and we're like, wow, look at all the new things we can build. Right. It was very much coming from people wanting to talk to people in Messaging APPs. And so we said, well, look, let's start for principals and think what tools do. We actually need to build great compensation I and what developers need. And we were working with some of these cod products realize that they're great for getting started quickly, but you very quickly also pain yourself into a corner, right? And the other thing as a developer, right? If you're. If, you're building an ailing startup. You're doing something right and every single message that goes in to your application has to go through a third party to get interpreted. It's pretty precarious situation to be as a developer right, and so we built a few things and we decided to hack together own. System, and then we were running this meet up in Berlin chat bots, balls, Berlin meet up. And everyone was saying Oh we're going to do. We're GONNA. Do our own NLP. You know. We don't have time now, but maybe next month something like that. Right, and always you know what he did, and so we said, well, why don't we just open source hours? And then everybody can contribute rather than rebuilding. Thanks. Very. Innocent insight by this was sort of six or eight months after message from opened up and everyone who is still seriously in the space have the same thought which was. I'm really dependent on the service which might shutdown might so being freedom is charging for it. It's not a great position to be in as a developer, and so when we said look, here's an open source drop in replacement for the clouds will the using. Now, it was just kind of the right product at the right time and instantly got a big community farming around it. So that's was kind of where we started, but we'd been working already for. Six months on a better way to build dialogue, and that wasn't ready for Primetime yet, but we'd already been working on that problem which was okay. It's nice to have this system right and you bring in message and you get back and intended some entities. bought. What do you do with that information and you just layer more if statements on one another all the time that be we're going to get anywhere, and so we've been thinking about that problem very hard and. because. Of the success of Razzano you which was the name of the library, I punched it. We decided to go all in on open sourced look. Everything has to be open source. And that kind of set us down that path burn interesting. Very interesting. So came from chat bots that came from a real need in the developed community using these cloud services I, you had wall stability tools, yourself, you open them up, and the rest is history of the community call onset communities been a real real key to success. Right? Right. From the very beginning, the community has built this company with you

Developer Raza Berlin Facebook Co Founder Alex Adela Razzano
Using Your Brain Without Thinking

Developer Tea

07:38 min | Last week

Using Your Brain Without Thinking

"What does it mean to use your brain? And how is that different than just thinking? As developers engage in thinking all the time but here's a entirely separate part of our brains that we might be missing out on using. That could be better at solving some of the problems that we face on a day-to-day basis. My Name is Jonathan trailer listening to develop for T and my goal on the show helped driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers. One of the amazing things about the. Human. Brain. Is Its ability to process complex topics. This is why we can write code that is abstracted so many levels. Away, from a physical reality that we have to tangibly think about. We can imagine entire. Kind of universes where we can create stories and. keep track of those stories while we read a book. A book that was written with a bunch of characters that are enough themselves abstractions. These are characters that we may not have ever even seen that specific character that specific size before. But somehow we are able to process all of this information and create meaning out of it. This is an incredible feat and part of our kind of intellectual superiority that we are aware of the domination that we have over the world around us. Has Given us. A somewhat distorted picture of what the brain is actually capable of more importantly where the limits are. And it's very simple to see the limits of your brain and specifically limits that we're gonNA talk about today. If you want to test these limits you can. Try to brute force memorize the first twenty digits of Pi. This isn't a lot of information. It's just twenty digits in after all we can process a lot more. Information than just twenty digits, we can read entire books with thousands of pages and understand them. So what is it about remembering twenty digits? Makes it difficult? Here's another exercising might want to try. that. You've probably faced already in your career, go and look at the features of what say three or four different libraries, popular libraries or three or four different languages and try to decide which one is best. This kind of information that you have to process. It's really difficult to do because the number of variables and that's the critical factor for today's episode, the number of variables that you have to weigh against each other. Can Be really large temper variables. You can imagine for example. That you're trying to deduce which which language should you learn next let's say you're a beginner programmer and maybe you're trying to decide which language to learn. You can use variables like the market size. You can try to quantify how much you enjoy that language or. Even how much you expect to enjoy it in the future, you can imagine you would use measures like the number of available repositories on get hub or get hubs own report of the trends for a given language. How do you decide what trend to use or how far back to look? These are all different questions they you would have to try to answer and then compare between the different languages. And so now you have this very large list of pros and cons and. You sit down and try to look over that information, but this is. Where we hit our limit. Our ability to cognitively process or think about something on purpose. We only have so much capacity to think in parallel. This is critical factor remember again, the number of variables were very good about thinking about one thing. At a time. In fact, most of the advice that you receive on this podcast is an attempt to get you to think about fewer things at any given point in time and reduce the things that you are working on to the simplest form. So you don't have to keep a lot of information in your head. But if you are trying to make a decision complex decision with a lot of variables. There is another part of our brains we can tap into what's interesting is that as knowledge workers, we are paid for using this one specific part of our brain, this prefrontal CORTEX. The part that's responsible for thinking very deeply and thinking very focused manner. But. There's another part of our brains that can help us think more abstractly. And without the same limits of the cognitive processing limits, the would find in the prefrontal CORTEX. Lots of studies. For example, one from Carnegie Mellon support the idea that the rest of our brain is working on the problem. In parallel to us focusing on other things. For example. If you expose yourself to all of the information about the various programming languages that you're considering let's say you have four of them. Then you can go and do something totally unrelated to that. Your going to keep on working on that decision problem. Now, we're not really consciously aware of this and there's no way to become aware of it but once we return to that problem at a later point in time we may have a different sense of clarity and we might even have. We might feel is a gut intuition, but actually it's an intuition that was given to us by that unconscious processing that's happening in the rest of our brain. So. Here's the critical thing to to take away I. We said the the most critical thing is to remember that this has to do with the number of variable. So if you can reduce the number of variables that you're thinking about, then you can actually process those entirely in that prefrontal. CORTEX. For example, if you're working on a math problem, this is a perfect example of processing in the prefrontal. CORTEX. But if you're working on something that requires much more evaluation much further a can of discussion about multiple variables or a comparison between multiple things, and that's not something that you're going to be able to hold in your prefrontal Cortex, the working memory for of a better explanations too small. So the prescription to fix this problem is to expose yourself to the information all the relevant information for making a given decision and then go and do something else. Maybe take a walk give yourself something that's totally unrelated that won't allow your mind drift backing and try to process that information again, on purpose in that intentional and conscious way.

Cortex Carnegie Mellon Programmer
How live coding can level up your development (Jesse Weigel)

CodeNewbie

06:31 min | Last week

How live coding can level up your development (Jesse Weigel)

