9 Burst results for "Desert Research Institute"

"desert research institute" Discussed on Think On Your Faith

Think On Your Faith

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"desert research institute" Discussed on Think On Your Faith

"Of people out there. That look just like me and i'm not talking about my color i'm talking about i'm talking about my demographic i know there's a lot of people out there that's just like me. They're married they have children. They have their family oriented. They they You know Have young children that they wanna teach correct principles and teach how to be good people in society and how to be tolerant and how to You know basically just do the things that t to make him good citizens. I actually think a lot of the people that are just like in hiding though and in plain view but they cannot come out they cannot come out and they cannot say anything about this because For fear that would lead to what i'm experiencing now which is just being ostracized from their family and on some level has a little bit of a fear of change and if you look at people the vast majority of people practice the same religion their parents do absolutely and there's comfort in that and i don't wanna strip someone of their security blanket but when you religion is harming you yes and taking you down a path that is not bettering your life. I would like people to have an opportunity to say well. Maybe i don't have to follow that book anymore. Sure i am an adult. Sure i could throw the entire book or i could just keep the pieces that make me happy and so and that makes it an that makes a whole ton of sense by the way what you just said and i and i think you said it beautifully And i think there needs to be more voices just like you carly out there Because i'll be honest with you. I'm pretty outspoken about my beliefs and about my experiences But my approach may not work for some people You know as far as my style. And the way that i deliver my content and my thoughts and things like that but Anyway i do think that there needs to be more voices like you. I just remembered so on facebook. There's a mountain of groups of people who have left the lds church and one of the reoccurring themes is okay. I'm out of the church. But i promised my mother. I wouldn't remove my name from roles from liquor just just in case you didn't know church of that stretched us goose and Dave dutton one of the founding members of the center for science and wonder speaks of his dave deadman. Okay He speaks of his experience of he just really enjoyed having a community growing up with this church and for him. His family went to church because that's where his friends were and it wasn't oh i'm gonna listen to the lesson. I'm gonna really studied this book. No it's just want to go where my friends are. And i would love to build something like that and After lots of thought is you know it's been. It's been two years since we had to close the centre down. We started to big Signing a lease for over two thousand dollars a month was probably not wise But that doesn't mean we can't hold event at more cost effective locations so just before the pandemic on leap year on weekday house. We know that's what i was about to say. You know if they're small. We could do it at somebody's house but on leap day. We actually rented out the atomic testing museum. How is housed by the desert research institute and they have classrooms and One of the members of seesaw is on the board there so he let us use their facility. And it's only a couple of hundred hundred dollars an hour or something. I'd have to double check but that's the kind of thing we should be doing when we have an event when we know people are coming then we should invest in a place instead of having a place that we have to pay for whether or not there's people coming So we need. I want to rebuild but this time we're gonna start smaller work up to it. And eventually i would love to have on cicilline again. Have you ever been to the unitarian universal church here in vegas no. I love to go though states variants. Yeah and they have their own building. Which i find interesting. It's so that's kind of my goal. That's my that's where i wanna go. But they didn't get there in a day either of course not I think. I think i think this is a good step And that's why i reached out to you too. I knew that by connecting with somebody here at least with the same values in the same vision and the same interest that we could at least spark something. Because that's how everything starts. Everything starts with a spark and then it starts to materialize starts to germinate in and then all of a sudden we start to see that. Hey we've got something here. i am here. I have a platform and my platform here reaches forty different countries. I get thousands of uploads You know every day and It's growing and and i. I don't make any money doing this. This is actually just my passion. Yeah this is my twenty third episode. This will be my twenty third episode. And i have conversations with people. All the time just go seeking superstars just to move the dial. I just liked to talk to everyday people with real life experience with real stories. That can help inspire some people to kind of say. Look we really do need something like this. But don't shy away from superstars so pendulum let recorded pen sunday school. Which is his podcast about atheism. Oh i guess. I need to get connected with him. Get him on podcast. So he's pretty high falutin but you know i wouldn't say don't try but So that that was a fun evening. When he recorded pen. Sunday school at our facility and we had a piece of drywall from pendulums house that had height markers on it with the six-foot-seven marked on it saiki go stand next to how tall six seven is. Okay there you go yeah. He is a pretty big dude. I've seen some of his promos okay. Perfect well So that was mainly mainly my purpose of inviting. You on was just to kinda you know again. Start a spark and talk about what What resources and what programs are available out there and And then of course Seeing what could materialize from that. I do want to ask you something based on based on On a comment that you just made why is it important. Why why is it important to to divorce yourself from Religious and and and and and find truth elsewhere white. Why do you think that's important. Well if your is no longer your guiding light but the thing that throws dirt on your day out for you as an example.

