31 Burst results for "Desegregated"

"desegregated" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:56 min | 2 months ago

"desegregated" Discussed on WTOP

"1153, a statue of former president Harry Truman was unveiled today inside the capitol rotunda. That statue of the nation's 33rd president, which was sculpted by a Kansas City artist, depicts mister Truman wearing a double breasted jacket and walking down steps. It also includes the phrase he used to display on his desk in the Oval Office, the buck stops here. The Missouri native helped end World War II created the United Nations and NATO desegregated both the armed forces and the federal workforce and helped lead the world's response to the Soviet Union. The general services administration says it's getting closer to picking a location for the new FBI headquarters, and we've learned how the three finalists will be judged. It's a story you're hearing first here on WTO. Locations in greenbelt land over and Springfield will be measured by 5 different criteria, the highest value being placed on FBI mission requirements, which is measured by a location's proximity to the bureau's training academy in Quantico, other FBI offices in DoJ headquarters. That seems to favor the Springfield Virginia site over the two in Maryland. Second most important is transportation to find his access to metro to local commuter rail services bus lines and commercial airports. After that, the sites will be judged on the flexibility that each side offers how they advance equity and promote sustainable communities and how much it'll cost to acquire the land and build it those sites, GSA also confirms that even after a suburban side is chosen, it'll work to find a new downtown location to keep some FBI personnel near DoJ headquarters. The final decision is expected in the coming months. John dome in WTO P news. Metro unveiled its new headquarters building today in southwest and all of the writers who use the transit service every day, those who are disabled may be cheering the loudest for this new building. When Denise rush started losing her sight 22 years ago, her job in home were at stake. I was panicking

mister Truman FBI capitol rotunda Harry Truman GSA Springfield Oval Office Kansas City WTO DoJ NATO greenbelt Soviet Union United Nations Missouri Quantico Maryland John dome Virginia Denise rush
"desegregated" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

06:12 min | 3 months ago

"desegregated" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"And throwing things. Today, ruby bridges is a civil rights activist. And an author, her new children's book, I am ruby bridges. Tells her story through her 6 year old eyes. So I asked her to read a bit for me. Second day, when I arrived at my classroom, my new teacher opens the door and greets me. Hi, I'm misses Henry. Your teacher. Come in and take a seat, she says. Then aren't I surprised? Because she is also white. For never have a white teacher before. The biggest surprise of all, I am the only kid in the class. I didn't see any other kids at all. Not one. That test must have been a lot harder than I thought. Why am I the only kid in my class? Not to mention the only kid in the whole school. The why don't I see anyone who looks like me? And then that's when it hit me. Because I was reading it took me a minute to get that, but why there were no other kids. This is because white parents had come to school and pulled their kids out, taking them home. Absolutely, when I arrived on the first day, the mob of people standing outside rushed inside of the building behind me. I was escorted to the principal's office where I sat the whole day with my mom, waiting to be assigned to a classroom, but that did not happen because every one of those parents rushed in behind me, went into every classroom, and they pulled out every time. I watched them for raid, right? Passed me out of the school building, and so by the time I got there on the second day, the school was totally empty. I am so sorry you had to go see that. Did it get better? Did kids other kids eventually show up? You know, I think part of the story that lots of people are not aware of is that there were some white parents who actually tried to cross that same picket line that same mom. During that year to bring their kids to school with me. But it was only a handful maybe 5, 6 kids. And the principal would take them and she would hide them. So that they would never see me and I would never see them. I remember hearing voices, but I never saw kids. And it kept me wondering where the voices were coming from. But if they were real at all, when I did not know is that every time I would mention it to misses Henry, she was going to the principal and advocating for me. She was saying, you know, the laws changed. And kids can be together now, but you're hiding them from a big. If you don't allow them to come together, I'm going to report you to the superintendent. And that forced them to allow misses Henry to take me to where they were being hidden. And that was near the end of the year. Here are the end of the year. I'm thinking I just introduced you as the first African American student to integrate an elementary school in the south and it sounds like integrate was way too strong a word for what was happening at that school for most of that school year. Yes. You know, that was always something that bothered me. I was the only kid and it stayed that way. Until the end of the year and misses Henry took me to this other classroom and opened the door and lo and behold there they were. Four or 5 kids sitting there playing and I was so excited. It didn't matter to me what they looked like. I just wanted someone my own age to play with. So I was excited to find them finally. But I have to say that that was the day that I realized that everything was about me. In the color of my skin because a little boy said, I can't play with you. My mom said not to play with you and he called me the N word. And that's when I had my aha moment. That the reason why there were no kids. Here. It was because of me and the color of my skin. He actually made it make sense. I did not realize what was going on around me until he told me. And that my first encounter with racism. He introduced it to me. Your only in your 60s now. What happened to you that first day of school was so recent in the grand scheme of things, and it occurs to me that the kids reading this today, many, most of them will take it for granted that black and white kids go to school together. It's just totally normal. Like, how else would it be? They've never known anything else. How did you think about writing to kids for whom this must feel like ancient history in a way? And yet it's so clearly isn't. What I found in the past 25 years visiting schools and talking to kids and working with them, I think that they relate to the loneliness. They relate to someone not wanting to play with you. For no real good reason. Not giving you a chance. So kiss, it resonates with them. They're not quite understand why someone would do that. Why someone would treat another person like that. And I think that they feel like, why don't we give each other a chance? Try to get to know each other. That everyone at that age wants a friend to play with.

ruby bridges Henry
"desegregated" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

03:23 min | 8 months ago

"desegregated" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"Jesse, when we talk about what happened 75 years ago today when Jackie Robinson desegregated Major League Baseball, I gotta say, it's hard not to feel like we're talking about a symbol like something abstract, something bigger than the specific dude who broke the color barrier of the national pastime in ways that continue to reverberate. So who was Jackie Robinson, the person, the athlete? He went to UCLA, the legendary UCLA and was sort of a ridiculous, unprecedented multi sport athlete. He is the only UCLA athlete to ever earn letters in four sports baseball basketball football and track. So let's start with the one he was probably the least good at in basketball. All he did was win the West Coast conference MVP, and he was only 5 foot 11. If you move on to track and field, he won NCAA titles in the long jump. If the 1940 and 44 Olympics had not been canceled due to World War II, he probably would have been an Olympian. But now we get to football and football might have been his best sport even considering his greatness in baseball. So in 1939 and 1940, he led the nation in punt return average. In 39, he was all PAC ten. He led the bruins to an undefeated season in 1940 he led the bruins and passing and rushing yardage. This is the type of athlete that we've really never seen even since then in those 75 80 years. No. So then after college, he was drafted into the army because the war is going on. He became a second lieutenant, which was extraordinarily rare for any black man, and he served in the 761st black Panthers tank battalion. He also was a husband of Rachel Robinson and at the time that he entered Major League Baseball. He was the father of a son. Jackie junior was born in 1946. He got his start in baseball in the Negro leagues with the Kansas City monarchs, one of the great franchises from that legendary Negro league time. So in 1947, Jackie Robinson was 28 years old. This combination of his athletic ability and by all accounts he was really a person of character and these characteristics were what made him attractive to the Dodgers because they knew that when they signed somebody, not only had they better produce on the field, but they also had to have the strength of character to survive what was coming. We talked to Jackie's youngest son, David Robinson, and asked him, who was your father? He was a grandchild. He was a child. He was a member of a race that he was an American citizen. In that day and age, particularly, he saw the responsibility to make opportunities where there was none in existence. So I think he stood up for himself, his family, and was able to make standing up his position in life, which he maintained right up until his death. So.

Jackie Robinson UCLA baseball football bruins basketball Rachel Robinson Jesse Jackie junior West Coast NCAA Olympics Negro league Panthers Major League army Kansas City Dodgers David Robinson
"desegregated" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

01:47 min | 8 months ago

"desegregated" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

"Reverend James M Lawson junior is one of the architects of the principles and practices of nonviolence, used in the civil rights movements of the 1950s and 1960s. His new book about revolutionary nonviolence offers a way to think about meeting today's challenges. When counseling, the Little Rock 9, high school students who desegregated the all white central high school in 1957, the reverend James M Lawson junior says he prescribed a way of acting in the face of violence that creates personal and social transformation. The methodist minister whose theories and strategies of nonviolence were used in the civil rights struggles of the 1950s and 1960s calls it soul force. Considered the architect of the nonviolent strategies of the civil rights movement, mister Lawson suggested when white students would throw projectiles at the black students in class that they took a deep breath and carry the bomb back to the student who threw it. One girl, carlotta walls, he says, told him she did just that. And the boy turned all kinds of complexions and could not speak. But the next morning, when she walked into that class, the boy said with a big smile, good morning, in a wide ranging interview about his new book, revolutionary nonviolence, organizing for freedom, a collection of his talks and dialogs, he told the monitor that most changes in human history aren't wrought by violence. But by changes of the mind and of the spirits. This Q&A was conducted by Dwight a weingarten for.

Reverend James M Lawson white central high school reverend James M Lawson mister Lawson Little Rock carlotta Dwight weingarten
"desegregated" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:14 min | 10 months ago

"desegregated" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"American Airlines hired David Harris in 1964 he became the first African American pilot for a commercial airline Historia of how he broke the color barrier in the clouds is the subject of the young adult book segregated skies It's by Pulitzer Prize winner Michael cotman and Pierre Elizabeth Blair has more Today David Harris is 87 he doesn't fly anymore and he misses it It's the greatest job in the world I would have done it Another 30 years had I not grown old Harris got his first inkling about a future flying airplanes growing up in Columbus Ohio He and his brother used to visit the lockbourne Air Force Base That's where the decorated tuskegee airmen were stationed after World War II My brother and I had run around the base and never paid any attention to the fact that all the people on the base were blocked At the time the armed forces were segregated Harris got to know some of the famed airmen who he says would have been perfect for the commercial airlines Like nobody would hire them But nobody would hire them President Truman desegregated the armed forces in 1948 a decade later David Harris was in flight training for the air force Lin may his wife at the time says he was able to stay focused despite the racism he faced To learn to do something While you know there are people around you who think you are inherently incompetent takes great for great courage and David had that After spending 6 years flying B-52s in the military Harris applied to be a pilot at several commercial airlines only American offered him an interview as a light skinned African American with green eyes Harris was often mistaken for white Michael cotman says that during the interview with American Airlines he went out of his way to set the record straight He stopped him and just said hey look I just want you to know before we proceed that I'm black because he is so proud of his heritage that he didn't want to pass the question And so he said he was stunned because the recruiter sort of chuckled I think And he just said look he says man you know I really don't care if you're a black white or chartreuse Can you fly an airplane Yes he could Harris.

