26 Burst results for "Developer Advocate"

DAPR With Cecil Phillip

The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

02:00 min | 4 months ago

DAPR With Cecil Phillip

"So yeah it's not been too long since we've had you on. Would you give our new listeners. A little bit of an introduction to you And then kind of catch us up with what you're working on these days sheriff shirt so Like y'all mentioned on a developer advocate microsoft's of been in this role for about three and a half years. Now it doesn't like three and a half years book you know time flies when you're having fun. Yeah born arisen antiga man. I lived in the caribbean. Until i was about nineteen years old and came to florida for school and college and stuff like that. And just kind been here ever since I've had the opportunity to work with a lotta great folks across a few different industries. I i used to work on healthcare at one point again as a software developer. I wasn't a doctor anything. So don't send many questions i did stock trading for a little bit i used to write like stocks ratings off for a little while I also worked for a company that the nyc. Hr is service for a little bit and that was pretty fun but i'll always being dot net right all dot net and web. Api's and distributed systems and that type of and so. I think if if one thing that i can see like throughout my career has always been about like creating distributed systems an interconnecting different services and in long before we had the term micro services quote unquote in long before. We'll get the next term next year. Whatever whatever next term will be It's it's always just been about. How can we find Clean an interesting way to like inter operate between differences. So i think if i take a look at what i'm doing now What i think is very different from what used to do before so before i used to work on products you know. I spent ten years working on products with other people's products. I don't work on products anymore. I can't say this with you. I don't have any standups or deadlines or we'll have deadlines but not looking up code. I have to check in for a certain day or anything like that

Caribbean Microsoft Florida NYC
Gathering Data for Zero Trust

Cloud Security Podcast by Google

04:39 min | 7 months ago

Gathering Data for Zero Trust

"Our guest today. Is max salt. Install a developer advocate here at google cloud. Max thank you so much for joining us today. We are stoked to have you on the podcast. And i think we will get right into it. So today's topic is trust or beyond corporal. Max what are these terms. What is zero trust what is beyond corp. So this goes back about twelve years or so when google had two fundamental reimagining of how we do security inside our company and the effort was called beyond corp because it was an effort to move beyond a corporate network. We had to go past the idea that you're either inside the corporate network and thus you can get access to the things and we presume that you are safe or you're outside and have no access at all like when you're working from home or from starbucks and we realized this was a problem for a host of different reasons as we started changing things more recently. Zero trust has become the meam the term and these efforts. And it really just means. I don't implicitly. Trust my network. And i'm a big fan of beyond corp a big fan of zero trust. I do think they both get thrown around broadly and can be very confusing when people often will say them but mean different things so it's great to define our terms here and dig into it a little bit so this is really the move away from enterprises being a crunchy exterior with soft. Julian said yes. No more eminem's more eggs is about abandoning perimeter security. It's about contextual access. It's about testing each and every time. Somebody tries to get to a resource whether that's a website. A database of the vm. And checking do. I actually trust max enough to let him in right now. I think the broad definition is something risk because frankly experience i've encountered people who say trust means you can trust anything and frankly this is false because you obviously need to trust the cia system itself you have to trust identity to trust endpoint data. So let's go have a discussion. About what else must be used announcement to trust it for zero trisystem to build a chain of trust completely and with beyond corp in the way we've decided to implement zero trusted google. You do have to start somewhere so often. That means you're starting with a trust in some of the information you have about your people because you've assembled it yourself having hired them and some information that you have about their computers which are getting from agents a frequent challenge. I get there is. What if the agent gets compromised. Then what do i trust. You don't wanna place all your trust in just one agent or one data source but what we do is gathering information about the devices that employees are using and we have information already about the employees. Right i know max. He's in new york. He works in engineering. And so that gives me a way to design a system that can grant or deny access based on that data. And i trust that data because i know where it came from. I know how i got it. And i have other data sources to corroborate it so that useful to talk about the root of trust in a system like this. What's the real root of trust. What must be trusted. Otherwise the whole thing collapses. I mean you trust it. I'm not an alien and human form feeding information to my overlords sin orbit the moon. But you have to trust some level of egypt based data about your devices right. I'm not in everybody's house right now as we work from home checking on their computer and a half to trust something that i'm getting back where the vets from crumbs verification whether it's from crowd strike or whatever it is i need that device identity and device meta data and i have to trust my. Hr system right hover tracking all these people and the groupings. Tim says he's in product management Really trust that that's true. I mean i could go check but if someone had access to the way we track. Employees had that had been compromised. that's definitely going to derail miser. Trust system for sure this was substantially line identities being accurate and correct so that means probably multi factor indications neither the actual identity should be attached to the right people and peoples would be grouped in the right way to me. This is probably the second big part of what i would call. Route of trust. Trust is identity not just device date exactly and the reason. I don't just trust tim to say who he is is that he's also antiquated with a strong second factor. So that it's very hard for someone to spoof or fish or otherwise impersonate his identity. And that's an important part of the whole chain of trust in the way beyond corp. Zero trust implementations should work.

Corp Max Salt Google MAX Starbucks Eminem Julian CIA New York Egypt TIM
"developer advocate" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

01:39 min | 7 months ago

"developer advocate" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"Yeah so if you have multiples of groups in a population right and you want to have. There's multiple ways to value system if you are using automated metric to train your system. Your system is going to do. The thing that gets at the best results made metric. Talk assuming you set everything else. Up well And if you have one metric that covers a diverse population that has multiple sub populations in end one of those populations is the majority of your your inputs and this is not be over anything. You're going to end up with a model that prioritizes what works well for that majority group. Because that's what make the number go up or down if it's you know error and that's really hard to pick apart and not built into any model unless you understand the population. You're working with understand the subgroups and are you know you have a way to Identify a rate by group and analysis. Analysis is your data in a more In a way that's accountable for the underlying data distribution It's harder and it is very possible if you have a single model as opposed to say a model that is broken down by. Let's say dialect region by increasing performance for some groups you decrease performance for the majority

first author one chicago african american stanford today both one of the authors american couple of dogs english southern
Rachael Tatman PhD Linguist and Rasa Senior Developer Advocate - Voicebot Podcast Ep 194 - burst 07

The Voicebot Podcast

01:39 min | 7 months ago

Rachael Tatman PhD Linguist and Rasa Senior Developer Advocate - Voicebot Podcast Ep 194 - burst 07

"Yeah so if you have multiples of groups in a population right and you want to have. There's multiple ways to value system if you are using automated metric to train your system. Your system is going to do. The thing that gets at the best results made metric. Talk assuming you set everything else. Up well And if you have one metric that covers a diverse population that has multiple sub populations in end one of those populations is the majority of your your inputs and this is not be over anything. You're going to end up with a model that prioritizes what works well for that majority group. Because that's what make the number go up or down if it's you know error and that's really hard to pick apart and not built into any model unless you understand the population. You're working with understand the subgroups and are you know you have a way to Identify a rate by group and analysis. Analysis is your data in a more In a way that's accountable for the underlying data distribution It's harder and it is very possible if you have a single model as opposed to say a model that is broken down by. Let's say dialect region by increasing performance for some groups you decrease performance for the majority