lds church Dave dutton center for science and wonder dave deadman cicilline unitarian universal church carly desert research institute facebook vegas saiki
"desert research institute" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

NPR's Story of the Day

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"desert research institute" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

"To fini- dot com where you'll find plans to fit any budget with speeds up to a gig restrictions apply actual speeds are not guaranteed skies are hazy across much of the us because wildfires are burning from california minnesota. The smoky air is the worst in western states. And it's forcing people indoors in places where vaccination rates are low montana. Public radio's aaron bolton on what's being called a recipe for new infections in western montana missoula just opened a brand new public library and people including grant noblet turley bluecher in dave duran are flocking to it. One of the things is getting out of the smoky air. We're definitely trying to stay out of the smoke. It's smoking hot and so yeah. Come to the library for a little bit about a quarter of the people here are wearing masks. And missoula has the state's highest vaccination rate and sixty percent but it's an outlier. Compared to the rest of montana and most other rocky mountain states the infection rate is pretty low here right now but a couple hours drive north. We've seen pretty significant uptick in cases what i feel is at least a fifty percent increase in cases. Joe russell is the health officer in flathead county montana where the vaccination rate is about. Half of missoula's wildfire smoke has been bad here to russell can't specifically say how much that's pushed people indoors but he says unvaccinated people attending events are driving up cases. These are activities that are happening specific to events or settings and they are indoors like many other deeply conservative counties in western states. Most people aren't wearing masks indoors. In flathead county. The scientists clear that unmasked people gathering indoors drives infection rates up. But it's very early to say exactly. What wildfire smoke means in terms of covert risk daniel kaiser with the desert research institute analyzed cova test results in reno nevada last summer when a lot of smoke drifted into the area. What we found was that there was about a eighteen percent increase in the reiter posits s during the most wildfire spark. That's only in association between smoke and a spike in positive cova tests kaiser's research doesn't provide a causal link but the centers for disease control and prevention says the very tiny particles and wildfire. Smoke can lodge in the lungs making people more susceptible to respiratory infections like cove nineteen especially as particles build up over time. John felton is the health officer in montana's most populous county. One hundred of the eligible folks are vaccinating so anytime we start moving more people endorsed in this case to try and stay out of the smoke. it's an increase. The risk of people getting y'all with coming back at the new library in missoula whitney cores in her daughter who was too young to get vaccinated are taking precautions. My daughter and i are still masked because she's not vaccinated. That just makes sense says sarah cowfield with a missoula county health department selling no that wildfire. Smoke messes immune system. We know that increases your susceptibility to infectious disease. And we know at least worse. Health outcomes if you have a disease was also known is that western states are dealing with a drought of historic proportions. Two point five million acres have already burned in the us this year and what's traditionally the worst weeks for fires in the northern rockies are just getting underway for npr news. I'm.