David Harris Michael cotman Pierre Elizabeth Blair Harris lockbourne Air Force Base American Airlines Pulitzer Prize President Truman Columbus Ohio Lin David
Joe Biden Contradicts Himself Visiting an HBCU

The Dan Bongino Show

01:29 min | 1 year ago

Joe Biden Contradicts Himself Visiting an HBCU

"Joe's alert Joe is out of HBCU today So you know that he is telling stories like nobody's business you know that they are just lies flying out of that man's mouth But he is having a hilarious day today So Jim isolated some clips just play whatever Jim whatever comes up first As I sat in a black church after going to 7 o'clock mass I'm a practicing Catholic And 10 o'clock on east side getting ready to go out and decide to get restaurants and movie theaters During the 60s I was in fact very concerned about the civil rights movement I was not an activist I worked at an all black swimming pool in the east side of Wilmington Delaware I was involved I was involved in what they were thinking what they were feeling I was involved but I was not out marching I was not down in Selma I was not anywhere else So somebody had contrasted that first clip of Biden telling absolute lie that he was out at the black church getting ready to go out and desegregate America What would we have done without Joe Biden And then there's a clip from him sounding way more lucid many years ago Saying that of course not he wasn't involved with his 1987 Thank you I would have been in the 7th grade in 1987 But yeah Biden I can't tell if he is a liar or if he's just

JOE JIM Wilmington Delaware Selma Swimming Biden Joe Biden America
"desegregated" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"desegregated" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"And boot camp. It was with something. No slack, you know, those lack at all. One person messed up the whole proton was punished, you know? At night. But somebody would say something at the tip. And the drill in front of their barracks, but hurts us doesn't know they don't want in the trail. So all I found out grabbed a locker box. And you're on the way, that puts us falling farmers and drill your right shoulder left so a lot of box stuff like that. All your clothes are something that walked around to the very some time they watch it, while they're going up here, then they give it to the real march. In fact, and 7 days a week we had training, you know, even on Sundays they were marching to church. But when you come back, then the drill and from the side, he wanted to drive it on, I do something. So I guess we were the hounds. Anyway, I'm on a finished boot camp, came home on leave. My grandfather, and he said, you might be in the main go, but I still run things around here. 8 o'clock, if you come if you've come home and the doors are closed, you might as well stay out because you're not coming in here. You know, let us know that he was still in charge, you know? Did you ever think about quitting during the difficult basic training? I thought about it, but I am just as I said, I'm going to stick it out. A lot of them didn't make it in the Marine Corps, but they John the army. After that. They made it in the army. I'll write it from Louisiana AI and why. How long were you at montford point? Well, after boot camp I was transferred to second marine second service, but session at what you call a camp Geiger. I guess I get it. Well, I'm a basic on a Sanya to after that. You had to go for advanced training. And then I was assigned. I can't believe that during the time that we were in boot camp. You can go to mainsail unless you possess it because it was all white. From the captain, I was transferred to warm. And the Pacific stayed there two and a half years. And came back. Let me go in well broke out. Well, let's pause right there. Mister grubs, we'll take a quick break and we'll come right back with your story on veterans chronicles. Welcome back. I'm great Columbus, honored to be joined in studio today by Eugene groves, a veteran of the United States Marine Corps, and of the famed montford point marines. And Sarah, we were just talking about you completing basic training at montford point and you're just about to tell us about when the Korean War broke out, but I want to touch on one thing before that, because in 1948, president Truman desegregated the armed forces, what did that mean for you specifically at that time? 1948. I don't see where it made in the difference from the time when I went in. Doing that. There were no immediate changes. We had separate barracks, stuff like that, you know. We lived in one area. And apparently they've done another area. And it was not integrated. It was definitely not even when I came back in Korean War. We would get to that..

montford point army Marine Corps Eugene groves Sanya Geiger montford point marines Louisiana United States Marine Corps John Pacific Columbus president Truman Sarah
"desegregated" Discussed on Legion of Skanks Podcast

Legion of Skanks Podcast

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"desegregated" Discussed on Legion of Skanks Podcast

"Nine eleven hijacker. He does it not look his hair and beard or one piece county show. That's muhammed haha. I'm pretty sure. I saw that guy to strip club on september tenth. It looks like one hundred percent of his hair comes in one thing. You got a belly full of pizza hut sweetheart. You're not an ugly pig. Lewis said you don't have to hide you're not garbage but you're not like ugly. He's hot but she's probably a dude. Let's get real. There's no way it's a real woman because so hottest microwave bacon michael baking this a sit down for breakfast family growing up yet bacon. Spit it you like. You're walking into a desegregated school causing the best big but it causes the least amount of clean up. That means a lot to me. It also big on like when begins chewy. It's gross to me. You're arguing yes. It's great causes. The la- less amount of cleanup isn't really an argument. No one was really. It is for me. Yeah you're is. No one was really disputing that. It's easier to make bacon and make a lot of food choices based off easy cleanup okay. That explains it by convincing him. I totally to that. Argument rests totally relate. To that. If i if i didn't have a wife to do everything for me yeah i would live that life too. I would live the life of your thing. Christine doesn't clean up after you know after me. I mean sure i guess. But we both clean we'll jay's you're different than me in that way i'm naturally slob. I have to fight to not be a sly louis. Louis is naturally a slob. Jay is naturally not a slob. You're naturally like it you couldn't you couldn't sleep in filthy fucking place like you'd be. That would mean. Dave were roommates. Imagine like a city of beer bottles with like fucking cigarette butts all the beer ball. Either cleveland clean christina. When i found her three twenty four. Yeah really now. When we say a city i mean. We're talking skyscrapers. There was a whole metro system was probably once in a while. You'd accidentally kick one beer bottles and then like dominoes. They all fall so cruel beer and cigarettes. It'd be everywhere. I'm so glad he walked into this part. Where's the bathroom. Oh i didn't even realize it was that nobody i'm i'm naturally a falcon slob and i'm naturally with all that shit lazy like even when i was broke his shit. When i was single i would. I would order not order out but go out. Do take out and shit like that. By 'cause i just can't. I had no energy to cook anything. I love brooklyn. But i hate cleaning. And i know same way. I like being clean. But i love clean so i try to. I'm lazy. also try to find convenient ways to not make a mess. I said this before. Now in hotel rooms because there's no housekeeping. I sleep on top of the whole thing but now they would have enjoyed lately though. I don't even do this at home on top of all on top of the bed. Move the sheets and sheets out. But now when i started doing is and this has been their housekeeping. There you just have to ask on the bay you check out. There they escort. Yeah that's someplace you can't they don't do it at all. I have been jumping around a bunch now but they. I don't understand why you sleep on why..

strip club Lewis michael Christine la jay Jay christina Louis cleveland Dave brooklyn
"desegregated" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

06:46 min | 1 year ago

"desegregated" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"For desegregating Dallas schools. Want to compare him. Contrast him to the black lives matter. Critical race theory garbage in our schools right now, In just a moment, 800 to 88 w B. A P is our number 800 to 889227. But first the city of Fort Worth is considering renaming. Uh, several streets have one street in particular. But, you know, several I know what blocks or longer. Of ST to Tatiana Jefferson Street. And I have nothing negative to say about Miss Jefferson or family. But we should not be naming streets, science after somebody because they died in a tragedy. That should not be a reason to rename a street sign. I want to ask something else too in and would this would they be pushing for this? These city Council members. Would they be pushing for this? If the person Who if Miss Jefferson was white? I mean, think of what they honestly be doing that If not, then why are they doing this? I don't think they should be really naming streets after her to begin with. Unless you want to start lining up everybody who has died from a tragedy. And just make a long list. By the way, you know, Here's another thing I thought about 2 700 property owners are going to have to change their address. If this goes through. And by the way, the City Council member in this district says. You know, it's not. It shouldn't be about the money. The money shouldn't matter. It's not about the money. It is not about the money. It's about the idea of naming renaming streets because somebody died from a tragedy. That is not a reason to rename streets. He, uh, the City Council member who pushed is pushing for this. I understand. People say it's going to cost the city money while her life is worth more money than the city will ever pay for church changing that name. That's not the reason dude. That's not why we shouldn't do this. We shouldn't do this because We are. We are We only picking certain people are we saying we're only going to rename the street because somebody's African American. They died from the police tragedy. I hope not. Because right now we've seen that in Dallas with Botham, Jean Which I was against that one as well. And the Tatiana Jefferson. And if so, every single street can be renamed because I guarantee you will not everyone, most of have some sort of a tragedy. 800 to 8 Vapes are number 800 to 889227. And what's the What is the What's the protocol here? What's the list? We check off the list is it only people who are black, who are deceased in a tragic Tussle with police or tragic incident with police. Oh, that's good. Yeah, that's that's That's the new stimulation. By the way. For the record, I've been totally on the record as well. About. We never should have named Um, victory. In Dallas. Renamed it to, uh What's his name of the From the retired for the maps, Dirk Never should have renamed it after dark. Let the man live a life. Pass away Hopefully when he's in the late of ripe old age of natural causes, because we don't want to look. Didn't you learn with Bill Cosby? There were street names after this, dude. Let people live their life before you rename a street named after them. Now. In conjunction with this because to me this is all about the race Pimp ary and the Black lives matter. B s That has Taken over so much of our society today. I think that's why the hyper push and you can't disagree with renaming streets. Science after both them after, uh Tatiana or you're a racist, that kind of garbage and by the way, Oh, my gosh. Think of these are the people at the top. The honest they're going to really industry after possibly think of the 700 people that live on the streets of 700 people, If any one of them is disagrees with changing the street name because they've lived on the street for however long or maybe it's a business. I don't know how many businesses are on that street. Anybody who's against it will be a racist. They'll call me a racist. You know how this works. Just like with in Arlington. I think it was a stretch I recall correctly. They were trying to rename MLK Boulevard. Several years ago. I recall that discussion we had on the air. And businesses was going to cost a ton of money to change. Their scientists change the letterhead to change their cards. And some people don't give a frog's fat. You know what will you know what? No. People should have a say. So this also came to mind today when I saw a story And as CBS 11 Dallas is D marks 50 years since landmark desegregation ruling Yeah, I think this story hearing this story about this man is Really cool and it's very inspiring. Here's Man 50 years ago, Robbie Ellen. Some CBS 11 Did this story 50 years ago, Dallas system of segregated schools finally began to unravel, she reports. A plumber named Sam Task B. Was the dad plucking at the legal court. He was quiet, very humble at church, man. His granddaughter says he wanted his two boys to go to the school that was closest to them. He was just dad. Just a dad willing to fight for a better opportunity. Pushed Children and still segregated schools, schools that remain segregated some 16 years after the landmark Brown versus the Board of Education ruling that found segregated public schools. Ban constitutional His granddaughter Rozonda. Phelps is now and this is what really gets this rich irony and and begs questions. His granddaughter LaShonda Phelps, is now a social studies teacher in DST. I'm just proud of this perseverance, proud that he's decided to take a stand, no matter the cost, and he kept going. Even with all the issues that came up, he never let it stop. He lost his job death threats. We.