First Author ONE Chicago African American Stanford Today Both One Of The Authors American Couple Of Dogs English Southern
"developer advocate" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

04:31 min | 7 months ago

"developer advocate" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"Rachel tavern. Welcome to the voice about podcast. Thank you grabbing me. Well i'm very excited to have you on this. I feel like this is long overdue. So i've been running this podcast. It's two thousand seventeen not long after you. And i met at a conference off of union square san francisco. I cannot remember the name of the conference or the hotel. The park central hotel But you'd made a really interesting presentation there. I wish i still remember parts of it today. So that's four years later. So what about about four years. Bow for years. This this This week even maybe this month certainly And then we had a chance to catch up For a quick lunch and talk about some things. I found it very insightful. so lo and behold you wind up raza. You're sort of in the industry. It's just like a perfect timing but let me let me let you tell your story a little bit. So why don't we start there for the audience. Who might not be familiar with you. Why don't we start with. Why don't we start with your background a little bit. And i think probably the academic background is a start unless you want to start before that so i think it's a reasonable place to to start so i am a phd in linguistics for my for my crimes And i got into linguistics physically. Because i actually going back and reading like Application materials grad school while ago and They were specifically about how i wanted to help. People build language technology. That really worked for everybody in helped make the world. A better place idealist. I can. I had like a lot of ideas. About how hollywood technology would make the road better so which i still think i still hold another one. And at that point i was really into speech and speech perception production from a human standpoint. So how humans perceive speech how to humans understand things And i realized that. I was working on this sort of designed experiments with an eye towards informing automatic speech recognition systems that people who are working on an automatic speech recognition natural language processing automatic speech recognition. We're not going to conferences. And we're not really reading the papers. Don't resident to shift more and more and more into natural. Language processing into more computational approaches In my dissertation i had a big be role experimental component big valuation component. And then also. I built up machine. Learning model that tried to emulate some of the things that humans did and specifically these were all around The ways that you use social information in speech production sorry in speech perception understanding each the you here and as part of that debate evaluation of a bunch of sr systems and this was in two thousand sixteen so awhile ago Looking at the ways that they were able to handle linguistic variation like a regional dialects. Or on i looked at african english I looked at gender and how that affected performance and it turned out the performance was best. You know white people who spoke very standardized prestige dialect not so much people who had a variety of language associated war with regional identity in metric. Finish my phd. Starting my data science wasn't a field. Who could do the entity. It was so i went to haggle which is owned by google So we all may be familiar with it. it's a There's a competition component Where people compete to do supervised machine learning problems and whoever does best wins. And there's also a Posted coating environment that they have and data hosting and was working more on that sort of infrastructure side of things. And then i was talking about this. A little bitter You know it's a little bit by this startup. Bills open source framework for building conversational. Ai conversational assistance rosza. And that's where i am now so i am Moved back to more of the inoki space more humour language students of like dita science more generally. I'm that's been my path to hear

Rachel rachel Today four years later rachel tavern Google this month two today union square san francisco iphone ford park central hotel amazon rossa twenty four th One This week two thousand seventeen two thousand sixteen alexis
Interview With Rachael Tatman PhD Linguist And Rasa Senior Developer Advocate

The Voicebot Podcast

04:31 min | 7 months ago

Interview With Rachael Tatman PhD Linguist And Rasa Senior Developer Advocate

"Rachel tavern. Welcome to the voice about podcast. Thank you grabbing me. Well i'm very excited to have you on this. I feel like this is long overdue. So i've been running this podcast. It's two thousand seventeen not long after you. And i met at a conference off of union square san francisco. I cannot remember the name of the conference or the hotel. The park central hotel But you'd made a really interesting presentation there. I wish i still remember parts of it today. So that's four years later. So what about about four years. Bow for years. This this This week even maybe this month certainly And then we had a chance to catch up For a quick lunch and talk about some things. I found it very insightful. so lo and behold you wind up raza. You're sort of in the industry. It's just like a perfect timing but let me let me let you tell your story a little bit. So why don't we start there for the audience. Who might not be familiar with you. Why don't we start with. Why don't we start with your background a little bit. And i think probably the academic background is a start unless you want to start before that so i think it's a reasonable place to to start so i am a phd in linguistics for my for my crimes And i got into linguistics physically. Because i actually going back and reading like Application materials grad school while ago and They were specifically about how i wanted to help. People build language technology. That really worked for everybody in helped make the world. A better place idealist. I can. I had like a lot of ideas. About how hollywood technology would make the road better so which i still think i still hold another one. And at that point i was really into speech and speech perception production from a human standpoint. So how humans perceive speech how to humans understand things And i realized that. I was working on this sort of designed experiments with an eye towards informing automatic speech recognition systems that people who are working on an automatic speech recognition natural language processing automatic speech recognition. We're not going to conferences. And we're not really reading the papers. Don't resident to shift more and more and more into natural. Language processing into more computational approaches In my dissertation i had a big be role experimental component big valuation component. And then also. I built up machine. Learning model that tried to emulate some of the things that humans did and specifically these were all around The ways that you use social information in speech production sorry in speech perception understanding each the you here and as part of that debate evaluation of a bunch of sr systems and this was in two thousand sixteen so awhile ago Looking at the ways that they were able to handle linguistic variation like a regional dialects. Or on i looked at african english I looked at gender and how that affected performance and it turned out the performance was best. You know white people who spoke very standardized prestige dialect not so much people who had a variety of language associated war with regional identity in metric. Finish my phd. Starting my data science wasn't a field. Who could do the entity. It was so i went to haggle which is owned by google So we all may be familiar with it. it's a There's a competition component Where people compete to do supervised machine learning problems and whoever does best wins. And there's also a Posted coating environment that they have and data hosting and was working more on that sort of infrastructure side of things. And then i was talking about this. A little bitter You know it's a little bit by this startup. Bills open source framework for building conversational. Ai conversational assistance rosza. And that's where i am now so i am Moved back to more of the inoki space more humour language students of like dita science more generally. I'm that's been my path to hear

Rachel Tavern Park Central Hotel Raza San Francisco Hollywood Google
Educating Companies on Microsoft Identity with Christos Matskas

The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

03:06 min | 9 months ago

Educating Companies on Microsoft Identity with Christos Matskas

"So what are you working on now right now. Working developer advocate for microlending. Shall we have developer advocacy team within. Mexico will try to educate company's developer's a anyone in fact about identity and how they should dude rights and what they should avoid and why no one's want to make news for you know for the batteries that We see company after company making the news every week identity is all about authorization and authentication than does that were looking to to say we know who you are and here are the things that you can do exactly. I mean there are a few facades when it comes to working with much of india especially with microsoft and if you're looking in the wider side of things like deploying code and running azure than there are somebody benefits about a one of the things we'd like to talk about as any platform language anywhere you want right you can do identity on. Aws with lambda and then still have or api's you can sit around Google cloud and cubanacan the security using metro of the whole point is we don't want developers to write their own identity providers if they want to have their business about its valuated heart to get it right so what we try to advise people while we try to take people down the right pot as first and foremost avoid riding their own identity providers and secondly if they are going to use the provided the us hours over everybody else because added benefits. Let's say a company has written. There may be the company that i work for has our own a security authentication system. Sure is there. Is there a way to properly integrate. That with the identity system method is connected with dot net up. Yeah obsolete i mean as long as you have followed open. Id connecting all standards than this. Nothing helping you for pointing to our points and then authenticating guests azure ad or see so. Obviously we don't want people to report their old codes as long as it's all. Idc compliance than a simple -cational pointing to new tenants setting up operated inside is radio b. c. and off you go but however if your code is ten years old obviously you're not compliant so there are that's somebody benefits in my migrating your code especially if you're dot net today since we've simplified all the boilerplate codes and we hit away the complexities but we want you to come you are we have a very nice slide usually with nirvana singing cameras you are and that's the slide because we don't want you to use our libraries don't want you to use our guidelines if you already have a connect complain libraries or if you want to use a community in one then you can integrate with no problem

