23 Burst results for "Derek Bell"

"derek bell" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

The Autosport Podcast

04:22 min | Last month

"derek bell" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

"Written for four or 5 hours a day for the last half many years. Who's which driver has driven the most miles in one of these? I've got absolutely no idea. But it would have to be a factory driver with a testing. Now if you're a bell or probably Derek bell or hench talk because they drove for the factory for that program. So the longest track. They were on the shakedowns and don't forget Roland Kuzma, who was also a driver, but the racing engineer basically, but he did like thousands and thousands of miles testing Mars around twice. He did not embark shook down every customer as well at the track, and it was all because they were obviously Porsche employees. So something needed testing. They were there. They didn't have to be able to just have to get out of the office, helping the car and drive around the track a bit. But says, you haven't given us your favorite moment. My favorite. It could be the most significant moment, but for me, I'm going to talk about a moment and I was there moment. I think there's this like two moments really Dijon 89 when Porsche one and that really made bob wallach's day. He really liked that. And it was a very popular win. And that basically revive your program because the program had been shelved at the end of 87. After May 7th came back for an encore in Le Mans 88, and then was done. And then some behind the scenes, some development still happened at the host. They won again, and then a portion of the suit said, we should really go racing. And then from 1990 to build up a proper works team run by years, but it was definitely the works team and tried to come back. They had been a way to do the IndyCar program, which netted one win in three years. That's not good. So that was Dijon 89 would stick out. And Le Mans 1990 as well when Bruin and perea lost the second place, 50 minutes from the finish when the engine went. So that was collapsed into the arms of his crew down at the old signaling pits. I remember looking at it on the big screens and it hit me in the guts. Do you know what I'm saying? Yeah, and I think most journalists wanted to be done with their race reports and everything because normally in the last 15 minutes, nothing really happens. In those days. Now, of course, anything can still happen on the last lap, but in those days, it was dramatic really. And actually that probably brings me on to, again, another question that I should have got too earlier about the why this is the greatest. And that I should have asked you already about reliability. The durability of these cars. We don't need to discuss that because it's a Porsche. So it just keeps on going. Well, there's your answer and also what may be attractive for gentlemen over amateur drivers is that Porsche at every racetrack had its customer support team. They had like a couple of trucks with spare parts with engineer with mechanics. If you had a problem, the right people were there to solve the problem for you. If you really can do it yourself. So that the warehouse almost at the track, if you blew an engine, you need its pair pause, they had them if you didn't have them in your own spare parts box. You could go to Porsche customer service. And they would have it for you. You didn't need to make that big investment in spare parts. There's some random fuel pipe that if you didn't have it, they have a spare FB two. They would have it in the truck. Then you went to the Porsche truck. And it's basically it's part of their business model list. They'll do that today with 9 11s. There's always a couple of Porsche motor sport trucks in the panic. And whenever a customer team needs a part or needs an engineer or needs some information or some extra brains to think of a certain problem, Porsche has the people ready for their customers. And that's why they've been so successful for so many years at so many levels and so many series with so many cars and happy customers. What's your moment? Your story. It's going to be another brand's hatch moment, not the year I was talking to Fitz about. One year before and the final race of the 1982 WEC world endurance championship, Jackie X is chasing down teo fabi in the reign of brands hatch for the title while actually not in The Rain on a drying track. The Rain had been the race had been stopped because of The Rain.

Porsche hench Roland Kuzma bob wallach Derek bell perea Bruin Dijon teo fabi Fitz Jackie
"derek bell" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