Sam Task B. Bill Cosby Robbie Ellen LaShonda Phelps Arlington two boys Rozonda Fort Worth Jefferson MLK Boulevard Tatiana Jefferson Street 700 people Botham Dirk Dallas 50 years CBS 11 both Jean Phelps
"desegregated" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"desegregated" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Author of the choice. We face the origins of school choice and the demise of public education john. Thank you so much for your time. Today mutation yeah so i. I'm excited to talk about your book. Because i feel like were were fighting. The notion of school choice as this kind of egalitarian notion that plucks the most deserving children out of these awful public school systems on many sides. Right in your book touches on these multiple buckets. You've got wealthy conservatives you've got kind of liberals in cities who feel like they can fix this and then there's kind of grassroots and energy on the ground about some of this which baffles me to an extent but I guess let's just really starts at the beginning. The notion of school choice. How this this you know began really with brown. V board of education if we could start and then move towards the modern day. Yeah so School choice as we know it really begins. In the aftermath of the brown decision people trying to resist desegregating schools. And you know freedom of choice turns into the rhetoric. Oats the right to choose where we go to school. But it becomes a way of talking about going to segregated schools without sounding racist released so in sort of builds from this racist policy to avoid going to desegregated schools into this form that we see today right and and so i guess let's delineate for people some of the options that School choice allows or the the different sections of education that Things up into you got charter. Schools magnet schools. But but but but they're more options than that. What what are they. Yes so you know. In addition to maintenance shutters one of the more insidious options are vouchers and we saw abuse in the nineteen fifties where you're using government money to fund families directly and they can choose any school. They want more often than not religious private schools vouchers really leader the privatization schools now during the pandemic we see online education. Really taken off In even home school is an option. School choice yeah. It's what supreme court decision allowed for. I'm blanking on it at this moment. Was there non. The supreme court decision. That was a bit contested about public funds via vouchers going to religious schools. Yes oh zombie harrison. Two thousand four really sort of talk about how we can use public funding. I'm sorry audio. Cut out lost your audio. Somehow john will maybe cut to a break real quick and we'll start the saudi. Oh wait we wasn't supposed to co go erico. Does hair's decision release allows public funding to go to families and that they wanted to. They can choose to private school so with this. We see vouchers to happen. Sort of You know legitimacy in the courts that is actually legal to do this on smaller scales but this is just one other choice option. That's become validated by the supreme court. So we really see more choice. After in the early two thousands. Yeah and so. There are a variety of different steps. I guess let's go back to brown be bored and some of the justifications that were used there like it's it's so interesting to see it framed as choice in for framing to remain black families never choice like black families. Were not a part of the choose. Whatever school you want to go to so you don't have to integrate your children with other black heads. That was not an option. Talk about that concept. And how heavily racial is. It really was from the outset. You're looking right and from the very beginning whites in privileged elite white families. Really use what they call freedom of choice to desegregate schools and was designed by and for leap wealthier white families to say the government has no right to tell me where to go to school. And if i don't wanna go to school a desegregated school. If i don't wanna go to score with black students or students of color i have a right of freedom of association was to where i'm choosing to spend my time with whom i choose to to suspend my time with and upon this principle. They developed any at school choice. It's my choice to go to school. The government cannot tell me work school and especially for some social experiment like desegregation. That families should have a right to opt out that so from the very beginning it. It's a way to void. Desegregated schools it. It's it's a way to dictate at your own level where he wants nicholas call and found that it sort of builds on that very principle and to your point. You're exactly right where people come and black feminists not help that schwartz right. They weren't they weren't involved in the process of up with freedom of choice that we you choose already where where to go by is just wanted to go to school that they want it to be because they were prevented by law from attending invest squawk freedom of choices. Something very different. That whites are using to avoid desegregation. So the very start it it. It's it's a policy to avoid desegregation and it's also a rhetorical a way to talk about race without having to talk about it right so it's actually during busing in the nineteen seven. They say i don't want to go to that. School consists my choice not to go. You don't have to say you don't wanna go to school with with children of color. It's a more convenient way that palpable cross the nation. Yeah i'm reminded of other discussions we've had on on the show about the notion of taxpayer. Right which is also heavily. Racial is i'm contributing Taxes i own property during this era where property taxes were. The income tax wasn't around. I own property. I'm the one who's should be people. like me. are the only people who should be having a say in our government and everyone else should basically be great for these are just notions. We repeat today. Choice taxpayer that have so much baggage and weight behind them In terms of the racial resentment caked in to those terms. But you know i. Your book talks about milton. Friedman the bit and then all seems to come back to him in the end unfortunately for us. He was an app. Huge advocate for this concept back in the day. Talk about his influence over this debate..

V board of education supreme court zombie harrison erico brown john nicholas schwartz Friedman milton
"desegregated" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"desegregated" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"When this particular pandemic subsides if it does I mean you think about the coverage in the media. It's you know you have the talking head speaking and then every 5 or 6 minutes of commercial for health insurance for a drug particularly drugs you know big pharma. But this bigger discussion of how you make your how you lift the health of a nation. What about that right now? And what would it mean as you look at COVID exposing the anatomy of racial injustice in this country? How does Medicare for All fit into this? Absolutely. So Medicare for All is essential for addressing our health disparities. We and we know that here in California we're working on the healthy California for all commission to advance a model of healthcare in California that does not involve private healthcare insurance. The American people are done with the financial abuse from the private healthcare industry. Medicare for All and single payer healthcare provides us with an opportunity to keep those resources. Within the healthcare system. So that that money is going to fund patient care to improve health outcomes. It's not going to healthcare executives. We see here in California that is healthcare executive lobbyists who are determining our COVID policy. So while we were on the front lines in UCSF in the hospital you know arguing for weekly testing so that we weren't unknowingly passing the virus to our patients. Arguing to for certain kinds of PPE we've learned that it was a lobbyist a healthcare executive lobbyist who actually had the ear of the governor and the secretary of health here to determine our policy. And that needs to stop. Because it did not prioritize the health of workers or the health of patients. It prioritize the profits of the healthcare industry. And so we need to restructure and reconfigure our our society at the most basic level. And Medicare for All is a great way to do that. And we know that Medicare itself is what desegregated hospitals in the United States. So it plays a major role in advancing healthcare equity. So if we talk about healthcare equity as an important thing and everyone's talking about it right now health equity. We can't just add it on as a feature of a system that was constructed for health inequity which is colonial capitalism. You have to start decolonizing medicine. You have to start decolonizing our society which means a restructuring and reconfiguring of how resources are flowing and how decisions are being made. And that is absolutely spot on. We do need Medicare for All and quite urgently. Well doctor rupa Maria clearly a conversation that needs to continue. Thank you so much for being with.

"desegregated" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"desegregated" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"And so we need to change the messaging. We need to understand that it has to be a multimodal response to this pandemic. There must be universal basic income so people can stay home and isolate there must be eviction moratoriums there must be. Places where we can dismantle the kinds of violences that are encoded in capitalist society so that people can be healthy. It what about simply Medicare for All? Something has been proven to people 65 and above. It seems that while COVID is getting enormous attention in the corporate media as it should and the issue is just you know how do you stop the next surge? When this particular pandemic subsides if it does I mean you think about the coverage and the media it's you know you have the Talking Heads speaking and then every 5 or 6 minutes of commercial for health insurance for a drug particularly drugs you know big pharma. But this bigger discussion of how you make your how you lift the health of a nation. What about that right now? And what would it mean as you look at COVID exposing the anatomy of racial injustice in this country? How does Medicare for All fit into this? Absolutely. So Medicare for All is essential for addressing our health disparities. We and we know that here in California we're working on the healthy California for all commission to advance a model of healthcare in California that does not involve private healthcare insurance. The American people are done with the financial abuse from the private healthcare industry. Medicare for All and single payer healthcare provides us with an opportunity to keep those resources. Within the healthcare system. So that that money is going to fund patient care to improve health outcomes. It's not going to healthcare executives. We see here in California that it's healthcare executive lobbyists who are determining our COVID policy. So while we were on the front lines and UCSF in the hospital you know arguing for weekly testing so that we weren't unknowingly passing the virus to our patients. Arguing to for certain kinds of PPE we've learned that it was a lobbyist a healthcare executive lobbyist who actually had the ear of the governor and the secretary of health here to determine our policy. And that needs to stop because it did not prioritize the health of workers or the health of patients. It prioritize the profits of the healthcare industry. And so we need to restructure and reconfigure our our society at the most basic level. And Medicare for All is a great way to do that. And we know that Medicare itself is what desegregated hospitals in the United States. So it plays a major role in advancing healthcare equity. So if we talk about healthcare equity as an important thing and everyone's talking about it right now health equity. We can't just add it on as a feature of a system that was constructed for health inequity which is colonial capitalism. You have to start decolonizing medicine..

COVID California Medicare Medicare for All and single pa pharma UCSF United States
Gloria Richardson, Civil Rights Pioneer, Dies at 99

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Gloria Richardson, Civil Rights Pioneer, Dies at 99

"Her by name, but you may have seen a moving photo of her during the civil rights movement in the 19 sixties. Gloria Richardson was an influential yet largely on song, civil rights pioneer who was captured in a photograph as she pushed away the bayonet of a National Guardsmen. Well, Richardson has died at the age of 99. Her granddaughter says she died in her sleep Thursday in New York City. She was the first woman to lead a prolonged grassroots civil rights movement outside the Deep South. In 1962, she helped to organize and lead the Cambridge movement on Maryland's Eastern Shore with sit ins to desegregate restaurants, bowling alleys and movie theaters.

