4 Burst results for "Desegregated High School"

What we've learned about Barrett's views on abortion cases

Her Turn

08:11 min | 2 years ago

What we've learned about Barrett's views on abortion cases

"Judiciary Committee hearings in full swing this week. Arlene's outta wrote this report. For many feminists, it is the most painful, outrageous and sad irony that the Supreme Court seat once held by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, one of the most staunch supporters of women's rights and civil rights, will soon be held by another woman. But one who seems to be the mirror opposite of R B, G and all her views the Senate Judiciary Committee hearings this week on the nomination of Amy Cockney Barrett to the Supreme Court. But her views on full display despite the fact that she repeatedly refused to answer questions about her opinions, questions on such settled issues as the right to birth control and the right to vote, including a peaceful transition of power. As the result of that vote, all got I cannot comment answers. When asked about her view opposing same sex marriage, she offhandedly used the term sexual preference when referring to the LGBT plus community, even though many activists say the term is offensive. One after another Democratic senators tried to press her on her record, such as the fact that she previously signed onto an ad describing abortion as barbaric and calling for the Roe v. Wade decision to be overturned. Her two dissenting opinions and abortion related cases, one of which involved allowing minors to get an abortion without notifying parents by way of judicial bypass, and another that would have required fetal remains to be formally buried. Observers say 17 cases related to abortion are one step away from the Supreme Court and three including a 15 week abortion ban from Mississippi could be taken up as early as its next session. And her only nod to any progressive opinion. Barrett seemed to support the idea of desegregation by calling the Brown v. Board of education decision a super precedent that isn't likely to ever be overturned. The Judiciary Committee is set to vote to approve barrettes nomination next week with a vote of the full Senate by the end of the month. Bang. With the nomination of Amy Cockney Barrett to the U. S. Supreme Court. Questions about her ties to the religious right have raised concerns about the fate of Roe v. Wade and a person's right to reproductive choices. Her turn. Reporter Ellen La Luzerne spoke with Karen Garst, who author to anthologies about the impact of religion on women. Women beyond belief, and women versus religion. Last received her PhD in curriculum and instruction from UW Madison and is a current resident in the state of Oregon. 2016 you published a book Women Beyond belief. In the book's introduction, You stated that you wrote the book after learning of the 2014 U. S. Supreme Court decision regarding Hobby lobby's denial of reproductive care for their employees. Your reaction was to question why a corporation can use its religious beliefs. To dictate the healthcare a woman could receive. Fast forward to today when we're witnessing the Supreme Court nomination process for a woman who is a valid Lee, a member of an extremist religious sect that believes that women should submit to their husbands What was your reaction when you heard about the nomination of Amy Clooney Barrett for the U. S Supreme Court. First of all, I wasn't surprised because Trump has already appointed people to the Supreme Court. I didn't watch quite a bit of the confirmation hearings of his previous nominees, so I wasn't surprised that he appointed someone who's conservative. He vowed when he was elected that he would appoint justices to the Supreme Court who would overturn Roe v. Wade. If Connie Bear is confirmed, What is your opinion about the impact that this might have for future cases such as the Affordable care act and a woman's right to choose? Well, I think it's going to have very dilatory ous impacts because now we're going to have a Supreme Court. That is considered very conservative. I believe six of the justices will be considered Catholic, and there are going to write decisions as they have for that have a conservative bent. I think it's very unfortunate that the Supreme Court has become so politicized. If we look in our history. One of the things that I was doing some research on was previous decisions and Brown vs the Board of Education. Which desegregated schools was fundamental change to the way this society was operating was a 9 to 0 decision, and people saw what was happening in society, and I talked to a friend of mine who is a lawyer there. Who said, you know, there's this public sentiment. That's how culture changes. And people were attuned to that, And now we're not appointing people to the Supreme Court who have an open view. They're very, very one sided, and I think it's totally tragic that she's going to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg. What do you think the consequences will be for Roe v. Wade and access to freedom of choice? An abortion? There will always be abortion. The question is whether it's going to be safe and whether it's going to be legal. There has been throughout time before Roe v. Wade. It was back alley abortions, and I think younger women today they don't know what it was like before then Roe v. Wade. If it were completely overturned, I think would have a revolution. It might take a while to put it together. Rather, I think what they'll do is just approved all these restrictions on it, making the doctors who on abortion clinics we associate with the hospital, whether it's making AA lot regulations on the clinic itself and what it can have and what it has to have delegating more. The authority of states and people are going to have to say I don't want to live in a state like this. If they overturn it completely and make abortion illegal. I just Hey, I'm ready to start the revolution. I don't think they're going to go that far. But who knows? What do you think, drives the women who are supporting people like Coney, Bharat and Support these types of efforts to keep women as subservient to men, such as the belief system of Annie Cockney Barrett. Religion is an indoctrination in a set of beliefs. I'm 70 when I was growing up in the fifties in Bismarck, North Dakota. Every person I knew went to a church or there were three Jewish families who went to a synagogue. But it was part of everybody's life. So you're indoctrinated in that It's your family. Everybody else around you is like that. Unless you're exposed to something different. This shapes who you are. And we know that Trump was elected by conservatives by people who identified as religion, particularly fundamentalist religion. That's too he appeals to, and it's unfortunate that the religion hasn't changed enough to deal with our society today. What is interesting to me? Is that this woman, Amy Cockney Barrett is very intelligent. She is ah, Notre Dame professor. She's an appellate court judge, and she has seven kids. I can't imagine trying to balance all that. But in spite of that conservative religion, it is pretty hard to say, Well, she's helped meat of her husband because she is Ted her own career. In your