The Autosport Podcast

06:30 min | Last month

"derek bell" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

"The engines were partly air cooled. And I think the heads were water. That's correct, yes. And the cylinders are cylinder block was air cooled, and. To facilitate that, it had louvers in the underbody. We have the tunnels under the car for down force, but it did have louvers in there to get it extract a bit of air from the engine. For qualifying, we had a little plate to put on them. So that you could do two or three laps and yeah, it's not worry about overheating the engine just for qualifying. And it made a difference probably second and a half a lap. It was worth having. And my fellows, live mechanics. Do you remember max Crawford? Of course I remember max Crawford. Great guy, super guys super guy. And he'd worked out that a way of getting more air into the engine. And we could block off the tunnels in, get more down force, we got more air coming in somewhere else, so we could actually run it in the race. Which we did. Do you think brands are high down force circuit brands going pre circuit, wonderful circuit. That could have been quite crucial in the victory during. No, no, definitely. It was Derek, who was incredible in the car. I mean, he was, I mean, I don't remember the exact figures now, but I was always a little bit quicker than harbor. I was always sort of half a second, just a second. Something like that would not be. I was doing more in the garden Hubble was your car. I'm not saying I'm like and I think Derrick was I think he was a good second a lot quicker than I was. As you know yourself is significant. So yeah, he was I mean, we wouldn't have won the race without dairy. That's for sure. We might become second or third. We wouldn't have won the race. And so say Derek always said you really established him, you know, which was nice. So that's some great tales there of a great period and a great car and yeah, and for me, quite well, just a victory I remember very well because it was sort of in that formative period of my life when I was falling in love with sports car racing. So John, thank you for coming and telling us these wonderful tales. Thank you. It's been a pleasure. Always like to talk about it. So Gary, that would be speaking to John early, what did you make of catching up with John now? I mean, I would say my impression, I sat here the other side of the desk, listening in, sprightly, I would say. And I hate to think of his age, but I mean you wouldn't you wouldn't know. He bounded in here with his BR D.C. top on and sat down and happily chatted all things Portia to you. Now it was good to speak to him in good speak to him about particularly about his victory in 1983 at bran's hatch with Derek Warwick, a day, a privateer team based here at Silverstone, beat the factories. As he explained with a little help from Goodyear tyres, a little help from an aero tweak that the team came up with, and I think a big help from Derek Warwick's talents. And we talked earlier about drivers who came from other disciplines who may who made their mark in 9 5 6s and 9 6 twos. Warwick, that was his first big sports car win. And he went on to have a very successful sports car career, as well as, of course, having a good F one career, but you know, he became he became a top liner in sports car racing, which was not quite the case in Formula One. Yeah, absolutely. And became a world champion, of course. As well. Let's talk a few favorites, because John mentioned a couple of his favorite moments from drivers in that clip we just heard. Serge, I'd say you've written the book, you've written the 5 books on this. You can't do that without having a few favorite moments, drivers, events, things like that. I got here really early doors this morning. And they had the fuel bowsers out and they were popping some fuel in a car and I looked on the side, I had nidal's side of it, and that reminded me that all sorts of people have driven it. I was like, oh my goodness, Tiffany, of course, are totally slipped, slipped my mind. That was kind of the year that I was getting into motor sport. As you've gone through this labor of love, what have been your favorite drivers to see racing these cars? Well, I've been researching quite a few drivers, of course, and I think in total it was like 445 drivers that drove ever drove a knife, 5, 6 or 9 6 two in their careers. So obviously, there are the classic names, if you like, Derek bell, and Jackie aches, obviously. The multi winners in factory cars, but there's also the nice people who may have been not as successful, but were just good solid drivers or nice drives or nice people. They were also people that was his name again, the Peruvian who showed up here in the Fitzpatrick Porsche and Lopez, who crashed. Yeah, Lopez, who crashed to his exiting the pits, I do believe. Exiting the pits and was first stint, floored went straight across the track and totaled the car into the crash barriers. And he was then later arrested for drug trafficking together with his brother. And a few other people. So there's also those dodgy characters. I mean, what you always have in endurance racing always have had. There's people from all walks of life who will go endurance racing because it's such the discipline itself, three people per car and like 40 50 cars on the grid. You need a 150 people to man all the cars to go racing and you can't find a 150 professionals. To go sports car race, you always have these people. And you need people to pay for it, of course. Exactly. Otherwise. It's all sponsorship. As long as the bills are green, you know, the deal is done. Wow. And I'm trying to think of questions that would possibly stump someone who's written for four or 5 hours a day for the last half many years. Who's which driver has driven the most miles in one of these? I've got absolutely no idea. But it would have to be a factory driver with a testing. Now if you're a bell or probably Derek bell or hench talk because they drove for the factory for that program.