missoula montana aaron bolton grant noblet turley dave duran flathead county Joe russell western montana daniel kaiser centers for disease control an rocky mountain minnesota desert research institute John felton california russell reiter
"desert research institute" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"desert research institute" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"It's monsoon season in the american southwest for arizona new mexico and colorado. The seasonal rains are very important for rivers and pastures and for keeping wildfires in check but climate change has made the monsoon less regular. Here's michael elizabeth circus from colorado public. Radio this is a welcome sound. In the city of dennison were colorado's governor has declared a drought emergency. This rain has brought some much-needed relief after three years. Almost no summer monsoon rains for the south west. Recall it for no soon. Because we just didn't get anything. That's build tramping a third generation denison rancher during a break from the rain. He sits in a plastic lawn chair in his backyard which overlooks one hundred and fifty acres. Where tramp he grows grass and hay or hay crop was terribly undergo. it just wouldn't grow. It just turned off horribly dry in june july august september. No monsoon at all tramp was worried. It was to drive for the number of cows ehab so he killed more cows in the fall then he usually would. He says he's running out of water on the federal land where they graze. Got one ditch. It's got the whole creek in it. And we're trying to irrigate three or four hundred acres out of that one ditch and we've got probably six hundred acres. That are nothing and so. These rains are super important but these rains are becoming less predictable and less effective rosemary. Carroll is an associate professor of hydrology at the desert research institute in nevada but she lives in crested butte. Near gunnison we meet on a high dirt road overlooking a tributary that feeds the colorado river. The two major reservoirs on this crucial water supply at record lows and carols research shows that with climate change. Less monsoon rain makes it into this system. She says the problem starts with the snowpack. What collects in the mountains over the winter if you have a big snow year and that no pack last late into the spring early summer than your soil moisture. Storage is high cool temperatures in. What soil mean rainfall is more likely to reach a stream. But if it's hot with less snow pack the soils are dried out and will soak in more of the water that than will buy us for the same amount of rainfall less monsoon rain making it into the stream another benefit at risk normally. The arrival of monsoon rains has ended the worst of the fire season but his temperatures get hotter. The atmosphere can hold more moisture. That's changing how. The monsoon behaves a study. Out of the university of arizona found that now rainstorms happen less often when the rain does fall. There's more of it all at once. Dole biedermann is the co senior author. New research hydrologist the us department of agriculture. Even if the total amount of rainfall is the same during the growing season. A few really large rainstorms. Isn't that beneficial this summer. The monsoon rain has caused extreme flash floods in arizona with big sporadic storms instead of consistent moisture vegetation and soils dry out don folk forest ecologist at the university of arizona says a week or sporadic monsoon means. The fire season extends into the hottest months of the year. It really plays a huge role in setting up these gigantic fires that have been happening in colorado and throughout the south west because the monsoon isn't playing that role of ending the major part of the fire season. The rain that has shown up. The summer has helped dampen some active wildfires now. The hope is that short. Frequent monsoon storms. Stick around through august. That could help parts of the southwest. Avoid another year of dangerous late season wildfires for npr news. I'm michael elizabeth circus in denver..

colorado michael elizabeth ehab Near gunnison american southwest dennison south west desert research institute arizona new mexico crested butte colorado river Dole biedermann Carroll us department of agriculture university of arizona nevada
"desert research institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"desert research institute" Discussed on KCRW

"Seriously. And to fix this problem for good, Yes. So the question is whether Congress will come up with the billions of dollars needed to wrap up testing to help blunt the toll of what could be a very grim winter. We're going into right now. All right. NPR health correspondent Rob Stein Rob Thanks so much. You bet, David In addition to being the year of covert 2020 was also a year of extreme wildfires and hurricanes, in part because global temperatures were among the hottest ever recorded. Here's NPR's Lauren Sommer. If you caught the weather report in Phoenix, Arizona this year, you heard one number over and over. All right, Jamie, we are hoping for some cooler weather, but I know we're just hovering around these hundreds. It was over 100 degrees a lot on a record breaking 145 days and all well, basically almost everything. Set records. Marvin Purchase is a meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Phoenix. I've lived here a long time. I grew up here in the seventies, and I've never seen anything quite like this. Phoenix also doubled the number of days it spent above 115 degrees. And those extremes are dangerous. Almost 300 people died because of heat related causes in Maricopa County, another record number certainly with the overall warmer earth, it makes it more likely to get these extreme temperatures and those temperatures set the stage for other disasters. 2020 hurricane season has been uniquely awful. There have been 30 named storms. So far, a new red warm waters in the Atlantic fueled the most active hurricane season on record. And many storms intensified quickly. Building strength faster than expected. The records kept falling in the western US to where wildfires burned more than nine million acres. Tens of thousands of people fled their homes, some with only minutes to spare. The restates California, Oregon and Colorado had the largest fires and they're recorded history. Dan McAvoy, a climatologist with the Desert Research Institute, says heat was one of the reasons when you have elevated temperatures and extra dry atmosphere that really makes the fuels more flammable and easier to burn. Hot, dry atmosphere is thirsty, he says. It's like a sponge pulling moisture out of plants and soils. That creates the conditions for fires to move fast and burn hot fire on the landscape in the West is normal. We need that fire. But the thing that's changing is how quickly they become these large mega fires. McAvoy has done studies showing how heat will dramatically increase this fire danger in the West. But even he's surprised to see it play out so quickly. This year is I mean, how many times can we say the word unprecedented? Kristina Doll is a climate scientist.