"So I, want to switch gears and talk about live coding, which is something that you do. You are a youtube live coding streamer for free coat cab, which sounds terrifying. How did you get into voting? So when I was at this job, it was at a university I. decided that I wanted to collaborate more with the computer science department. I wanted to help the computer science students start to build a resume before they graduated and I thought it would be cool to get some of their ideas because I knew my own gaps in my learning, not having a computer science degree. So I thought we can kind of help each other out in the maybe they would have a lot of knowledge that I didn't, and I would have more practical not. That, they hadn't yet acquired about just like getting things done in making live in applications. So I decided to record myself doing some work and then put a link to it in the the facebook group for the Computer Science Club. And My boss thought that was a good idea and you said, yeah, let's let's do that and I had always been developing everything I. Could Open source on get hope anyway. So that wasn't really an issue and I did some live streams and I didn't I'd never livestream anything before like I really didn't know what I was doing the first live streams were. You couldn't see the code even the the the video quality was terrible the phone I had two small. So it was, it was pretty bad So I went on the Free Co Camp Forum and I a post saying. Just. Here's what I'm trying to do, and I don't know what I'm doing. If anyone has some time, please check out one of my live streams and at appreciate any advice that you have. And I ended up getting a bunch of people watching and giving advice. But probably, the most important view that I had was from Bo Corns who's in charge of the Youtube Channel for Free Code. camp. Alcohol. had asked if I would be interested in doing. Some live coating on the Free Co Camp Channel and I. You know, of course, 'cause my channel, add maybe three subscribers at the time in the Free Co. camp. Channel at the time had maybe somewhere between fifty thousand, one, hundred, thousand subscribers gone up significantly since then we're over a million. Maybe three years ago. So after I did that Quincy who's the head of recode camp also, ill, he watched the stream and he said I really like this and new said, you know you could do this? You know however many times a week you one. So I started live coding for at least an hour a day five days a week. Monday through Friday. How? Is a lot of time that is dedication yet in would really helped was I lies streamed my work. So it wasn't prepared beforehand or rehearse. It was whatever I had to work on that day. I would try to pick whatever I thought would be the most exciting in helpful for other people to see. And I would lie stream that portion of my work. And they were real projects that I was working on, and thankfully you know my boss was just super excited about it and saw this as a great opportunity for publicity for the university. which it really was for a tiny university in Ohio, the logo of the university was seen by people all over the world. So we definitely got some publicity and we also got a lot of people contributing code. So since it was open source. We had a nice community of developers from all over the world that would contribute code. Actually, add a developer. Believe was fourteen years old when he started watching the show from the Himalayas was one of the top contributors on most of the projects and he was so good. He's fine. The Best Coder I've ever worked with. He was so good. I would be in the middle of a livestream talking through a problem of. So here's what, I'm trying to do and I would look over the live chat and there would be five or six messages in all caps saying check my request. And I would look. In, he would have already solved the problem in submitted requests. Yeah It was so. He would often call me out on things. I was doing wrong and I tell you I. I kept in mind all the time. How young he was. I if it were an older person, I may not have taken it so well. A. Little Bit. Yeah. It it did. But I just imagined that he was young. US very excited about what he was doing us very skilled. With it and to be honest, I love what up so much during the live streaming so much more than I ever thought I mean, well. I never thought anybody would really watch it maybe a few computer science. So like. Like maybe one or two people watching to now having hundreds of people you're watching, live all typing and contributing code, and then my work day changed dramatically. It went from me coding most of the day on my own to me spending my mornings, reviewing pool requests in merging them, and then spending my afternoons live coding. And that was like my daily work, we would regularly have you know maybe. Somewhere between like five and a dozen contributors to each one of the projects that I was working on and I, I'd like to think that it was a pretty fair exchange that I would. I would give a shoutout to everybody that contributed in review their pool requests on on air just to let people know what they had done. So I kinda helped. These people who were volunteering their code, build up their portfolios and get some exposure on the Free Code Camp Channel, and then in turn they helped make my projects better. And and I learned so much because I couldn't merge

Computer Science Club Developer Facebook Himalayas Youtube Ohio Bo Corns Quincy
Trump wants to ban Tik Tok

This Week in Tech

14:06 min | Last week

Trump wants to ban Tik Tok

"Actually let's talk a little bit about Tick Tock today I performed this morning. An Act of rebellion. I downloaded installation talk on my iphone because who knows how much longer I'll be able to do it it's very confusing I don't know what's going on. Tick Tock, which is owned by the Chinese company Bite Dance Safest that committee. Or foreign investment in the United. States apparently is investigating I. Think they actually issued a ruling saying that like, wow away tick tock was a threat to the United States One of the ways tiktok became really big as by acquiring a couple years ago musically, which is really I think from what I see on. tiktok kind of the backbone of what Tick Tock is these days, which is lip synching or acting or dancing to an original track It's it's very entertaining. It's a it's probably the most engaging social network out there. But apparently, it's a threat to our way of life. On Friday the president on Air Force One. said that he was about to ban it as soon as yesterday. From the United States I'm not sure under what law safest can do it I think. But I don't know if the president can by executive order banning application. then for the last week Microsoft Been. Negotiating to buy the American rights to talk to kind of create a tick tick Tock America that would be separate from the Chinese bite. Dance. TIKTOK. But then the president says I'M GONNA ban it but I don't want anybody to buy it. So, micro-. Microsoft said. Threw their hands off and said figure it out and there. They didn't end the conversation with bite dance. Apparently, they were fairly close but they're not forwarding it until they find out what happens I'm GonNa make a prediction. Nothing is going to happen except now people are going to download and use TIKTOK. Brianna is tick tock a threat to national security. It's not a unique threat to national security. We need to have a conversation about the kinds of information social media APPS are able to download from our phones. We all remember the scandals of facebook on android downloading your tire phone list gang everyone you've ever called. We need to have a conversation about that, but there's there's really no evidence that what Tiktok is pulling is any greater than what you know facebook instagram these other social media sites are. Pulling so far. So we need a wider discussion about that. How's it just want to say I wish I could tell you this was just trump in the Republicans that would make me very happy. My heart broke today to see Chuck Schumer on the Sunday morning shows advocating the same thing tech talk. So you know it's it is we need to have a conversation about national security and the amount of information were giving up but it's I think. To just focus on TIKTOK. Sign of. Phobia. Or Zena Phobia Paris, you seem like a Tiktok user. I that's only because you're younger than. I. Did recently re downloaded when this whole. Wanted to make sure that I had it. I'm sure is a common response. I agree with everything the Brown said in the sense that I don't know I've been particularly disturbed by. The reactions to take talks, data collection both from the left and right and just. Experts in the tech field generally over the past couple of months because it is definitely coming from a place of seeing phobia. I mean, we have so many different. American. Made APPS that. Do many of the same things I mean one thing that I've seen noted quite often as to talk has the ability to see what you've. You know copied near Clipboard when guests so do most of the apps you have on your phone. Is Operatives. It's not a tiktok specific problem. This came up because of Iowa's fourteen, which is in public Beta now so people are suddenly using it and dozens of applications. I. Think must be a library that they all subscribe to infect somebody a couple of weeks ago. Somebody told me that it was. Ad Library I use of what a clearly noninvasive program from panic software Call Code editor, which lets me log into my Server. with SSh and and edit files and things like that and it was. I got the same thing that you get on Iowa's fourteen O, coders looking clipboard every time I typed to character. Now I don't think coded only panic software famous for an FTP program and this H. Program is at spying on me obviously, they're not. they're using the same code library. So it's a, it's a, it's a bug. That's what Lincoln Microsoft's linked in said as well. So. I think it's also just one of those things where if you're building an APP especially in. The Tom I. Don't know there was a time when absence of for being built were there wasn't this conversation about security and privacy. Why would map designers not take the position of? Yeah. All the things maybe we'll need that information talk said quite credibly. We're just looking to see if you put a url on your clipboard so we can pasted in. That seems credible I. Don't know if you need to do it every single time I type of character that seems like more that book I can tell you firsthand from developing an Iowa it's often easiest just to get it submitted to the APP store to take a bunch of permissions and It's just it's like you're trying to debugging in. Store, to accept it is just quirky. I can't tell you how many times I in other APP developers have. Just it's a very, very quirky system. So I, think this is just in Beta. I think it's really important to point out as far as the impetus for this I personally do not think it's a coincidence that tiktok was widely credited for disrupting trump's Tulsa rally a couple of weeks ago and Sarah Cooper is so famous for she's making five star she's she's amazing and those videos are brutal to trump and I I don't. That's a coincidence. She does trump limps licks lip sync. And I was talking to a friend said you know is the trump on TV I can't understand what he's saying but then I watched Cooper and that makes sense Sarah ads expressions and Gestures and all kinds of makes sense all of us and so I don't think the president should be so quick to to not like Sarah purchase he's adding context Might have something to do with it certainly in his mind because we know. You know. I don't know what he's going to do to Cape Pop stands because they were the other the other group that apparently figured out that you could register took on trump's team has got to be wise enough to know you can't take on the capons stands. Being. The capon stands the United States would crumble. Yes. That would be it would be over right. You just can't win against the K pop stands So. They were both advocating people sign up for the Tulsa Rally and not not show and Honestly the fault lies with Brad Par Scout trump's former campaign manager and his campaign team for believing all those registrations and building a giant outdoor stage. Giant parking lot so that the millions of people who are going to be coming because they all registered would have somewhere to be, and then I loved. Well, I shouldn't say that that sounds partisan was interesting to see the one person with the baby stroller in that giant area and the rest of the arena half full or third full So I could see why he might be a little angry about that. Is there. No, Matt. And I'm not putting you in the position of speaking for the government I want to say that in fact, we should have said that. That Nazi for the. Federal government but you also having worked Akiko Google you understand how you know a little bit about how this stuff works the the there's not any proof that while way for instance, has ever done anything. Particularly Evil they've done some commercial espionage apparently, but nothing could particularly evil but there's the potential if they run the entire five G. Network that at some point, they could inject malicious software to the network or shut it down. Is What could Even even sounds stupid asking it. What could take time do? It's the forbidden APP. If you think about it if you don't have it on your phone, it could disappear at any time. No I think it's it's less about that although you do see companies like Amazon saying, Hey, on your work phone or work device please don't install. And they did it. Because they realize Oh we do business with these guys. Let's not this them off but wells Fargo did that I think the Department of Defense I don't know about you sds, but it's reasonable if you've got a company phone. Probably shouldn't have facebook or instagram on it either you right? Yeah. I keep my twitter and all that stuff very far away from work phone. It's my it's my personal account, but you know it's I can understand why people want to have just a a sense of okay. Let's be careful. Let's see what's going on and then You know just making sure that you can depend on the. Tools all the way down reflections on trusting trust. You can put things into a compiler, which then you can remove it from the source code and turns out that thing can stay in the compiler for years and years and years. So you know you don't WanNa be load bearing on any particular technology that you can't quite vouch for his guesses what people are thinking, what would be the legal? How could a president ban an APP in the United States I was thinking about this in the one thing the United States government is very effective at is We we we went after Isis in I sell at a very effective way instead of this Ip address to a recruitment site you can't access it. So my my guess would be the executive order would basically grafter the ISP's and say you can't go to this particular ISP but think about that I know of VPN products is sponsor show sponsored mind and to know how few seconds would take the average teenager together VPN account to just keep their tiktok going. Yesterday I downloaded the tiktok cap the first video that came up credit account 'cause I forgot my previous password was a if Tiktok it's banned. Here's how to get around it. You don't Vpn you can go into the settings, your phone, change your country of origin to Canada and then You're great. Exactly I mean it's not enforceable basically So I mean one thing Leo I think. Matt and I would probably agree that we do need to. I don't know if it's more oversight from the point of sale like on the APP store or Google play I I don't know if it's kind of an External Code audit policy for these kinds of APPs on their own by countries I. Think we agree we we need more oversight and we need to make sure all of these are not stealing data from people and just to get people very brief history lesson you know Edward Snowden had some very serious allegations about our own spying agencies using. Facebook to gather intelligence on people all around the world there's evidence for that. There's no hard evidence at this point the Tiktok is doing any of this. So if we're serious about doing this, the answer isn't to further balkanize the United States from the rest of the world the answers to form coalitions with other countries say look if you're going to operate here in, you know if you're gonNA have the software operating in our country here, the rule you have to follow you can't just arbitrarily download people's Phone books, there's going to be You know civil fights. That's clearly the way to go is got to be bigger than just tiktok. I'm just looking at Tick Tock on my iphone. It has access to my photos because I gave it access to my photo so I could put a profile picture on there. it gives me notifications I could turn that off. That's that's a push though that's not a poll. Background APP refresh means it can run in the background and cellular data doesn't ask for. location data doesn't ask for I mean facebook asks for ten times more. That's why I don't have it on my phone. I. mean the worst thing Tiktok does is waste millions of hours a productivity, and maybe that's a recent ban I don't know. But I, just I don't understand how it could be used. If it's not getting location permissions, how could it be used maliciously and I think it is getting location position. I know that I've know anecdotally at least from a couple of friends whenever they let's say go to Connecticut to visit family or something they will suddenly get Connecticut. Themed Tiktok content or something similar. Okay. that could just be from. Connection you can get that from the IP address so they could get a Geo location through IP address without asking APP without telling apple that they're doing that that would make sense. Okay. So they're getting them. Every cannon probably, I hate to say it probably does do that.

