35 Burst results for "Desa"

"desa" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

04:05 min | Last month

"desa" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"I'm elise hugh. It's ted talks daily. You're about to hear talk about breakups and heartache. But from rapper and singer desa so it's full of life and humor to in her twenty eighteen archive talk from ted ex. Wanchai desa shares the story of how she used the neurobiology of love to learn how to fall out of love. It's fascinating stuff. Hi this is adam. Grant of work life with adam grant this year. We worked with our sponsor verizon to tell amazing stories from their workplace..

elise hugh ted ex Wanchai desa desa adam grant adam verizon
Heres Why Tesla Is so Important

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

02:01 min | 2 months ago

Heres Why Tesla Is so Important

"Everybody raum our here and today we're gonna be talking about a couple of really important reports. First tesla's most recent impact report which has a ton of fascinating details and it won't go through the highlights. There that release also coincided with a huge new report on climate change by the will spend some time on that as well and then we've got a few other quick hits of news which will run through at the beginning. Quick look at tesla stock another relatively low volume day to day to start the week off just under fifteen million shares traded but tussles up two point one percent on the day to seven hundred and thirteen dollars. Seventy six cents that compared to the nasdaq up about two tenths of a percent. Cosstalk did see an upgrade today from jeffries and almost philippa who schwa- upgrading from neutral to buy which as we've talked about upgrades like that where they're actually rewriting. The stock those are more significant to analysts than press targeted adjustments. But that being said he did increase his price. Target from seven hundred dollars per share up to eight hundred fifty. From the note quote valuing tesla is as challenging as ever we raise our discounted cash flow base price target from seven hundred dollars to eight hundred fifty dollars on higher profitability and accelerated growth. While at thirty five percent five year compound annual growth rate. we remain below tessa. Guidance of fifty percent as trend growth desa currently trades on nine times revenue and sixty two times earnings before interest and tax a level disconnected with auto multiples but in our view more consistent with net growth lack of legacy issues and wider addressable markets including energy generation and storage and one. Quick little note here. Just because i do see these inflated allot tesla has guided for greater than fifty percent growth compounded annually for vehicle deliveries. That doesn't necessarily mean revenue would grow at fifty percent. Plus obviously it very well could but that's not what tesla has specified so to me. It's not super clear but it does look like in this case. Jefferies is comparing their revenue forecasts tesla's vehicle delivery guidance and tennessee that a lot so just wanted to point that out next year. We've got an update on giga texas. From joe tag mayer. He does drawn flyovers there and remember last week. We had talked about him here. He that tussle was going to be doing a test. Production run for the mentawai next week. Which would not be this week

Tesla Philippa Jeffries Tessa Jefferies Joe Tag Mayer Tennessee Texas
Sebastien Gorka Slams AOC's Recount of What Happened on Jan. 6

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:32 min | 2 months ago

Sebastien Gorka Slams AOC's Recount of What Happened on Jan. 6

"First let's just dwell a little on the question of yesterday's. I hearing of the select committee on the january. The six quote unquote insurrection. The first insurrection. In human history when no weapons were bought by the insurrectionists to the event. It's rather funny. It's like having a tea party with not. That wouldn't be a tea party in my opinion. But hey you gotta live in the crazy world of the democrats but the question is so i. It was death. Now it's rape what is it going to be next she was going to be beamed op into an alien spacecraft. Was the yeti gang to kidnapper and take her to his a mountain hideaway in the in the mountainous regions of nepal. It's theater it's all. She's a liar she's not even a democrat. She was elected a member of the democratic socialists of america yes desa. She was a member of the democrat socialists of america. That's why she cannot she simply refuses to denounce the communist regime in cuba instead. She says the people screaming for freedom for libertad undoing so because america has oppressed them with an embargo. We it because they're waving of flags. If you're if you're being oppressed by america maybe you won't you wouldn't actually wave our flag strange but that's afc's world

America Nepal Cuba AFC
Supreme Court Affirms American Indigenous Man's Right to Hunt in Canada

Native America Calling

02:14 min | 6 months ago

Supreme Court Affirms American Indigenous Man's Right to Hunt in Canada

"The supreme court of canada friday ruled seven to two in favor of a washington state man who was charged with illegally hunting and canada more than a decade ago. Emily swing reports in two thousand ten. Rick data crossed the us. Canada border into british columbia. Where he intentionally hunted for elk without a license back in nineteen fifty three the last surviving member of desautels ancestral tribe. The cynics passed away in british columbia three years later. The province reclaimed cynics lands and canada's federal government officially declared the tribe extinct does to wanted to prove his people were anything but extinct. He was acquitted in two thousand seventeen but the province appealed twice and lost now. The supreme court of canada has sided with denzel via zoom defense. Attorney mark underhill delivered. The news to desa tell his wife linda and dozens of other cynics who had gathered to celebrate the rooms on behalf of canada. Welcome we want. This is the first time. The supreme court of canada has interpreted what it means to be an aboriginal peoples of canada in the majority opinion. Judge malcolm rowe wrote but cynics rights are protected by canada's constitution and that to exclude aboriginal peoples who were forced to move out of canada would risk perpetuating the historic injustice suffered by aboriginal peoples at the hands of europeans loggers miners and white settlers who moved into british columbia in the nineteenth century proved to be hostile. Neighbors and many strikes were forced to move south across the border onto the reservation of the confederated tribes of the call ville in washington state. Rodney causton is the call chairman. He's also cynics. He says his tribe will now work to protect cultural resources and sacred sites in canada. We will begin looking at are averaging title back to orlando are traditional homelands and also the recognition that we do have rights as the first nation in canada.

Canada Supreme Court Of Canada Emily Swing British Columbia Attorney Mark Underhill Judge Malcolm Rowe Desa Washington Rick Denzel Federal Government Linda United States Rodney Causton Orlando
Interview With Roy Kinsey, The Rapbrarian

Good Life Project

06:48 min | 8 months ago

Interview With Roy Kinsey, The Rapbrarian

"Tell me if this is true. Your parents met in a way that kind of foreshadowed your future in a little bit like they didn't mean a bar that didn't mean party is actually true that they met at a library. Of course it's a. I've had my own moments with that story. But it's the absolute truth. My mother was going to interview at. What was the large libraries in sta cultural center and my father was working at a desk. Saugus he Slip some gaming but yet that's that's where they met and then my mother was working actually on the the floor where the music was where all the film were. The vinyls that was this is not harold washington library This is before perr washes number and They met their first date was purple. Rain of the movie yet differs date was to go see preparation. The movie that is not suspicious. I eight yeah yeah. My dad loved france and it was really interesting. Because when i was putting out kinsey a memoir that is very reminiscent to me in a lot of ways of the story of purple rain Imprint the first place that i was asked to come pretty much to drop. The album actually was to first avenue for sold out show. And that's where my father lives now. My father has lived in minnesota for longer than twenty years. Twenty five thirty years probably which is why. This album is a purple winds wire at the vinyl herbal. But it was the first show that i was asked to come in do at prince's club where my father would walk at c be reforming in his hometown. Right before the shutdown so was the first and last show that i got to perform before we before the pandemic times matt. What what was it like for you. It was magical. It was so so amazing. I felt like it's called me. They're a felt like prince called me. You know called me to be there not knowing that things would shut down in a couple of weeks after that. But i think that it's sustained me in a way. I really miss performing and to be sold out show. I was called by desa so Of doom tree who lives in minnesota's a artist and author our own. Right of course asked me to come an open for her. So i do the sold out show and it was just one of the most magical experiences that i've had as far The reception was so so incredible and You know the people of minnesota really made me feel like a star that day in so it was just a lot of moments that were more magical more synchronised than even you know just the forty minutes i was on stage. It was just a whole magical experience that it's sort of like everything was leading up to that moment. Have you talked to your dad about that. His show yeah. It was so funny. My dad is very mysterious guy so when he came i didn't see him. He called me till we. It was a great show. And all that but i think just the way my mind works in the art. That was moving through in the art. That i was making and where i was in that space. I can't lie that i was like. I don't even know if he came. I don't even know if he was even actually here and van but me and my dad had this really interesting connection. I mean you have that connection with your parents. You have the connection with people that brought you into the world doesn't have to be so literal or on the phone or shortly proof or whatever life. I have that tie with my parents. My parents no when. I'm going through something whether i talked to them or not. Like they'll feel it from across town or prostate or cross country in so Randomly two or three weeks later. He sends me a video of me like on my last song. You know rocking the stage of okay. Right he was legit there. that's awesome. yeah. I mean as bad i think You know amazon. There's that connection. There's that sort of thing which. I'm fairly practical person. But there's also certain things like that that i just believe in you just feel something doesn't matter where you are I know you're also really close with grandma coming up as well right. Oh yeah my best details. Tell me more better ellen thompson. She was born in nineteen forty three in mississippi. And i love to speak her name. She was one of the first people that clap from me in made a really big deal out of me knowing how to read on my seventh birthday. She made me de. Protagonist of this book was a story of dr martin luther king junior. It should be around here somewhere. But it's right there so in this in this book that my grandmother gave me my tribute to martin luther king. Junior i am the protagonists of this book. And i'm writing a paper on martin luther king junior at tell the story of his life. But i'm you know in the beginning saying oh telling my cousins rookie creek turtle i have to write this paper on martin luther king junior Go into the story by the end of the story. I've told this whole thing. I turned it in. I get a on the paper. That is the book right. So not only. Did my grandmother clap for me. When she sees me reading. And saying that. I you know had a love. For words you should go to market a garden classes with me and sit in a walk me home and then when i began talking she would call me radio or lawnmower. She said because. I've talked so much if you call me that. And that was a foreshadowing in itself. Right i mean of me getting a on the paper. Maybe the paper was the black album. Right me. Being able to use my words for the upliftment of myself in marginalized communities in it was really just kind of like thinking about this is a power device and words in education literature a are powered by

Sta Cultural Center Prince's Club Minnesota Harold Washington Saugus Kinsey Desa Ellen Thompson France Prince Matt Martin Luther King Dr Martin Luther Amazon Mississippi
Yellen’s nomination to be U.S. Treasury secretary advances on unanimous committee vote

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | 9 months ago

Yellen’s nomination to be U.S. Treasury secretary advances on unanimous committee vote