Mexico Microsoft India Google IDC United States
Best Productivity and Technology Stories 2020

Anything But Idle

04:15 min | 9 months ago

Best Productivity and Technology Stories 2020

"I'm recieving smith immigrants and we're your hosts for anything but idle this is episode thirty five And we are going to be covering productivity and technology news in review twenty twenty hour recording on december twenty first twenty twenty and each week we cover the productivity news headlines of the week and to do that we usually bring on some panelists and today we have one panelist to help us talk about all things in the personal productivity in technology space So today we're bringing j miller onto the show. Jay is a developer advocate at elastic in san diego. California a multi potential potential light. I'm hoping i'm getting that right. Jay enjoys finding unique ways to merge his fascination with productivity automation and development to creek tools and content to serve the tech community. Welcome to anything but idle j. Glad to be here. Glad to have you got to have you wonderful and so with that. This week's theme. What i thought we would do stone. I thought we would do is to walk us. Through the the stories of the year as many can kind of figure out twenty twenty was a little bit unusual. It was a it was a challenging year for a lot of us and it was unusual in many regards but we've had a lot of productivity and technology news. That's happened a lot of things of have occurred this year and so augusta you wanna kick us off with. What you believe is kind of the biggest story this year. The virtual shows you know as as a person who is star his life doing sales deny remember the big shows and and i remember the apple event and events in big deals when the beginning of twenty twentieth star. And we got covid on all this. What is going to happen with this shows and we saw apple with google sampson with microsoft going into this virtual events from good to better because really there was just there was but but we're going to remember only the good ones that got better There were some that. Were not that way what happened but but even we were able to experience. How apple did the first one you know. Then it gets better and better event to wonder because and google did there and samson need an incredible job was there events too so that was something that i don't think any of us will have considered before twenty twenty that it was going to be an option to watch this event. Live this way everybody live instead of having some people who is going to be there and we were really jealous about it. I mean as a someone who like my job as a developer advocate. Is that go to shows like this. Go to conferences. Go to all the types of meet ups and things like that. I think we look at the larger shows for inspiration on how we can do things and this was like the hardest one because at the end of the day like no one's got the production budget of apple google and samsung so for us. It's like okay. How can we take these massive productions that they're doing in downscale them for the local know. Meet up or you know the online conference that you know for a lot of these companies a lot of these foundations and organizations. They rely on these events to stay afloat until the next year. And so it's like super important but yet we're all like rolling with the punches and doing some crazy stuff and honestly that's kind of been like the coolest thing for me to notice. Is that presentations change. I saw developer conferences where people were doing like scripted. Talks in law muslim Full featured production sets. And they look like you know everyone's favourite high school musical play but like at the same time it was it was causing us to think differently and to do things completely unheard of in terms presenting Whether you were presenting you know for your favorite programming language your favourite productivity tool a meet up or whether you're introducing a brand new chip architecture as in the case of apple

J Miller JAY Apple Google Smith San Diego Sampson California Samson Microsoft Samsung
Edge to be updated with browser extensions "Manifest v3"

Security Now

10:22 min | 1 year ago

Edge to be updated with browser extensions "Manifest v3"

"Edge. Is going to. BE UPDATED WITH BROWSER EXTENSIONS Known as Manifest V. Three. The proposed changes to the web extensions API, which are sort of. generically known as manifest. The three just shortly known were first announced by Google two years ago back in October twenty eighteen, and this was four you know chromium. This is what Google said, what we're GONNA do. And we talked about this at the time our listeners may remember these stated plans from Google did not go over very well with the industry. When they announced their planned changes, they explained Google explained that the main intent of this manifest victory was to improve extension security, improve extension performance, and give users greater control over what extensions did and which sites they could interact with which all sounds great. But extension developers quickly pointed out that this manifest V. three updates contain changes which would cripple the ability of ad blockers Av parental control enforcement, and various privacy enhancing extensions to do their job as they had been and as a consequence Google's. Announcement, triggered a significant backlash from users, extension developers, and even other browser makers. Because among other things, the extensions had the effect of limiting the power of adblocker to block ads Of course, the Non Google community was unhappy to see Google clearly an advertising based company. Moving to limit our ability to to control the ads that are browsers would be subjecting us to and as I've often mentioned. From time to time, I will encounter a browser lacking a competent adblocker. And I'm always shocked by the experience I think wait whoa you know buckle up. It's just it's horrific. So I can imagine choosing a browser entirely based upon whether or not it allowed me to have control over just how obnoxious the ads work that I was being served. And back at the time browsers including opera brave and vivaldi quickly distanced themselves from Google's plans, announcing their intentions to ignore these manifest v. three updates and thus allow users to keep using the AD blockers. They already were using and liked, and Mozilla which had implemented. The web extensions API up to that point in Fire Fox in order to get compatibility with where the rest of the industry was going. Also explicitly denounced crumbs plans and said, it would not be following Google's web extensions API to the letter and would instead be making its own changes to allow ad blockers to continue working as they always have now. I would argue. that. Google had its heart in the right place. But that they did. Perhaps wilfully under appreciate the importance of allowing for dynamic extension based page filtering. Here's what happened at the technology level, the original web request API. And that's what it was known. The web replaced API allowed developers, of Web. Extensions. To install complete and powerful in line filters both in the query and in the reply loops sort of. Sir encircling the the browsers engine a query filter would inspect and perhaps modify any browser queries. Leaving the browser on the way to remote web servers and a reply filter would receive remote web server replies before the browser engine saw them, and this would allow the extension to make extensive edits of the received page among other things blocking subsequent requests for secondary page assets like ads. Google's. V THREE RE engineered solution. was going to discard all of that and in fact has. In favor of what they called a declarative net request API. Google explained that it would prevent extensions from inspecting web requests made on a page while providing much of the same functionality, and again I'll say that I think Google heart was in the right place because that Previ- three filtering. Which is what we've been living with for the lap for like up until now. was, awesomely powerful. A two years ago at the time of the announcement Simeon Vincent who is the developer advocate for chrome extensions said that forty two percent of all malicious extensions which Google had detected. Year to date. So from January twenty seventeen, until October, I'm sorry from January two, thousand, eighteen until October two, thousand eighteen. Forty two percent of all militias extensions were abusing that API. For nefarious purposes. He said quote with Web Request Chrome sends all the data in a network request to the listening extension including any sensitive data contained in that request like personal photos or emails. He says because all of the request data is exposed to the extension, it makes it very easy for a malicious developer to abuse that access to a user's credentials, accounts or personal information. Gives me. All of that is true. Which is why I like the idea if we can somehow like arranged to get both if we could have good blocking. While somehow not allowing extensions. That could misbehave to see everything coming and going to and from the. Web Browser. So with Google's declarative net request API, which is what is in the V. Three. Next Generation, an extension pre registers rules. That the browser reads and then applies to each web page before and after it's loaded. This hugely improves security and privacy since extensions never receive and see all of the page data which they up which they do under V two. And then the browser makes all the modifications requested on behalf of the extension only when one or more of those pre declared rules are met. An addition to enhance privacy and security this allows crumbs optimized processing paths to handle all of the actual web request filtering rather than leaving this to an extensions possibly slow Java script code. So we get a big performance boosts in addition to enhance privacy and safety. So. The the problem is these changes promised to create a number of problems. The first obvious was that this would be restricting what extensions were able to do. And I don't see any way round that you're either going to give extensions like unfettered full access to a web page or you're going to say. We know just tell us what things you're sensitive about, and we'll look for those for you and then then take care of it. So for example, at the time, the developers of no script and you block origin were not happy because they liked the power that they had. They made it clear that the new API's declarative rule system would not provide the same level of control. But the most glaring limitation that arose at the time was the total number of rules that the new engine could accommodate Google plan to allow which what what I would think would seem like plenty of rules at thirty thousand. But it was quickly revealed to be far insufficient for AD blockers. They often have to filter web requests for hundreds of thousands of AD. Related Domains these days. So during the debate which ensued, the State Requirements Range from ninety thousand to one hundred and fifty thousand some people even arguing that like look let's not. You know like have a too low limit that ad blockers could could hit their heads on. So how about half a million? Anyway Google compromised and did agree to raise their planned thirty, thousand, two, hundred, fifty, thousand individual rules. So that's where we are and that brings us to today. Manifest V. Three changes are now being tested in chrome developer channels and much of the post announcement grumbling from two years ago has died down although some adblocker extensions. The, devs have given up on their products ability to reliably block ads. Once these changes reach stable versions of chrome. And I think that may be some grumbling.