max Crawford Derek Warwick Derek John Derrick Portia bran Goodyear Gary D.C. Warwick Fitzpatrick Porsche nidal Serge Derek bell Lopez Tiffany Jackie hench
MSNBC's Jonathan Capehart Degrades Winsome Sears' Victory, Citing Race

Mark Levin

01:11 min | 11 months ago

MSNBC's Jonathan Capehart Degrades Winsome Sears' Victory, Citing Race

"Go ahead They elected winsome seers as lieutenant governor She will be the first African American woman to be elected statewide in Virginia history It's The Wall Street Journal Nice try But invoking the name of lieutenant governor elect winsome Sears doesn't prove my assertion wrong about the role of race in the Virginia governor's election Not in the least Look voting for someone black does not grant absolution from racism It's not because people voted for somebody who's black They voted for somebody despite her race That's the point Martin Luther King Not Derek bell Are you too stupid to understand He obsessed with your racist hate to get it People go to the polls white racist go to the polls and say I'm going to vote for a black person a pro I'm not a white racist Just listen to how pathetic And how irrational this clown

Winsome Sears Virginia The Wall Street Journal Derek Bell Martin Luther King
How Derrick Bell Coined 'Critical Race Theory'

Mark Levin

01:37 min | 11 months ago

How Derrick Bell Coined 'Critical Race Theory'

"The baton was picked up by a guy by the name of Derek bell He was a Professor of law at Harvard And he started to develop critical theory as a race issue Critical race theory He always felt that he was looked down upon that he didn't succeed in academia although he was relatively successful but that is scholarship was not embraced in fact he was viewed as a real whack job by many including Thomas Saul With this fringe ideology he was developing or expanding on critical race theory Taking this notion of law existing for those who dominate the power to the argument that the society exists for the dominant race White people And so again he was a Marxist Markus was a Marxist Most of the professors promoting this are marxists And this is in the 1970s so he's promoting critical race theory particularly in law schools As a Marxist approach an Americanized Americanized Marxist approach To seize on the past imperfections of society or anybody's imperfections Anybody's resentment jealousies anger And create a theory around it The theory being critical race

Derek Bell Thomas Saul Harvard Markus
"derek bell" Discussed on Into America

Into America

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"derek bell" Discussed on Into America