Facebook United States President Trump Tiktok Microsoft Iowa Tulsa Sarah Cooper Matt Executive Donald Trump Zena Phobia Paris Chuck Schumer Connecticut
Microsoft to 'move quickly' on TikTok deal following Trump talks

This Week in Tech

06:06 min | Last week

Microsoft to 'move quickly' on TikTok deal following Trump talks

"The last week Microsoft Been. Negotiating to buy the American rights to talk to kind of create a tick tick Tock America that would be separate from the Chinese bite. Dance. TIKTOK. But then the president says I'M GONNA ban it but I don't want anybody to buy it. So, micro-. Microsoft said. Threw their hands off and said figure it out and there. They didn't end the conversation with bite dance. Apparently, they were fairly close but they're not forwarding it until they find out what happens I'm GonNa make a prediction. Nothing is going to happen except now people are going to download and use TIKTOK. Brianna is tick tock a threat to national security. It's not a unique threat to national security. We need to have a conversation about the kinds of information social media APPS are able to download from our phones. We all remember the scandals of facebook on android downloading your tire phone list gang everyone you've ever called. We need to have a conversation about that, but there's there's really no evidence that what Tiktok is pulling is any greater than what you know facebook instagram these other social media sites are. Pulling so far. So we need a wider discussion about that. How's it just want to say I wish I could tell you this was just trump in the Republicans that would make me very happy. My heart broke today to see Chuck Schumer on the Sunday morning shows advocating the same thing tech talk. So you know it's it is we need to have a conversation about national security and the amount of information were giving up but it's I think. To just focus on TIKTOK. Sign of. Phobia. Or Zena Phobia Paris, you seem like a Tiktok user. I that's only because you're younger than. I. Did recently re downloaded when this whole. Wanted to make sure that I had it. I'm sure is a common response. I agree with everything the Brown said in the sense that I don't know I've been particularly disturbed by. The reactions to take talks, data collection both from the left and right and just. Experts in the tech field generally over the past couple of months because it is definitely coming from a place of seeing phobia. I mean, we have so many different. American. Made APPS that. Do many of the same things I mean one thing that I've seen noted quite often as to talk has the ability to see what you've. You know copied near Clipboard when guests so do most of the apps you have on your phone. Is Operatives. It's not a tiktok specific problem. This came up because of Iowa's fourteen, which is in public Beta now so people are suddenly using it and dozens of applications. I. Think must be a library that they all subscribe to infect somebody a couple of weeks ago. Somebody told me that it was. Ad Library I use of what a clearly noninvasive program from panic software Call Code editor, which lets me log into my Server. with SSh and and edit files and things like that and it was. I got the same thing that you get on Iowa's fourteen O, coders looking clipboard every time I typed to character. Now I don't think coded only panic software famous for an FTP program and this H. Program is at spying on me obviously, they're not. they're using the same code library. So it's a, it's a, it's a bug. That's what Lincoln Microsoft's linked in said as well. So. I think it's also just one of those things where if you're building an APP especially in. The Tom I. Don't know there was a time when absence of for being built were there wasn't this conversation about security and privacy. Why would map designers not take the position of? Yeah. All the things maybe we'll need that information talk said quite credibly. We're just looking to see if you put a url on your clipboard so we can pasted in. That seems credible I. Don't know if you need to do it every single time I type of character that seems like more that book I can tell you firsthand from developing an Iowa it's often easiest just to get it submitted to the APP store to take a bunch of permissions and It's just it's like you're trying to debugging in. Store, to accept it is just quirky. I can't tell you how many times I in other APP developers have. Just it's a very, very quirky system. So I, think this is just in Beta. I think it's really important to point out as far as the impetus for this I personally do not think it's a coincidence that tiktok was widely credited for disrupting trump's Tulsa rally a couple of weeks ago and Sarah Cooper is so famous for she's making five star she's she's amazing and those videos are brutal to trump and I I don't. That's a coincidence. She does trump limps licks lip sync. And I was talking to a friend said you know is the trump on TV I can't understand what he's saying but then I watched Cooper and that makes sense Sarah ads expressions and Gestures and all kinds of makes sense all of us and so I don't think the president should be so quick to to not like Sarah purchase he's adding context Might have something to do with it certainly in his mind because we know. You know. I don't know what he's going to do to Cape Pop stands because they were the other the other group that apparently figured out that you could register took on trump's team has got to be wise enough to know you can't take on the capons stands. Being. The capon stands the United States would crumble. Yes. That would be it would be over