"Today to confirm Janet Yellen is Treasury secretary. NPR's Scott Horsley has more yelling, has already led the Federal Reserve and served as a top White House economist in the Clinton administration. While Republicans on the Finance Committee expressed some differences with her policy positions, no one questioned her qualifications. If confirmed by the full Senate, Janet Yellen will be the 78th Treasury secretary and the first woman to lead the department. She's already matched the first Secretary Alexander Hamilton in scoring her own hip hop musical tribute. It only took a couple centuries. The first female secretary yet the change. Yeah. Great Public radio program Marketplace Commission that number from the artist Desa Secretary Element Service the administration's point person in addressing the economic fall out from the Corona virus pandemic. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington A full Senate vote is expected Monday on Wall Street. Today the Dow was

Janet Yellen Scott Horsley Treasury NPR Clinton Administration Finance Committee Federal Reserve White House Great Public Radio Program Mar Alexander Hamilton Senate Desa Secretary Element Service Washington
"desa" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"desa" Discussed on KTOK

"Institutes of Health with an update we have right now are to drugs. That have undergone randomized placebo controlled trials. And I've shown to have benefit both in diminishing the time to recovery with from Desa Pia and diminishing the 28 day mortality with Dex and met the zone and then we have a number of other investigational therapies that are in various levels of clinical trial. Ouchi says. Medical leaders and drug makers are working together to come up with treatments and will continue to do so. The number of cases of covert 19 and Italy is rising again with a one day record of nearly 38,000 cases about 16 million people in four regions of the country are in the so called Red zone, unable to leave their pounds and all shops except for those deemed essential have been closed more than 440 deaths in the country were reported today. The number of Dan from covert 19 in Italy is the highest in the world over 40,000 Mid Atlantic state, keeping a restriction in place that officials say will help curb the spread of covert 19. Maryland governor Larry Hogan will keep his state's mask order in effect, which means all people in the state aged five and older must have faces covered in public spaces. Medical officials in the states a Corona virus numbers are rising and there is a risk of another high wave. But Hogan adds, he won't place any new restrictions on businesses, saying current rules would be enough. If followed and enforced. Maryland has seen 150,000 covert Cape. It's Evan Brown Fox News. Facebook has banned a large group called Stop the Steel that supporters of President Trump We're using to organize protests against the vote count in the presidential race. Facebook says some members were called for violent calling for violence. And he says that it will continue to watch for activity that violates the rules. Silently. Scylla. Sarah, this is new. Some patchy fog possible tonight, your Friday evening that looks very mild. Still 60 at 10 o'clock tonight and a low in the low to low mid fifties at American Public University. We believe that everyone should have access to a great education. It's not a privilege reserved for the few And we believe higher.

Larry Hogan Facebook Maryland Italy Desa Pia Institutes of Health Dex Mid Atlantic Evan Brown American Public University President Ouchi Dan Sarah
"desa" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

06:12 min | 1 year ago

"desa" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Guys, We're back about the doll. You think you offered to me men 1877, Doc Dolly 1877 Deal, CD A l I I realized the media had been kind of ripping on Wendy severe and what President Trump had received from Gilead Rum disappears, an antiviral we've been using in the hospital now for months. For covert patients and against the media a couple weeks ago said Well, it's not FDA approved. They have They improved it so the FDA has now proved from disappear as a treatment for covert. It's an antiviral. It's not the Regeneron The Regeneron was the poly global and a body. It was, it was the infusion of antibodies to help neutralize the virus. The room. Desa Veer's an antiviral. That's a treatment we use in the hospital setting. We don't do it outside the hospital setting yet, but it's a good sign of the FDA has approved it because that means we do have some. You know some some, you know, official and approved treatment for Koven, and it also means That somebody is kind of acknowledging that you know, the doctors and nurses in the hospital teams are doing something right. So Bravo, first responders and everybody out there on the front lines doing what they're doing, because it was you guys saving lives that allowed the FDA to be like You know what this stuff works, so Very, very good. Well done. Mitch McConnell, uh, got himself caught on camera in the news number. No zoo meeting knows Umi. No, no, no, no, Lord, have mercy. Please be careful of the zoo meeting. Gosh, no Mitch McConnell was was caught on camera was a pretty severe bruising. But I didn't think much of it because he's 78 years old. I've seen hands like that in so many people that, you know, take blood thinners or whatever. And I don't really know what Mitch McConnell takes. But people have been kind of freaked out a little bit. And Mitch McConnell, Senate majority leader, Kentucky. Center for Kentucky. What believes Is having his reelection campaign against McGrath, Thiss this go around this next couple weeks had some pretty significant bruising on his hands, also on his right lip. Um, And it was this right lip? Yeah, his upper right lip, and you could see bandages on his hands. And, you know, people kind of freaked out a little bit by that. I also noticed that on his 20 words glasses, you saw some significant bruising where his glasses were. And so When you see that as a medical provider, you're like, OK, V is on a blood thinner. It's a little too thin. Okay. You know, we don't want anybody to spontaneously bleed, but we call those bruises in medical terminology, Purpura or Popara. I always put my accent on the wrong thing. But I call it proper and I think they currently he's Popara. Okay, A lot of peace. We have a lot of P's in medicine, but the perp Aurra, Okay, bruising happens when you have blood vessel. Loss of integrity or the blood vessels burst and so you could have a baby blood vessels, a little baby ones. Or you could have a larger bruising. So if you like, fall on your knees, you hurt any of brews. We called a bruised but I still prefer okay. Now older individuals. They have something called senile. Prefer up or solar prefer. I don't like the term senile. Um and and we call it that or we've called it that because older people have thinner skin. So you notice you bruise easily. Not if he ever looked at your grandma's hands your grandfather's hands, But I mean very, very thin and they always seem to look bruised whether on they're on a blood thinner or not. Um, when we do see Bruising, right? We think a trauma We think of maybe medications that could be messing with. You know your clotting abilities like let's say aspirin. Or maybe even some, you know H two blockers. There's other medicines out there that could thin the blood. We think of you being on a blood thinner for reason. Mitch McConnell had broken his shoulder last year and then a few years back. He had triple bypass He had Three vessels blocked that he had to have bypass he had bypassed cardiac surgery. LA Times If you have triple vessel disease or review of coronary artery disease, you're going to be in some sort of a blood thinner, whether it's aspirin or something stronger if you have stents, etcetera. So I'm not surprised if he's on a blood thinner. But then you also worry about something like a bleeding disorder and with bleeding disorders that could be like a GP tp. There's there's disorders were all of a sudden her platelets. Your clotting factors. Just kind of get eaten up or used up. And you you don't have enough clotting factors. And so just little simple things like clapping your hands could make you bruise or wearing glasses. And I'm not saying that's what happened to him. But I understand why people were freaked out and you know, I could really write much on the topic because you know when Rich McConnell was interviewed by reporters, he's like I'm fine. There's no health concerns, you know. Do you have concerns about your health? You know, no. No concerns at all. He's a 70 year old man is probably out of blood thinner and maybe things need to be adjusted a little bit. He might need some vitamin K or whatever. So you know, you know, he says he's fine. But I understand the bruising kind of made people feel, you know, a little nervous now and nothing that made people feel nervous in Ah headlines this week is there was a cove in 19 vaccine trial. I believe in great Britain and somebody died. I believe he was young. I think he was a volunteer. I think it was a 27 year old doctor. Even hold on. He was a 28 year old doctor. And he had It was an AstraZeneca vaccine and he had died. Never scold. My gosh. AstraZeneca! Oh, my gosh, I don't think this is the My light is one. I think this might be a different one. I'm not sure but the patient. Never got the vaccine. He was in the placebo group. So he was in the group. That did it. Get the vaccine..

Mitch McConnell bruising FDA aspirin Desa Veer Kentucky AstraZeneca Doc Dolly Gilead Rum Trump Umi Wendy President Lord Senate Purpura official Koven Popara
What happens to all the other COVID-19 candidates when the first one is approved?

Science Magazine Podcast

09:45 min | 1 year ago

What happens to all the other COVID-19 candidates when the first one is approved?