U. S. Supreme Court Amy Cockney Barrett ROE Wade Ruth Bader Ginsburg U. S Supreme Court Judiciary Committee Senate Judiciary Committee Annie Cockney Barrett Brown Arlene Senate Hobby Lobby Mississippi Donald Trump Bismarck Ellen La Luzerne
NAACP moving from Baltimore to Washington DC

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

NAACP moving from Baltimore to Washington DC

"Is moving its headquarters to a part of the district that's preparing for a major redevelopment project. The end of the CCP has served as the nation's largest civil rights organization with its main offices in Baltimore. But the organization has signed a letter of intent to relocate its headquarters to the Frank D. Reeves Center. Right on the northwest corner of 14th and you street, the building will be transformed into a mixed use hub with affordable housing, Another neighborhood serving amenities. It's a project Mayor Muriel Bowser calls Nick and culturally significant. Frank D. Reeves was a civil rights activist and attorney who worked with the end of the CP to shape the Brown versus Board of Education case that desegregated schools. Melissa held A popular

Frank D. Reeves Frank D. Reeves Center Mayor Muriel Bowser CCP Baltimore Melissa Board Of Education Nick
Historically Black Colleges' Contributions to the NFL with Dr. Derrick E. White

In Black America

06:27 min | 2 years ago

Historically Black Colleges' Contributions to the NFL with Dr. Derrick E. White

"On this week's program historically black colleges and universities and the NFL with Doctor Derrick white in black America in their celebration of the hundred year. It was not as historical as we would like right. I think the for better for worse college football who celebrate the One hundred fiftieth year and in conjunction with ESPN primarily. Done these series of documentaries. That kind of documenting the game so they did a great set of talking about the early game when the Ivy Leagues Dominated College Football. Right you get that kind of Astaldi. Nfl is not so much right. In their part of Wigan's law says that the integration the reintegration of the. Nfl in part is done. Because you know teams WanNa move to the West Coast Right. They WanNa play in Los Angeles And that the black community the La said no in particular forced the L. A. Don's to say if you WANNA come in you. GotTa you gotTa desegregate Your Team. So woody strode gets an opportunity to play and Kenny Washington gets a chance to try out for these teams and they make these teams in the NFL so we were talking about the kind of reintegration of of professional football as the National Football League celebrated. Its first one hundred seasons unbeknownst to many sports fans the NFL didn't have any African American players for decade from Nineteen thirty four to nineteen forty-six. There was an unspoken agreement between owners to ban African American players today. They are two African American general managers for minority head coaches and one chief operating officer for the first time the crew for sue both fifty four had a record number of minority officials of the seven on the field five for African Americans the contribution of historical black colleges and universities. Acc use to the NFL has changed the game forever undrafted by an NFL team. Paul tank younger was the first African American player from grambling State University to play in the NFL when he signed with the Los Angeles Rams in nineteen forty nine the first African American drafted in the NFL draft was jaws rooks. I running back out of Morgan state in the Eleventh Round. One hundred and twenty fifth overall by the Green Bay packers in nineteen fifty one doing super bowl fifty four week in south Florida Group of area high school athletes had an opportunity to learn about the rich history of black college football and his contributions to the NFL and Black America spoke with doctor. Derrick wide associate professor at the University of Kentucky. When I was teaching a class on sports history I found that the students knew nothing about historically black college role. They were as part of their assignment. They had researched The histories of sports history at various institutions and students had cookman in Florida. And I knew