Tiktok Iowa Microsoft Sarah Cooper Donald Trump President Trump Zena Phobia Paris Facebook Chuck Schumer United States Brianna Cape Pop Lincoln Microsoft Brown
Working, Making, Creating in Public and Private

a16z

05:19 min | Last week

Working, Making, Creating in Public and Private

"Hi Everyone. Welcome to the. podcast I'M SUNOL and I'm super excited to do one of our special book launch episodes for the new book coming out just this week working in public the making and maintenance of open source software by Nadia Ball and published by Stripe Press. The topic actually applies to all kinds of communities and groups coming together whether it's an open source project, our initiative of Department in a company, a club or a special interest group even group of friends and family because it's all about how people come. Together to coordinate and collaborate around some shared interest or activity whether participatory or not whether code or content, and so one theme. We also pull the threads on in this episode is about how the learnings of open source communities do and don't apply to the passion economy and create our communities as well. Nadia has long been immersed in studying the health of communities including getting funding from the Ford Foundation to study open source then worked at hub in developer experience then did research at protocol labs. And is now focused on writer experience at sub stack for longtime listeners of the six and Z podcast I've actually had her on the show years ago along with Michael Rogers our protocol labs than of the No jazz foundation where we talked about the changing culture of open source, you can find that episode on our site, but in this wide ranging hallway style episode Nadia, and I cover everything from types of communities, social networks, and the evolution of being online and ironically while the book is. Called working in public we also talk about the emergence of private spaces as well as the tragedy of Big Public Commons and how to counter the tragedy of comments which is why I believe everyone should read this book because it's a dirt of literature out there for the era of President Online collaboration creation and consumption that we're in we end with some practical advice for community managers, platforms and leaders, but we begin by defining open source in this context with a really useful taxonomy for categorizing communities. Earlier early was like I really hate this term and I just wish we gotta have something else like public software whatever. Love that I love it too. Unfortunately, it's pretty hard to change terms that everyone. On so I know this firsthand. Yeah. I mean I personally find the term kind of intimidating and it doesn't sound exciting when I say the term open source but it really does just referred to the distribution side of cook the existence of open source licenses made it very easy for anyone to use and modify and re Polish someone else's coat and put it in their own software but it doesn't really say a whole lot about how it was actually produced and so I made this analogy in the book, which is actually an analogy I borrowed from a friend Devon Devon Zuko, she still apple podcast for me I. Love Her yes, and says something like the term open source doesn't mean anything anymore than the term company does it's like, yes, we kind of get what a company is but there are so many different kinds of business models for different types companies with open source saying something as open source tells you a little bit about how the code might be used. That doesn't really say anything about how they're actually being made someone has to continue taking care of it. One of my favorite parts of the book is you actually outline different types of communities you call it classifying project types, but it's really to me how people are. Essentially social networks. Really. So why don't you break down that taxonomy and by the way the reason I'm asking is because when I think of the ARC in history of open source, the concept that comes to mind for everybody is that classic book by Eric Raymond, which is a cathedral and the bazaar and I think that framing has two long framed our discussion of open source and frankly any online community yet everyone sort of has maybe like General Santa W-what community is like others a bunch of members and their and organized around some common interests or reason for spending time together. In that highest level definition of community, there's an underlying assumption that all members are sort of similar than just the term members washes over the underlying dynamics between those different numbers and so what I started doing was saying, okay. There is a difference between at minimum, an open source people who are contributing to open source and people who are using stars. So I try to sort of separate out users and contributors and say, okay in some open source projects or as you said, really communities and general, some communities have high trigger and some communities have high user growth and then there's sort of like. Different permutations of that it's like federations, clubs, stadiums, and I forgot the fourth but toys in me what are so I think it's really useful to start with your taxonomy, a federations and onward. So federations are like the really big projects we might be thinking of like Lennox or. Where you have a lot of people who are contributing to the project and you have a lot of people that are using their project. But there are enough people that are working on the creation of that project that it does form his own sort of contributor community. By contrast, clubs have a lot of people who are participating in Chretien but they don't have as many people that are using it and said a product that's kind of focused on a niche interest. The example to give his Astro Pie, which is a Python Library for astrophysicists right? It's high contributor incredibly interested in that but very low user growth because how many people in the world are really interested in That intersection exactly and toys I sort of mentioned in passing in their police. Interesting thing to talk about that's where you have both low user and Lok contributor growth. So that might just be like a personal project them thinking around no one else is really looking at it. They're sort of waiting in the wings before they become one of the other types of communities

Nadia Ball Devon Devon Zuko Stripe Press Ford Foundation President Trump Eric Raymond Apple No Jazz Foundation Writer ARC Developer Chretien Lennox Michael Rogers
Roblox Rocketship

The Business of Esports

03:17 min | Last week

Roblox Rocketship

"And this is an article from tech crunch roablocks jumps to over one hundred and fifty million monthly users will pay out two hundred and fifty million to developers in twenty twenty. the article goes on to say the gaming platform roadblocks, which has seen a surge of us the coronavirus pandemic. now has more than one hundred and fifty million monthly active up from one hundred, fifteen, million, it announced in February. So from February. Two today just white like four months. a pretty substantial increase in users and. A an almost doubling of a more than doubling of what developers earned on the platform from last year last hundred, ten, this year two, hundred, fifty, million. So massive. Growth William. Roadblocks is not aimed at you or me. I don't think either of us have ever. I don't know I think I have played beat one mind for your South Hall Oh I. Don't know are you on rocks all the time? Twenty four seven I I if I know. To be. To be very fair roadblocks is a game that is I. I have some existential frustration about raw blocks right I feel like it's a game where creativity outweighs execution, which I think for some people is perfect and I think for other people like me at Arc's a little bit. But like you, you can't deny these numbers and I think for the longest time I slept on box right I'll be the first to say like I was I viewed them as the knockoff is the minecraft knockoff young honestly you know like I I think. That's fair of you to have done to. Well don't give me too much credit arguably for a while that was true. But what you really see here is two very unique things very unique things. One is you see rob blocks really emerging as a tier one gaming business like this. You just can't argue with these numbers, right? Like this is this is you might not like carrying the words. Fortnight. League of legends, raw blocks in the same sentence, but I'm going to start to feel comfortable putting those things in the same sentence because they're just games with massive user bases and massively entrenched gaming community such one thing you take away from this. From this, interestingly, enough if I'm fortnight I think this is my biggest competitor I. Truly do I truly do because if you look at what four-night maybe is trying to be a sort of more than game, a social hub something around in network right? We talked about this another like I would argue rob locks might be a little further down that line right there. Already have this whole creativity sharing shopping interface different that I think is is maybe closer to the sort of ideas and interactivity marketplace that that Ford would like to be a and I'd also say they have a younger user, which is a big advantage in these demo walk ends, Right With these networks youngest user platform wins so. I'm not saying it's lights out for at all guys are GonNa do very well but like it's weird to me because this new cement cemented something I felt for a while, which is fortnight's biggest competitor is rob locks and that's a weird sense but I really