"Now we have staff writer John Cohen. He wrote a story this week about an interesting question what happens to all the other covid nineteen vaccine candidates when the first one is approved. Hi John. Hi. Sarah. How are you? I'm good. He could be let's be honest. We're both sick of the pandemic. Yeah. Absolutely. Let me leave my house that my child leave the house. That's all I want to normal. Yeah. Normal. Let's talk about vaccine candidates. How many are in studies now under study now and what does the trial landscape look like at this moment? Know they're forty two in human clinical trials according the WHO list? The World Health Organization doesn't update list that was as of October second in there about two hundred in development. Of, the forty two in clinical trials tanner in the last stage of efficacy trials, the phase three, we're going to be mostly talking about what's going on in the US those numbers reflect worldwide vaccine development that's global. The US has four efficacy studies underway right now, and these are all part of what they like to call warp speed all part of operation more speed. Yeah. Yeah and so they're going through trials going through all the same steps, but that could change once one of them gets. Approval, why would something changed about? You know what's going on with the other CO bids scenes? The concern is that the mediocre might be the enemy of the better or the best the way that we've set things up in the United States the food and Drug Administration has a mechanism called an emergency use authorization. It's received a lot of attention because of hydroxy chloroquine because of rim, Desa there, and because of convalescent plasma and because of diagnostic testing, all of those have used this pathway for. Approval and authorization essentially is short of a full approval and it says, Hey, were in an emergency we only minimal data that gives us an idea of this stuff working and then we'll let it be used widely. So why are we worried about the other possible covid nineteen vaccines? If for example, one gets a UA by November I the FDA has said in a document issued in June that the EU a could be issued for fifty percent efficacy. That's a pretty low standard to begin with. As. Soon, as you authorized the use of one vaccine, first of all, this is an ongoing study because they're going to use data for an e you a most likely from an interim analysis someone of axion efficacy trial is scheduled to take six months. An Independent Safety Monitoring Board looks at the data at certain pre scheduled time points in the case of these efficacy trials they look at. The data early based on what they call? It's are basically the end points of the study. The studies are primarily asking the question. Do they prevent symptomatic disease that the number one question they're asking? So that's an event. If somebody gets a symptomatic disease and these trials are scheduled to have one hundred and fifty events to reach their final conclusions, but they're going to take peaks at the data. At fifty events, a net one, hundred events roughly at fifty events a company. If it had strong evidence that the people in the vaccinated group as opposed to the Placebo group were doing better, they could seek you a based on fifty percent efficacy at that moment they ethically in a quandary because the people who are still in this trial, blindly a receiving either vaccine or placebo ethically you could. Argue you've gotTa Blind and tell the people who are receiving. Placebo. We've got a vaccine that looks good. Do you want to get it? So you've undermined that study from reaching it's real and points of one hundred fifty events What's more? Every other study underway has to let the participants know that the US has issued and ethically you have to give people the option of taking a vaccine. The FDA's blessing. People might walk out a trials who are in trials. If you were staging a new clinical trial, you may well have to compare your vaccine to the one that has received the authorization. Well, it's much easier to prove that something is better than nothing. But what if you have a vaccine that's fifty percent effective and that becomes the competitor not a placebo well. Then, this new vaccine let's say it has sixty two percent efficacy. You're comparing sixty two percent to fifty percent not fifty percent zero. It's really hard to see that small difference or even if they're equivalent, let's say they're both fifty percent. So you need a much larger study and it needs to go on for a longer period of time and it costs a lot more money we. Don't have. It's not likely that people involved in trials for other vaccines or even the people in the placebo arm of the one that does get approved would have access to the sack seen. That's a critical consideration. If supply doesn't meet demand, then we have an easy you were only giving outlets twenty million doses to the top priority people healthcare workers then for the people in other. Clinical trials they have no other option. Then the issue is not this great ethical dilemma, but remember were speeding things up with operation more speed in order to pump out three, hundred, million doses of vaccine from one company by as early as the end of January. So this problem, it's not here today because supply doesn't meet demand, but it sure could be here in late. January and. February march April who knows what we're going to have in terms of efficacy data and who knows what we're going to have in terms of trials in their enrollment. Remember we have a couple of trials that have been stopped because of side effects. When you put a trial on hold that means it's not going to reach its end point for even longer and that's happening right now with two of the warp speed vaccines. In your story, we don't want just one vaccine. There's some good reasons to continue to investigate and to look further afield even after one is approved, can you talk about some of those? For one thing we may need different vaccines for different populations. The elderly we know with influenza, they need a much higher dose because their immune systems don't work as well as they age we may need one that's tailored for pregnant women. Pregnant women are GonNA, tolerate a risk factor much much lower than everyone else. You might need a vaccine that simpler to deliver for some parts of the world that doesn't have a cold chain issue or you need to keep it at. MINUS SEVENTY DEGREES CENTIGRADE. You might need a vaccine that's cheaper for many countries even though it's maybe sixty two percent versus sixty, eight percent effective, it might be a better deal at the end of the day because more people can get it for the amount of money you have on top of all that we want a lot of vaccines because more vaccines means more supply we have an insurance policy of something goes wrong at a manufacturing plant. If a side effect crops up when it goes into wider use, we have this backup of other vaccines. So there are loads of reasons why we want a whole portfolio vaccines ultimately to prove safe effective. That's the. Case that you have to make to participants people who might be involved in trials. Do you think it's going to be effective? Do you think people are gonNA still volunteer to get a vaccine or not vaccine that hasn't been approved? You put your finger on a really important issue and that's who enrolls in a vaccine trial why it's not like you have cancer that's going to kill you and you're enrolling in a trial because you've exhausted all medicines and you're hoping beyond hope that this new treatment will work and Save Your Life. That's a completely different motivation to join a trial. Then a vaccine when you are healthy, you're joining this to prevent something from. Happening so ethically, you can argue that well, that person most of these people are doing it for altruistic reasons the really doing it to help other people and you can ethically approach people in a study and say, Hey, look this one vaccine got EU a based on the early data that it's fifty eight percent effective. We'd like to keep you in this trial and it's a blinded study and we promise at the end of the study is one of the bioethicists I interviewed said we promise at the end we're going to give you the better vaccine, but will you stick with this for a while so that we can figure out if the vaccine that isn't For us is worth pursuing going back to your cancer example. There are cases where a clinical trials is happening the people in the treatment group are doing so well that it's no longer ethical to continue to deny that treatment to the placebo arm. That's not what's happening here. It is a different equation, some ethicists. That, even in a vaccine study, a person has a right to know if they're a participant whether they're receiving a placebo vaccine if there is convincing and compelling evidence that the vaccines working but keep in mind too and this is something that I think a lot of people have a hard time getting their heads around wearing a mask and social distancing goes a long way toward protecting you from this virus maybe even more than fifty percent effective vaccine 'cause then you're walking around. With none of this protection or you're not taking it as seriously exactly and that's called behavioral inhibition. If a vaccine leads to behavioral discipline habituation and people dropped their guard, stop wearing masks stop social distancing they may be putting themselves at more risk even though they have a vaccine in their bodies

United States FDA EU Sarah Staff Writer World Health Organization John Cohen Chloroquine Influenza Independent Safety Monitoring Cancer Drug Administration
"desa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"desa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That is music from Desa with the Minnesota Orchestra conducted by Sarah Hicks. There collaborative album is called Sound. The Bells on Desa is with me in our new sound studio. So this is a compilation that Covers what, like seven or eight years of song writing? Yeah, even a little more. And some of these songs you had recast before. I mean, the shock alone is also on that remix record that you did, right? Yeah, man. Good research. So you know for me existing as a studio artist with kind of a hip hop pedigree and then Trying to figure out how to take that show on the road necessitates some degree of reinvention. And I think that's been true. I would say for the past like 10 or 15 years for a lot of touring hip hop artists, right? It isn't very often just a just a deejay behind turntables and a vocalist. You know you're adding stuff, and so I had the opportunity to to tour with like a trio of guys who all had jazz chops, and the songs are going to sound differently when you're dealing with them, And now I tour with it with a group of guys who has, like pop and rock chops. Well, the Toms are going to be playing differently by those guys. Right? Right. And so you really get to know the tune. I'm sure a lot of people say that, but you get to know it when you're on the road in a way that you don't because it's brand new. You've just met it by the time you've recorded it in the sound booth. That we get reintroduced to these songs in a new context with the full orchestra. Desa is obviously my guest on this edition of the program and, in a moment will return to the album will talk about why you can't hear all of the album on the radio and much more so stay with us. I'm John Schaefer, and you're listening to new sounds. On the next all of it. Director Dawn Porter and former White House photographer Pete Souza join us to discuss their documentary The way I see it, which follows Suzie's life as a photographer during.

Desa Minnesota Orchestra Sarah Hicks Pete Souza John Schaefer Dawn Porter Toms Director White House Suzie
The Trump Treatment for Covid Is Coming Soon

Squawk Pod

06:46 min | 1 year ago

The Trump Treatment for Covid Is Coming Soon

"The president's trip for Corona virus and their implications on Wall Street in a video posted to twitter Wednesday evening president trump touted the drugs administered to him and urged federal regulators to approve emergency use authorization for two in particular regeneration and Eli Lilly's antibody therapeutic treatments. Both companies submitted requests for FDA emergency use this week beyond clinical trials very few covid patients have received these treatments to this point. Also this week, the FDA published new guidance vaccine manufacturers mandating at least two months of follow up safety data after vaccinating trial participants in making a vaccine approval before November. Third Election Day unlikely here's Joe Kernan make trump joins us now with more. Mega just mentioned to you. Something that are cashing actually wrote I think it was yesterday morning that at least perhaps to keep in mind twenty percent of what we're seeing in the stock market and the rally after the stimulus. Debate could be because of. We may have we may be getting closer to to some type of treatment. For Cove it I know you're going to talk about the president he looked. Did you see him yesterday after being diagnosed a week ago or whatever it was? He looked good and looked it looked like he was almost fully recovered yesterday Williams talking about this regeneration drug and you know he had a lot of medicines so you can't tie it to one obviously but pretty amazing I think right? Well, certainly, you can't tie to one but the president putting a lot of focus on these antibody drugs we know of course he received regenerates. Cocktail on Friday. Ella Lily is also developing an antibody in this space. Now, both of these companies have filed for emergency use authorization. We brought you that news from lily yesterday and last night just hours after that video from the president regenerate announced it had filed for emergency use authorization as well, and there are still more of these in clinical trials behind these. Now, guys will have to see how quickly the FDA acts here but the next question is going to beat the supply of these medicines. Take a look at what the companies. Have told us about what they have available if they got emergency use authorization now regeneration says about fifty thousand doses could be made available at aims to get that up to three hundred thousand within a few months. Now, one dose is one whole course of treatment. So that's the number of people they treat. Now regenerate does have a contract with the government four, hundred, fifty, million dollars under which it would provide those initial doses and the government would make them available to Americans at no cost. The government would also be responsible for the drugs. Distribution now lilly says it has a single antibody, not the cocktail approach that regenerates pursued that it's filed for authorization of it would have one hundred, thousand doses of that available in October, and it also has a combo approach that filing four. Probably in November, our it would have fifty thousand doses, the entire fourth quarter. So guys supply of these is going to be the next major question similar situation to what we saw with when Desa Vir. Hey. So meg earlier before this avenue and we don't want to rush anything obviously you're talking about. A compassionate use for whatever this this was an and with anything especially monoclonal is you need detailed phase one, two and three trials, and you need to have a a control group and everything else. So it's very important but just philosophically mega let's think about what a vaccine does. You introduce maybe a part of the spike protein your body sees it and manufacturers its own antibodies against the virus doesn't sound that much different. If you're generating similar antibodies, in vitro in in a test tube and introducing those antibodies that are already against. Against the corona virus, so I mean almost takes out a step of the vaccine where the body actually has to manufacture its own and you're just giving someone the antibodies said this morning that that's a powerful idea if you are. If you're convinced of the proof of concept that the May factor one of these similar to what the the body would would do. Naturally, this could be a game changer I don't think the trump is wrong on this. Yeah. You're exactly right. In the way you described that Joe, I mean this is an immune response that has been generated by someone against the coronavirus. Some of these are actually taken from survivors of covert nineteen regenerate also combined one of those with one. Made in its labs but it is the immune response and while the initial trials were given as treatment for patients. Similarly to what we saw in the setting of the president, he was recently diagnosed and received this treatment. It's also being tested as prevention for high risk patients who've been potentially exposed to somebody with covid nineteen, and so it is a similar idea but the problem Joe is there just won't be a lot of these available at the beginning and their feet drugs so they're not pills easy to take either. And in the president's case, it was very early on to and. You worry about that second week when the virus has already gotten to a level that causes that immune response that can be so harmful and You would have to get I assume you'd have to get this. We have we need to do the testing obviously, but it seems like president trump. Was An advantage that he got it very early on. In his treatment theoretically, if that's what if that's what caused the improvement so there's a lot of questions still, but but reason for hope I think to be you know we need hope this point after watching what's happened to the entire world right? Absolutely, and we haven't seen what's happened with the president's visual load. So we don't have all the information of course. Yeah we don't. We don't they just from appearances. All right. Thank you, Becky, you want you went in and dead I questioned to Maggie talked about how regeneration thinks that they could get three hundred million doses ramped up in the next several months, which would be great. That's almost the entire population would all of that go to the American population I know you mentioned that some of it's already been bought by the government and kind of guaranteed but are we talking about taking that and then splitting with other nations? Or what all of that stay in the. United States. So I may have misspoken they'll have three hundred thousand within a few months and only fifty thousand now and that all has been purchased by the US government. But that's why I'm kind of comparing it to the best of your situation where we were in a shortage. Yeah. So it's not going to be enough for everybody they're going to have to make decisions about who should get the strugg-.