that those are really successful. Athletic programs and students came back with nothing. And so I've you know I just thought chalked up. Initially students being students that they just didn't do enough but when we both begin system. I realized there was a huge gap in the scholarship. And there's a Lotta work on sports. History is a lot of work on college sports especially college football but there was very little nearly nothing on historically black colleges And so at the time I was at Florida Atlantic in so I was like Bam. You is like right up the road. Well you know eight hours away from my house but I and I knew Jay. Gator was dominant. I'd heard these stories from my uncles and I knew he was a fantastic program so I did a research trip and I went up there and they have the archivists there. And the the library's at up in Florida were amazing and they gave me these materials in there. All these letters documents and so I had budgets and letters of professional teams and I begin to understand how he organized his football program because the issue is discussed our Pamela Day. That there wasn't a lot of research money. A lot of research recruiting money not money budgets. Within Coach Gate. There was the ad coach basketball at one point. And those things. I thought those kinds of stories and that the greatness that the success that he was able to produce was Willie Gallimore Kim. Rowley Bob Hayes. I wanted to understand how that was done. I didn't WANNA chalk it up to that. These were just natural athletes that there was something being done happening on these institutions in some coaches Were better than others and so I wanted to tell that story talk about. Integration Immigration had a positive effect but it also had a devastating effect on also African Americans going to the NFL right so an integration was boom for professional football. Right then you know one of the reasons that Jake was so able to be so successful especially early on in the forties and early fifties that many of his former players gather degrees and became teachers in the high schools. All across the State of Florida and North Georgia. And so he would. They would just send him letters. Like hey coach gay. Got This really. Good kid this Willie Gallimore guys pretty good right. Like this is how he got recruiting information was from his former players but those players were talented but there was no professional football opportunities and so when those opportunities really begin to open up a specially after nineteen sixty when the AFL comes in then professional football now creates a new opportunity for black colleges in small colleges in general and so that becomes this boom and on the backside that the course the civil rights movement is happening at this exact same time right so brown. V Board of Education. This is entire push to desegregate schools Whether the high school level colleges etc and so so many ways why colleges Kinda caught between their own. Their success right. They're producing these great players in the NFL. Minium all pros as we talked about earlier. Thirty two or in the NFL Hall of fame at the same time. There are new opportunities at Florida. Miami or Georgia and that these schools especially in the deep south are slowly trying to recruit them when you look back at the history of ACC using his contribution to to the NFL. I found it amazing and the one hundred year the League. There's very little that has been articulated about a SPEC- US or the early African American players and they and their celebration of the hundredth year. It was not as historical as we would like right. I think the you know for better for Worse College Football who celebrated his Hundred Fiftieth Year and in conjunction with ESPN primarily. Done these series of documentaries that kind of documenting the game so they did a great set of documentaries talking about the early game when the Ivy League dominated college football. Right you get that kind of Nfl is not so much

National Football League Football Florida Ivy Leagues Dominated College Derrick White Espn Astaldi Los Angeles Willie Gallimore Kim Ivy League Woody Strode America United States Rowley Bob Hayes League Willie Gallimore ACC Green Bay Packers
Black Teachers Wanted