Ford
Episode 86, Older iPads: Love it or Leave it in Fall 2020

Mac Minutes

08:08 min | 2 weeks ago

Episode 86, Older iPads: Love it or Leave it in Fall 2020

"Welcome to the Matt Minutes Episode Eighty Six for Sunday July twenty sixth. Older ipads love it or leave it in fall twenty twenty. This is the MAC minutes podcast with John Scudder where you will hear about the world of Apple, and how technology can help you work smarter personally and professionally. We will give you the news. You can use in minutes. Not Hours. That's why this is. The MAC minutes podcast. This episode is being recorded in Anchorage Alaska. Let's go to the show. In this episode we will begin to help you prepare for the launching of new hardware. Starting in September. Specifically will be looking at ipads, especially for those of you. Who owned two thousand eleven, IPAD, second, second-generation, two, thousand, twelve, IPAD, third or fourth generation or two thousand twelve IPAD mini first generation. If you own an older ipad model, some are now becoming too old to underpowered and completely incompatible with any of the current and future versions of I O. S. and IPAD WES. In addition, these ipad models many which are eight and nine years old will be fully and completely obsolete by the end of twenty twenty. And you will have no older version APPS available for them any longer. So, you might want to consider upgrading when apple makes new hardware announcements this fall. To help illustrate this further. There's a chart at. That B. L., U. B. R. Y. Dot Net showing the twenty one models of ipads released in information about screen size, release, year, discontinuation, date, and the most advanced operating system. They can run now. This is a great chart to illustrate the purpose of this episode. For those of you, who own on older IPAD, there are options, but it is time to say goodbye for a new refurbished or a much newer ipad. This doesn't mean you need to buy the latest IPAD model. Apple will debut this fall. There are options we will discuss. As a minimum, you'll need to purchase it. Knipe pad that can run the latest and greatest versions of operating system as well as the most current APPS available. You can do so from apple or a discounted refurbished ipad from apple's refurbished in clearance section. This website link can be found at the bottom of the page or at https. Colon slash slash. WWW DOT apple dot com slash shop slash refurbished, slash IPAD. Another option is from an apple, authorized third party, retail, or online reseller, or other trusted sources for new or used apple products I predominantly gone with apple refurbished, because refurbished has different definitions depending on the retailer. Furthermore Apple Care is available to purchase giving you reassurance of a sound product. If. You decide to purchase an IPAD and must purchase used ipad models do not look at anything older than two thousand fourteen IPAD air, two or two thousand fifteen ipad mini four. Both of these models are the oldest ipad models that the up incoming ipad Os fourteen will support this fall when the version is released for those of you who look at third party retailers, you must ask a whole lot more questions of the. Device seller specifically more photos and images, if you can't see the device in person, and above all ask for visual proof that such an APP head has been properly set to the factory settings and needs to be shown proof of the IRS devices startup screen, showing the animation moving multi-language. Hello welcome to ipad screen. This is a necessity. If the Iowa device seller is unwilling to do all of this. Pass on the. Device and look at other used. Iowa's device sellers elsewhere. Are Unscrupulous people who will try and sell stolen devices which cannot be unlocked. These devices are unusable, even with possibly trying apple support, which normally requires a court order, ensuring these steps are done are very important. Getting back to the question of why and upgrade is in order. Let's delve deeper into a explanation. I the amount of older compatible available APPs for these older ipad models has been severely significantly dwindling down since the beginning of twenty, twenty. Getting older versions of APPs for these older ipad models initially from Apple's. APP store is getting very difficult and problematic. As of the beginning of two thousand and nineteen many third party, APP developers are all more quickly and completely permanently dropping older APP support for all eight nine and ten year old IOS devices that are running two and three year old earlier IOS versions specifically Iowa's ten and earlier. Third Party APP developers removing all their older legacy versions of their APPs from Apple's APP. Store servers. Third Party APP. Developers no longer want to support these eight and nine year old or older. Devices there's simply no financial incentive for them to do so. Older versions of APPS are soon going to be gone for good. Apple considers these ipads. Vintage models, indicating these old IPADS have reached their complete end of life and support cycles. So these old IPADS that can no longer be upgraded or updated lab, no more applications for initial download at all from the apple store. Thus making these older ipads unusable from a practical sense. If you own one of these eight or nine year old IPADS, they will be pretty much obsolete by the end of twenty twenty, so looking soon with the fall launch for a new or slightly used ipad is in order. I understand what the current economic climate covert nineteen pandemic purchasing a new IPAD is not possible for everyone. If this is the case, many people will be upgrading and looking to sell or donate their devices at a greatly reduced price. If MAC minutes can help you with your tech. Please get a hold of me at the MAC. Minutes website where I can answer them in a future episode. Again that webpage is located online at Mac. Minutes dot be l., U. B. R. R. Y. Dot Net? Other places are twitter at minutes, underscore MAC and facebook at MAC minutes. So that's all we have for MAC minutes. I urge you to join the minutes podcast group on facebook where I post articles from the top tech journalists, people can discuss topics post. Articles joined special events and other great tech happenings. For the MAC minutes listeners. I hope all of you and your loved ones are well and look forward to seeing you next week for our next podcast. We are planning on doing a tips and tricks podcast, barring any new announcements from Apple. Thank you again for listening to MAC minutes. It's available on Apple podcasts, spotify iheartradio cashbox, Caesar and many other of your favorite podcasts yours take care of yourself during the upcoming week and we will talk to you soon on the MAC minutes podcast.

Apple MAC Iowa Twenty Twenty Facebook Anchorage Alaska John Scudder Twitter IRS O. S. B. L.
"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

05:12 min | 10 months ago

"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"A couple of episodes ago did an episode talking about how to be a terrible manager. Of course this was done satirically we don't want you to go and become a terrible manager if you're a developer there are similar That's what we're talking about in today's episode my name is Jonathan Cottrell and you're listening to develop tea and my goal in the show is driven developers like you find clarity perspire active and purpose in your careers and so we're GonNa talk about what it means to be a bad developer and notice that I'm I'm not saying what it takes to get fired as a developer instead I wanNA focus on the kinds of actions that you might be able to take and still sustain your career still hold job still continue being a developer just not a good one and ultimately this will stifle your career it'll stifle your growth and much of what you want to do you may never get a chance to you so gonNA share a list of things that would really help you become a terrible developer what's the most critical thing you can do to become a terrible developer is to always stay distracted and this distraction can come from anywhere really probably from your email at least because that's the most common distraction that we all have and so can easily let that one slide by but eventually you will get through those emails and there's GonNa be some lull in those emails hitting your inbox the other ways that you might stay distracted as a developer is in endless conversations about your tooling if you you have strong opinions or even if you have weak opinions if you continuously discuss those opinions with other developers and for come to any common ground that will act as a strong distracter for you in your career let's say that you don't yet have opinion and you work with other people who do or maybe you don't have a job as a developer at aw and you want to start out your career totally distracted well encourage you if you WANNA be entirely distracted at the beginning to try to learn as many languages as possible and what this will do is it will constantly keep you in that hello world state you'll never really learn anything majorly different between the languages right learn some semantic differences of a very small subset of the languages but you're never going to learn anything meaningful or practically productive by switching between them all the time so now you have a strong sense of distraction in your day to day work to kind of add a cherry on top make sure that your notifications on your phone are all turned on their all enable in that all of your social accounts are enabled as well so that you are getting those notifications at all hours of the day once you have this major amount of distraction with time that you have left in your day there's a handful of other things you can do to make sure that you become I'm a terrible developer we're GONNA list a couple of these Before we go to our sponsor break I make sure you attend all of the meetings on your account under even the ones that are optional be certain to be present but don't pay attention try to do work during these meetings and try to split your focus between them remember distraction is kind of the critical factor in becoming a terrible developer. and so if you attend the meetings the external perception is that you are engaged but actually because your mind is split between two things you're not really giving either one the attention that it deserves of course as a terrible developer you shouldn't ever tell your team what you're working on you shouldn't share that information with them and you certainly shouldn't know what they are working on so if you can to announce during your daily Standup or work on something entirely different from what you say is priority maybe even something that isn't even a kind of agreed on by the team as important enough to work on on now when you're kind of a rogue developer and of rogue developer is one of the characteristics of a terrible developer we're gonNA take a quick break and then we're gonNA come back and talk about Out some other things that might help you become a terrible developer but first let's talk about today sponsor.