Gloria Richardson National Guardsmen Richardson New York City Deep South Cambridge Eastern Shore Maryland Bowling
"desegregated" Discussed on Nightline

Nightline

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"desegregated" Discussed on Nightline

"And that tells me. I need to do something about that. But those changes led to an explosion of anger and legal action menders and four other plaintiffs are suing the school board claiming the district expect students to speak act and think in line with a particular ideology any dissent from that ideology can be labeled as bias and anonymously reported to the speech police and in the name of dismantling systemic racism. Lc has implemented explicit. Racial distinctions between its students. There are lawsuit is based on two fundamental promises of the constitution that all of us have a right to free speech and including our students and all of us right to equal treatment under the law. School board says it doesn't comment on pending litigation. Do you think this is something that loudon county public schools. The adults the administrators. The school board needed to address. We need to address race. What we need to do is include all races not just exclude others. Loudon was one of the last counties in the nation desegregated schools. Many believed the legacy of that is still apparent last year. The school board apologized to the black community of loudon county for decades of unequal treatment. Loudon county has not had its name. I would love to tell you about all the wonderful things in loudon county but we need to address the systemic racism that those of us who are white unfortunately haven't seen teacher andrea weiss. Cough believes loudon county. Schools should do more to combat racism. When you say that loudon county has an had its reckoning. what are you talking about. People like to think the civil rights movement is done. But we need to remember. This started in sixteen nineteen and loudon was built with enslaved labor in the nineteen seventies. There was one public swimming pool in leesburg and rather than integrate the swimming pool. It was filled in with concrete back in texas. Chris and his mother are celebrating. June teeth honoring their ancestors in their part in american history. Those stories now harder to learn in his school. I wanna see more cultural teachings in the classrooms and just everyone on on a even playing field people be better than other people like we should be celebrating every ethnicity and culture that decides to move back here and they're not only starts in our community and acknowledging them and learning from them but it also includes are thanks to alex up next leaving it all behind and hitting the open road stressed out by politics addicted to your phone or just plain stuck in your own head. I'm here to help this. Dan harris from abc news. And i have a podcast called ten percent happier. We talked to all sorts of meditation gurus and also celebrities who meditate or wanna meditate on the podcast. You will hear incredible personal stories and also you'll get practical advice that could transform your life. Listen for free on apple podcasts. For on your favorite odd at when most people think of their dream home it usually doesn't involve something on four wheels.

loudon county andrea weiss Loudon county Loudon School board swimming loudon Cough leesburg Chris texas Dan harris abc news apple
"desegregated" Discussed on Diary of a Nation

Diary of a Nation

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"desegregated" Discussed on Diary of a Nation

"Us has san francisco at guadalcanal The pearl harbor experience for the san francisco was stand there and watch because they were in the drydock. The japanese believing in the code of bushido attacked viable worships the san francisco. The turrets were out of the ship. They had no guns. No major guns and the ship was in pieces in a drydock so they did not engage in combat per se in pearl harbor but in at the naval battle of guadalcanal. They were the flagship for the strikeforce. The navy was segregated and it was nothing anyone in the military or the navy could do about it. The thing that really pissed him off was he had this Test to qualify him for for three the best attended to and had this place setting diagram and he misplaced one of the spoons. That was enough to fail. He was pissed. He says those fuckers he says who gives a shit what spoon they use you know and it was things like. There's a picture in the guide in the ratings manual of a mess man looking down the length of a table to make sure that all the silverware is one inch from the edge. That's what the military does do that with your uniform to. Yeah and so when it was all over they desegregated navy and he's well geez. I'll get to be an engineer. A electrician no because even though the military was desegregated..

guadalcanal The pearl harbor san francisco navy pearl harbor Us
Vernon Jordan Shares Experiential Nuggets on Business, Civil Rights

In Black America

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Vernon Jordan Shares Experiential Nuggets on Business, Civil Rights

"Vernon jordan. Junior has been called the rosa parks of american business born on august fifteenth nineteen thirty five in atlanta georgia. Jordan is a civil rights. Icon business consultant influential. Powerbroker jordan is a graduate of depaul university way earned a political science degree in nineteen fifty seven and howard university. School of law. Never want to sit on the sideline and nineteen fifty one. He helped desegregate colleges and universities in georgia from one thousand nine hundred sixty one to nineteen sixty three. He was the field secretary. For the national association. For the advancement of colored people in georgia and nineteen seventy jordan became executive director of the united negro college fund and nineteen seventy-one. He became president of the national urban league. He held that position for ten years on may twenty ninth. Jordan was shot and seriously wounded outside. The hotel in fort wayne indiana. This incident became the first story covered by cnn. And as we all know by now join me. Came close confidant and political advisor to president. Bill clinton this past spring. Jordan was a keynote speaker at the summit on race in america held at the lbj presidential library on the campus of the university of texas at austin. The following is an expert of that reason. Tation now let me explain to situation. You are in with me this morning. And i can only explain it by telling you a true story. I'm a member of the african methodist episcopal. Church all my life. And that was this young pastor who just graduated from seminar and the bishop assigned him to a church and a small town in georgia to begin his pastoral ministry

Georgia Vernon Jordan Jordan Depaul University Howard University School Of Law United Negro College Fund National Urban League Atlanta National Association Lbj Presidential Library Campus Of The University Of Te Fort Wayne CNN Indiana Bill Clinton African Methodist Episcopal
T.C. Williams High School renamed Alexandria City High School

Chris Plante

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

T.C. Williams High School renamed Alexandria City High School

"The Titans but forget their old school name. The school board in Alexandria also voted last night to change the name of T. C. Williams to simply Alexandria City High School, scrubbing the name of a longtime segregationist superintendent from the school that was best known for its true story of a desegregated football team winning the State Championship. An elementary school, named after a Confederate naval officer was also renamed this time after a beloved teacher, Nye Omi, Brooks. She died last year. Just his

T. C. Williams Alexandria City High School Titans Alexandria Football Nye Omi Brooks
‘A new day’: Kim Janey sworn in as Boston’s first Black, woman mayor

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

‘A new day’: Kim Janey sworn in as Boston’s first Black, woman mayor

"Of color is mayor Attendings applauded his Boston mayor Kim Janey arrived for her historic swearing in. I stand before you as the first woman and the first black mayor of Boston, the city that I love, Janey experienced firsthand Boston's racial divisions school bussing rolled into my life. Was forced onto the front lines of the 19 seventies battle to desegregate Boston public schools. Danny became acting mayor when Marty Walsh was confirmed as president Biden, secretary of Labor ABC is Aaron Carter Ski, You're listening to ABC

Mayor Attendings Kim Janey Boston Janey Marty Walsh President Biden Danny Labor Abc Aaron Carter ABC
"desegregated" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"desegregated" Discussed on WTVN

"S. Could fill Raymond James Stadium host site of tonight's Super Bowl about seven times over over 463,000 US covert deaths, says Johns Hopkins University, the CDC says of the more than 59 million total vaccine doses that have been distributed 41 million have been put into the arms of Americans. Dr Anthony Fauci, White House medical advisor on Cove. It predicts more vaccine doses will become available next month and the month after and vaccinations will go up. We certainly I guess could have contract did a little bit more aggressively with the companies. To get more doses. But right now, this is what we have the the contractual arrangements. They're coming off the line as quickly as we can get you on NBC's Meet the Press. One cause of death that is not among the highest is still right now unusually higher in the past week, 15 people of lost survives and avalanches. That's the deadliest week for avalanches in the US since 1910 4 people died on Saturday in Utah in the past week, four of died in Colorado three in Alaska, one in Montana. One in California and one in New Hampshire. Multiple storms been piling up on top of a weak base layer, and it's believed Cove in 19 is driving more people to ski and back country areas where there are fewer people and no cove. It rules. Alex Stone ABC nears his budget director, Treasury secretary secretary of State Under several presidents, including Nixon and Reagan, George Schultz has died at 100. Built Tubman Schultz, his biographer, on his accomplishment, less well known effort quite successful during the Nixon administration to desegregate Urban school systems in the South. Eyes efforts as labor secretary and the Nixon administration to desegregate trades unions. You're listening to ABC News..

Nixon administration Cove US George Schultz Raymond James Stadium Dr Anthony Fauci secretary Johns Hopkins University ABC News Alex Stone ABC Nixon medical advisor NBC White House desegregate Urban school CDC Press
"desegregated" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"desegregated" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is all of it on W N Y C. I'm Alison Stewart. Thank you for spending part of this MLK day with me. We're going to start today's show with an excerpt from Dr Martin Luther King Jr is November 22nd 1961 interview with Eleanor S. Fisher Ah, foreign correspondent for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and the founder of National Public Radio's New York office. Is your interview Dr King in Atlanta. She was producing a documentary Syriza on Dr King and that Southern city for the CBC called Project 62. Here. Is Emma OK, talking about why voting is critical and the fight against voter suppression. He called on the federal government to ensure the black right to vote so the proper leaders can get into office. Let's listen. We work in the area of direct action to break down the system of segregation. And we are also working direct action, too. You break down many of the most subtle problems and barriers that we confront. Now the voting issue is very important. It seems to me I am convinced that one of the most important steps that the Negro can take Is that shot walked to the voting booth, and I think one of the most important steps that the federal government can take is to assure the Negro the right and the protection. A Z moves toward the voting booth. This is one of the ways that and one of the main ways that we will be able to get The proper leaders in office and the proper political leaders at work in the South so that the transition from the segregated to a desegregated society will be much smoother. Now in many areas in the South. We face not only the problem of the apathy of people, and this is a general problem that not only faces a Negro with American people, asshole. This problem of apathy but will face a problem of external resistance where many Negroes as the civil rights gonna commission reported, and it's Report a few days ago to the president that now at least 100 counties in eight states of the South when Luke grows, are intimidated and harassed, and actually Denied the right to vote. And Lou feel that this is such a big job. That we must work in these areas through direct action, and I think more and more The method of nonviolent direct action must be used in the area of voter registration. If we use it in the farmer stand ins are some other method, but it must be used in order. To double the number of Negro registered voters, and I think the same thing, the same kind of pressure must be placed on the federal government. To assure Uh, job privileges and rights to Negroes and that by bringing about the type of economic security needed for there's still a great gulf. As you said, and If the federal government vigorously and forces Um, laws already existing. And if it refuses to put government money in, uh, plants and in agents is and in Situations where discrimination is a glaring reality. Even a subtle reality. I think many of these problems will be song. That's Dr Martin Luther King Jr. Speaking in 1961 interview with journalists, Eleanor S. Fisher. Founder of National Public Radio's New York office. We're staying in the theme of civil rights and human rights. Later, we'll discuss how to raise an anti racist child will listen to Matt Katz. His conversation with Dr 90 Massie Watson, the vice chancellor of diversity, inclusion and civic engagement at Rutgers University, Camden about kids race and living in an anti racist life. And the protest music of the civil rights era and some modern songs that continue to fight for racial justice. Veteran music journalists, NPR music critic and powers will be here. That's all in the way, so let's get this started. Mm. This'll M L K. J.