President Trump FDA Joe Kernan Eli Lilly Ella Lily Donald Trump Corona Twitter United States Desa Vir Williams Cove Becky Maggie
President Trump Received Regeneron Experimental Antibody Treatment

TIME's Top Stories

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

President Trump Received Regeneron Experimental Antibody Treatment

"Night, and the team plans on giving him a five day treatment course. The FDA has authorized the use of Rim Desa. Vir on hospitalized covid nineteen patients with mild to moderate symptoms. When asked if the president would complete the course of treatment at the hospital Conley said the president would leave the hospital when the team agrees it's safe

Rim Desa President Trump FDA Conley
President Trump "doing very well," his physician says

Up First

01:05 min | 1 year ago

President Trump "doing very well," his physician says

"The president is now staying at Walter Reed Hospital. The White House says he'll be there for a few days in that it's out of an abundance of caution and at the recommendation of his physician late last night, the the president's physician sent out a note saying that trump was quote doing very well and had started a treatment. Called Desa. trump also tweeted last night quote. That going. I think. He was seen yesterday walking from the White House to Marine One wearing a suit I'm walking normally press secretary. Kelly mcenaney said he plans to work from the presidential suite at the hospital There aren't many details beyond that and the White House hasn't really elaborated on what symptoms trump has or when they started the New York Times toward it that he had a mild fever in a cough we also know that trump has received an infusion of an experimental drug made by regeneration. That has shown some promise, but still under review.

Donald Trump White House Walter Reed Hospital President Trump Kelly Mcenaney Mild Fever New York Times Marine One Press Secretary Cough
David Blaine: Daredevil takes flight with helium-filled balloons

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

02:57 min | 1 year ago

David Blaine: Daredevil takes flight with helium-filled balloons

"Illusionist David Blaine says he didn't have control of anything for his latest stunt that took him very high into the Arizona sky. Yesterday. 80 sees Matt Gutman reports took 52 giant helium balloons to get him up and gravity to bring David Blaine back down to the Arizona desert floor. In his first major life event in nearly a decade, the illusionist soaring more than 4.5 miles in the air, hosted by all those balloons. It was a scene lifted right out of the beloved kids movie on blame, dedicating the feed to his own kid, nine year old Desa, who was right there by his side as he took off and as he floated off into the stratosphere, the temperature dropping into the single digits, the air dangerously thin, available oxygen on lied about Half the amount at sea level, putting him in a serious risk. High poxy is when you don't get enough oxygen because you go to high. You have no idea what you're doing is you're completely five. It's like you're drunk, and as he keeps climbing, Blaine is communicating with his ground team. Including Desa anything up. Um Or it's 16,000 now. We're probably gonna go up. Where the airplanes go, and as he climbs to nearly a jets cruising altitude, the oxygen shortage hits it's 95 blamed, finally pulling his oxygen tank out trying to get his wits about him for the most dangerous part yet coming back down, Finally, almost an hour after he took off as you reaches 24,900 ft, he gets the signal. Releases the safety and plummets at over 125 miles an hour for minutes straight, he free falls towards the earth, then pulls that parachute cord came down in a Gallup almost deliriously happy. And for the flight back to go see his daughter Desa. This time he took a helicopter that was actually beautiful. Top to bottom. K. Ken's a professional skydiver who helped blame prepare and talked him through it while he was in the air, revealing just how hard it was to get this right on event that requires whether to be bright wind has to be perfect. Everything has to line up. There's no stopping start. It's all live for everyone to see such an incredibly complex stunt and made more so because so much could go wrong and was complicated by the fact that originally Blaine apparently wanted to try it without a parachute, but the basic idea of a human grabbing a bunch of balloons and floating right off into space. Well, that just made for an uplifting

David Blaine Arizona Matt Gutman K. Ken
Justice for Berta Cáceres

Blood River

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Justice for Berta Cáceres

"It's now been four and a half years. Since the night of march second twenty-six when bertossa's was shot dead in the bedroom of her house four and a half years of frustrations secrets and revelation. I there was the survivor. The witness that the assassins failed to kill embarrassed guest bedroom. Then there were the false leads allegations of a cover up and surprise raids after all of that investigators piece together. A murder plot pointed the finger at the hydro electric company. That berretta had opposed. This led to seven murder convictions but a critical piece of the story remains unresolved david. Sto the ceo of desa was arrested in two thousand eighteen for plotting bertos debt. And since then his case has been in limbo all the while o'clock has been ticking. Under honduran law a person can be held in custody without going to trial for only two and a half years and david's time in prison expires on september. Second twenty twenty. It's now late. August just two weeks to go before that day arrives and bertos family is growing very worried. They say david's legal team is trying to run out. That clock bertos older brother. Gustavo tells a honduran television. Show that if david goes free. The family's hopes of finding some measure of justice will slip away to

Bertossa Bertos Hydro Electric Company Berretta Desa David Gustavo
"desa" Discussed on A Touch of Grey

A Touch of Grey

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"desa" Discussed on A Touch of Grey

"We live in a finite world. But we certainly behave as if it's in A. IT'S GONNA. Go on forever, and and then you give the use of your book. Helpful tips for really being able to sustain life on our planet as we currently know it, and that's something all of us want, so I wanNA. Thank you so much coming on the show and Chris. Burgess. How people get your book attainable sustainable the Lost Art of self reliance, and you have a block. Yeah the the book is available anywhere? Books are so I? I have enjoyed sending people to to something called Bookshop Dot Org. They support independent booksellers but it is available anywhere. Books are sold I. Do have a website on tangible sustainable dot net. And can go there. They can certainly search site. They can sign up for my newsletter. That goes out once or twice a week. I am on social media. I'M ON FACEBOOK On instagram I'm on Pinterest. You can search for attainable sustainable and find me there. That's Crisper Desa in conversation with the host and founder of our program, Christopher Desa has the book attainable sustainable? The Lost Art of self reliant living. Coming up next Carol, Mark with her covid nineteen report and a new episode of Meg Meg McDonald when a touch of grey, the talk show for grownups continues right here in the street station in just a moment..

Crisper Desa Meg Meg McDonald Bookshop Dot Org Christopher Desa Burgess Chris founder Pinterest Carol Mark
Special Report | Markets in Turmoil: Healthcare & Reopening