developer Jonathan
"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"For sponsoring today's episode of developer t. So you're setting your goals, you're going through your resolutions. Whatever your particular way of you know, kind of doing a reboot for the new year. Most people have some kind of process that they follow. And by the way, if you are if you're listening to this, and you kind of don't believe that, you know, the new year should be such a big deal. There is some support that our brains. Do see the beginning of something as a good time to do this kind of thing. It's not just a, you know a way to sell gym memberships, this is actually there's there's some good evidence to show that we have we really do benefit from this kind of clean slate. Clean slate kind of thinking so encourage you to take advantage of this stuff and don't just, you know, push against it because it's the popular thing to do. But instead to find. Some value in it. Okay. So if you're doing whatever ritual it is that you perform to try to figure out what is it that I want out of this year? What is it that I want out of my life? These there's plenty of topics undeveloped not in the past where we talked about finding those things. But in today's episode of specifically wanna focus on how setting those those goals and figuring out how you measure them can be absolutely critical to your success. Here's the reality. If you measure the wrong thing if you choose the wrong metric. If you are for example, let's say that you decide that your health. Is going to be measured by strictly your weight your body weight? You're going to measure your health strictly by your body weight. And perhaps you're going to measure your physical.

developer
"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"The. What are you doing today to improve? The easing answer for developers often something along the lines of learning language or reading a book about programming or maybe building something. These are all very good. In fact, there essential parts of the learning process as developer. You might even include listening to this podcast in your list of things that you do to improve your career, and I would be honoured if this pike cast made that list, but if we only focus on our practical skills, if all we do is learn a new technique for building software. If all we're doing is adding to our toolbox, and we don't think about the wide range of tools that we may actually need and instead of adding to our. Toolbox for actually just adding a bunch of the same type of tool we may end up in a scenario where career seems to be somewhat limited. Our ability to move laterally in our career from one company to another or her ability to connect with the people that we work with connect to as the show is so often reminding you are career purpose. The truth is the work that we need to be doing is not just about our practical skills. It's also not just about our relationships are networking these things once again are very important. But there's another piece to this puzzle. Then perhaps it's the primary piece at least it's the kind of the foundational piece, and that is our working on ourselves are working on the. The way that we see the world the way that we perceive our jobs. You're listening to develop a t my name is Jonathan Cottrell. And in today's episode. I'm announcing something we've already kind of soft announced before the new year began. But today, we're officially announcing that the tea break challenge is live. It's.

developer Jonathan Cottrell
"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"That's developer t two zero one eight that will give you that twenty dollars worth of credit. There's so many other things that linen provides as part of their service. We're not going to get through them all in today's episode, but owed is a continued sponsor of. Developer t thank you again to Leonard for sponsoring today's episode. So we're talking about kind of the etymology of a software project. All of these things. We probably have some bad and some very good memories that are being vote by talking about his various types of problems that we face in software. Some of these things can make us feel proud. Some of them can make us feel a sense of shame and perhaps the most important feeling for us to pay attention to his fear. Fear is important because fear is often an indicator. The feeling of fear is an indicator of some level of uncertainty. The unknown. This is often causes fear as software developers begin to work on a new project, the fear of the unknown. Specifically the fear of the unknown as it relates to changes things that I might interact with things that I might do. If you give me a task, however you are managing those tasks doesn't really matter. But if you have a task and I take this, this on as a software developer go into this project that has all of these eighty sink receives that we've already discussed in the earlier part of this episode. Then it's very possible if not likely that I'm going to have some level of intrepid nation. I'm going to be uncertain about the changes that I'm getting ready to make. And so understanding that software comes about as the result of human processes that should prompt us to create systems that support that human side of sulphur development. So what is what was it mean to support this? Well, first of all, we have to recognize what of those human traits can cause software to be dangerous. Right? And again, we said on previous episodes of the show, I'm gonna say it again on this episode if you follow the fear. In other words, if you pay attention to what developers are afraid of, you'll often uncover places where your software needs to be refracted needs to be changed or rethought in some way that software is causing a level of uncertainty as some uncertainty is is absolutely attributable to a lack of experience for a given developer in this needs to be kind of brought out as well, but very often, uncertainty and fear come as a result of a developer feeling like. There's something that they should know, but they don't. And perhaps that thing that they should know is not necessarily rudimentary programming knowledge, but instead it some kind of knowledge that's embedded in this project, something in that life cycle that atom apology, something human, some decision that was made along the way or some colloquial language that was adopted along the way. Some vocabulary that is not obvious. Maybe some level of indirection is confusing or maybe even unnecessary. And so as new developers come onto projects, this is a critical point to understand the fear, the uncertainty that those developers have because this is going to point you in the direction of places where your code has the artifacts and perhaps even an damaging way the artifacts..

developer software developer Leonard twenty dollars
"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"But as a beginner starts on this path, they don't have the scheme. A Bill tough. So younger developers, you're listening to the show. I encourage you to not be afraid of choosing different solutions. Of course, it's important to recognize that there is a lot of value to be learned from people who have experience, but remember that your benefit as young developer is that you are more apt to question. Why? Why are we choosing solution x over solution? Be. And when you ask these questions, you're slowing down your thought process in your creating your schema more intentionally rather than relying on your existing schema, your forging new schema. So if you are an experienced developer in order to kind of combat this issue where you may have blind spots, it's important that you do two things. One, listen to the questions and the concerns of learning developers. If you're an expert, then having the questions reposed to you that you haven't asked maybe in evening years, these these same questions allowing those questions to ask and considering the answer slowly intentionally slowing down and I would even recommend doing something like telling yourself out loud that I'm going to think about this thoroughly. I'm going to think slowly about this idea. This will allow you to challenge. Your schema and it's important that you keep this learning mindset not just because you know, maybe you're scheme is wrong. That's not really the point. The point is that blind spots can cause problems as you collaborate with other developers, especially if you're in a company where you have new people on boarding all the time. One of the reasons that new people often feel imposter syndrome as they come into a company regardless of their experience level is because other people in the company are fairly experienced with their way of doing things. And in fact, usually companies have a kind of way that the company does things. And so as you come in as a new developer for that company, it's easy to feel like an impostor. If you don't know why things are done the way that they are so experienced developers, if you are mentoring young developers, especially if those developers are working in a collaborative role with you and courage you to slow down. And allow those those developers ask why things are the way that they are and young developers to take advantage of this of this brand new field of new scheme that you're creating in.

developer
"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Again, it is your lotion for sponsoring today's episode of developer t. So we're talking about beliefs today and I want to. To kind of explain why believes her some important when we have beliefs that kind of act as these immovable guardrails in our decision making process. And when we have beliefs that we're building our habits from those habits, kind of add, even more structure to those beliefs you can think of that as kind of like pouring cement over your guard rails on really creating this immovable object. That's very difficult to dig up very difficult to move to change in any particular way. And as we get older and as our brains continue experience more things and we continue to travel down those roads with those particular guardrails, they become even more ingrained in. There's a good reason for this to happen. Of course, over the years, we use confirmation bias to help us even further establish the sense of safety that we get from the. Guardrails, no one wants to feel unsafe. This is true, not only for kind of our pride or mental pride of doing something that isn't smart, but it's also true at a fundamental human instinct level. We don't wanna feel unsafe. And so we justify a lot of our believes with reasoning. The problem is sometimes that reasoning is broken. Sometimes it's flawed or sometimes it's really kind of copying pasted from someone else's reasoning. We heard a story we saw we had a particular experience maybe and we base a given belief off of those experiences or from those stories. This is the idea of anecdotal evidence and very few times do we look at, for example, the frameworks that we choose to use or the languages that we choose to use or the particular way of running an organization very. Few times if we're the ones that are making the decision, it's very difficult to look at those what they true critical eye with the intent of checking those beliefs. Did I choose the right language instead we try to answer a different question internally. We try to answer the question. What are the good things about my choice? And even further, how can I make myself feel good about my choice? How can I feel safe? What are the reasons that I can feel safe about my choice? And as we said before, at the beginning of the episode, what we really need to be doing with our beliefs is giving ourselves of rain and understanding of how much we actually believe whatever that belief is. So I have a very simple exercise for you..