Dr Martin Luther King Jr federal government National Public Radio Eleanor S. Fisher Alison Stewart founder New York Canadian Broadcasting Corporat Dr 90 Massie Watson Atlanta Emma OK CBC Uh desegregated Lou Matt Katz
"desegregated" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"desegregated" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Any leaders has created his leaderless institution, and the positions of majority and minority leader were not created until the 19 twenties. So it was supposed to be a free flowing open body where people crossed the aisle frequently on Dat is what happened. So you know in you can sort of Start by flipping the roles of the parties as we know them today as a starting point in the sense that the most conservative members of the Senate were Democrats at the time, All of the Southern senators were Democrats. This'll was back in the days of the solid South, pretty pre civil rights on DPI. 1948 when the Democratic convention when they decided to embrace the stronger civil rights platform, and strong German led the Dixiecrat walk out. So at this time, the core of of the conservative movement of conservative life in America resided in the Democratic Party. Republicans would often cross the aisle, but the issue of civil rights specifically, you had tremendous amount of cross party pollination. Republicans in many cases were leaders on civil rights that continued on and off all the way up through the 19 fifties. You know, it's I did not expect this to happen when I started my research, but Richard Nixon emerged. Is sort of a weird hero type role in the book because before he became Mr White backlash in the 19 sixties, he was actually an extremely aggressive champion of civil rights. Theo Eisenhower administration arguably had a better record on civil rights than the Truman Administration or even the Roosevelt administration. Eisenhower desegregated the District of Columbia. Truman desegregated the order to desegregate the armed forces, but but he didn't do anything to enforce it. And Eisenhower. Enforced it in the 1956 election. Eisenhower was endorsed by the deep by Adam Clayton Powell, congressman from Harlem who crossed over to endorse Eisenhower. And there's literally an episode in 1956 election where Richard Nixon is campaigning in Harlem, with Adam Clayton Powell demanding the reform of the filibuster in order to pass a strong civil rights bill. So you know that episode. I mean, look, Nixon was was a McCarthy I, There are other many other things wrong with him, even then, but It just goes to show how fluid the parties were. How civil rights was not a Democratic issue as recently as the late 19 fifties and and in general, just how how much more cross pollination there were between the parties versus what we what we know today. Just don't mix in. There was an interesting anecdote in the book about him presiding over the Senate and establishing this rule. I have never heard about that. You know, like, Could you tell us a little bit about sort of his role in the filibuster? Yeah. So after the 1956 campaign, you know Eisenhower campaign pretty hard on Silver Rights and the during the year 1956 in Congress. Eisenhower had set up a very strong civil rights bill to Congress on Lyndon Johnson, working with Southern Democrats basically stuck it in in committee, which was run by James Eastland, who was a horrible segregationist and killed it in committee. So Eisenhower wins reelection in a massive landslide. Republicans have tremendous momentum, and they decide to use a lot of that momentum to try to wage a campaign to reform or get rid of the filibuster in order to pass that strong civil rights bill and their point man for this effort is Richard Nixon. And so Nixon forms an alliance with the leading liberals in the Senate. People like Hubert Humphrey, who would later be his opponent in 1968, you know, ardent Ardent new deal liberal Paul Douglas, you know, and they take this alliance and they create a hatch a plan on the first day of the Senate convening in January, 1957 the Nixon as the vice president will preside over the Senate..

Theo Eisenhower Richard Nixon Senate Democrats Adam Clayton Powell Democratic Party Truman Administration Harlem Truman Hubert Humphrey America District of Columbia Roosevelt administration Lyndon Johnson James Eastland Dixiecrat Congress vice president congressman
"desegregated" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"desegregated" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Providing this this public, uh course So. 1937, the city of Boston takes over and and as part of their, uh, new lease with the University of Texas a 50 year lease by the way. They were required to do some improvements to the property, which included an irrigation system They brought in the W. P A. To make some improvements with the Some of the maintenance facilities, and that's when they w telling has came in, and he was an irrigation specialist as well as a golf course architect and did a few homes. This goes back, married to me with history. We're talking about the W He A that was started by President Roosevelt. This is how historic community is, and it is so preposterous to me that some people say Oh, no, There's not many history over there That is mind blowing to May. We've got house Park, the foot football stadium that was built by the W P A. You think that you would knock down that they also did work at Zilker Park? Yes. And so, So, anyway, we got all that done. And and the history of Munich continued with a lot of players playing out there since it was the only public course in Austin. And Lo and behold, 1950 of the course is integrated. Suddenly it becomes a desegregated golf course that everybody can play. And it remains the only desegregated course south of the Mason Dixon line until 1953. I think when another course in Atlanta, 54 54 Okay before. Yeah,.

President Roosevelt Zilker Park Mason Dixon University of Texas house Park Boston Lo foot football stadium Munich Atlanta Austin W P
The Fight for Civil Rights and Freedom

TED Talks Daily

05:13 min | 2 years ago

The Fight for Civil Rights and Freedom

"This is such a great honor for me to be in this room with you to have this conversation. I can't tell you what it means to me to have this opportunity. You represent something so precious to so many of us not just wanted to start by thanking you for that for your willingness to wrap your arms around people may and to make me think that it's possible to do difficult things important things and i just want to start by asking you to talk a little bit about that experience. Growing up in rural alabama and the black belt of america and how that cultivated the spirit that shaped your life and your vision. You used to have to pick cotton on your family's farm while usa fuss as a young child complaint. Why this to. Emma motherless. Avoid so many things we can do. She's to his hard work with. What are we going to do. We have to make a living. But i was hoping in prynne. What a day. When people wouldn't have to work so hard in hot sun she was hoping also the thing would be better much better for us as a as a people and for my family my mother She was always thinking ahead. Did we get up early and going pick as which climb as we could. We get more money. 'cause she knew declining would be heavier. Coulda do we own it so it was weighed. Miami will be increased. Your mother sounds really strategic my New mother one day. She came across a little newspaper in downtown short. That says something about the school in nashville tennessee. That blanks students could attend. She encouraged apply for that. Even though that met you'd be leaving. The house should be leaving the farm. You would not be contributing that that extra labour will out was willing to go to try to do what mine. We'll call during better yet to get an education but in the beginning i wanted to choice state you wanted to. To desegregate. estate submit an application. High school transcript and never heard from the school saw. I wrote a letter to dr king at india. my mother. My father enema sisters brothers in an teachers told him i needed his help. He wrote me back. iran Around bus ticket invited me to come to montgomery to meet with. You can never ever forget it. You knew about dr king even before the boycott you'd heard his sermon The apostle paul preaches to american christians. It's the speech she gives to. All the people in montgomery four days after rosa parks has been arrested by at the end of the speech. He says one day they're going to tell a story about a group of people in montgomery alabama and then he says a black people who stood up for their rights and they stood for their rights. The whole world changed and you had an immediate response to that call to action. The message really appeal to me. Yeah it was sort of a social gospel message. I wanted to do what. I could make things better coinc- something that is not variety of just you have to assess something you have to do. Something was like a fine burning up in your bom and you cannot be silenced. My mother was said to me. Boy don't get in trouble. Don't get in trouble. you can get hurt. You can get killed. Dr king and rosa eating nixon and others that are read about done it time and later met in spine. Rena get when the trouble necessary trouble. And i've been getting in trouble. Ila sems- the citizens to freed awry. You went to nashville mcgann. The work of leaning nonviolence winded nonviolence become an essential part of your worldview in the theology and the activism that you wanted to create grown up wanted to be minister. I felt that dr king was saying in his speeches in keeping of jesus so readily accepted the saadia nonviolence. The philosophy disappoint a nonviolent. We talked to respect the dignity in the worst of every human being

Dr King Emma Motherless USA Montgomery Alabama Nashville Enema Miami Tennessee Rosa Parks Apostle Paul Iran High School India Rena Rosa Nixon Mcgann
What we've learned about Barrett's views on abortion cases