"Media so diverse that people still confuse us for each other. So i got the tribeca which is that this week. I have been confused for you for tallahassee and female buoy man. that's the same on fire. So i'm working on amanda gorman one but you know they talked about the need to diversify these institutions. They said that policing had to be diversified. They said that there had to be a serious approach to reforming housing in ghetto communities. And what are the things. I think that handicapped this report. Even outside of the political moment that it was delivered in was the simple fact that they made so many recommendations. That if you'd had fifty commissions with one hundred years. I don't know that they could have enacted everything bikaner commission suggested but it was sweeping. There are real problems once again out of kerner and their areas where we're making some progress other areas where we're making not sufficient progress. Try to isolate them all at this moment the break them all down between jobs and housing and the problem of education integration police and community relations of various kinds as very tall subject. And that's what that's why we're spending so much time at it. You know it'd be easy to view this as a missed opportunity right. Yeah they were so wide in scope that it might have been hard to unpack. But was america ever imposition to really enact any of these recommendations and then so deeply ingrained the racism and segregation. Everything that makes america tick so deeply ingrained that no report. No recommendation no political operative was ever going to get us a position to do that. I think i think the risk of ruining my reputation. I actually am optimistic. And somebody's i think that america has been at points where it could make significant changes. But it's the question of what has been the motive in the motivation to do. It is a question of will. And the reason i say that is that i just this afternoon finished a piece for the new yorker on derek bell which you know some of us will remember derek bell. He was the famous harvard And then later. Nyu law professor passed away in two thousand eleven notably resigned from his job at harvard in protest of the law. School's refusal to hire or tenure. Any black women faculty and is a tremendously principled person. The reason that bring up derek bell into in response to that question was that bell had a very kind of pragmatic read on american history. And he said that there had been moments of great racial advancement when the interests of black people and the interests of the american state converged and bet is very kind of their. If you read. Lincoln's writings people think of lincoln as the great emancipator. He didn't think of himself as that. You know in lincoln's writings. He talks about very much there being a transaction Emancipating these enslaved black people They are interested in no longer being slaves. I am interested in keeping this union together. Those two things are mutually beneficial and that will be what will happen. There's kind of one to one relationship here. And so all of the reforms for a moment why people wanted to do in alabama was in conflict with what people in washington dc wanted to do in the world and what people in dc wanted took precedence over this and so these two things aligned. And so i think there are moments just quite frankly looking at george floyd and the fact that his death embarrassed this country internationally and i do believe people were legitimately moved emotionally by what we saw catastrophe that horrific episode that we all witnessed via video but greasing the levers of the machinery to make any kind of change happen was a product of national interests. And so i think it has been. The struggle has been to answer the very long gated response to your question for those of us who are interested in the work of democracy building for us to persevere through the fallow times in the interest of those moments where these interest alive and i think that has been the story of progress in this country not only enra- race but fundamentally and centrally in matters of race. We talking about progress. How much has really changed here. We are fifty years later. Coming off of michael. Brown and ferguson. Coming off of george floyd and do we have any different. Kind of vantage point are different. Land from which view that takeaways from the initial report. And then this release. Yeah i. i think that there are parts of kerner. That don't really hold up over time. One of the things that they talked about was the need to diversify police departments police departments in many places. You know a much more diverse than they were. You know these points. They talked about in kind of outmoded language. Some of the things that we've seen come to pass but we still have a situation that is recognizable. It's still legible to us in ways that were if not identical. Been highly similar to the circumstances. That colonel was talking about but also to make sure we understand this. The kerner report drew these conclusions. In the same way that the sixty seven lily report had drawn them in newark and that sixty five report had drawn in watts and that the nine thousand nine hundred forty three report drawn in detroit and that the nineteen thirty five report had drawn in harlem. There's a whole collection of reports that you could throw up in the air and let them fall and you wouldn't be able to tell one from the other because they had looked at this problem again and again and again the nineteen ninety-two christopher report from the lapd after rodney. King the ferguson report but they all share this kind of dna and so about the ideas of police corruption. You're less likely to have the kind of naked graft that you saw that likes was about but in terms of the use of force. I think that we are far similar to what we saw. Nine hundred sixty eight in this deep dive into the kerner commission report. What you learned About america about who we are say something fundamental about. Not just where we've been but perhaps where we might be headed if we don't ship. Yeah i mean. I think it's. It's like the poet of mary. Baraka used to say that we had the cest complex where we were cursed to roll the boulder up the hill only to see it. Roll back down for all eternity and i think that my version of optimism has been that we roll the boulder up the hill knowing that it will likely roll back down but not all the way to the bottom and that each time we may stop at a quicker and begin the work of pushing back.

derek bell amanda gorman bikaner commission george floyd kerner america harvard tallahassee lincoln dc Nyu bell Lincoln alabama ferguson washington King the ferguson Brown michael colonel
"derek bell" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"derek bell" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"At ober. We'll read your screenplay. Goodyear you can borrow the blimp to go to your high school reunion. That's pretty good hooters shifts now towards your degree at the university of arizona. I was always the case. They baskin robbins. Employees are allowed to take up to four hits of nitric oxide off the whip cream down that i used to do that. petsmart every sunday. You can take home a fish to grill. All right toys r. us now accepting sex offenders that really run warmer. You come to work dressed like the customers. I care you can live here and subway. We reversed our policy on employees touching. The bread with their penis go ride. Wow many toys my rule one too many go too far then then then you know you're done all right so let's get back into hard news. I hit it. We're having a good time and now we're gonna fight. I'm gonna make you fight. But it's okay but i gotta talk about the muzzle laws. These laws that are being introduced in a nerve states to talk about critical race theory now critical race theory. I must say to begin with I hadn't heard the term probably year ago. Now i hear it every day. I think americans are just starting to hear it and i think no one knows exactly what it is. They know what has something to do with race and some kind of a theory. How would you describe it. And then we'll ask. How would you describe. What is chris christie. I will admit that. I read a lot of critical race. Theory and law school. So you know the work of derek bell or john or genes defined one knows but you and six other people right so what matters is what is it. what is it practically. It's being taught in schools or some form of yes there's there's a certain sort of crystallized version of it. That is a lot less complex than critical race. Theory actually is but critical race theory essentially argues that racism is baked into all the systems of american society and that any sort of neutral system is in fact a guys for racial power and so the argument is made by derek bell for example that brown versus board of education is an argument. He made in nineteen ninety-one that brown versus board of education was actually a way for the white to leverage its own power wasn't an attempt to end segregation in public schools. Even things that are purportedly good in terms of race songs. They uphold these broader systems. Things like capitalism or things like the meritocracy. These things are actually just guises for power and so what that boils down to sort of practical terms is all disparity equals discrimination if you can see any stat or black people are under performing white people. This means the system was set up for the benefit of white people and white people have a duty to tear down these systems in order to alleviate the racism that's implicit in those systems when it comes to schools what this tends to boil down to is kids who are white have experienced privilege because the system was built for white people and we have to change the standard right now. Okay well so malcolm utah me your different. Oh i agree with everything he said. Oh great you being honest in defining of what. It's like to be black american right. That is i mean. We're talking about assists unfair. No i'm just saying. I.