Squawk Pod

11:25 min | 1 year ago

Special Report | Markets in Turmoil: Healthcare & Reopening

"Day. One hundred twenty three of the corona virus crisis new information tonight on a key drug to fight the virus as the nation moves closer to reopening stocks are under pressure the best month for stocks since. Nineteen eighty-seven comes to an end but questions persist about the rally and our ability to stop the virus. What we found out is just a little piece of the puzzle. Also tonight when we take a step forward we don't want to take two steps back. One business owners plead to his State. We're not ready to reopen this. Cnbc special report markets in turmoil begins right. Now here's Scott Wapner. Welcome good to have you with us on this Thursday night after the biggest month for stocks in a decade. Let's get to our first look futures right now early but they are lower following lackluster earnings from some big tech names. After the bell today stocks were lower across the board the Dow losing nearly three hundred points but the real story was the month of April. The Dow gaining eleven percent S. and P. Five hundred almost thirteen percent. That was its best performance. Since nineteen eighty-seven you see the major averages putting in that mark tonight the Nasdaq adding more than fifteen percent. It's best month since June of the year. Two thousand there is also new information tonight and the path towards vaccine drug maker AstraZeneca teaming up with Oxford University information on phase. One of their testing is due very soon our farmer reporter make to route following the details for US tonight. High Bank Scott. Well it is. One of the most advanced vaccine programs in development fur-coated nineteen right now. Researchers at the University of Oxford started the first phase of human clinical trials last week and five different centers in southern England with data expected to be available next month. They say if all goes well a later stage trial could begin by the middle of this year. A key question for any successful vaccine though will be the ability to manufacture it at a large enough scale that is where a partner like Astra. Zeneca comes in under the agreement with Oxford. The British drugs giant will be responsible for development and worldwide manufacturing and distribution if the clinical trials. Prove that the vaccine works. Now it's not the only experimental vaccine already in human studies one from dern and the National Institutes of Health in the. Us began testing in healthy volunteers. In March well small biotech company and no view has also said it's begun tests. Several vaccines in China have also entered the first phase of human testing whilst Pfizer and bio tech began trials in Germany last week. And they're expected to start. Us trials imminently a key question for all these potential vaccines will be whether the course of the pandemic will enable efficacy to be proven. It often happens and outbreak scenarios that the science is too slow to keep up with the disease. Many times in the past outbreaks have subsided before a vaccine could be ready to be tested. The development and manufacturing of new drugs and vaccines is also an expensive endeavor and Gilead who's drug desa. There yesterday showed positive results in an NIH. Trial said it spent fifty million dollars on the drug in the first quarter and may spend up to a billion dollars this year. The company's pledged to donate it's available supply of the drug and hasn't commented on pricing plans. After that Daniel Day was asked on a conference call with analysts tonight. Why covert nineteen is different from other diseases? The company does profit from treating like HIV. Hepatitis and flew. There's been no other time like this in the history of the planet than any of us about live. In terms of the far-reaching reaching effects of this pandemic so medically from a patient perspective most importantly but also economically and so I think there is no guidebook out there. There is no rule book out. There and day will join us tomorrow morning to discuss that and more on squawk box Scott Meg. We'll look forward to that very much in the morning on squawk box. That's Meg Terrell reporting tonight on the money as always joining us now. Cnbc CONTRIBUTOR IS DR Scott Gottlieb. The former head of the FDA. Dr Dot leaves good to talk to you again. You must first your reaction to this story about Oxford and AstraZeneca teaming up good news. We're going to need more than one vaccine developer to be successful here and the fact that Oxford's teaming up with Astra Zeneca which has the ability to manufacture this product at scale. Because the big challenge here isn't just going to be demonstrating that these products are safe and effective and running the clinical trials but also engaging in a large scale manufacturing this can be required to produce these in quantities sufficient to provide them to an entire population. Astrazeneca has heft. They have that ability so this is a positive development. We need more than one vaccine developed. It'd be successful here. We need multiple vaccine to be successful across the world if we're GONNA have enough doses to supply the entire world and also the low and middle income countries that locked out of this race right now. There's a lot of exuberance last evening. Plenty of opportunity today for some maybe to walk back. Some of the expectations of having a vaccine ready as quick as some of the timelines have said through this operation warp speed for example though Dr Falcone this morning on the today show certainly didn't back down. Is it really possible to have a vaccine Dr Gotlib by January? Well we're probably GONNA have by January. Is Vaccines in sufficient quantities to run very large scale trials. So we have outbreaks in American cities. We'll be able to deploy thousands probably hundreds of thousands of vaccines in those cities. I run kind large trials that we're going to need to do to prove that these vaccines not just are effective. But that they're safe. In terms of having sufficient quantities to inoculate the entire population. That's really a twenty twenty one event and hopefully we'll we'll have it in time for twenty twenty one but it's unlikely to be available before the end of this year but we could have tens of millions of doses before the end of this year if you if you see multiple manufacturers being successful because each manufacturer could probably produce millions if not upwards of around ten million doses and so you have involved fires of the company that I'm involved with. You have a couple of small biotech companies engaged to no fee. Gsk's engaged now you have Astra Zeneca J. and J. Working on an ad no viral vaccine. These are large companies that know how to manufacture at significant scale overall. How would you describe your own level of optimism about where we are in our fight against this virus tonight? I'm very optimistic. And we're making very rapid progress and trying to drug this this virus and there's nothing particularly complex about a corona virus. That would suggest that. We're not going to be able to develop an effective therapeutic vaccine against it. We haven't had a vaccine against the corona virus before but we haven't tried really except for SARS emerge typically corona viruses caused common colds. And we haven't really sought vaccines for them. We already probably have one antiviral drug. That's effective not a home run but a drug that looks effective in severe. I think we're GONNA have antibody drugs by the fall. At some point this fall that starts to be the makings of a pretty potent toolbox. Those are the first generation products and so we'll see second and third generation drugs come online. The entire by pharmaceutical sectors really focused on this intently. And I think we're making very rapid progress and so I'm optimistic that we're going to have therapeutics. Never seen anything like it really. Let's move from Therapeutics and vaccines to talk about more reopenings Georgia now set to lift a most shelter in place restrictions tomorrow. Is that a good idea. Well look I think what's taking shape in this country is that we've reached a plateau in the number of infections at about thirty thousand a day. We're bouncing around. But is that about three thousand a day so you have to assume about three hundred thousand infections a day in this country because we're probably diagnosing one in ten infections to one in twenty infections and the number of deaths has plateaued as well. I think we're likely to bounce around on that plateau for a sustained period of time and the risk we face by reopening isn't necessarily that we have very rapid surge in infections and run into another epidemic but we never really snuff out the infections that we have smoldering infections all through the summer. And if that's the case if we continue to have three hundred thousand infections a day by the time you reach September first upwards of fifteen percent of the US population will have had corona virus. And so you starting to get pretty significant proportion of the population. I think that's the risk we face by some of the reopenings that we're seeing when you still see cases going up now Georgia. The cases are going down in recent days. But they're still not testing a lot and so you don't know how reliable those that data is but they haven't seen the kind of sustained declines that we've all said at the outset that you'd want to see to try to safely reopen an economy. We've had this conversation about Georgia. Numerous occasions you tweeted a few days ago that they were still having an epidemic there that cases were on the rise. Though I saw today you did say that. They've seen a big improvement. It seems like a fairly short period of time to have some level of improvement. No improvement was in the model that model that everyone looks at from Washington state and that model is just based on trends. And so what they're doing is they're looking at current trends fitting lines curves so they're trying to project from what the current trends are so. Georgia has shown in the last week of reduction in the number of new cases on a daily basis. Some events probably improvement some of. It's probably under testing Georgia ranks in the lower echelon of states in terms of the testing that. They're doing their population. So it's unclear whether or not the epidemic Israeli subsiding in that state. When you look across the country you see a lot of states probably about twenty five states. Where the epidemic is rising in terms of the number of new cases on a daily basis. So the number of cases being diagnosed on a daily basis is actually going up. Some of that's a function of the fact that we're testing a lot more so we're capturing more cases but some of it's also a function of our seeing expanding epidemics in a lot of states. Now that's said many of these states are states with a very low number of infections. So they're going from one hundred infections of data one hundred ten to one hundred twenty so they're not states that had a big epidemic to begin with but nonetheless it just shows that we're really not through the woods yet when it comes to this national epidemic New York showing a lot of improvement and that distorts the national figures but nationally. You still see a lot of states with a lot of spread. What do you think about New Jersey's plan to open golf courses and parks this weekend? Is that a good idea. I think it sound for the states to try to contemplate what they can do to give people a sense of normalcy again. And the first thing you can do is try to open back up. Recreational activity done outdoors. We know the risk of spread is lower. I've been advocating and talked to a number of local officials about the idea of trying to move things that are traditionally done indoors outdoors and so two extent that we want to restart religious services holding them outside. We want to restart gym classes holding those outside. Even as we contemplate reopening restaurants lifting local ordinances that make it easier to businesses to try to move some of that business outside maybe closing blocks and sectioned off more real estate more public real estate for businesses to try to open up at venues outside. That's not going to be foolproof but holding these things outside does reduce risk and. I think it's important that we try to start reintroducing activities that give people a sense of normalcy about their lives and the first thing to do really is to put the nets backup in parts. Let's let's finish by discussing the

Georgia United States Astra Zeneca Oxford Cnbc NIH Scott Wapner Zeneca University Of Oxford Daniel Day Dr Scott Gottlieb Astra Oxford University New Jersey Scott Meg Hepatitis Meg Terrell Pfizer
Gilead Sciences stock rises on hopes for COVID-19 treatment

WSJ What's News

01:33 min | 1 year ago

Gilead Sciences stock rises on hopes for COVID-19 treatment

"With regards to that drug treatment. Shares of Gilead Sciences closed up five point seven percent after it reported that patients taking its antiviral drug rim. Desa VIR showed a speedier recovery than patients taking a placebo in a large study funded by the US government our health reporter Joe Walker has more details. People have been watching this trial really closely because it's a large study comparing this drug to placebo and it's sort of the gold standard for the way to do clinical trials. So the idea is. We think that it's the first and best sort of look at whether this truck really works treating Cova nineteen and if it does it could become the first road proven to actually be effective against this disease. A separate study of the drug out of China posted negative results today but researchers there say they needed more testing. Their trial was shut down early. Because it was hard to recruit subjects as the pandemic slowed analysts are still cautioning that the drug is unlikely to be a silver bullet. Obviously it would be really great if this works and cove in nineteen. I think the expectation though at this point is that if it does work. It's not the type of thing that everybody would get. If you've got the virus you know. It's an intravenously administered drug for people who are hospitalized so we can really make a difference in in helping people who are very very sick but isn't sort of the vaccine. It's not a pill so I would just say. Take some caution. There in terms of expectations for the magnitude of its impact

United States Gilead Sciences Desa Vir Cova Joe Walker Reporter
Fake news and its impact on health

Second Opinion

03:32 min | 1 year ago

Fake news and its impact on health

"News has been a rallying cry from the White House for the past three years and there certainly is fake news. That can make our blood boil because some people somewhere. We'll believe it. The news around drugs for Cova has been misleading in sensationalized. All the hype around the malaria. Drugs like hydroxy caloric win have not been evidenced based and they were not peer reviewed while Peer Review certainly has its faults it none. The less brings US closer to accuracy than without it. When unsubstantiated reports are published it leaves patients and doctors confused and therapy can be misdirected. It is hard to get companies to develop new drugs for viral pandemics. As you'd expect. The reason is money most viruses that cause a large outbreak last for a relatively short period of time usually no more than a year or two. Sars lasted from two thousand and two to two thousand and three but by the time a drug is developed evaluated mass produced and marketed. The epidemic is over and the company loses its market and its ability to make money. This is perhaps why with covert people are looking through their shelves to see what they already have. That might work well. The drug maker founded drug called Rim de Severe. That was a drug without a disease to treat. It was developed Freeh Bulla but it was ineffective for that virus. So let's try it with. Kovin will a story this week in the online publication stat reported early data on Rim Desa. The report suggested that sick people were responding to treatment. The problem is that the researchers observation was taken without their permission during an internal scientific discussion. It was not meant for public distribution further. The study design was weak and it doesn't allow for an accurate assessment of the drugs real effect regardless according to Health News Review Dot org the day after the report shares of Gilead stock went up. Sixteen percent coincidental While the covert pandemic is unique in many ways and has created huge hurdles for all of us to behavior on the part of medical journalists is not new. Many medical journalists are. Ill prepared to cover their medical beat. They have moved from City Hall sports and now medicine but covering a special niche topic like medicine or economics or climate change requires special knowledge. Every medical journalist should be required to go to a research boot camp they should become familiar with basic research approaches biases in designs. The sneaky ways that conflicts of interest can influence reporting and most importantly journalism ethics. The Gold Star from medical reporting does not go to journalist who breaks a partial or inaccurate or bootlegged story. I The gold star goes to the journalist who methodically understands the process reports only when the

United States Cova Freeh Bulla Peer Review Malaria Rim Desa White House Kovin City Hall
Report says COVID-19 patients respond to Gilead's remdesivir

CNBC's Fast Money

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Report says COVID-19 patients respond to Gilead's remdesivir

"They got a glimpse from one of the hospitals that has been enrolling patients in a clinical trial of Gilead Desa. The University of Chicago essentially what they saw in video communications to faculty members. There is a report that on the clinical trial. It sounds like the patients According to them are making rapid recoveries at least in terms of their fever and the respiratory symptoms stat reporting. Nearly all patients discharged in less than a week. I'm so this is not controlled. Clinical trial data. We are still waiting for that from Gilead and expect to see the first of it later this month. It is a glimpse into what one of the sites that is running. This trial is seeing And it looks pretty encouraging guys. So we're all going to hope that we see this. Continue to bear out when we see the bigger data set but it is our first glimpse into a clinical

Gilead Desa University Of Chicago
"desa" Discussed on Dumb Geeks Podcast

Dumb Geeks Podcast

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"desa" Discussed on Dumb Geeks Podcast

"Probably just eating. My dead dusty. Three dragons have died on top of you and they are starting to devour their. They're eating tip live. Okay Gotcha what would you like to see? Adventure I gotTa Bounce Blade. Ask when you cast a spell you can choose a point within twenty feet of you. A sphere of pure energy appears in the center of that point until the spill ends. The sphere moves at an incredible rate of speed. The sphere remains at the location. As long as you maintain concentration if you move more than twenty feet from the center of the sphere the spell ends. It's a very useful spell. You gotTA sphere right one of those fucking dragons. It's trying to eat my asshole. I'M GONNA go ahead and cast a bouncing blade role for it. Then I go to reverence. Nobody none of our listeners would get that and I gotta go get it. These are some loaded dice. He really are. I just really good. So I'd say thousand play than I just shoot. Got fucking bounce blade. Beam at at one of the dragons are eating tip and and those mother fuckers GONNA learn a lesson dust if he uses his magic to create a ball of energy inside of the dragon which moves at an incredible speed burning it up from the inside. Oh Yeah Dust. It creates a ball of fire. That bounces off the sides of the dragon before hitting the ground. Desa then uses the fire to burn the dragons leaving nothing but ash dust if then tosses the ashes at you all right. Who'S YOU SHARON.