Phoenix Dan McAvoy NPR US Marvin Purchase Rob Stein National Weather Service Congress Maricopa County Lauren Sommer Kristina Doll Jamie Arizona Atlantic David Desert Research Institute scientist California Colorado
"desert research institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"desert research institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Three states, California, Oregon and Colorado had the largest fires and they're recorded history. Dan McAvoy, a climatologist with the Desert Research Institute, says heat was one of the reasons when you have elevated temperatures and extra dry atmosphere that really makes the fuels more flammable and easier to burn. Hot, dry atmosphere is thirsty, he says. It's like a sponge pulling moisture out of plants and soils. That creates the conditions for fires to move fast and burn hot fire on the landscape in the West is normal. We need that fire. But the thing that's changing is how quickly they become these large mega fires. McAvoy has done studies showing how heat will dramatically increase this fire danger in the West. But even he's surprised to see it play out so quickly. This year is I mean, how many times can we say the word unprecedented. Kristina Doll is a climate scientist at the Union of Concerned Side. Dentists. Events like that make it really hit home for climate scientists that this is not just something theoretical that we're predicting. It's something that we are living through. 2020 is basically tied with 2016 for the hottest year ever recorded at almost two degrees above average. Whether it takes the top spot is beside the point, Paul says. The last five years where the five hottest on record since 18 80. It's only expected to get worse for me personally, I think that there's not going to be one wake up call that Spurs the public in the US and our policy makers into action. It's more the accumulation of All of these events, and all of the heartache is incurred because of them. That heartache, she says, should be a reminder that the more fossil fuels are burned. The more years like this, we should expect to see Lauren Sommer NPR news This'll is NPR NEWS. Joe McConnell reporting Bay Area traffic this time on interstate 5 80 in the Richmond area. Reports of a car fire westbound five it, he said to be before Canal, but it's also said to be about two miles before Canal so it could be back at.

Dan McAvoy Kristina Doll Joe McConnell Paul Desert Research Institute NPR Lauren Sommer Union of Concerned Side California Colorado scientist US Richmond Oregon Spurs
How Climate Change Is Setting The Stage For Natural Disasters

Environment: NPR

03:26 min | 1 year ago

How Climate Change Is Setting The Stage For Natural Disasters

"In addition to being the year of covert twenty twenty was also a year of extreme wildfires and hurricanes in part because global temperatures were among the hottest ever recorded. here's npr's lawrence summer. If you caught the weather report in phoenix arizona visit you heard one number over and over alright jamie. We are hoping for weather. But i know just hovering around these hundreds. It was over one hundred degrees a lot on a record breaking one hundred and forty five days all well. Basically almost everything set records. Marvin percha is a meteorologist. At the national weather service in phoenix. I've lived here a long time. I grew up here in the seventies. And i've never seen anything quite like this. Phoenix also doubled. The number of days at spent above one hundred and fifteen degrees and those extremes are dangerous. Almost three hundred people died because of heat related causes in maricopa county another record number certainly with the overall warm earth. It makes it more likely to get these extreme temperatures and those temperatures set the stage for other disasters. Twenty twenty hurricane season has been uniquely awful. There have been thirty named storm so far a new wreck. Warm waters in the atlantic fueled the most active hurricane season on record and many storms intensified quickly building strength faster-than-expected. The records kept falling in the western u. s. two or wildfires burned more than nine million acres. Tens of thousands of people fled their homes. Some with only minutes to spare three states california oregon and colorado had the largest fires in there recorded history. Dan mcevoy a climatologist with the desert research. Institute says heat was one of the reasons when you have elevated temperatures and extra dry atmosphere. That really makes the fuels more flammable. An easier to burn a hot dry atmosphere is thirsty. He says it's like a sponge pulling moisture out of plants and soils that creates the conditions for fires to move fast and burn hot on the landscape in the west is normal. We need that fire but the thing that's changing is how quickly they become. These large megafires mcevoy's done studies showing how he will dramatically increase. This fire danger in the west but even he's surprised to see it. Play out so quickly this year is i mean. How many times can we say the word. Unprecedented christina doll is a climate scientist at the union of concerned. scientists events. Like that make it really hit home for climate scientists that this is not just something theoretical that. We're predicting it's something that we are living through. Twenty twenty is basically tied with two thousand sixteen for the hottest year ever recorded at almost two degrees above average but whether it takes the top spot is beside the point though says the last five years or the five hottest on record since eighteen eighty. And it's only expected to get worse for me personally. I think that there's not going to be one. wake up. call that spurs the public in the us. And our policymakers into action. It's more the accumulation of all of these events and all of the heartache as incurred because of them that heartache she says should be a reminder that the more fossil fuels are burned. The more years like this. We should expect to see lorne summer npr news.