Google Developer Fire Fox Mozilla Vivaldi Simeon Vincent Developer Advocate Previ
Sitting down with the Kotlin Advocates

Talking Kotlin

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Sitting down with the Kotlin Advocates

"We are all develop had for Katelyn. Some of us are for areas that are better well known some of us of areas that are less known some of US offer areas that say oh. Oh, you mean that Kotlin is more than just android So talking starve aside talking Kotlin Jaaz stalking everything else that is not android and so I wanted to discuss a little bit. What life is like as a developer advocate at jeppe rains as a cotton develop advocate jeppe brains, how we work, who tells us what to do what not to do well. Before, I I would say that it was mostly we would decide and then sweater you decide now for us right? I wouldn't put it like this. No I'm just kidding. Like I know you're laughing there you're muted it doesn't make sense. I can record my life and you can after add it. On the places that you want. Yeah I'm like are we gotTA have a back? Channel on slack that I keep pressing a button that says you know now laugh and then everyone loves so this is I think to the vision death like long time ago so But anyway. So No, let's let's discuss a little bit like what what color advocacy implies. So especially, nowadays that you know a lot of times when we talk about when we talk about advocacy in general. People immediately associate that with going to conferences and giving talks and. Engaging with people in the community and stuff like that. And you know right now the situation in the world is a little bit. and. So people kind of ask me sometimes, I what do you do all day because you can't really do your work can you and we're GonNa Bust this myth right that developers are more than just about going to conferences. And to bars and to. Having Beers and and the. And the podcast yes. So what do you do? What? What do each of you do on a daily basis try to out a lot with a on on twitter and kind of A feeling for how people feel about technology, it's it's pretty known that that Cutler Jay s for example, has a couple of rough edges them So I tried to kind of see who is trying to adopt the technology try to help them get started and can either be on an individual basis reaching out to people asking them for their feedback to the technology, and then bring that back to the team. But it can also be in the creation of materials than the people can just consume at their own pace. So for example, on play dot, Copter Nine, dot org, we have our section of hands onto orioles, which are kind of long form to`real, you've go through in interactive fashion and we of course, right those we keep those up to date and we always allowed the community. What kind of topics should be covered. And also keeping with the Team that actually developed technology right Shanyou well. As, we know that the Greater China? Region is huge. So for me I think it's more important to facilitates with community. So basically I Love connection with the community leaders. Mostly East our cutting user. Group. Part of. Confront you. And I tried to arrange some Webinar, to invite sound speaker to share their experience about calling. And the in order to. Make more people to learn calling I arranged. Study Group. Study Jen. that. We have on lies degen that Basically teach people how. Write calling coat. And we also have their coating practice. that. Encourage. People to use calling in different way. For example, we use calling in beckon you can have a new can learn how to write calling. Using Kato War or even in Spring boot. You can use calling in enjoy can use calling in data signs. Et Cetera so we provide. The possibility to poke to calling is everything. So that's why we do every for every day.

Orioles Jeppe Rains Developer Advocate Kotlin Katelyn Kotlin Jaaz Twitter Stalking China Cutler Jay Jen.
Rails Camp USA with Bobbilee Hartman