Her Turn

08:11 min | 2 years ago

What we've learned about Barrett's views on abortion cases

"Judiciary Committee hearings in full swing this week. Arlene's outta wrote this report. For many feminists, it is the most painful, outrageous and sad irony that the Supreme Court seat once held by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, one of the most staunch supporters of women's rights and civil rights, will soon be held by another woman. But one who seems to be the mirror opposite of R B, G and all her views the Senate Judiciary Committee hearings this week on the nomination of Amy Cockney Barrett to the Supreme Court. But her views on full display despite the fact that she repeatedly refused to answer questions about her opinions, questions on such settled issues as the right to birth control and the right to vote, including a peaceful transition of power. As the result of that vote, all got I cannot comment answers. When asked about her view opposing same sex marriage, she offhandedly used the term sexual preference when referring to the LGBT plus community, even though many activists say the term is offensive. One after another Democratic senators tried to press her on her record, such as the fact that she previously signed onto an ad describing abortion as barbaric and calling for the Roe v. Wade decision to be overturned. Her two dissenting opinions and abortion related cases, one of which involved allowing minors to get an abortion without notifying parents by way of judicial bypass, and another that would have required fetal remains to be formally buried. Observers say 17 cases related to abortion are one step away from the Supreme Court and three including a 15 week abortion ban from Mississippi could be taken up as early as its next session. And her only nod to any progressive opinion. Barrett seemed to support the idea of desegregation by calling the Brown v. Board of education decision a super precedent that isn't likely to ever be overturned. The Judiciary Committee is set to vote to approve barrettes nomination next week with a vote of the full Senate by the end of the month. Bang. With the nomination of Amy Cockney Barrett to the U. S. Supreme Court. Questions about her ties to the religious right have raised concerns about the fate of Roe v. Wade and a person's right to reproductive choices. Her turn. Reporter Ellen La Luzerne spoke with Karen Garst, who author to anthologies about the impact of religion on women. Women beyond belief, and women versus religion. Last received her PhD in curriculum and instruction from UW Madison and is a current resident in the state of Oregon. 2016 you published a book Women Beyond belief. In the book's introduction, You stated that you wrote the book after learning of the 2014 U. S. Supreme Court decision regarding Hobby lobby's denial of reproductive care for their employees. Your reaction was to question why a corporation can use its religious beliefs. To dictate the healthcare a woman could receive. Fast forward to today when we're witnessing the Supreme Court nomination process for a woman who is a valid Lee, a member of an extremist religious sect that believes that women should submit to their husbands What was your reaction when you heard about the nomination of Amy Clooney Barrett for the U. S Supreme Court. First of all, I wasn't surprised because Trump has already appointed people to the Supreme Court. I didn't watch quite a bit of the confirmation hearings of his previous nominees, so I wasn't surprised that he appointed someone who's conservative. He vowed when he was elected that he would appoint justices to the Supreme Court who would overturn Roe v. Wade. If Connie Bear is confirmed, What is your opinion about the impact that this might have for future cases such as the Affordable care act and a woman's right to choose? Well, I think it's going to have very dilatory ous impacts because now we're going to have a Supreme Court. That is considered very conservative. I believe six of the justices will be considered Catholic, and there are going to write decisions as they have for that have a conservative bent. I think it's very unfortunate that the Supreme Court has become so politicized. If we look in our history. One of the things that I was doing some research on was previous decisions and Brown vs the Board of Education. Which desegregated schools was fundamental change to the way this society was operating was a 9 to 0 decision, and people saw what was happening in society, and I talked to a friend of mine who is a lawyer there. Who said, you know, there's this public sentiment. That's how culture changes. And people were attuned to that, And now we're not appointing people to the Supreme Court who have an open view. They're very, very one sided, and I think it's totally tragic that she's going to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg. What do you think the consequences will be for Roe v. Wade and access to freedom of choice? An abortion? There will always be abortion. The question is whether it's going to be safe and whether it's going to be legal. There has been throughout time before Roe v. Wade. It was back alley abortions, and I think younger women today they don't know what it was like before then Roe v. Wade. If it were completely overturned, I think would have a revolution. It might take a while to put it together. Rather, I think what they'll do is just approved all these restrictions on it, making the doctors who on abortion clinics we associate with the hospital, whether it's making AA lot regulations on the clinic itself and what it can have and what it has to have delegating more. The authority of states and people are going to have to say I don't want to live in a state like this. If they overturn it completely and make abortion illegal. I just Hey, I'm ready to start the revolution. I don't think they're going to go that far. But who knows? What do you think, drives the women who are supporting people like Coney, Bharat and Support these types of efforts to keep women as subservient to men, such as the belief system of Annie Cockney Barrett. Religion is an indoctrination in a set of beliefs. I'm 70 when I was growing up in the fifties in Bismarck, North Dakota. Every person I knew went to a church or there were three Jewish families who went to a synagogue. But it was part of everybody's life. So you're indoctrinated in that It's your family. Everybody else around you is like that. Unless you're exposed to something different. This shapes who you are. And we know that Trump was elected by conservatives by people who identified as religion, particularly fundamentalist religion. That's too he appeals to, and it's unfortunate that the religion hasn't changed enough to deal with our society today. What is interesting to me? Is that this woman, Amy Cockney Barrett is very intelligent. She is ah, Notre Dame professor. She's an appellate court judge, and she has seven kids. I can't imagine trying to balance all that. But in spite of that conservative religion, it is pretty hard to say, Well, she's helped meat of her husband because she is Ted her own career. In your

U. S. Supreme Court Amy Cockney Barrett ROE Wade Ruth Bader Ginsburg U. S Supreme Court Judiciary Committee Senate Judiciary Committee Annie Cockney Barrett Brown Arlene Senate Hobby Lobby Mississippi Donald Trump Bismarck Ellen La Luzerne
Civil Rights Champion, Unita Blackwell

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:24 min | 2 years ago

Civil Rights Champion, Unita Blackwell

"Hello for Wonder Media Network, I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica. Today. We're talking about a key figure in the civil rights movement who risked her life to lift her voice and the voices of other black. Americans. Through violence and abuse she campaigned for equality and became the first black woman to serve as mayor and Mississippi. This is the story of UNITA. UNITA Zelma Blackwell was born he uses brown on March Eighteenth Nineteen thirty three in Lula Mississippi. Her father was a sharecropper and you need a picked cotton in the field alongside her mother until her mother sent her to live with relatives in Arkansas to receive a better education. At that time in Mississippi, black children could only attend school for two years before they were forced to return to the fields. Though you need us mother couldn't read or write. She was determined to give her daughter a better life. You need a chose her own full name after her teacher told her. She couldn't just go by the initials UC. She decided to go with UNITA Zelma. At the age of twelve, you need a left school she returned to picking cotton until she was thirty one years old she married three times but kept the last name of her first husband Jeremiah Blackwell. It was with him. She had her only child Jeremiah Junior. The turning point of UNITA's life came in nineteen, sixty four during the freedom summer. The student nonviolent. Coordinating Committee or Snick was campaigning to raise awareness about registering black citizens to vote you need a signed up to help right away during her attempts to help register black voters across our community. She was arrested more than seventy times. She was also targeted by the K. K. K. members burned crosses in her yard. You need was one of only eight black people in her county who tried to register to vote armed white men threatened you need other brave people trying to vote outside the courthouse and nearly prevented them from entering when they were finally allowed to enter the building they were forced to undergo an unfair literacy tests which all of them failed. You need to realize that despite the fact voting was illegal right society still stacked all the odds against the black community. She was more determined than ever to make her voice heard. So she began to participate in one movement after another to fight the unjust system. In nineteen sixty five UNITA sued her county's board of Education for suspending three hundred students including her own son for wearing freedom pens. She also suit to desegregate the school district. These cases traveled all the way up to federal courts though the pins remained banned, the district was ordered to desegregate. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, six UNITA was elected mayor of mayors spell. which reportedly made her the first black woman to serve as a mayor in Mississippi. When she took office, the five hundred person town had unpaved streets and no sewer system many residents lived in small tin roof shacks with no running water. UNITA immediately set to work on improving conditions serving the town for two decades from a one room. City Hall. She led the way for the town to pave a name. It's roads, install streetlights, built sewers, improve its housing, and even get its first fire truck. In nineteen eighty three UNITA earned a master's degree in regional planning from New Mass Amherst having never previously attended college in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, two, she brought national attention to mayors, Ville, and all rural communities when she won three, hundred, fifty, thousand dollar Macarthur Genius Grant. Throughout her career you traveled internationally she gave speeches advised presidents like Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton a never stopped fighting for civil rights. She was defeated for re election to her position in two thousand one by then she'd long made positive mark on the rural communities of Mississippi and beyond. You need. Blackwell passed away on May, Thirteenth Twenty nineteen she made an enormous difference in Marysville Mississippi enter influence extends far beyond her hometown. She fought for the rights of all Americans and brought attention too often forgotten areas of the country.

Unita Unita Zelma Blackwell Mississippi Unita Zelma Ville Jeremiah Blackwell School District Lula Mississippi Black Community Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan Jeremiah Junior Arkansas Thirteenth Twenty K. K. K. Bill Clinton City Hall Marysville Jimmy Carter
Markey fends off Kennedy in Massachusetts Senate primary that divided Democrats

TIME's Top Stories

05:58 min | 2 years ago

Markey fends off Kennedy in Massachusetts Senate primary that divided Democrats

"Joe Kennedy. The third loses Democratic Primary Challenge of Massachusetts Senator Edward Markey. By Steve Leblanc for the Associated Press in Boston. US, Senator Edward Markey of Massachusetts defeated. US Representative Joe Kennedy. The third in Tuesday's hard-fought Democratic primary harnessing support from progressive leaders to overcome a challenge from a younger rival. WHO's a member of America's most famous political family. It was the first time. A Kennedy has lost a race for Congress in Massachusetts Marquis. Appeal to voters in the deeply democratic state by positioning himself as aligned with the liberal wing of the party he teamed up with a leading Progressive New York representative Alexandria Cossio. Cortez on the green new deal climate change initiative, and at one point labeled Kennedy quote a progressive in name only that helped Marquis overcome the enduring power of the Kennedy name in Massachusetts. The thirty nine year old congressman sought to cast the seventy four year old marquis as someone out of touch after spending decades in Congress I in the House before moving to the Senate Kennedy said Tuesday night that the results aren't the ones he'd hoped for but pledged to work for Markey's reelection. The senator is a good man. You never heard me say, otherwise Kennedy told supporters at an outdoor rally. Kennedy also suggested that the movement of supporters the campaign pulled together would continue past the current election. We may have lost the final vote count tonight but we built a coalition that will endure. He said I would do this again with all of you in a heartbeat. In, the waning weeks of the campaign Kennedy leaned into his family's long political legacy in Massachusetts his pedigree includes former president John F. Kennedy, former US senator, and US Attorney General Robert F Kennedy, his grandfather, and former US senator Edward Kennedy who held a Senate seat in Massachusetts for nearly half a century until his death in two thousand, nine Marquis countered by leaning into. His own family story growing up in the working class city of Maldon with a father who drove a truck for the Hood Milk Company in one campaign video marquis also paraphrased a famous JFK quote saying we asked what we could do for our country we went out we did it with all due respect. It's time to start asking what your country can do for you. Marquis also found himself on the defensive at times during the campaign with Kennedy. Repeatedly trying to portray him as having a tin ear to Racial Equity Concerns Kennedy Faulted Marquis for his initial opposition to the effort to desegregate the Boston public schools beginning in the nineteen seventies marquis countered by noting that he changed his views on the contentious issue that tour at the fabric of the city he also said, he supported the creation in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy, three of a state Senate seat aimed at helping elect a black senator to the Massachusetts Legislature Kennedy also repeatedly pointed to the father of Dan Roy Dj Henry a young black man from Massachusetts killed by police ten years ago. Henry's father has criticized Marquis saying he failed to help the family seek justice markey said he has apologized to the Henry family and signed a letter seeking a Federal Justice Department investigation into the killing. Marquee also wasn't shy about talking about the Kennedy. Family at one point pressing Kennedy to tell his father former U s representative, Joe Kennedy. The second to stop supporting a Political Action Committee that was running ads against Marquis I'm sure your father is watching right now markey said tell your father right now the you don't want money to go into a super PAC that runs negative ads Kennedy said he had no idea if his father was helping fund the pack late in the race Kennedy also. Landed a major endorsement when Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi formerly backed his candidacy while Marquis who served with Pelosi in the house for decades congratulated Kennedy Pelosi's decision angered some of Markey's younger Progressive Supporters Marquee had earlier won the endorsement of Ocasio Cortez and fellow Massachusetts Democratic US senator. Elizabeth. Warren Ed. Markey wasn't afraid. He offered his expertise and partnership. He wasn't scared of big policy and didn't use kid gloves. It's great to watch him overcome the odds and wind tonight Oh Cossio Cortez tweeted Tuesday night. The Corona virus ended the way both candidates could reach out to voters severely limiting more traditional means of electioneering like knocking on doors, shaking hands or. Big rallies instead, the campaigns were largely waged on line with virtual rallies, virtual endorsements, virtual fundraisers, and virtual roundtable events to discuss issues. Eventually, as Massachusetts began to suppress the virus and emerge from a near lockdown, the candidates began to take their campaigns on the road with appropriate social distancing rules and face masks in tow. The showdown drew criticism from some Democrats nationally who feared it would siphon time and money away from the primary goals of defeating President, Donald Trump and winning back control of the Senate. It also wasn't cheap with both Kennedy and Markey raising millions to pay for campaign staff television, and digital ads and old school campaign flyers. Marking now faces a general election contest where he's considered a strong favourite in a district that has historically elected Democrats hill face the winner of the Republican Primary Kevin O'Connor in November.