Lawrence Summer Marvin Percha Phoenix Hurricane Dan Mcevoy National Weather Service NPR Maricopa County Jamie Arizona Christina Doll Union Of Concerned Atlantic Mcevoy Oregon Colorado
"desert research institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"desert research institute" Discussed on KCRW

"This is NPR news, and I'm Cherry Glaser with this KCRW news update. Scientists say there's no rain in the forecast for Northern California for the rest of the year, and that's increasing the chances of a multiyear drought. Valentini. A weather pattern is pushing wet storms north of the state keeping California dry and those conditions could last throughout the winter. And McEvoy's with the Desert Research Institute in Reno. His latest research found that the probability of a multiyear drought is climbing as the climate warms, really our last several year drought was the really bad drought of 2012 to 2016. Since then, we've kind of been up and down with some really, really wet years and then also some really dry years, but they've all been very warm years which increases the drought severity, McAvoy says. By the end of the century, the probability prolonged droughts will increase 15 fold. Because of warming temperatures. You're listening to KCRW. KCRW sponsors include HBO, Max presenting Let them ALL Talk, starring Meryl Streep, Candace Bergen and Dianne Wiest in a new Mac's original film by director Steven Soderbergh. Let them all talk. Streaming December 10th on HBO Max Rated R. Santa Monica College number one in transfers to U. C. L. A. U. S C and the UC system for 30 years straight. The classes you need with flexible schedules are now open for winter and spring semester. Make your future a brighter one at Santa Monica College as M c dot e. D u Couple of traffic issues to be aware of, if you're out about this morning. For starters, Topanga Canyon has been shut down overnight between PCH and Old Panga because of a brush fire there. We've got crews on the scene. They were hoping to get that reopened.

KCRW Santa Monica College Northern California HBO Cherry Glaser NPR Topanga Canyon Meryl Streep Desert Research Institute Steven Soderbergh Old Panga McAvoy Dianne Wiest McEvoy Reno Candace Bergen director U. C. L. A. U. S C Mac
"desert research institute" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