Ruby on Rails Podcast

09:18 min | 1 year ago

Rails Camp USA with Bobbilee Hartman

"Bobby Lee Hardman is a developer advocate. Swear she's been in development for the past five years president more widely known as the founder of rails Camp West the longstanding unplug retreat for Web developers in the United States. Bobby Lee recently moved from the wind. West Seattle bobbly. I wrote rails instructors for vote bootcamp call block. It's so great to talk to you once again. Bobbly yeah you to me. I'm excited. Thanks thanks for joining me. Bobby Lee what is your develop origin story okay. So it's Kinda crazy so I didn't study my first year of college was photography then. I transferred transferred after a year. In did You Know Business Administration with an emphasis in marketing so then after college I started working at a small startup it up and we are building a mobile APP. Emmy outsource all of our development work to you know like a small dead shot and I was kind of you. Know doing Little bit of designed for them and a little bit of like preparing to do marketing. Because the apple doesn't live yet so as always at that deb shops office and the guys is in. There could kind of tell that I was really interested in what they're doing. I thought they were like Superman News. Just so cool to see at the time. And so they gave me a book to read L. H. Meal on a Schmaltzy assess and I read it really quickly and I was just like super into it and excited that I can learn it and I just was like Oh my God. This isn't that difficult you no. I think this might be something I might be interested in so then probably like a week after I finished that book there is a technique Chicago conference and I was living in Madison Wisconsin at the time so it wasn't that far so I went with a friend and one of the sessions that was going on there was called Anyone learn to code and so I was like oh for sure have to go to the session. They're going to like teach me all kinds of stuff you know like maybe there's some magic thing going on that's not not you know. Engineering is not that complicated. Whatever some drop and drag thing like photoshop or something and totally not that but they kind of explained to me about this the program? There's this new concept of doing learning one specific language in eleven weeks and so they were the first school to do it and even before Dev bootcamp when I was like. Oh this sounds interesting. You know maybe I'll just figure out if I don't like it. I mean if I don't like it that'll be able to communicate with our engineers that were working with you know win win regardless bliss so you know but you know. I wasn't quite sure so when I went back to Madison to think about it and then a week after that. This all happened really quickly Week after that Madison Ruby. I was in town which is a smaller conference and the day before it was a rail bridge in rails was the language they were going to teach in that course in Chicago so I was interested so went to this one day workshop in rails bridges a one day workshop that you teach you kind of the basics of what rails is. It's it's pretty probably made for people that no other languages but I was like. Oh Whatever I. I don't know how to use a computer. Besides doing a little bit of photoshop stuff and now each to Mounsey assess the book so I went to this thing and I learned you know pretty you know lake. It was still very confusing. I mean it's very high level But it was you know really I just got me really interested in thinking more about going to school and then at the end of the workshop they were like is anyone in the Roma photographer. You know it can be casual. I don't have to be super professional national anything but we just want someone to take some photos of the Madison Ruby Conference over the next few days so I was like. Oh I can do that. You know I'm not you know. Amazing at doing internal shots are inside indoors shots. But you know they're like whatever yeah sounds good and so it was jam who I'm still friends with. And so yeah. I shot the whole conference when I met all these people in the rails community Ruby community that I'm still friends with today and One of the instructors that school in Chicago was there so he kinda convince me a few convince me to just go ahead and take the program in Chicago and just see what would happen. I love that story because it's essentially a series of you saying yes to opportunities soon. be allowing up. Yes so yes so then. Pretty much after that Yeah I went to school in. Chicago's two months or whatever and after that out I was like I should move back to Minneapolis because my first role could be you know an internship it can be unpaid. I'm not sure and I'm from Minneapolis. So but yes. I got my first paid salary and everything junior position after that And that felt kind of like my first real job because my startup job fell a little. You know just kind like a starter thing before right up right out of college so see then my career just kind of kept going after that I got my next suffer engineering role at intuit do it in San Diego and then if you other things Until I started working at square. So yes so that leads us where you are first. Developer advocate on the show. How can you tell me what that role entails okay so a developer evangelist or advocate developer? Relations are all interchangeable and there are a little bit different at every company and and at Square. We kind of are less focused on going to events a lot and traveling a lot which is what a lot of a lot of evangelists as you as you may have met some of of them. That's a lot of what they're doing is creating You know talks conferences going to conferences and blog posts. So we do you know. We do a lot of talks conferences. We also encourage a lot of our engineers to speak at conferences and to teach them about what are the opportunities are out there for them to get Get out into the community deep and then we work on the blog newsletter. and Um yeah this new YouTube channel which we've created a lot of tutorials and short videos intro videos videos about you know maybe one topic that you'll see on our docks or something and so. We're still coding. Because recreating these orioles and creating these workshops stuff on on our videos and for blog posts. Well and let's see what else is the main thing is that you know Every developer over ventures as a little bit different to and what. They're evangelizing. So what they're sharing to their community of developers so we focused on sharing and spreading the word about our SDK's API's his and about this new marketplaces kind of like an APP store for evangelists mean for developers so a lot of people know of square for our hardware. But they don't know about us as much for some of the you know adding a payment form. It's your website or your mobile APP so a lot of that is what kind of were getting the word out what. I'm trying to get the word out. Maybe you know on twitter or you know just being part of the community going to meet ups telling people kind of what we're up to and you know writing different blog posts and then And then another cool thing that we're up to is this marketplace's APP store if you will where we're connecting our smelling of sellers that we have so people that have readers tres in the hardware at their coffee shop or for their store the farmer's market We're kind of trying to make you know we're trying to work on. Adding developers offers into the scene there. So there's some developers who might WanNa make us custom tool for a seller so we're kind of connecting them in a marketplace where they can make money on people and building APPs for sellers dollars. So that's kind of this new thing that were Working on as well so yes so it's kind of different. You're always kind of like you know you're either spreading the word about what S. gave an API or were also teaching Our own internal teams. You know what are the developer saying slack or the questions coming through recently any. How can we change the docs to be a little bit? More user friendly What are some things that developers want that we aren't building? What are what are they saying about our current offering offering our current? SEK's in waters. You know yeah so. We're kind of like the voice of you know we can be help helpful in a few different ways but those are kind of all the things that would entail maybe something in evangelist evangelist would do not sounds like a lot. So what is the day in the life where you are you still coating yes so we're so coning. There's only three of us on my team that do mainly vandalism or advocacy and we so-called because we're creating blog post with some content in there so something where reteaching engineer engineer how to us when we're SDK's for example or introducing something that's new In an anarchist that were building for the Youtube Channel. We or you know coating up examples making small APPS Yeah kind of live coding on all of those videos so live examples of APPs Yes US oh. We're so th coating data days changes. Recently I've been working on looking back at all of our old blog posts making sure we don't have a lot of four fours and a lot of redirects going into some of our new content are new versions of Sek's or we've seen new API's that come out and there's new stuff coming out of the time so making sure blogs are up to date Working on a script for a video is something I do a lot now and mainly. That's I would say. Most of my time goes towards making scripts or working with other engineers on our team to produce a script gripped for something Yeah and like events we do some events for select engine like we'll have a group of people come and tell us how their experience with their API he is so we'll have you know events like that and stuff

Developer Chicago Bobby Lee Developer Advocate Youtube Bobby Lee Hardman Seattle Emmy United States Madison Ruby Conference SEK Madison Ruby Minneapolis Apple Camp West President Trump Madison Wisconsin
"developer advocate" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"developer advocate" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"I mostly dealer. The dot net side of the family, and I speak in right? And I am happy to be here. I everyone my name's John Looper. I'm also developer advocate progress. I'm working more on the native scripts side. So the Java script to native product that we have. And I'm also the CEO of you vixen which is an initiative, and I found it within the view as community. So very happy to be here. Hey, everybody. I'm Joe Frank. Cathy. I am a developer advocate at Samsung internet, my team really wanna help old develop his at that to make the web, a better place to be awesome. So I mean for better or worse, we have to teller folks on this panel. But you do come at it from different angles because you're very much dot net sort of Zaman guy Sam. Yep. Okay. And then in jen's more on the native scripts side, which is a whole other conversation. I'm sure we'll have some fun with that. How how are you feeling as as folks who build stuff in the camera in space? How are you feeling about it like what's how Zaman doing for you? I think very very good because I think this is going to have done interesting juncture and things are going to evolve. But we're at a good place. I think from if you're a dominant developer the tools that we have to go build apps that are formal not doesn't need to adjust apps, but something that is formidable. This tools have matured. The eagles system has matured a lot over the allegation into Microsoft. It seems like it's yet that helped and things are evolving on the mic on the Microsoft enzyme land. So it's all about coach sharing. Right. Where can we take our code? That is just for Zaman now to other places other platforms, some more and more dot com. Support for Zimmerman. And then if you look at the web side of things it's again, the evolution of how we can reuse. Our code everywhere. Really just see what happens with web assembly in a mobile context.