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

10:46 min | 2 years ago

Black Teachers Wanted

"America is becoming more and more diverse every year and that means our schools are also also seeing increasing numbers of students of color but the trend isn't necessarily reflected in teachers across the country. Black students and other students of color rarely see the teachers who look like them and that can have serious consequences for their education and their future for the beginning of black history month. We wanted to play you. An episode from our archives that goes into the history of black teachers in America why gaps and representation among teachers persist to this day and what we can do to address this issue. Hi I'm Lizzie. Does he get era and misses the scholars strategy networks. No jargon each week we discussed an American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon and and in this episode I spoke to Dr Michelle Foster. She's a professor. And the Henri Hauser Endowed Chair in urban partnerships at the University of Louisville and a former teacher in the Boston public school system. Here's our conversation Dr Foster thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for asking asking me. So you've conducted a lot of research on teaching but before that you were in the classroom yourself. Where did you start teaching? Well I started teaching in and the Boston public schools before desegregation which was in one thousand nine hundred ninety four and so the first year. I was a system wide substitute teacher which meant I taught in almost all of the schools. That would be in Boston. That would have you. That would have me and sometimes the schools that where I could manage. oftentimes the principal would come at recess. And if I was still there he said can you come. I'm back tomorrow because as you know. Substitutes often have difficulty with some classrooms and urban schools and then the second year I was a teacher at the William Monroe Charter school which was one of the first magnet schools in Boston. And can you tell US quickly. What a what is a magnet school? A magnet schools were schools that usually had themes And they were designed to help ease desegregation to have programs that might be a program in music. What theater with the idea that you would attract voluntarily Ellen Terry Lee attract white students to attend thereby making it easier to desegregate and Boston had magnet schools before actually the court order in nineteen seventy four? Lots of Cities Louisville has a magnet program. So I had a three four five combination at the charter school. which is we're not too far from where I lived? And then the next year I had a job. As a fifth grade teacher at the champlain. School which was in Dorchester. And tell me more about those experiences. What was that like working in the Boston? Public school system during that time. Well that was a time. When Boston didn't necessarily hire hire black or African American teachers black teachers tended to be segregated in predominantly African American or black schools? Boston would often have overcrowded. African American school bus them passed a under cry and under crowded white school to another overcrowded. Black school the charter school was of a magnet school. So it was is racially mixed but the champlain. School was probably predominantly baby. Ninety nine percent African American there was a school across way which was the John Marshall School and the schools were segregate they were in a cluster of schools. But the John Marshall's which was across Washington street at the time was predominantly white and my school was predominantly African American. We it was like today day. We have very few supplies not many many books. Hence Loretta Premium No Playground equipment was a place. Where if you want to be a successful teacher you had to be creative? And it's one of the places I learned. I think to be a good teacher. you know. If you don't have textbooks textbooks are good but you can do a lots of things if you don't have them so one of the things I used to do is take the textbook and cut up the story the reading story and put on cards and hand them out to the kids and then I read the first paragraph and I say who is that the next one and that solve off two problems one. If you've ever taught you realize kids don't follow along so they never really know what page you're on that solve. That problem and I realized later on that I was teaching sequencing using because in order to know what comes next. You have to listen so it is possible with not a lot of equipment or supplies to be creative in your teaching but but of course you have to WanNa be wanna be creative and I had not been prepared as a teacher you know. I didn't study teaching so I was left to my own devices. But what I thought would make sense for kids and part of my principal was to have them excited. I felt like if you came to school every day. It was like Christmas. was you'd WanNa come so of course. I was probably not your typical teacher and and I think that my kids probably made too much noise. The principal would always be knocking on my door as they were noisy. Because in those days I suppose even today silence and comportment comportment looking like your on task. Whatever that means? You'll you'll pay attention is kind of rules the day. But I wasn't that kind of a teacher. I would run and have racist with the kids. I would play kickball where I would throw the ball. And then the kids would have to give a multiplication table and they'd have to answer it and then kick so I tried to combine the physical Cole with intellectual. I had all kinds of little tricks that I did. I suppose even as a college teacher later on I have some of those. And how did those early experiences in the classroom GonNa Affect your later research. The research questions you wanted to explore. I don't think I thought too much about that. Initially it wasn't until I laid Iran. Iran started my academic and my first job was at University of Pennsylvania. And I would ask you to summer school courses and I decided to teach teachers perspectives