08:02 min | 2 years ago

"desert research institute" Discussed on Revisionist History

"Interviewed for a documentary by the BBC. After flying six hours, we climbed up to bombing altitude, we climbed up to thirty seven thousand feet. and. We broke out of the store. There's Mount Fuji sitting right in front of us. It's a gorgeous sight of really as. hiatt tried to describe what went wrong on those. I B twenty nine precision attacks on Tokyo. His Bombardier Amending Glenn starts to make his calculations on their bombsite lining up the Nakajima factory but the telescope on the sight wouldn't lineup they turned around. He said is I can't get this damn telescope on the target. And so we called the radar operator, check your ground speed, and what are ground speed is he came back and he says we got one hundred and twenty-five not win. You said we're going about four hundred and eighty miles an hour simplicity of it can't be. There's no wins like that. New Air Force pilots had ever experienced what was now happening to the B twenty nine bombers over Japan, they expected winds a fraction of these speeds. God four hundred and eighty miles an hour when we should be going three hundred and forty miles an hour. I said well, land dropped the damn bombs. Dropped the bombs and we were already twelve miles past the target. Because of that win. They were bewildered and back at base that couldn't explain what happened to their superiors. They debriefed us I gave third degree. They said No. There is no such thing there can't be a win like that. You're lawyer you didn't make it over the target you're just making this up. But one crew after another arrived back at the Marianas told the exact same story. Tell you how powerful these winds were. Reconnaissance plane went up one time to take some pictures after mission to see how effective they've been and the navigator call the pilot and told him they were going three miles an hour backwards That was something you couldn't afford to do because if you went from east to West, you were going to be a sitting duck for Japanese fighters or their flack. To solve that puzzle, hensel turned his team of meteorologists. They've all been trained to the University of Chicago. Back then in the days before sophisticated radar meteorologists were crucial to the success of bombing campaigns. If you were doing a daylight bombing run over a city, you had to see the target it order to line up the bomb site, and if the skies were to cloudy that was impossible. So going or not going on emission hinged on the weather forecast. But, the tools available to meteorologists of that era were crude. The easiest thing to forget about the Second World War is that it was another technological era. It's half twentieth century and half. Nineteenth. Century. The chief tool of the meteorologists at that time were balloons weather balloons that would float up into the atmosphere carrying little instrument kits that could record the wind, the temperature and the humidity, and transmit that information back to Earth. I asked John Lewis about those days. He's a scientist at the Desert Research Institute in Nevada. He knew a number of the meteorologist who worked with the Air Force during the war and these balloons. They can forgive me very naive question. Are they connected by a rope or they just free floating on all? They'll eventually as the pressure gets lower as the balloon goes higher in the atmosphere, they expand expand, expand Kabul they explode and they fall to the ground with the instrument attached at that time, they had a message on all the instrument packages. Could you please return this to the University of Chicago? In the Pacific field of war that technique wasn't gonNA work. So they were the meteorologists in the middle of the Pacific with one of the most important jobs in the whole outfit figuring out when to send the bombers and they're baffled. What's with these winds? On a theoretical level. Do they have a suspicion that there may be very high winds and I out to choose at the Air Force or is it that they don't reach that conclusion until the pilots come back with their they did not reach the conclusions and tell the pilots came back. What slowly became clear is that the pilots had stumbled on a previously unknown phenomenon in the upper atmosphere. What came to be known as the Jetstream A river of fast-flowing air circles, the globe starting at around twenty thousand feet some scientists had theorized about the jet stream but until the twenty nine was built almost no one had ever flown at altitudes high enough to experience those winds firsthand. This fast stream of air very narrow. Moves. From. North to south in both hemispheres basically is dividing the very cold air of the polar regions from the more warm mid latitude and equatorial air. Yeah. When you say very narrow, how narrow? I would say typically two hundred kilometers across something on that order. So that's the narrowness of it. And does it entirely encircle earlier? It does. So. What is the problem facing the pilots gathered on the Marianas that in the winter of nineteen, forty four and the early spring of Nineteen Forty Five This narrow hurricane-force Benda they're known as the jetstream happens to be directly over Japan. And that makes it impossible for Hansel to do any of the precision bombing that he had planned to do. If they fly across it, the plane will get blown sideways. If they fly into it, they'll be fighting to stay aloft and be easy targets for the Japanese and if they fly with it w racing too fast take proper aim. In the service of a conviction that bombing could bring Japan to it's knees. Thousands of marines had been killed in the fight to capture the Mary. US. The construction of the three island airbases had been one of the most intensive engineering feats of the war. The two twenty nine was a three billion dollar project. That's forty three billion in today's money all that investment in the air war against the Japanese by December of nineteen forty four. come up empty. Hansel and all the other brass mary-anne. `As were bewildered. When a true believer discovers that his God cannot save him what's left Nothing. Haywood Hansell was finished. In January of nineteen forty five. Hansel was relieved of his post as head of the twenty first bomber command. In his place was put the man you bring in when all else has failed. Curtis Lemay. Even, decades later, possum Hansel would bristle would ask about the circumstances of his departure. And the person who replaced him in the Pacific. He had taught the May at the Air Corps Tactical School and was his commanding officer in Europe. Here's Hansel again at the air. Force Academy in Nineteen Sixty, seven. He's just been asked to name who he felt with the finest officers of his generation. Among People I. Knew in my little rea-. I would say the. Three hundred stunning ones. John Washable Landrovers Joe Fanshawe They were they.