Zaman developer advocate Joe Frank Microsoft John Looper developer CEO Cathy Zimmerman Samsung internet jen eagles
"developer advocate" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"developer advocate" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Developer advocate specializing in DevOps and Azure welcomed software engineering daily. Hey, thank you so much. I want to talk to you about some various subjects under the purview of DevOps and continuous integration. I'd like to get your perspective on the general landscape of continuous integration. So I've talked to a lot of different companies who are at various stages in their continuous integration rollout there, kind of their test coverage. Where is it typical enterprise at in its CI coverage? How many enterprises out there or does the typical enterprise have continuous integration deployed? So that's a really good question. And the answer like everything under industry is kind of it depends. Right. So if you look at the very basic, most enterprises have some type. Built set up. So if you check in their code, guess what is going to kick off a built so correct for that. We're, we're at that point where almost everybody has that in. That's not a problem. I'm so old. I remember back in my day when I first started writing code, that wasn't even a thing right. When you check in code, it didn't autumn just kick off a built. But then it really starts varying pretty broadly from one company to a next depending on how far along they are on their DevOps journey. Even if you look at Microsoft itself between from one group to another group, we have vastly different capabilities and how much weaved adopted DevOps does practices. And so the industry is kind of like that as well. But thankfully, most people have build testing is still a big problem, right? Or is not even a problem. We know what the fix is is just people haven't done them like right, massive amounts of unit tests that you can put into your CIC pipelines. But for the most part, Bill darn place the deployment, it starts getting a little bit sketchy or testing sketchy as well. Is it would build itself is kind of useful even if you just are building your application into a what, like a staging environment or a testing environment where you can maybe do manual tests over it before you promoted to production. Oh, yeah. Builds are super, super important, right? That's like the very first up. I mean, if I check in code and if the Bill does nothing more than just compile or not, that right there can give me immediate feedback as developer, write a check in my code. Wait a couple of minutes for the Bill to kick off in finish, and then I immediately know did I break the builder? Not once again, this jerk, right. I remember back in my day we would check code in and we would only have nightly built, which means I wouldn't know that I built a broke the official build until the next morning, right when disaster strikes, but now I can get that immediate feedback. So even if you're build all it does is just compile her life for that. That's a win, right? That's like step one next step is to take those bits. And let's go ahead and run all of our unit tests because that can once again, let me know Ambit that few unit tests for slanted defense and our best line of defense for quality, right in those can happen. Just right before you deploy your bits anywhere. That's just right on the build machine. Once that's done, it'd be great to pick those bits up deployed into some type of environment where you can start running other types of tests. So one challenge of getting this CI DevOps journey going that I have seen is these tests the question of how you get test coverage over your legacy spaghetti, like your legacy monolith spaghetti code where the original person that ran it that wrote that code ten years ago is no longer with the company in nobody knows how to work. This code is impossible to get test coverage over these legacy balls of mud. That's a very painful. Subject and the short answer is sort of kind of, but so we also have massive amounts of legacy code. Microsoft is you can imagine just piles and piles of code and anything that does not have unit tests. We consider that legacy coat. How do we maintain quality for that? You know, nobody is going to want to know management team is going to give you the time in money to go back to working code and retrofit unit tests into everything, right? It's just it's impossible, especially considering bids also spaghetti code in order for you to write unit tests, you have to make sure your code is test -able..

Bill Microsoft Developer advocate Azure CIC developer official ten years
"developer advocate" Discussed on Rocket

Rocket

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"developer advocate" Discussed on Rocket

"The. Hello, and welcome to rockets still A-Rated eek conversation. This episode is brought to you by fracture and text expand her. Yeah. Hey, I'm smarter oc- for a video producer probably dot com. And I'm joined today by brianna woo democratic candidate for congress and Christina, Warren senior cloud developer advocate and the leftovers that I'm not going to put in my mouth. Even mobile bay sitting next to me on the bed for the next hour. Well, I mean, you can nibble just like mute yourself. Just turn. I mean, let's be honest with the first topic. I'm gonna go so deep on Ray tracing. What's going to happen. So the people, the people at home may know that Invidia announced some very exciting new graphics cards, and what's going to happen is breeze gonna talk about them. And then the scene is going to talk about them and I'm just going to kind of you my Mike and I'm going to wander, you know, might do some laundry or something every so often I'll come back. I'll turn the mic on go. Uh-huh. And then we'll all go about our days. But at the end of the day, obviously what I'm going to have is a a super sick, new gaming rig that's gonna super sample. All the graphics running everything in four k. and then the lighting will be so realistic, my eyes will burn outright Bree, maybe sort of you heard those scandal this week. Well, I mean, talk from the beginning, then Christina, I will.

Christina brianna woo Bree developer advocate producer congress Invidia Mike Warren four k
"developer advocate" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"developer advocate" Discussed on The Changelog

"For Amazon web services? I think developer advocate, at least for me is kind of a new position or it's a burgeoning position. We're starting to see them pop up all over the place. What does it mean to be a developer advocate for AWS. What's that? All entail? Totally a burgeoning position on sorting to see. I don't know if it's just because I'm now a developer advocate that I've noticed that everyone's Twitter profile says, developer advocate now, RV. Well, it's kind of interesting. A lot of our engineering friends and colleagues and people that we've talked to on the shows like they're all developer advocates. Now, a lot of them are moving into those positions and so it's it's something that we're definitely noticing. And the question is how many can there possibly be? Because certain point you've got to have some developers who aren't advocates, but no, no. Not enough. We need more rabbits. I mean, you're like it's, it's sort of like the position I guess I can talk about for a little bit as this share. It's basically, in my opinion, it's kind of like a new form of marketing. I think traditional marketing has not been, of course, working with how the industry has been moving because a lot of developers they don't. I guess they don't. They can't appeal to the typical developer with the traditional marketing approach, I guess. So like with the developer advocate, we have to understand how to not only build applications, but we have to understand how developers stink. And I think the combination of us being developers as well as being out there interacting with other developers. We provide a lot of value not only being able to kind of talk about what we're working on to, but to bring feedback back to the teams that are building the tooling that we're working on. It's kind of like a product manager as it is. The product is developer advocate as it is to the software that gets created to be the product is kind of my seat that because you're sort of this middle person where you interface within users. There's you have to provide.

developer advocate developer Amazon product manager Twitter
"developer advocate" Discussed on Google Cloud Platform Podcast

Google Cloud Platform Podcast

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"developer advocate" Discussed on Google Cloud Platform Podcast

"In a row as well i'll be we have evidence that much him carney when it comes to security which jen is doing as well i think that's really interesting i think that will say a lot of space for more generalists to grow up into that space is to learn from practitioners unto become practicians as hobby more senior people as practitioners but having more junior people as the people who learn from them take messages on the road maybe not have onto recognition his asia but can help with content videos and suchlike and oftentimes people read indicate as well because are not that many practitioners in the world and so if you wanna have reasonably large team coverage and if we're not gonna be added up just my harm partitions so you get from practice compensation about selling recently about trust busters credibility and i do great trust is extremely important we need people to trust out advocates when i talked to them i notice person i trust what telling me at the same time output at team stakeholders as well should trust unjust when just bring stores and back to the teams say maybe you should display they trust that person view and they give it to consideration and trust in particular is very valuable when you can give them a perspective and it's not necessarily being driven by the product itself it's being specifically driven by this is what i know about the space this is what i'm able to bring to the table about the space yeah so when i was asking earlier before about you know developer relations with that look like a little part of why i had let down the pats of that question was i hear developer evangelists as a term that's constantly intermixed with developer advocate so i'm curious what your perspective is on these two terms and you know how they relate in how they don't really.