Attorney General Robert F Kenn Senator Edward Markey Marquis Massachusetts Senator Massachusetts Marquis United States Kennedy Pelosi Senate Representative Ocasio Cortez Congress Boston President Trump Associated Press Steve Leblanc Alexandria Cossio Democratic House America
NAACP moving from Baltimore to Washington DC

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

NAACP moving from Baltimore to Washington DC

"Is moving its headquarters to a part of the district that's preparing for a major redevelopment project. The end of the CCP has served as the nation's largest civil rights organization with its main offices in Baltimore. But the organization has signed a letter of intent to relocate its headquarters to the Frank D. Reeves Center. Right on the northwest corner of 14th and you street, the building will be transformed into a mixed use hub with affordable housing, Another neighborhood serving amenities. It's a project Mayor Muriel Bowser calls Nick and culturally significant. Frank D. Reeves was a civil rights activist and attorney who worked with the end of the CP to shape the Brown versus Board of Education case that desegregated schools. Melissa held A popular

Frank D. Reeves Frank D. Reeves Center Mayor Muriel Bowser CCP Baltimore Melissa Board Of Education Nick
Historically Black Colleges' Contributions to the NFL with Dr. Derrick E. White

In Black America

06:27 min | 2 years ago

Historically Black Colleges' Contributions to the NFL with Dr. Derrick E. White

"On this week's program historically black colleges and universities and the NFL with Doctor Derrick white in black America in their celebration of the hundred year. It was not as historical as we would like right. I think the for better for worse college football who celebrate the One hundred fiftieth year and in conjunction with ESPN primarily. Done these series of documentaries. That kind of documenting the game so they did a great set of talking about the early game when the Ivy Leagues Dominated College Football. Right you get that kind of Astaldi. Nfl is not so much right. In their part of Wigan's law says that the integration the reintegration of the. Nfl in part is done. Because you know teams WanNa move to the West Coast Right. They WanNa play in Los Angeles And that the black community the La said no in particular forced the L. A. Don's to say if you WANNA come in you. GotTa you gotTa desegregate Your Team. So woody strode gets an opportunity to play and Kenny Washington gets a chance to try out for these teams and they make these teams in the NFL so we were talking about the kind of reintegration of of professional football as the National Football League celebrated. Its first one hundred seasons unbeknownst to many sports fans the NFL didn't have any African American players for decade from Nineteen thirty four to nineteen forty-six. There was an unspoken agreement between owners to ban African American players today. They are two African American general managers for minority head coaches and one chief operating officer for the first time the crew for sue both fifty four had a record number of minority officials of the seven on the field five for African Americans the contribution of historical black colleges and universities. Acc use to the NFL has changed the game forever undrafted by an NFL team. Paul tank younger was the first African American player from grambling State University to play in the NFL when he signed with the Los Angeles Rams in nineteen forty nine the first African American drafted in the NFL draft was jaws rooks. I running back out of Morgan state in the Eleventh Round. One hundred and twenty fifth overall by the Green Bay packers in nineteen fifty one doing super bowl fifty four week in south Florida Group of area high school athletes had an opportunity to learn about the rich history of black college football and his contributions to the NFL and Black America spoke with doctor. Derrick wide associate professor at the University of Kentucky. When I was teaching a class on sports history I found that the students knew nothing about historically black college role. They were as part of their assignment. They had researched The histories of sports history at various institutions and students had cookman in Florida. And I knew that those are really successful. Athletic programs and students came back with nothing. And so I've you know I just thought chalked up. Initially students being students that they just didn't do enough but when we both begin system. I realized there was a huge gap in the scholarship. And there's a Lotta work on sports. History is a lot of work on college sports especially college football but there was very little nearly nothing on historically black colleges And so at the time I was at Florida Atlantic in so I was like Bam. You is like right up the road. Well you know eight hours away from my house but I and I knew Jay. Gator was dominant. I'd heard these stories from my uncles and I knew he was a fantastic program so I did a research trip and I went up there and they have the archivists there. And the the library's at up in Florida were amazing and they gave me these materials in there. All these letters documents and so I had budgets and letters of professional teams and I begin to understand how he organized his football program because the issue is discussed our Pamela Day. That there wasn't a lot of research money. A lot of research recruiting money not money budgets. Within Coach Gate. There was the ad coach basketball at one point. And those things. I thought those kinds of stories and that the greatness that the success that he was able to produce was Willie Gallimore Kim. Rowley Bob Hayes. I wanted to understand how that was done. I didn't WANNA chalk it up to that. These were just natural athletes that there was something being done happening on these institutions in some coaches Were better than others and so I wanted to tell that story talk about. Integration Immigration had a positive effect but it also had a devastating effect on also African Americans going to the NFL right so an integration was boom for professional football. Right then you know one of the reasons that Jake was so able to be so successful especially early on in the forties and early fifties that many of his former players gather degrees and became teachers in the high schools. All across the State of Florida and North Georgia. And so he would. They would just send him letters. Like hey coach gay. Got This really. Good kid this Willie Gallimore guys pretty good right. Like this is how he got recruiting information was from his former players but those players were talented but there was no professional football opportunities and so when those opportunities really begin to open up a specially after nineteen sixty when the AFL comes in then professional football now creates a new opportunity for black colleges in small colleges in general and so that becomes this boom and on the backside that the course the civil rights movement is happening at this exact same time right so brown. V Board of Education. This is entire push to desegregate schools Whether the high school level colleges etc and so so many ways why colleges Kinda caught between their own. Their success right. They're producing these great players in the NFL. Minium all pros as we talked about earlier. Thirty two or in the NFL Hall of fame at the same time. There are new opportunities at Florida. Miami or Georgia and that these schools especially in the deep south are slowly trying to recruit them when you look back at the history of ACC using his contribution to to the NFL. I found it amazing and the one hundred year the League. There's very little that has been articulated about a SPEC- US or the early African American players and they and their celebration of the hundredth year. It was not as historical as we would like right. I think the you know for better for Worse College Football who celebrated his Hundred Fiftieth Year and in conjunction with ESPN primarily. Done these series of documentaries that kind of documenting the game so they did a great set of documentaries talking about the early game when the Ivy League dominated college football. Right you get that kind of Nfl is not so much

National Football League Football Florida Ivy Leagues Dominated College Derrick White Espn Astaldi Los Angeles Willie Gallimore Kim Ivy League Woody Strode America United States Rowley Bob Hayes League Willie Gallimore ACC Green Bay Packers
Black Teachers Wanted