Hansel Air Force Japan University of Chicago Pacific John Lewis Air Corps Tactical School scientist Mount Fuji Tokyo BBC hiatt Glenn Force Academy Haywood Hansell Curtis Lemay West hensel Nevada
The Latest in U.S. Legislation

Ask the Experts

06:21 min | 3 years ago

The Latest in U.S. Legislation

"And Tom Paula calluses on the phone talking talking us through the this year session and new bills at are out. And what's happening? So Tom you wanna finish up before we went to break a couple just to to remind listeners that there's a great website, WWW dot L, E, G dot state dot N, B got US. That's the legislative council bureaus of the legislature's website. And you can go there. It's very user friendly do search for whatever topic that you're interested in and you'll find the Bill there. It's just a fabulous resource for citizens dealing with the the water issue. There's an interesting Bill coming up AB two. Sixty five which would require the desert research institute to study water treatment and recycling so of interest of the conservation community, and then just keep in mind. There's also the again going back to the economic benefits we have a b three thirty one which would create an office about recreation and a grant program to help boost our tourism industry in the outdoor recreation area. So a lot of bills others that are dealing with conservation measures in general. So again, I just encourage people if you've got a particular interest not uniquely on conservation issues, but everything's up there on that. Let's cancel bureau website, and a great resource, you can put your opinion on bills directly online. Find your legislators contact information and to plug into the whole decision making process up in Carson city. That's right. Find your Bill track at follow it participate be a member of sustainable society. Things you said going to break was when you save electricity. You save on water. And what's interesting is. Conversely, that's true as well. So when you save on water also save on electric city because people don't think about well, if you're saving some water, you're saving water. That's great. But you also saving the pumping of that water. So there's a lot of lectures, e goes into getting that water delivered to people's faucets. Excellent point. So other things happening in the legislation. When do we expect to see some of these bills voted on well today, we'll be a big day again for a major advancement in clean energy with SP three fifty eight against shut up to Senator Chris Brooks? He's been moving that advancing that concept ever since he's been in the legislature starting off as an assemblyman. So again wanna recognize some of the folks that have. Kudos to the entire legislature. As it did move forward unanimously. But a couple of folks have been working at it for a long long time. Also to various groups that have supported us such as Nevada conservation league and others that have been really just getting the word out explaining the benefits later this week. Again, we have a b four sixty five that is coming up. So that is the Bill that would provide expanded solar access program and facilitate solar getting to lower income neighborhoods and an opportunity for lower income consumers to get some savings from solar. So those are bills that are coming up this week again, there's an opportunity to support or to voice your opinion. One. Also, go back to the electric school bus issue. That was again, Senator Chris Brooks working in conjunction with Senator Pat Spearman and trying to get more electric transportation on the roads specifically in the school sector, which I think is both. Great for the environment. But also provides an educational opportunity as kids get a chance to see what electric Motors can do as as we get those types of day calls on the roads time, I heard a metric one time that the Clark county school district is a second largest buses earn the US. Is that true? I was I could well be you may have. Yeah. It sounds sounds certainly plausible. They are the fifth largest district. And I think they're in districts that sized they're the most spread out most districts that are huge like that Lanta LA New York are more compressed than so more kids are are walking to school. So the school bus program. That's a great idea is this a pilot program, or is this a you gotta do this. So how knows Bill go to work a pilot program. Right. I mean, just the sheer number of as you allude to sheer number of buses, there's not funding in order to provide all all school districts. You know, certainly. Not all buses will be going electric. But certainly enough can get on the road where we can start to see some empirical data verify the cost savings estimates. See how they play out in in the real world. Be able to see how batteries perform under different conditions of high heat and so forth. And then also provides an opportunity to really see some interesting concepts. When you've got a big battery and about you've got an energy storage device that mobile, so there's been some interesting discussion as to addition to transporting students what could those batteries on buses be used for? And it's, you know, the idea of electric storage is certainly an important concept. Now, we have with electric school buses, the the idea that there was a need or backup power. You've got a big battery and a chance to move it on over to a facility that may not have power for whatever reason and get. Some some backup to critical facilities through electric school buses. So number of interesting ideas, how electric batteries and vehicles can help improve the grid down the road. We'll see more vehicle to grid integration. And the idea that batteries in whatever vehicle can help manage the grid more economically. And we also went to space seeing some ratepayer savings for everyone as we get more electric vehicles on the road as we'll be able to leverage our electric system more efficiently. So good stuff than about alleged. Sure is looking at. And so it's an exciting time and the energy relevant about. And thank you for for your interest and keeping people informed as to what's

Bill Senator Chris Brooks United States Tom Paula Clark County School District Desert Research Institute Senator Pat Spearman Carson City Nevada Conservation League Senator Lanta La New York