developer
"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"The. As a developer, you've probably encountered the discussion or the offer to pursue a remote engagement, some kind of work where you're not necessarily bound to a specific location. Most developers would otherwise be in an office, but then they choose to work remotely. And traditionally this is working from home, but more and more people are working in a nomadic state or working as they travel for example. And this isn't necessarily all that surprising. Most of the materials that we need to do our work, it's pretty much a laptop and a good internet connection. So it makes sense to do a little bit of studying about remote work, seeing as many of us in many of the people listening to the show, especially will end up with some kind of remote engagement as your primary means of income. My name's Jonathan Cottrell and you're listening to developer team. I go on the show as to help driven developers just like you connects to your career purpose and do better work. See you can have a positive influence on the people around you. The people who come in contact with you. It's not just the people who are using the stuff that. Make, it's the people that you surround yourself with. And one of the ways that you may have a positive impact is based on your location, the literal community that you are part of. So it's very possible that remote work is going to improve your community relationships, but that's not what we're focusing on today. Today's episode were focusing more on the problems or more specifically, the one major problem that many managers are concerned about, and that is, how do we communicate with remote workers? How can we -ffective -ly create the same type of productive environment when people are not around each other? When there's no water cooler for example, no, passing each other in the hall and sharing personal stories about what happened over the weekend. That doesn't really happen when you're. Workforce is remote. So we want to talk about some of this communication dynamics and maybe something a little bit more surprising about how to mirror a more natural communication pattern. We're gonna talk about that a little bit more and just a moment. I wanna share some news with you all. The first piece of news is that spec has just launched a jobs board for designers and developers. Go and check it out. It's at spec out of him slash jobs and quick shot up to Brian Levin for pulling that together. It's a super awesome job board. Of course. If you are winning to hire designers and developers, the spec community is full of talented into people go in post your job. You can post at the same place back him slash jobs of second piece of news is that developer t recently rolled over ten million listens. We have five hundred sixty six episodes. Now we're actually nearing Tim one million, but ten mil. Billion listens since we started this show and I can't tell you just how grateful I am for you all the listeners, the audience of the show I want to connect more and more with you and the future is exciting, very thankful that you have stuck around this along, especially for those of you who who have subscribed over the years and you've listened diligently. No, there's three episodes of week that's a ton of content. And of course, we've had people listening some people even since the very beginning, some very grateful for that amount. Just that sheer number of people who have participated in making developer t happen. Thank you so much last piece of news. I wanted to remind you all about breaker upstream. This is a brand new partnership that developer team and breaker the pike, cast listening app breaker. You can find it in the app store..

developer Brian Levin Jonathan Cottrell Billion Tim
"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"The. For the first few minutes of today's episode, I want to talk about kind of where we been and layout a little bit of a vision for wherever headed the show isn't going to change very much, but I do want to identify the reality that developer t started as a developer focused pike cast. This is pike cast that we want to to give developers the most value. Now with that often looks like impact casting is really specific technical discussions in. We've had a few of those on this show, but more more I'm noticing that developers who listen to this show, they value the discussions that we have. There are a little bit more abstracted away from technology, taking those concepts and then turning around and applying them to your career as a developer, as well as your practice as developer, not. Only your coding practice, but also how you handle yourself in social interactions and professional interactions. So I wanna make sure that everybody understands as you're listening to the show developer TV is intentionally crafted for developers, but the topics that we talk about on the show in many of the principles that we uncover on the show, they extend well beyond the development practice. This show will continue to be focused on software developers into the future. We're going to continue talking about these abstract concepts. Sometimes we will have technical discussions from an abstract perspective, but you can consider this moment in developer tease history, kind of the open door moment. We're not restricting the people who listen to the show to only software developers because as turns out software development is becoming a more and more open field. The value of creating software is going far. Beyond, you know, web development or even application development and it's extending into every other sphere. So I want to make sure that the people who listen to the show that if you're not if your job title doesn't include software developer and even if you aren't necessarily targeting job where that is your title that you know that you're welcome here because the show is more about and principles than it is about any specific technology. And the truth is we've had all kinds of people listen to the show and reach out and say, thank you because the show has provided some kind of value well beyond the software development practice. So I appreciate you for listening to the show, but I also want to extend that welcome to anyone who's listening to this for the first time or maybe you're developer and you know somebody who can appreciate this show even though they aren't necessarily developer themselves, encourage you to share. To share, whatever you think is valuable with those people. Okay. Let's jump into the content for today's episode. If you haven't already guessed you are listening to developer, not my name's Jonathan Cottrell. And the goal of this show is to help driven developers connect to their career purpose and do better work so they can have a positive influence on the people around them. And you've already heard some of the ways that we do this. We talk about abstract ideas, talk about a lot about how the brain works about how we can work effectively as humans. So in today's episode, we're going to talk about a very important subject. Of course, it's to do with the way we think not just the way we think in general, not the way we process information, but the way we view ourselves and as a result, the way the issue others..

software developer developer Jonathan Cottrell
"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"The. Part of the point of developer t is to help you the driven developer connect to your career purpose in order to do that. Sometimes it takes a little bit of investigation on the show. We're going to talk a little bit more about purpose in this episode. Specifically, we're going to talk about how you can find purpose in a smaller way. My name is Jonathan Cottrell and you're listening to developer prety, and we've already talked about point of this show in the other point of the show is so you can do better work because it's very difficult to do truly good work. If you're not connected to why you're doing that good work, the most lasting motivation that you will find is caring about the work itself. Of course, there are other kinds of motivation, for example, a paycheck or working with people that you enjoy being around. But if you can't find motivation in the work that you do, then you'll probably find limit to those other motivating factors. But in today's episode, I wanna talk a little bit about the struggle of finding purpose in your work and maybe help you out a little bit at least four today. That really is what today's episode is about the work you're doing today. So it can be difficult to find purpose. There's a bunch of techniques exercises you can do to try to uncover your purpose, but people can go their entire lives and never really find it. It seems like an elusive treasure that you have to dig up or maybe something that doesn't exist at all. Maybe something that you're searching for that you'll never find because it's not there to find. I think the problem with all of these ways of describing purpose is the idea that somehow this purpose is a token something that you can seek, or you know something that you have to carve out of the matter that is your time. And unfortunately, this is very hard to do for most people finding that token, finding that buried treasure that hidden sudden epiphany. This is something that doesn't really happen to the degree. That they feel like it substantial there is not a kind of light shining through the clouds. It piffling moment for most people. Now that's not to say that you won't have moments where you have more clarity than others. For example, figuring out that you like working with interesting problems. The sounds very generic, but sometimes people don't care about how interesting problem as so even those kinds of insights to your own preferences. Your own desires can be helpful. Other fifties that you may have is the people that you want to work for. For example, the users, the clients, the kinds of people that you care about working for regardless of what you're doing for those people. All of these things can be composed into some semblance of a purpose, and it's easy to think that are the people have found there's in the same way that it's easy to think that other people find that one perfect path. In any other area of life that they choose the perfect school or the perfect significant other everything fell into place, just right. The reality is much more messy. So what can we do when we have to deal with this irreducible uncertainty, this kind of big block in the road that we can't walk through. And sometimes it seems like we can't raw walk around it. We might have to choose different road altogether..

developer Jonathan Cottrell
"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Your time investor energy into machines rather than incremental thinking all of your energy going into maintainable investments where you have a little bit of cost you how to have a little bit of risk but ultimately the upside is significantly worth it that's the way that i want you to think if you're listening to the show if you are driven developer i want you to start thinking rather than in terms of incremental value i wanted to think in terms of machines of generators of things that provide value that continues over time i like to think that developer tea falls in this category for the people who listen to the show because every episode of developer is available oil it's free and we continuously add to this catalog try to keep as much of this content as evergreen as possible and so what what this means is that people are constantly finding this content the constantly getting new value out of it this is a generator of value rather than just being a one time value where everybody can listen to the assode and then it goes away new people can come to the show and anytime and the same value that the regular listeners who have cut in out of the past episodes those new people can get at any point in the future i hope that you are excited by the idea of machine thinking i hope it clarifies to you ways where you may be wasting your time in ways that you.