baskin robbins derek bell Goodyear petsmart university of arizona chris christie us john brown malcolm utah
Caller Inquires About Critical Race Theory in Law Classes

Mark Levin

01:02 min | 1 year ago

Caller Inquires About Critical Race Theory in Law Classes

"With my students and all students are getting that, you know, conflated thing. You know you were talking before about critical race theory, And there's a lot of professors out there saying, Oh, well, this is the same like in law school when you learn critical thinking and critical theory and about case law You know, to effectuate social justice, and I was hoping that maybe you could explain, Um, you know, to the audience like how that's not the case. We will get into that because it really did start in our law. Schools started at Stanford and then really gotta push at Harvard by this fellow Derek Bell. Some of us kind of knew who he was early on. In fact, Mr Producer's wife was taught a little bit about Derek Bell in college. But he took this Marcos model and apply to broadly he was considered a cook at the time. But critical theory. I'll just do this very quickly is the theory that the law is written. By the majority dominant culture. The law is written in a way where it excludes certain people.

Derek Bell Mr Producer Stanford Harvard
Caller Uses Fallacy to Defend Critical Race Theory

Mark Levin

01:39 min | 1 year ago

Caller Uses Fallacy to Defend Critical Race Theory

"I would like to discuss critical I would like to discuss Trooper Race theory Go for it. Let the audience know California aspect about critical race theories. It's not laws that were explode. Laws that were set up in the past have left current populations at a disadvantage. Redlining didn't allow for African Americans redlining is illegal, sir. Yes. Where there was more. Yes, I understand that. But redlining. That's that's a critical race theory goes all the way back to the Constitution. It doesn't a job where I understand that, But I'm trying to explain Is that what happened was, I said, Red lining is illegal. And if you did understand critical race theory, you would understand that Most of the theoreticians going back to even Derek Bell condemned the civil rights movement. You condemn the civil rights movement, either. I'm what I'm what I'm trying to get at is the reasons why the export? No, sir. Listen, I understand you want to go through all that You want to talk about other issues. What I'm saying to you is this Red lining is now illegal. We had court decisions that make certain other behavior illegal. And I'm telling you, that critical race theory isn't about redlining. Credible race theory argues that a colorblind society is a lie. At the civil rights movement is a lie that the civil lights removing enshrined a white dominant society do not read about critical race theory, sir. Critical race theory before identifies laws that held minorities back. I just said to you Let me try it again. Do you think the 1964 Civil Rights Act was a ruse for the white dominant society? No no in 1965 Civil Rights Act.