on teaching. You know I just. I just thought it was a two week course. I went decide. I would use autobiographies or biographies of teachers on their own practice. And when I looked into the literature I found very few Accounts of black teachers about their own practice and so. I thought this is unusual because I knew enough to know that for most of history black students have been taught by black teachers right. I knew that so I was shot that there were no. They were not more accounts of their practice. Because I found a few and it on the basis of that. I decided that I would do a study that looked at life histories of black African American teachers. And that's how I got into that area I was led into it just circumstantially. It was not something I had planned to look at. And so tell us about what you found then. Well one of the things I was interested in was what were the experiences of black teachers and I was particularly looking at teachers who were who started. Arctic teaching before desegregation I knew the desegregation was a pivotal moment in the education of African American students. I didn't know what I find and so the earliest teacher who was the oldest oldest was born in one thousand nine five. She taught in polly's island South Carolina. And then I found teachers to a process I called community nomination which was to ask S. communities I made up that term made it up to nominate teachers who they thought were particularly successful and so I went around the country Texas I went to Missouri. Glory and these teachers and then for many many years I wrote academic articles about them. You know just what the teachers had to say was kind of used in the service service of making better big points in a lot of points and then at some point someone. The new press actually asked me if I would write a book and I wrote a book called Black Teachers on teaching and that was like I was ninety. Seven with a twenty interviews are actually you know not condemn not cut up their whole interviews and many of these teachers would teach who started in in segregated schools in Texas and then made the transition to working in the newly integrated desegregated schools in the south. So that's story that I I was pleased because later on many young African American teachers who came of age nineties and two thousands read that book and many of them have commented that the situation that I just got different than what they are today. So you have worked as a teacher both before and after desegregation you have studied sort of that transition and what. It's looked like for other teachers across the country. Let's talk about the situation right now. Do you know enough about the typical sort of American teacher. Fair to say what that person kind of looks like on average today. You know we do know that there are more male teachers at high school than Elementary School. Most of the teachers at elementary the are women and as it turns out. They are white women from suburban and rural communities who teach the population of teach of African American teachers. It has not changed that much over time. In fact I was at a conference not too long ago and although the numbers are increasing in other words number of people afterward teachers will be coming candidates and going into teaching positions. They have the highest attrition rate. They ended up leaving in greater numbers numbers than other teachers. And I think there are some reasons for that. Of course you know one of the reasons is that they often get assigned to the most difficult teaching conditions. I mean let's the honest people want African American teachers because I think that they will be good for African American children. And there's no doubt that that's probably the case but you know if they end up in a school whether or no supplies wear. There are a lot of difficulties and they're not going to likely to stay especially if they don't have support to make it so although we know that the number of African American churches increasing we also know that the number of relieving actually not even lasting three years is also increasing. So it's been a zero sum game. The numbers have not increased appreciably that much because of that and then let's talk about the benefits to students. What are the good things that having a teacher who may be looks like you and your community can afford to students? Well for a long time. People had this idea that was just the role model argument. The reason that African American children in a benefit of having african-american role model then in two thousand three. I think it was a man. Whose name is Thomas? D actually wrote a wrote an article. What he had done he looked at some old studies? Are these that had randomly assigned students and teachers which is very rare in education research. Because you can't resign randomly assigned teachers and students but there was one study and he realized it one of the things he found. Is that where you had a teacher match. When you had a black students who had black teachers have teachers? They actually improved in their standardized test scores scores and of course he had a hard time publishing it. Partly because you know sometimes things that can be positive and also have negative kickback. People thought what would happen if if if we could say that matching teacher and student on race was a good thing. I mean you could use that negatively as well so he was the first person to write that article and then recently there have been more articles that have come out that have shown that African American students who have African American teachers are more likely to graduate graduate. They're less likely to be suspended or punished. punitively they're more likely to be assigned to gifted and talented less likely to go to special the lead and a host of other

Boston African American School Boston Public School Black School Principal Dr Michelle Foster America William Monroe Charter School Texas John Marshall School Elementary School Champlain Henri Hauser Endowed Chair University Of Louisville Professor Louisville United States John Marshall Ellen Terry Lee Wanna