developer
"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Over to spec dot of him slash lynyrd use the code developer t two thousand eighteen at checkout and you're going to get twenty dollars worth of credit you can use that twenty dollars on any of leno's hourly plans and services go and check it out spec dot fm slash linda think you'll get a leno for sponsoring today's episode of developer t i think again we have we're in this is more american problem may be then then it is a universal problem but increasingly so for for all kind of people in this industry at least the idea that problems are supposed to be solved quickly rather than solved thoughtfully can be really damaging in in the long term and so yeah i mean but at the same time you know you don't want to you don't want to strip away and so it's really about finding where the most valuable effort is rather than we're the most complex effort is necessarily and sometimes those things can become a little bit muddy but this is this conversation on complexities exactly where i was hoping this discussion with go but i do want to kind of pull back a little bit and ask you you know of all these experiences that you've had what really kind of as for you personally what parts of this have you connected to kind of a deeper level where you feel like hey you know what i'm really actually serving a important purpose for these people who are using air table for example in what has has there been any particular moment where you felt really strongly that that you were exactly where you were kind of quote supposed to be in that moment yes absolutely that's great question i i think i've always found products that have take something that was previously really complicated and only assessable to kind of a small class of specialists and really kind of lowered the usability bar enough that it can have opens up this whole new class of of creativity for you know kind of a whole new set of people so i guess like one example of that is going back.

leno developer twenty dollars
"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"You won't be able to definitively put a ranking between you and another person the only way you can really create that ranking system is on a single or on a group of metrics that only pale in comparison to the reality of the complexity that every person phases every day there live so recognizing when you are engaging in this kind of comparison especially when you start feeling uh you selfdoubt and when you start feeling a lack of self worth or when you start feeling like no one around you understands you and that's a year superior to everyone around you when you have these feelings remind yourself that things are more complex that everyone has their strengths and weaknesses that comparison is only a rough metric to help you survive you can thank your brain for trying to help you survive but then move down the road and remember that the best thing that you can do in any scenario when encountering any person is remind yourself of your own humility remind yourself of the things are grateful for remember the you have something to learn from every one thank you so much for listening to today's episode of developer tea and of this was a much more relational and kind of a neuroscience oriented episode but i believe that this subject is really important for developers who are going through this this struggle trying to figure out in a where they fit and trying to figure out if they're good enough to pursue this career and wanna tell you on a wouldn't be the first to tell you you have common ground with the best of the best you have common ground with the most capable developers they experience very similar things the you experience on a daytoday bay ace is your life is not so far removed from the people the you admire from the goals that you have remind yourself of this every day that everyone is human than we all have an opportunity to take advantage of those.

developer
"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"What does a text message have anything to do with how much money you save that's what we're talking about on today's show in kind of a roundabout way my name is jonathan control you're listening to develop a t my go on the show is to help you become a better developer we're not going to go through all of the details of what that means in today's episode because i'm really excited to get into the content for today this is an extension of the previous episode of developer t we talked about practical practical advice for changing your habits changing your behavior and we're going to continue that discussion today there's tons of research on how behavior change occurs and how we can encourage it both on larger scales with with a group of people or perhaps if you're a leader of a company and you have employees you may want to nudge your employees in one direction or the other that that is the large your scale of behavioral change but also in ourselves uh our own behaviour change how can we do the things that as we said on the last episode in our slow thinking and our intentional and deliberate a goal setting thinking how can we accomplish those things even if those things are relatively straightforward like for example taking your vitamins every day rate and this is a very common an example taking your vitamins are drinking enough water every day is a very simple habits and yet we often fail to accomplish these habits and this is true in our software projects to i it doesn't really take that long to write a speck and we know that it's going to cover us is going to help us significantly and we also know there's plenty of research that says it doesn't really slowest down in the long run if you if you play out the course of an average software project writing tests very often doesn't slowest down most of the time a dozen so why don't we take the time that just as a general rule why don't we take the time to write those tests i know ha i have had issues with this in the past and changing that behavior.

developer
"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Let me say that again this kind of like a aside bonus piece here i'm going to optimize my energy and focus rather than my time essentially what that means is i want to put my energy and my focus on the right things at the right time my motivation isn't to try to regain extra minutes in every single crack that i possibly can but rather to put my energy and focus on the right things at the right time all right so moving onto number two of the three things that you should stop doing is a developer number two going with your first got four estimation going with your first got for us mason this is a totally different subjects then staying up late read this is more about your working processes we've talked about us summation in the past before it we've talked about estimating sandwiches i recommend hueco and listen to that episode that when really can change the way that i think about estimation fundamentally but here's the reality your gut believes the you are better than you are and this isn't a bad thing your guy is not you know it is not prideful rain it's not a problem of humility but rather it's a problem of perspective and the ability to forecast your guy is not a good forecaster and here's what ends up happening unexpected things occur right even in the average case are even in the most predictable work style the most predictable work environment with the most predictable work tasks i'm predictable things can happen.

forecaster developer
"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"It will get that twenty dollars worth of credit thank you again to leonard for continuing to sponsor developer tea and helping developers everywhere have access to excellent when xboxes for less thank you again to leonard so we're talking about things that you shouldn't do in today's first episode of a three by three week on this whole week we're going to be doing these three point takeaways today's episode is three things you should stop doing is developer number one staying up late staying up late at first they my career i thought i was doing a good thing by staying up late i felt creative i feel energized it felt like i could get a lot done and i felt like burning the midnight oil that was something that was kind of it followed the lord of being a developer it was part of being a developer in a lot of ways culturally speaking people know delivers as the guys who stay up late and drink energy drinks and eat pizza and hack things out fix problems build staff build side projects and all of that was attractive to me on top of that i have a natural tendency to want to stay up a little bit later rather than wake up early and as it turns out this doesn't really work out and for a few reasons one most businesses actually run uh a normal business hours rain so even if your company is progressive and you work remotely in you work a synchronous lee and you get to choose your hours most other businesses run from nine to five.

developer leonard twenty dollars three week
"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"What differentiates you as a developer so many of the problems that we saw with code are not necessarily complicated and so much of what we do is an about managing the code itself but it's about managing ourselves it's about managing the creator of the code ends setting us up sending your own teams up setting up yourself your patterns for success setting you up to deal with people who need that code set you up to understand the people who need that code the users the clients the people you work with these are all so much more of what you will spend your energy on throughout your career as a developer this is not to downplay the importance of code this is not to downplay the importance of technical understanding because truly to be a great developer you must not forget those pieces but for the majority of developers who are listening to this show your career will demand more from you impersonal interactions and more from you and understanding the psychology of helping other people and the psychology of productivity and the psychology of learning your careers going to damn demand more from you in those areas than it ever will demand from you technically of course this is heavily opinionated this is my own perspective on this subject there certainly jobs were this is not true and there are certainly parts and days of your career where this is untrue where truly eat the most value that you're providing is in the technical sphere but for the most part uh these interpersonal connections are going to be the difference maker for you you're listening to developer t my name is jonathan cottrell in my goal on the show is to help you become a better developer.

developer jonathan cottrell
"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"I hear and i forget i see and i remember i do and i understand although the origin of this quote is somewhat unknown the it's a chinese proverb but most of the sources citing that come from the 1960s the underlying concept of this quote is still very strong that's where we're going to be talking about in today's episode by name is jonathan cottrell you're listening to developer t michael on this show is to help you become a better developer you may be listening to this new not a software developer guy you don't right code i don't do maybe anything with computers although fewer and fewer people that category as the years where on in as technology continues to imbue our lives and even if you're a software developer you may not see yourself as a software developer the title of developer is very much so incomplete for most people who work in this job tons of people own businesses and also develop software tens of people who listen to the show are also designers who work with software perhaps you are indeed or writing code in your daytoday work enter code continues to become more and more important so as people start listening to this podcast in those varying categories i went to make sure that we're avoiding mislabelling developers i want to make sure that we're avoiding perpetuating a sense of fear of perpetuating a sense of impostor syndrome but talks about impostors syndrome in the past but part of the way that we do this is by not trying to get into extremely technical details in short podcast and that's one of the reasons why we focus on larger more applicable topics that span of basically your entire life you can listen to this episode and five years from now and hopefully it will still be applicable to what you do so we aren't afraid to talk about specific technology we are avoiding those conversations but a lot of the time the better value the you can get out of this podcast is going to be when we talk about things like what we're talking about today today's episode is focused on learning.

jonathan cottrell developer software developer five years