carney jen asia developer advocate developer
"developer advocate" Discussed on Google Cloud Platform Podcast

Google Cloud Platform Podcast

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"developer advocate" Discussed on Google Cloud Platform Podcast

"In a row as well i'll be we have evidence that much him carney when it comes to security which jen is doing as well i think that's really interesting i think that will say a lot of space for more generalists to grow up into that space is to learn from practitioners unto become practicians as hobby more senior people as practitioners but having more junior people as the people who learn from them take messages on the road maybe not have onto recognition his asia but can help with content videos and suchlike and oftentimes people read indicate as well because are not that many practitioners in the world and so if you wanna have reasonably large team coverage and if we're not gonna be added up just my harm partitions so you get from practice compensation about selling recently about trust busters credibility and i do great trust is extremely important we need people to trust out advocates when i talked to them i notice person i trust what telling me at the same time output at team stakeholders as well should trust unjust when just bring stores and back to the teams say maybe you should display they trust that person view and they give it to consideration and trust in particular is very valuable when you can give them a perspective and it's not necessarily being driven by the product itself it's being specifically driven by this is what i know about the space this is what i'm able to bring to the table about the space yeah so when i was asking earlier before about you know developer relations with that look like a little part of why i had let down the pats of that question was i hear developer evangelists as a term that's constantly intermixed with developer advocate so i'm curious what your perspective is on these two terms and you know how they relate in how they don't really.

carney jen asia developer advocate developer
"developer advocate" Discussed on Rocket

Rocket

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"developer advocate" Discussed on Rocket

"The hello and welcome to rocket accelerated gig conversation i'm your host simone to roche wait wait wait wait i'm not simone to roche for dickerson linda rush for okay all right well i the tonight on the on the podcast rocket the part of smoke rose four will be played by christina warren senior cloud developer advocate at microsoft's that's who student i knew i i'm not gonna get enough i'm sorry and the part of brianna wu democratic represented a candidate for condit the new democratic candidate for congress it will be played by toronto boo sir can i tell you about awesome meeting i had yesterday a real quick episode of rocket is brought to you by pinged them and tech memes the ride home podcast so i had a meeting with cindy gallop yesterday awesome about ads for campaign and she is i don't want to say it but she is really going to help us with the ads for our campaigns i'm so super psyched about that that's amazing so so for the listeners out there were cut for courting things this week a little bit out of place because we're actually live at microsoft bill duffy teen in the washington state convention center in seattle washington and really are actually literally sitting in the convention center right now recording this podcast we've already done two interviews and we've already tried to do this a couple of times and if the show is geared this week is this is why because we had to do this multiple parts how much sleep if it'd be.

simone linda rush christina warren microsoft condit congress cindy gallop washington roche developer advocate toronto seattle
"developer advocate" Discussed on Android Central Podcast

Android Central Podcast

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"developer advocate" Discussed on Android Central Podcast

"So obviously google is not just about announcements by google but it's about developers i think steve bombers actually going to be up on stage on tuesday just like running back and forth shouting bella pers this year but it's all about giving developers the tools they need and not just that the mentorship the support they need to be part of google's ecosystem and that system has expanded so much since the early days of i o android right we have yes android and chrome but we now have google assistant we have google cloud we have daydream we have air core we have all of these different parts of the google ecosystem but we also have products we have products like youtube which is at self an enormous business we have the play store which is again enormous business these are not just a part of android or chrome right they exist on their own you can sign up for google play music separately from being an android user or chrome user i think these are important because google is acknowledging that is important as android and chrome are they're not neces sarily the only ways to experience google services and you touched on something the the support network for developers that's something that google has i mean i i know andrew in daniel you'll agree the developer advocate team and the people that run the departments that google are some great people that will help you any way they can we know this because that's the type of people we work with but if you're developing an app you need to know that that that's vailable for you that you can shoot out an email and you're going to get somebody that wants to help you you just have to be able to find them in know that they exist and to that end google offering office hours for all most all of its products for developers one thing that i'm looking forward to talking to developers at i o on the ground to see what they're doing some cool experiences that they're putting in their apps and services but last year one of the coolest installations was tango jerry but obviously.

google youtube steve andrew developer advocate
"developer advocate" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"developer advocate" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Eric saint martin is a cloud developer advocate with microsoft eric welcome to software engineering daily thinks god to be here yeah it's great to have you so we're gonna talk about go and to various systems that are built with go win go was started when the language got started the primary languages around that time for low level systems programming i think we're just c and c plus plus there were a few other fringe languages but mostly was cnc plus plus what were the shortcomings of the c and c plus plus language environments i think there's a lot of complexities in the languages themselves especially as they've been expanded over the years especially when you talk about like c plus plus and then some of the versions there and there's a lot of foot guns there and i think that what they were looking for was one a language that was more simple and easier to reason about you know without having twenty ways of doing the same saying and confusion looking at code and in addition to that some of the newer languages one of the things people love about them as a garbage collector where you're not having to manage your own memory and worry about those things but i think the primary motivation was also to design a language from the ground up that thought about concurrent see from the beginning because when we think about like threads and some of the patterns that we use for can currency and parallelism these were afterthoughts right all these languages that are being used as systems languages now they were added on after the fact as far as you know instead of thought about from the beginning would that lead to what would those low level because historically low level programming is really difficult around these issues of concurrent easy or resource sharing i think about cima fours in mutek ses from college when i had to program in my operating systems class ordered the language mechanics that go introduces to make those concurrently problems easier so when we think about go kind of the two primary ones are go routines which we can kind of think about as.

Eric saint martin developer advocate microsoft
"developer advocate" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"developer advocate" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Eric saint martin is a cloud developer advocate with microsoft eric welcome to software engineering daily thinks god to be here yeah it's great to have you so we're gonna talk about go and to various systems that are built with go win go was started when the language got started the primary languages around that time for low level systems programming i think we're just c and c plus plus there were a few other fringe languages but mostly was cnc plus plus what were the shortcomings of the c and c plus plus language environments i think there's a lot of complexities in the languages themselves especially as they've been expanded over the years especially when you talk about plus plus i mean some of the versions there and there's a lot of foot guns there and i think that what they were looking for was one language that was more simple and easier to reason about you know without having twenty ways of doing the same thing and confusion looking at code and in addition to that some of the newer languages one of the things people love about them as a garbage collector where you're not having to manage your on memory and worry about those things but i think the primary motivation was also to design a language from the ground up that thought about concurrent see from the beginning because when we think about like threads and some of the patterns that we use for can currency and parallelism these were afterthoughts right all these languages that are being used as systems languages now they were added on after the fact as far as you know an instead of thought about from the beginning would that lead to what were those low level because historically low level programming is really difficult around these issues of concurrent easy or resource sharing i think about cima fours in mutek ses from college when i had to program in.