Desa TA
The Round Schoolhouse of Japan

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:43 min | 2 years ago

The Round Schoolhouse of Japan

"Podcast. It was requested by tyree. Hesse told me on the island of Hokkaido so herod has tyree in today's mystery. Japan's most haunted placed first a bit about Japan. Japan has made many iconic spine chilling moments in the history of the horror. Reveal John Laura yet is considered to be one of the safest places to live in the world. The United States has roughly four times more violent crimes in Japan. Gun crimes in Japan are ranked at point six per hundred residents compared to the United States. Eight point eight that said the. The United States boasts hundreds of haunting from the Pacific northwest these coast but perhaps none so chili's those across the Pacific and Japan today will visit Japan's haunted schoolhouse and Japan's largest island Kaido nestled on the shore of Lake. Mu G me which is kind of wetland Liza creepy ruins of a former schoolhouse at has a sinister reputation. As one of the most haunted places in Japan the structure was built in one thousand nine hundred six and designed in a round shape there is referred to as the round schoolhouse from nineteen forties up to nineteen seventies seventies. It was used as an elementary school than it was closed for. Unknown reasons and left to fall into ruin tablespoon desa collecting dust. They're all lined up as as if expecting students. The surrounding grounds have become a thick tangle of overgrown brush that surround the building. The playground is consumed by force growth. The only way to reach the round schoolhouse is by foot. Rumors Sprang up almost immediately after the school closed locals claim that the woods around around the school were haunted with shadowy figures received period out from behind trees several students who ventured into the woods surrounding the schoolhouse who reported missing stories surrounding the haunting. The schoolhouse soon attracted paranormal. Investigator concluded that indeed there was a dark force present for nearly thirty thirty years. People came from all over Japan to visit the school house in hope of Seen Ghost as recently as twenty twelve. Paranormal investigators have said they were chased from the woods spy. Well some claim to have been followed by creepy shadows. The schoolhouse has no history of violence Lila or tragedy and some speculate that the images that lurk in the woods the shadowy images that seem to chase people are the Oct- those used occupy. The schoolhouse are not go. said all but the product of an open door to another dimension in the United States. We have Halloween spirits rice. Shaw usually. They're very short demand candy. Still Halloween is a time of seances. A meeting of which time people attempt to make contact with the dead especially especially through an agency of a media but in Japan summer is known as a kind of ghost season. One reason for this is that summer's traditionally believed not to be when ancestors spirits. visit the land of the living during the festival of Oman and families gathered together to remember their deceased once. In fact in summer when you visit an Amusement Park in Japan you might notice that one of the more popular attractions may be the haunted houses where you can have some real l. hair raising experiences as for the round schoolhouse being a doorway to another dimension if you have a chance to travel around the beautiful island of Hokkaido. Don't don't forget to visit Lake Maya Tsim and rows schoolhouse there. Then decide

Japan United States Tyree Hokkaido Lake Maya Tsim Hesse John Laura Pacific Liza Amusement Park Investigator Oman Lila Shaw Seances Lake Thirty Thirty Years
The Trouble With Embryos

Science Friction

09:21 min | 2 years ago

The Trouble With Embryos

"This sounds a lot like that battle of thoughts going on inside Fiona mind about her embryos if they were destroyed then what if my child needs something from a sibling medically in the future and I've just destroyed that option and then also what it might sense of identity on the flip side she might be completely and utterly with her identity and I'm just thinking well it's a single children out there exactly right exactly right it's hard to see how these complex questions could be easily on a single form Ivy clinics themselves also bear some responsibility for helping parents decide what to do after all they make money from it with IVF treatments and the storage of excess embryos Louise Johnson again in my experience clinics are very supportive of patients is when they having trouble deciding what to do with your embryos and you say thinking about donating their embryos clean counselors will spend considerable time with paypal helping them to make sure that that decision is the right one for them in fact the national health and Medical Research Council's ethical guidelines for IVF clinic state that they we must discuss with patients their options for using or discarding embryos but the level of counseling clinics a legally required to offer varies across Australia and some argue that this counseling is more focused on the start of the IVF process than the end look I think that's also the focus of paper taking treatment as well that's the focus is to try for baby but one of the medicine needs to be coveting canceling in Victoria and elsewhere he's what to do with embryos at the end of the day if treatment is successful or not successful so it is a matter that is coveting canceling right from the Gar so let's come to another option you have a small proportion of people decide to donate the embryos they won't use no one else who wants to have a child that might be a family member or it might be a total stranger they really want us to have a chance at having a baby maybe and and they would prefer their embryos to be used by others then allowing them to succumb on auto bar tree bench but that's not a common path people choose to take so in Victoria in two thousand seventeen to eighteen they were only seventy embryo donors compares with four hundred and twenty four sperm donors and three hundred dollars so the number of embryos donald is much smaller and why do you think that is I think it's a really hard decision they know that any children born or before to nick siblings if there are in children and that's hard decision to make let's come back then to the two women you've met in this program funeral and Desa neither of them want to donate their embryos to other families that just not comfortable with the idea of someone else raising what would be the potential children Fiona feels a great sense of responsibility for her embers the joined the spam dialup would never eight and would never have created those embryos I created them so giving them to somebody else to raise a family where I'm not I've got no sane or I'm not aware of what sort of parents apparent though built sort of family situation you know what if I go to a family or a situation that puts him in Ham then I would feel very responsible about that of course I'd Never Nari but it would always be there Jessica on the other hand says that she's been advised that the law in her State Victoria prevents her from donating her embryos to someone else because we've got Dana Sperm we count on donate to anybody unless the law has changed or I think it has correlative more than us for them and I said to her even if a Kudankulam to you because there's a diner involved in Victoria Dan can legally donate sperm to up to ten women that number varies around Australia. Gab Kovacs is a professor of obstetric gynecology at Monash unit acidy as we had last week he was also the clinical director at the Queen Victoria hospitals. IVF program back in the eighties then he helped create some of Australia's first frozen embryos for infertile couples the couple's Godal over Kabul the Women Guthrie stimulated saw monitoring surgery and the hassle and the expansion credit is embryos and then when they reach their five-year use-by date to then have them discarded to me a terrible waste he's opinion is donating your excess embryos to another person or couple wanting a child is a good option and always tried to encourage couples to consider donating and not can understand how couples who understand the pain of subjectivity who understand how difficult is to create these ambers war they don't donate their embryos to somebody else this Rodney having destroyed and when we ask people about this today are now we don't want somebody else bringing up children but I'm sure there's other ways with that could be involved the children and be updated and have some sort of a situation where they can visible if they want to but to give us the chance of law rather than being left on the inch to succumb okay so let's come to another option the final we're considering on science friction today and that is to donate excess embryos to scientific research what does that involve before here from an IV scientist here's Fiorina's first response to that idea instantly for I'm not having any conflict whatsoever I instantly just thought of horrible scenes from old movies of crazy scientific research that might happen Dan and again the fact that even though I don't see them as children I do see myself as being responsible for them desa maybe watch the same movies because she owes so has similar worries about embryo research limbs might grow that that to me I couldn't carp tonight at that we're doing that it just worries me that and I put electric shocks in that soulful of just thinking I'm just thinking I watch too much science fiction professor Alan Trounson helped pioneer the F. treatment in the eighties and he wants to demystify how scientists use embryos in research and locate the just short period of time the embryo is destroyed really by the processes of the research but they would be destroyed anyway if our terminated and that seems better than just disposing of them which is just to do that then to look at some data that you might mind from those embryos in the process of scientific study leader in stem cell research and he was involved in the public debate over whether we should extract stem cells from donated IVF embryos today there's less demand for embryos donations in scientific research because we now have other ways to develop embryonic stem cells from adult cells but they're still crucial for helping just to understand human disease and early development Professor Johnson says embryo studies can also be used to help improve the treatment of the modern be used to create a new technique luckily trip occasion where that's sides you know millions of embryos but you have to do the research in the beginning and you can't just sort of magic that's an area focused on the possibilities of replacing and repairing diseased cells organs and body parts I think it donating embryos for research bionic stem cells to work ahead of May an Ip so I- cells or induced pluripotent stem cells can be converted into different cells in the body you to perform different functions and that is the core element for so therapies for regenerative medicine now the lots

Fiona Queen Victoria Hospitals Gab Kovacs Australia Monash Unit Acidy Professor Clinical Director Three Hundred Dollars Five-Year
The Trouble With Embryos