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

10:46 min | 3 years ago

Black Teachers Wanted

"America is becoming more and more diverse every year and that means our schools are also also seeing increasing numbers of students of color but the trend isn't necessarily reflected in teachers across the country. Black students and other students of color rarely see the teachers who look like them and that can have serious consequences for their education and their future for the beginning of black history month. We wanted to play you. An episode from our archives that goes into the history of black teachers in America why gaps and representation among teachers persist to this day and what we can do to address this issue. Hi I'm Lizzie. Does he get era and misses the scholars strategy networks. No jargon each week we discussed an American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon and and in this episode I spoke to Dr Michelle Foster. She's a professor. And the Henri Hauser Endowed Chair in urban partnerships at the University of Louisville and a former teacher in the Boston public school system. Here's our conversation Dr Foster thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for asking asking me. So you've conducted a lot of research on teaching but before that you were in the classroom yourself. Where did you start teaching? Well I started teaching in and the Boston public schools before desegregation which was in one thousand nine hundred ninety four and so the first year. I was a system wide substitute teacher which meant I taught in almost all of the schools. That would be in Boston. That would have you. That would have me and sometimes the schools that where I could manage. oftentimes the principal would come at recess. And if I was still there he said can you come. I'm back tomorrow because as you know. Substitutes often have difficulty with some classrooms and urban schools and then the second year I was a teacher at the William Monroe Charter school which was one of the first magnet schools in Boston. And can you tell US quickly. What a what is a magnet school? A magnet schools were schools that usually had themes And they were designed to help ease desegregation to have programs that might be a program in music. What theater with the idea that you would attract voluntarily Ellen Terry Lee attract white students to attend thereby making it easier to desegregate and Boston had magnet schools before actually the court order in nineteen seventy four? Lots of Cities Louisville has a magnet program. So I had a three four five combination at the charter school. which is we're not too far from where I lived? And then the next year I had a job. As a fifth grade teacher at the champlain. School which was in Dorchester. And tell me more about those experiences. What was that like working in the Boston? Public school system during that time. Well that was a time. When Boston didn't necessarily hire hire black or African American teachers black teachers tended to be segregated in predominantly African American or black schools? Boston would often have overcrowded. African American school bus them passed a under cry and under crowded white school to another overcrowded. Black school the charter school was of a magnet school. So it was is racially mixed but the champlain. School was probably predominantly baby. Ninety nine percent African American there was a school across way which was the John Marshall School and the schools were segregate they were in a cluster of schools. But the John Marshall's which was across Washington street at the time was predominantly white and my school was predominantly African American. We it was like today day. We have very few supplies not many many books. Hence Loretta Premium No Playground equipment was a place. Where if you want to be a successful teacher you had to be creative? And it's one of the places I learned. I think to be a good teacher. you know. If you don't have textbooks textbooks are good but you can do a lots of things if you don't have them so one of the things I used to do is take the textbook and cut up the story the reading story and put on cards and hand them out to the kids and then I read the first paragraph and I say who is that the next one and that solve off two problems one. If you've ever taught you realize kids don't follow along so they never really know what page you're on that solve. That problem and I realized later on that I was teaching sequencing using because in order to know what comes next. You have to listen so it is possible with not a lot of equipment or supplies to be creative in your teaching but but of course you have to WanNa be wanna be creative and I had not been prepared as a teacher you know. I didn't study teaching so I was left to my own devices. But what I thought would make sense for kids and part of my principal was to have them excited. I felt like if you came to school every day. It was like Christmas. was you'd WanNa come so of course. I was probably not your typical teacher and and I think that my kids probably made too much noise. The principal would always be knocking on my door as they were noisy. Because in those days I suppose even today silence and comportment comportment looking like your on task. Whatever that means? You'll you'll pay attention is kind of rules the day. But I wasn't that kind of a teacher. I would run and have racist with the kids. I would play kickball where I would throw the ball. And then the kids would have to give a multiplication table and they'd have to answer it and then kick so I tried to combine the physical Cole with intellectual. I had all kinds of little tricks that I did. I suppose even as a college teacher later on I have some of those. And how did those early experiences in the classroom GonNa Affect your later research. The research questions you wanted to explore. I don't think I thought too much about that. Initially it wasn't until I laid Iran. Iran started my academic and my first job was at University of Pennsylvania. And I would ask you to summer school courses and I decided to teach teachers perspectives on teaching. You know I just. I just thought it was a two week course. I went decide. I would use autobiographies or biographies of teachers on their own practice. And when I looked into the literature I found very few Accounts of black teachers about their own practice and so. I thought this is unusual because I knew enough to know that for most of history black students have been taught by black teachers right. I knew that so I was shot that there were no. They were not more accounts of their practice. Because I found a few and it on the basis of that. I decided that I would do a study that looked at life histories of black African American teachers. And that's how I got into that area I was led into it just circumstantially. It was not something I had planned to look at. And so tell us about what you found then. Well one of the things I was interested in was what were the experiences of black teachers and I was particularly looking at teachers who were who started. Arctic teaching before desegregation I knew the desegregation was a pivotal moment in the education of African American students. I didn't know what I find and so the earliest teacher who was the oldest oldest was born in one thousand nine five. She taught in polly's island South Carolina. And then I found teachers to a process I called community nomination which was to ask S. communities I made up that term made it up to nominate teachers who they thought were particularly successful and so I went around the country Texas I went to Missouri. Glory and these teachers and then for many many years I wrote academic articles about them. You know just what the teachers had to say was kind of used in the service service of making better big points in a lot of points and then at some point someone. The new press actually asked me if I would write a book and I wrote a book called Black Teachers on teaching and that was like I was ninety. Seven with a twenty interviews are actually you know not condemn not cut up their whole interviews and many of these teachers would teach who started in in segregated schools in Texas and then made the transition to working in the newly integrated desegregated schools in the south. So that's story that I I was pleased because later on many young African American teachers who came of age nineties and two thousands read that book and many of them have commented that the situation that I just got different than what they are today. So you have worked as a teacher both before and after desegregation you have studied sort of that transition and what. It's looked like for other teachers across the country. Let's talk about the situation right now. Do you know enough about the typical sort of American teacher. Fair to say what that person kind of looks like on average today. You know we do know that there are more male teachers at high school than Elementary School. Most of the teachers at elementary the are women and as it turns out. They are white women from suburban and rural communities who teach the population of teach of African American teachers. It has not changed that much over time. In fact I was at a conference not too long ago and although the numbers are increasing in other words number of people afterward teachers will be coming candidates and going into teaching positions. They have the highest attrition rate. They ended up leaving in greater numbers numbers than other teachers. And I think there are some reasons for that. Of course you know one of the reasons is that they often get assigned to the most difficult teaching conditions. I mean let's the honest people want African American teachers because I think that they will be good for African American children. And there's no doubt that that's probably the case but you know if they end up in a school whether or no supplies wear. There are a lot of difficulties and they're not going to likely to stay especially if they don't have support to make it so although we know that the number of African American churches increasing we also know that the number of relieving actually not even lasting three years is also increasing. So it's been a zero sum game. The numbers have not increased appreciably that much because of that and then let's talk about the benefits to students. What are the good things that having a teacher who may be looks like you and your community can afford to students? Well for a long time. People had this idea that was just the role model argument. The reason that African American children in a benefit of having african-american role model then in two thousand three. I think it was a man. Whose name is Thomas? D actually wrote a wrote an article. What he had done he looked at some old studies? Are these that had randomly assigned students and teachers which is very rare in education research. Because you can't resign randomly assigned teachers and students but there was one study and he realized it one of the things he found. Is that where you had a teacher match. When you had a black students who had black teachers have teachers? They actually improved in their standardized test scores scores and of course he had a hard time publishing it. Partly because you know sometimes things that can be positive and also have negative kickback. People thought what would happen if if if we could say that matching teacher and student on race was a good thing. I mean you could use that negatively as well so he was the first person to write that article and then recently there have been more articles that have come out that have shown that African American students who have African American teachers are more likely to graduate graduate. They're less likely to be suspended or punished. punitively they're more likely to be assigned to gifted and talented less likely to go to special the lead and a host of other

Boston African American School Boston Public School Black School Principal Dr Michelle Foster America William Monroe Charter School Texas John Marshall School Elementary School Champlain Henri Hauser Endowed Chair University Of Louisville Professor Louisville United States John Marshall Ellen Terry Lee Wanna
Vernon E. Jordan, Jr. Reflects on His Past

In Black America

07:15 min | 3 years ago

Vernon E. Jordan, Jr. Reflects on His Past

"<hes> best analogy comes from politics permanently. Jordan junior has been called the rover parks of american business born on august august fifteenth nineteen thirty five in atlanta. Georgia jordan is a civil rights icon business consultant and influential powerbroker. Jordan wouldn't a graduate of depauw university way earned a political science degree in one thousand nine hundred fifty seven and howard university school of law never want to sit on the sideline in nineteen fifty one he helped desegregate colleges and universities in georgia from nineteen sixty one to nineteen sixty three he was as a field secretary for the national association for the advancement of colored people in georgia in one thousand nine seven jordan became executive director of the united negro college college fund and i eighteen seventy one. He became president of the national urban league. He held that position for ten years on may twenty nine thousand nine hundred eighty jordan wooden was shot and seriously wounded outside a hotel in fort wayne indiana. This incident became the first story covered by c._n._n. And as we all i know by now jordan became a close confidant and political advisor to president bill clinton this past spring. Jordan was keynote speaker at the summit on race in america held at the l._b._j. Presidential library on the campus of the university of texas at austin the following is an expert of that reason tation now now. Let me explain to situation you. Were in with me this morning and i can only explain it by telling you. I'm a true story. I'm a member of the african methodist episcopal church all my life and and this young pastor who just graduated from seminary and the bishop was signed him to a church a small town in georgia to begin his pastoral ministry astray and the young pastor was cited about the beginning of his pastoral ministry so he went to this small georgia town and on saturday he went around to community to say i'm the new pastor here and i'm beginning again in my pastoral ministry tomorrow and i. I'm looking forward to seeing you at church. In the morning. The morning came mm-hmm and it was raining and stormy and then the black community. The streets were unpaid so they were almost you couldn't get through anywhere but he was excited about the beginning of his pastoral ministry so he put on his suit. He got for graduation and his new shirt and he went to the church at nine in the morning. Nobody showed up for sunday school and it eleven o'clock. Nobody has shown church at eleven twenty. One so parisian shows up the church services so the young new pastor russia's down to the so perimeter and says brother. I'm the new passed a here. I've just graduated from seminary but in similar nair they don't teach you what to do. When only one parisian shows was up for the church service he said do you have any suggestions and the so parisian says well preacher. I'm not a preacher. <hes> i'm a farmer and all i know is that we're well now. Load my wagon full of hey go feed my cows and only one cow shows up with the feeding i feed them and

Consultant African Methodist Episcopal Ch Jordan Junior Georgia Howard University School Of La Depauw University National Urban League University Of Texas United Negro College College Bill Clinton Atlanta Fort Wayne Indiana Austin Black Community Russia Executive Director Secretary America President Trump
What to expect from Mike Pompeo's confirmation hearing

Atlanta's Morning News

02:06 min | 5 years ago

What to expect from Mike Pompeo's confirmation hearing

"City will not say if that was paid or not wbz news time is five sixteen the ajc and channel to file a formal complaint accusing atlanta's city hall of a culture of political interference with open records requests this has been a real problem for anybody who tries to get basic records out of the city of atlanta for a long time channel two's richard belcher says the complaint outlines ten examples against the city including filing fake documents a democrat challenging congresswoman karen handel and the sixth district race shows his support for obamacare in his first tv ad bobby capable says thank god for obamacare former atlanta tv anchor says the affordable care act helped keep down medical expenses after his twins were born premature capable says it costs hundreds of thousands of dollars to keep them alive explosive new details in a sex scandal involving missouri governor eric greitens a woman claims greitens forced her to have nonconsensual sex then threatened her with violence the governor calls it a political witch hunt but missouri's house speaker todd richardson says the investigation is now expanding is not a witch hunt and the committee had no political agenda governors republican there five republicans and democrats on the state house committee signing the report describing the woman's testimony the senate begins confirmation hearings today for secretary of state nominee mike pompeo the second confirmation hearing for pompeo in the trump administration he was confirmed as director of the cia by a vote of sixty six to thirty two with a majority of democrats voting against his confirmation abc's lana zak reports the ranking democrat on the senate foreign relations committee senator bob menendez is promising a rigorous confirmation process during her confirmation hearing federal judicial nominee wendy refuses to say whether she agrees with the brown versus board of education decision desegregating the nation's public schools would be found by it and if i start coming on i agree with this case or don't agree with this case i think we'll get into a slippery slope resin trump nominated bitter to become a federal judge in the eastern district of louisiana wsb news time five eighteen next traffic update includes recheck georgia four hundred less than two minutes the.

Lana Zak Georgia Louisiana Mike Pompeo Karen Handel Wendy Senator Bob Menendez Atlanta CIA Director Senate Todd Richardson Eric Greitens Missouri Obamacare Richard Belcher Two Minutes