Eric saint martin developer advocate microsoft
"developer advocate" Discussed on Rocket

Rocket

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"developer advocate" Discussed on Rocket

"Hello and welcome to rocket accelerate a geek conversation i'm murderers for video producer propoganda combination joined today by christina warren senior cloud developer advocate and briana wu at democratic candidate for congress hello welcome to very early morning on the with also drivers right we switch coaster it's seven twenty in the morning for you holy cross mona i'm so sorry no it's okay i do that this would happen no i did too simone i would've i would've worked with you i forgot about them says i would rather get up at six once a year to record a podcast than a have scheduling weirdness happen i go cans just just be clear this is mostly my fault because i apps gigot bosox who laugher layers of jews while we have the time over together here on this postchristmas pre two thousand eighteen weekend who knows what could happen next year oh my god so okay our first story of the day is about the lawsuit against apple for slowing down iphone batteries and some of the newer phones as they age as a as a function to just keep the phones from shutting down a inconsistently based on things like temperature and how much work the the batteries are are trying to accomplish as they get older us so some users have a foul was it against apple for doing this and not making it clear i think mostly is the issue not making it clear that you'd it's not necessarily a an issue where you need to get a new phone it's an issue wearing tickin' new battery how do we feel about this i think like i think your thoughts.

christina warren briana wu congress apple producer developer advocate simone iphone
"developer advocate" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

02:34 min | 4 years ago

"developer advocate" Discussed on Triangulation

"Personally lose their age but that the brilliant minds there might go elsewhere and we are at risk red alert were were right on the behalf degree tien series young we have to be evidencebased in our thinking decisionmaking it's not an option and again you don't get to the moon by going like this do the math dr dodges our guest he's developer advocate for google and we are going through his checkered past how did you get to know rayasi had go to groove this was after lotus right yes uh race started a lotus notes uh and lotus of course was a spreadsheet company best known for spreadsheets uh bouquet poor and another great did new england action silicon valley has his reputation but really latah amazing stuff came at a new england quitting visit cal as well as lewis right dan brooklyn dan brown bob france than yep mayor mich is amazing so ozzie uh was doing notes yet was a collapse for people don't know a collaborative emails slashed database environment it was filesharing was all the stuff that you do now just kind of secondhand i mean second nature but it but it was hard to do in those days preinternet days very hard to do so he did notes which was a enterprise server based kind of collaboration environment filesharing email um that sort of thing and then he sold it uh to ibm and made a ton of money and ray wanted to do the next thing so that was basically lotus notes in appeared appear environment oh how interesting so it basically took the lotus notes model and took it off the enterprise price server and put it on appeared appear kind of uh environment and added things like file sharing and work groups and all this kind of thing so it was a revolutionary at the time yeah and at now i understand their interest in you because of the database background the ah 'peertopeer background of napster right it made a debt with a perfect fit as i started my career at digital equipment doing database systems and it turns out rayasi was also their own okocha uh many many years ago uh and then after having the database experience.

developer advocate google rayasi cal bob france ray lotus notes lewis ozzie ibm
"developer advocate" Discussed on Google Cloud Platform Podcast

Google Cloud Platform Podcast

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"developer advocate" Discussed on Google Cloud Platform Podcast

"More though but uh anyway so we have miles is going to be joining us to talk about node and we're going to be talking about known in the governance and how we works in all the open source organization in all of that stuff but before we start we've all of that winning it does it a bit about yourself what do you do a google yes so as was mentioned my name is miles my other name is born together it's miles parents and i'm a developer advocate on google cloud platform i focus primarily on new js but i also dabble in compute in couvert at ease in claude functions and pretty much anywhere rican run node or june od things i'm on the technical steering committee of the new jets foundation where i was recently elected the technical steering committee director so i also sit on the board of directors of the foundation now i'm one of the primary release managers running most mostar lts program so most of the version foreign version six releases and some of the version it releases are coming for me in lately most of i work has actually been around the eight and making sure that the new project can have the most modern versions of the aid as possible goal so actually why are we start with them history i mean most people probably know what node is by maybe some people don't so why don't you tell us a little bit about the language where came from sort of with that background like yeah totally i can give lake i'll give a super abridged version of the keno that i gave at note interactive recently google was there we had about like five different talks in three keynotes and one of mine was a one of the closing keynotes and i called it node wave six in was just about how like there's been many different ways of note node was originally created in two thousand nine by ryan dolan presented a chance konthi you that would be what we would consider way one and ryan doll was the bdnf fell which is short for benevolent dictator for life of the project or about like guy i think two or three years and then the project was taken over by isaac schlueter who ran the project for a similar amount of time and then tj fund.

google developer advocate director ryan dolan isaac schlueter claude ryan doll three years
"developer advocate" Discussed on Google Cloud Platform Podcast

Google Cloud Platform Podcast

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"developer advocate" Discussed on Google Cloud Platform Podcast

"Go what about you gave so i'm the developer advocate for google cloud platform focusing on not just to corporate iot platform so i'm really serving the developers that are using the devices out in the world the connected devices to do bigger better things so archie core specifically is the entry way into the rest of gcp so i'm here to make sure that the product at intervals building with the cross teams really does land with developers and make sure that it's successful with them and that they can use it to do their things will cool all right so engineer you're the pm so i'm gonna ask you the the hard question so 30000 and review like what is core from like a really basic standpoint sure so if you if you think if you look at google clark platform we have what we believe is a state of the art a well received data analytics and machinelearning services today available for our enterprise customers are developers and our partners as well and what clarity core does is it really makes it easy to onboard your iot devices you know things that are union factory near island ray oil and gas rigs are other enterprise setting too easy ardmore does devices to goo goo cloud so that you can start pushing data from ed devices sister we cloud and start benefitting from our data analytics in machinelearning services so that's at essentially what clout article does it is a fully matt it's series to sikulje connect and manage your iot devices on goodwill caught platform.

developer advocate google archie engineer
"developer advocate" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"developer advocate" Discussed on Triangulation

"So it's one line in your wikipedia biography dodgers laid off from microsoft november fifth in two thousand nine and became developer advocate a koogle i have a field there's more to that story at well they're always is as i was laid off with five thousand or almost six thousand other people so it wasn't of firing in the traditional sense where you know you're was had personal no it wasn't personal while was to me yet but always pursue but but i was laid off with five or six thousand other people out at the time but the end result is the same you're gone and to not randomly the there were reasons uh so i call it the scoble affect a amtra robin and bridges that well you might remember that a robert scoble also exited microsoft kind of quietly and unceremoniously but here's here's the effect in here's what happened to me uh the scoble effect is when you are more famous than your boss or your bosses boss or your bosses bosses boss of these guys have egos and you know they they're smart guys and and they have thousands of people reporting to them and they want to be the face of the company uh so robert god to a point where he was the face of the company and there were some senior executives that weren't comfortable with that and they wanted a piece of that so robert was sort of shuffled out.

developer advocate robert scoble microsoft