Science Friction

11:26 min | 2 years ago

The Trouble With Embryos

"The predicament of what to do with embryos today that you might have left I ever after you've done rv if for some it's clear you thought the mad you let the embryos guy for others though it's much more complicated should you donate them to science or perhaps another woman and you even found that some people are gnashing their embryos and even making jewelry out of them yeah it's a way for them to hold onto what was or what might have been so today I'm going to take you to make women who are really struggling with what to do and just a heads up today's story features some things that might be distressing to some people China Wadsworth just after she gets home from work with her two year old daughter hello how are you the owners a single mom who works as an administrator at a school in Melbourne Jane before we can get started at dinner ready for a daughter tonight she asks for weeks and some socks tips talks like many women Fiona had never planned to raise a child alone can you when she was about to turn forty her relationship ended and I decided that I was wanting to have a child sooner rather than later I went to the doctor to find out what my options were and at that point found out that I was classed as medically infertile that news came as a terrible shock even though I was older I always thought that children or child was always going to be part of my life I remember sitting in the doctor's surgery crying and having my doctor cry with me so I've never forgotten that friends the owners who hadn't had any success IVF in Australia we're able to have a baby using a donor egg in South Africa so as soon as fear and I got the funds for Tree meant that's why she went to it was cheaper it was much more convenient than accessing joiners hearing Korea in here in the area and so I didn't do any other research I just did exactly what my friend had done because it was successful for her and her husband and so that then involved going overseas to South Africa to excess Dina Egg and five like Fiona Desa is also a single mom by choice she has two sons what did what a daughter paypal didn't happen so but look I love more boys they draw be crazy a on very very grateful very lucky Desa began ivf on her own when she was forty two at the time she hoped that she and her ex husband to get back together my ex husband was still on the same on an Fini's SORTA was playing around to say let's go have a baby the couple began preparing to stop fertility treatment but at the last minute dessus ex husband changed his mind in the waiting room said norm not doing this always full pullman injections and that was it was horrible it was hard journey with him marriage is uneasy with anybody but that was pretty bad and not only did all the pavements and and then said Narayan then always left half hormonal injections and got nowhere it was a turning point for desa should she go ahead alone naught she already had a referral to see a fertility specialist so desa decided to go through IVF treatment using donor sperm but we can that my ex annoy split completely forever the following Waco went straight to the doctors and he went and checked on something and then came back and said Yep we'll from one counseling session it was and next time you come in you can pick your donors as she underwent IVF treatment all of dessus energy went into hoping that at least one of her embryos work so the prospect of having embryos leftover was the last thing on her mind you just want to have a baby incubator off you know lucky enough to have Cabrera's because I know these girls that they were lucky to get one so that's desa over in South Africa Fiona was about to undergo IVF treatment for the first time using donor sperm and a donor egg and it was only then that she was confronted with the prospect that there might be embryos leftover that she wouldn't news I remember sitting in the waiting room all the clinic for the first time really saying Matt Paperwork and going K. other than thinking that in the moment that transfer in that attempt at pregnancy I can see that if it wasn't successful I'd go back a couple of months later for one I but I'd never had any real concept of excess embryos for both Fiona and Jessica there was happy news they both conceive children but now they're both left with the decision they hadn't anticipated what to do with the embryos stealing storage ivf clinics it's something that both struggle in with for now Fiona Endesa both paying their clinics hundreds of dollars every year to keep their excess frozen embryos frozen unfurnished case she's not ruling out the possibility of having another baby it's not off the cards I would love another one to give my child a full genetic sibling it's just my current view is that I wouldn't want to have another baby if I was until my current child is it it'd be more independent so another two years away which will then make me forty six forty seven but it's kind of very k now thin when they turned twenty one Obi oh my seventy sorry it's just something I'm aware of that's maybe not an ideal situation and then I'd also like to keep it if I only because I've not ruled out of it being in a relationship or eight I would love to mate someone to relationship we thin if he would like to have a child old then I would again prefer to have it is a genetic sibling sorry keep the mice in case that ever happens desa on the other hand knows she doesn't want any more children but she can't quite bring herself to discuss her embryos just yet when I was asked when you have excess embryos that's what you WanNa do at that time you not looking at them as human beings you just looking at the little you know I got bills in the Petrie dish but they want so I had my first son and then my pinned or I couldn't get rid of them because I thought Oh what about if they're also girls when you think about those two frozen embryos in the fraser how do you think of them I think of them as children or do the trouble is you can't keep embryos frozen forever there's a limit on how can you can legally stole them and that can go up to ten years depending on where the embryos are so both women will have to make that decision one day Fiona has a few more years left I've not been swayed either way I think for me it's going to be a decision up until the last day as to what I do with them so we'll probably keep them on ice for the full five years to keep my options open and just trying Wayne everything in factoring everything to try and make the right decision and for me for my child and family and everything Louise Johnson understands the complexities more than most she's the executive officer of the Victorian Assisted Reproductive Treatment Authority that's the body that oversees all of the clinics Victoria when people and into Aviv treatment the emphasis on trying to have a baby and it's a costly process and sometimes people ran out of steam financially emotionally when they've been on that journey for some time and the thought there is potential life that store does now if clinic decision really tricky papal so if you decide you don't want to use your frozen embryos to try for another baby what are your options they can decide right that they'd like to donate their embryos to research but the number of protein that might be available at any one time can be limited and all clinics are linked up with research activities the other opportunity to donate embryos another couple or another individual Meinie embryos are donated for those people don't want to die night theory embryos to somebody else and don't want to donate them to raise rich it can be a matter of letting their embryos succumb on laboratory bench he is a is a technical term in IBF circles but if you look at walks fitting dictionary it's defined as failed to resist pressure temptation or some other negative force so does this relate to what happens when we let a frozen embryo succumb it's really allowing the embryos to come out of the frozen stash and it allows them to sit on the Lebron streep inch as they they want to remain viable and and no longer capable of life some clinics offer the opportunity to pick up the calmed embryos and take them harm plant them in a garden did as a way of saying goodbye today treatment journey in those particular embryos dessus wrestling with what agency she ascribes to the embryos she has left and she wants to see guidance not from her doctor but from a priest all think that he probably site to let them go because they already created but then autumn my stomach to study giving birth for them but I'll have to speak to him actually just WanNa see what his view is but that doesn't mean I'm GonNa go with that view Desa knows unlikely she can fall pregnant again but she can't bear to let him Brio succumb on a bench either so she's thinking about another way a very rare procedure. I mean why don't use them I'm nearly fifty five so I'm GonNa go and have another baby but but look if ordered maybe put them inside me just to release them but not to give any hormone injections or whatever to keep it that rare procedure is referring to is known in the US as a compassionate transfer it would involve a doctor attempting to implant desert embryos in her uterus knowing that this won't resign in a pregnancy but these two would lead the embryos to eventually succumb IVF clinics I spoke to said that they are reluctant to do it and that it's almost I never asked for is it the idea that if you put them in and they don't work out at least you kind of gave them a chance it is and but annoy that are proven wouldn't fall pregnant and would be the so either way you having to let them go and that's the hard part for you it sounds like and maybe I'll get there but I just haven't thought about it to that point where are just let him guy

United States Five Years Ten Years Two Years Two Year One Day
"desa" Discussed on Fantastic Worlds Podcast

Fantastic Worlds Podcast

15:56 min | 2 years ago

"desa" Discussed on Fantastic Worlds Podcast

"Previously on the fantastic worlds podcast. It's not freer. You don't see me eating in your fallen species, and you see something you never really fully understood until now. You see the magnificence of what is white throne. Oh, it's so pretty it's going to be a hell overwhelm by what she can't do. And then she met you guys and like things of started to matter, and she didn't really have to do the things that like nobody else wanted to do or nobody else had the stomach to do because most of you were willing to do those things. Oh, Desa is Han solo and it's amazing to me. I love in a strange way. I feel like I've.

Desa
"desa" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"desa" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Sar guest today is all Desa keys, founder of the central health for pets who's gone to China to do extra ordinary rescue missions and has seen results with CB oil. So when we get back from these messages or Desa will be joining us. When Helen Brown ran away to New York City five years ago. She had no idea that homeless cat with a punk rock haircut and enough cata to to light up the Empire State building would be the one to teach teacher the true meaning of love and a forever home in the tradition of her internationally bestselling memoir, Cleo Helen Brown's Bano. The amazing story of a rescue cat who inspired a community is a heart warming true story about a woman without an anchor a homeless cat without much hope and finding a forever home in the city that never sleeps. Modern cat magazine calls Bono an uplifting tale about how everyone deserves love and a second chance Bono by Helen Brown is on sale now everywhere. Let's talk pets on pet. Life radio dot com. Welcome back to save the food. We are talking with Odessa and her experience in rescue dogs in China and house, help them recover. So thanks for coming on and talking about your experience. I know you're an animal advocate on have recently gotten back from China. I really admire your efforts and going into the so called trenches. But before we get into.

Helen Brown China Desa New York City Modern cat magazine Bono CB founder Odessa five years
"desa" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"desa" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Today is Odessa keys founder of Odessa's central health for pets who's gone to China do extra ordinary rescue missions and has seen results with CB oil. So when we get back from these messages or Desa will be joining us. When Helen Brown ran away to New York City five years ago. She had no idea that homeless cat with a punk rock haircut and enough cata to light up the Empire State building would be the one to teacher the true meaning of love and a forever home in the tradition of her internationally bestselling memoir, Cleo Helen Brown's Bano. The amazing story of a rescue cat who inspired a community is a heart warming true story about a woman without an anchor a homeless cat without much hope and finding a forever home in the city that never sleeps. Modern cat magazine calls Bono an uplifting tale about how everyone deserves love and a second chance Bono by Helen Brown is on sale now everywhere. Let's talk pets on pet. Life radio dot com. Welcome back to save a pooch we are talking with Odessa and her experience in rescue dogs and China and help them recover. So thanks for coming on and talking about your experience. I know you're an animal advocate and have recently gotten back from China. So I really admire your efforts and going into the so called trenches..

Helen Brown Odessa China New York City Modern cat magazine Bono Desa founder CB five years
"desa" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"desa" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"A Sar guest today is Desa cheese, founder of essential health for pets who's gone to China to do extra ordinary rescue missions and has seen results with CB oil. So when we get back from these messages or Desa will be joining us. When Helen Brown ran away to New York City five years ago. She had no idea that homeless cat with a punk rock haircut and enough cata to to light up the Empire State building would be the one to teacher the true meaning of love into forever. Home in the tradition of her internationally bestselling memoir, Cleo Helen Brown's Bano. The amazing story of a rescue cat who inspired a community is a heart warming true story about a woman without an anchor a homeless cat without much hope and finding a forever home in the city that never sleeps. Modern cat magazine calls Bono an uplifting tale about how everyone deserves love and a second chance Bono by Helen Brown is on sale now everywhere. Let's talk pets on pet. Life radio dot com. Welcome back to save a pooch. We are talking with Odessa and her experience in rescue dogs and China in the house. She's them recovered. So thanks for coming on and talking about your experience. I know you're an animal advocate recently gotten back from China. I really admire your efforts going into the so called trenches..

Helen Brown China Desa Modern cat magazine New York City Bono CB founder Odessa five years
"desa" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"desa" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"So far this morning. Very light volume out there. We don't have any problems on. I two seventy five coming across a Howard Franklin or the skyway looking good on I four as well. We don't have any problems on. I seventy five you'll be happy to know that the intersection of Ashley street and brewery in St. reopened again last night right about nine thirty. So you don't have to worry about that this morning. Broadgreen street bridge is open K long, NewsRadio WFL. Starting out the month much warmer. A high today at seventy three it's fifty eight degrees at News Radio WFL, a the woman who is watching a baby when he was mauled to death by dogs won't face charges. Pamela, maser was watching her seven month old foster granddaughter in her home in October. When the dog attacked prosecutors decided not to pursue charges against mazer. But the lawyer for the girl's mother says prosecutors dropped the ball you telling news channel eight they are now pursuing a civil lawsuit against her. A Tampa Bay area woman was attacked by a hippo while on a dream vacation in Africa last month and lived to tell about it, Kristen yelled or a durable. Desa was canoeing down these NBC river Zimbabwe with his husband Ryan to guides when the hippo suddenly came out of nowhere something popped up underneath our canoe more towards the middle. The canoe tipped forward to where I fell into the water forward and towards the deep sign. I took two. Strokes towards the shoreline telling good Morning, America. She immediately grab and was pulled underwater. She thrashed back and forth for forty five seconds before she was able to pry the hippos jaws loose and pop to the surface seven surgeries later, y'all door is expected to make a full recovery. She and her husband already planning their next adventure. They're gonna slim with sharks next month. The director of the boulevard zoo on Florida's east coast addressed findings of state investigators in the wake of an accident at the first of the year when a toddler accidentally got into a rhino enclosure. Keith Winston says they got their first look at the findings this week. This.

Ryan NewsRadio WFL Broadgreen street bridge Howard Franklin Keith Winston maser Tampa Bay Florida NBC director Desa Zimbabwe America Pamela Kristen Africa fifty eight degrees forty five seconds seven month
"desa" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"desa" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Checking traffic center, we're in good shape on our roads. So far this morning. Very light volume out there. We don't have any problems on. I two seventy five coming across a Howard Franklin or the skyway looking good on I four as well. We don't have any problems on. I seventy five you'll be happy to know that the intersection of Ashley street and rain street reopened again last night right about nine thirty. So you don't have to worry about that. This morning, Bahrain street bridge is open K long, NewsRadio WFL lack. Starting off the month much warmer. A high today at seventy three it's fifty eight degrees at News Radio WFL, a the woman who is watching a baby when he was mauled to death by a dog won't face charges. Pamela, maser was watching her seven month old foster granddaughter in her home in October. When the dog attacked prosecutors decided not to pursue charges against as her. But the lawyer for the girl's mother says prosecutors dropped the ball you telling news channel eight they are now pursuing a civil lawsuit against her. Tampa Bay area woman was attacked by a hippo while on a dream vacation in Africa last month and lived to tell about it, Kristen yelled or a boat. Desa was canoeing down the Zambezi river in Zimbabwe with his husband Ryan to guides when the hippo suddenly came out of nowhere something popped up underneath our canoe more towards the middle. The canoe tipped forward to where I fell into the water forward and towards the deep sign. I took two strokes towards the shoreline telling good Morning, America. She immediately grabbed and was pulled underwater. She thrashed back and forth for forty five seconds before she was able to pry the hippos jaws loose and pop to the surface seven surgeries later, y'all doors expected to make a full recovery she and her husband already planning their next adventure. They're gonna swim with sharks next month. The director of the bravado zoo on Florida's east coast addressed findings of state investigators in the wake of an accident at the first of the year when a toddler accidentally got into a rhino enclosure. Keith Winston says they got their first look at the findings this week. This.

Ryan Bahrain street bridge NewsRadio WFL Howard Franklin Tampa Bay Keith Winston maser Florida Desa director Zimbabwe America Pamela Kristen Africa fifty eight degrees forty five seconds seven month
"desa" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

The Andrew Klavan Show

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"desa" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

"Christmas vacation. And see if that helps you out it's because it's a tough problem when you're on the drug it's hard to get to the real you and to see how much the drugs affecting it from shade. Dear Mr. Cleveland, I loved the show. I watch every day. And I'm reading some of your books. I only have one bone to pick with you. Why do you? Like, Ben and Knowles equate criticism of Israel, the Israeli government to criticism of the Jews as if the government and the citizen were one monolithic body. This tired old refrain of incident. Incredible intellectual dishonesty, Israel is not the Jews Jews are not even a single people. But rather groups of disparate peoples. I know plenty of orthodox Jews who were incredibly critical of any actions taken by the Israeli government. Are you calling them anti-semites too? How do you square the glaring double standard when it comes to defending Israel? You're playing identity politics by reading Muslim statements as coming from a place of default anti-semitism, I'd like to see a bit more nuance in your analysis. But I'm not holding my breath because you really have it in for the Muslims. That's all I love this season of another kingdom, and I'm purchasing the hard copy of the book as we speak keep the episodes coming. Thanks. Couple of issues here. I I do not Kwait criticism of Israel with Desa -sarily with anti-semitism. I am suspicious. I am suspicious when non Israel is. I don't care if they're jus they're plenty plenty of antisemitic. Jus I am suspicious. When people take this incredibly huge area of the Middle East, which does not have a free government in it except for Israel and find the source of all its problems in Israel behavior. I I'm sure the Israelis do things wrong Americans do things wrong. Everybody was a human being does stuff wrong. And I'm sure there's stuff that is can be criticized in Israel. I'm suspicious when they identify the problems of the Middle East coming out of Israel's actions, I believe that is the opposite of the truth and unsuspicious when they use overblown phraseology phraseology like genocide and apartheid to describe the policies of a of a country that is the size of a shoebox, and is surrounded by enemies on every side. You can climb a hill in Israel and see four countries that wanted to wipe the country off the face of the earth..

Israel Israeli government Middle East Mr. Cleveland Kwait Ben Knowles
"desa" Discussed on Undisclosed

Undisclosed

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"desa" Discussed on Undisclosed

"Could have made but didn't desa sarily make so all the talk about using caliber biter and oblique lighting to compare the shoeprints it was hot air they're an insufficient number of distinct characteristics to compare the prince so mooney eyeballed it and determined that it was possible the long show could have made the shoeprint on the banister call and ask jamie low rone's current attorney the duke innocence project about the significance of this report and the shoeprint comparison i think suggests that even more problematic even to suggestively lading lift was for mr long's shoe so of course that's important however with respect to the lady she print i think any credence to the testimony regarding at this point in time has to be you know that there should be zero relying on anything suggested by that shoeprint because the lady comparising in this manner has has more or less proven to be unreliable over the course of time and there's no scientific validity to making these comparisons allows referring to a body of research that includes a twenty sixteen report by peak ask the president's council of advisors and science technology what's concluded that quote there no appropriate blackbox studies to support the foundational validity of footwear analysis to associate shoeprints with particular shoes baseness pacific identifying marks such associations are unsupported by any meaningful evidence or estimate to their accuracy and thus are not scientifically valid janin's annan would certainly agree with this analysis because she was a specially unimpressed with the in compressions they made ronnie shoes and then compared with the leyton shoeprints that they lifted from the crime scene.

attorney president janin annan desa sarily jamie mr long ronnie
"desa" Discussed on Side Hustle School

Side Hustle School

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"desa" Discussed on Side Hustle School

"Okay maybe that's true maybe that's not but i do like this one self confidence is the best outfits i don't quite know what source that's a tribute to but i appreciate the philosophy self confidence is the best outfit and where to self competence come from well one way or another it comes from learning that you are enough and other people are not better than you because they can afford nicer clothes or for pretty much any other reason and often talk about how one of the greatest reasons for starting side hustle is not just the money it is the self confidence that comes from strangers purchasing your clothing items or hiring you for your service or whatever it is that you do in story liz loves her job she's pretty young she's just getting started with this new career but as she begins this career she's also learning about entrepreneurship and she's learning all the aspects of running a little business in terms of buying and selling in terms of the marketing in terms of telling stories and so for this real world education instead of paying for an nba or some other form of program she's actually earning money right which i think is a little bit better than paying money maybe there's other podcasts that tells you how to spend your money perhaps fashion podcast i have no idea but here on this show i'm all about helping you make money so that just like liz you'll have more selfconfidence you'll be able to make more choices and do what matters to you that is my hope my mission my intention every day don't forget inspiration is good but inspiration with action is better if you would like to check out the desa racia or instagram all that stuff will be like on today's show notes page that page is site us will school dot com slash four five four.

liz nba desa racia instagram
"desa" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"desa" Discussed on The Vergecast

"And he's like a usled because they're gonna be the bigger the off though and i'm like i think desa disagrees with i had i will note that you put out an entire episode about space suits in any on put out a pictures yes eulevel apolinario hey these watching you uh so the three haitians redial but how do they program their time against that much brick workout requirement um i mean i believe it's just like a scheduled day yeah like any other and uh yeah i mean i think they get a fairly early they build and free time to so it's not like they're just going nonstop all the time but yeah i mean they basically have things kind of down to the hour planned out but um it's interesting because of our actually setting about this incident long ago before i assess before mere they had a a station called skylab where they would go and do experiments from time to time back in the early days of the shuttle and that i remember that is this thing called the skylab mutiny it's not really a mutiny just gets that name but essentially what happened was the astronauts felt like they were being overworked like the everything was regimented to the minute and they had no free time so then one day like the last day of their trip or whatever they just spent the day like hanging out over though basically they call it a mutiny because they were going against protocol but in reality was like an eye opening experience for nasa be like okay kit make their like people or people like we need you view even in space you get burnt out you know so they have to they do have free time worked into their days on a treadmill by the arc from other at washing afflicts on the treadmill everybody else over they do have movie nights actually is a river one time i think scott kelly was tweeting or maybe it was somebody else but he tweeted that they're watching gravity.

desa scott kelly nasa one day
"desa" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"desa" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"What are working debt also play soccer mom socket damning indicate the keys they got the five or whether they be entrepreneurial blue collar worker lawyer dot you name but they get out here and we can do three eighteen on america they train espada at best impressive as does a tap of people i do look up to because they're working professionals the not protracted lease at a look up to the approach roughly or the pro athletes whether you're football basketball those guys are facilities may not training teams made our pero they should be pretty pretty impressive physically but for that ma desa lawyer busted a her as and go through it three saab three eighteen merit what's that woman needed she knees she needs to be paid mecc these appraisal for real and i i look out to those people to to to those working professions kinama work in professional and our i managed to squeeze in the little time i had a train and doodles schrafft's i get it a notice struggle i've been too but there are some very impressive about that as do it work in an unofficial yet as are you are you still trade of her tries i i it in the gym were so right now this year i took off i took off the latter part of last year to as well because going through this we must start a company skin so out of control and i had a manish that an an and get that pretty much under control with many is growing effort is growing really well it's grown out of control so i had to typically i would do.

america basketball soccer football ma desa