Derek Bell California White Dominant Society
"derek bell" Discussed on Cars That Matter

Cars That Matter

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"derek bell" Discussed on Cars That Matter

"Era of motoring. What do you think j. Well i sort of have three words for the legacy. One is preservation. derek. Marshall both touched on it in a way the film preserves a glimpse into that classic era of motor sport. There's just no way to recreate it. And if we didn't have it we would be so much the poorer for not having it. Second word is inspiration. Which derek just touched on. I mean i'm a lung kid. I remember seeing it for the first time. When it was on television in the us. I would have been seven or eight years old. And if i hadn't seen this film at that age at that time again who knows if i'd even be here talking to you guys so i think it has inspired many many people over these last years in some way shape or form to become interested in motorsport Or whatever it might be and then the third one not to end on a downer but the third word that came to me on the legacy is devastation. And maybe we can get marshall to comment on it a little bit too but it was a devastating time for steve and his personal and business life. And it's strange because he finally got to do this film that he really wanted had a burning passion. For and yet the outcome it ended up being part of a pretty devastating period for him as said in his personal in his business life. So there's a contradiction there that i find fascinating. I'll one ask derek question after finished as you know. This was a movie that steven didn't want to do a whole lot of movies. This was one he definitely wanted to do. He had to be talked in the bullets. He had to be talked in to thomas crown. He had to be talked into a lot of movies. Lemond was one that he didn't have to be talked into. He basically staked his whole future whole fortune on the mons so it came at a point where he wanted his way or not at all. And as you know there was a shutdown. He had to give up his salary as it turned out the financially. The film didn't do as well as cinema center had hoped. I think it did okay but it did make back the money for him. So he had the shutdown productions it also coincided with the end of his relationship with agent the end of his relationship with his wife. The ship this whole company so all these things are really devastating price but my question a derek. Is steve show any of that pressure to you. Did you have any idea. Ended up pressure was going on. Because i have the feeling that you know that steve compartmentalized a lot of his feelings. It would be interesting to me to know if you saw that while this was going on all. I remember after a certain number of weeks. They said we're all having a week's holiday. Everybody can go for a week. I went back to england and will let you know into come back when oman goodness. What's happening now. Stephen is amazing. Actually he never talked to me. But i didn't know that what same to i was. Just one of the drivers who contributed quite a lot was used as the main drive with so we shall the light that socially that never really associated told too much later. Don't studies disappeared. And we then came back alley cats in came in and had it sorta directing. That's the way. I looked at it and he wanted more more action and i could see that maybe it needs it. It's the back the outcome was. I think they made a heck film. But i knew nothing really that it was difficult. I mean i never got a hint that it might not make the end of it. All i know. I believe in kneecaps the came in cbs. I think will something they'd come in and taken over but we never really saw any gone. 'cause you say barbara lee was dead time and he just followed the long but you know what would the cats in and says and even at the end when stephen i shed the house together in we had some good times. He never really talked to that. He actually didn't bring his concerns to work as such was never dragged away in the middle of of a scene. Saint john to stay. There was never any kind of like what the hell's happening here. There's nothing we just hired on making the film because that's what everybody was there for those states that come hell or high water. We're going to make the so even if we haven't bought the budget to lay we might want to finish it. But i hope you'll never tell it wasn't quite the same direction. I think it was pretty damn consistent. Well the result is certainly something that everybody can celebrate fifty years on getting to talk about some of the secrets and some of the parts of the story that most people aren't familiar with was a real treat today. Obviously you touch on so much of that in your latest book. Steve mcqueen in his own words marshall. So that's.

Stephen england seven fifty years steve Steve mcqueen eight years barbara lee Lemond steven Marshall first time Second word third word today both thomas crown three words derek third one
"derek bell" Discussed on Cars That Matter

Cars That Matter

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"derek bell" Discussed on Cars That Matter

"The film was done and later on in life. I was invited by porsche to drive a jackie. Fix at the mall. And so i drove me. Jackie all the factory team when we won the race in one thousand nine hundred eighty one jacket. I wanted them all to times. You'll cotton and the first time absent. The nine five six. And then. I wanted to know a couple of times they Eighty six eighty seven. But it really made such a difference to oversee mike korea being built with the movie at the stop. As far as nine states. I kept by relationship enjoying that. Rather lally period. I've never forget we actually used to right lessons. Who's in those days wasn't central tendency and snacks and out of the blue. I go from one day. Asking how i was that i never get so bloody naive. And i thought how tastic told steve mcqueen dribs. She was really hockey in those days and he just said what are you ought to be great to see you sometime and i remember. I was flying actually out to raise the puppy down. Riverside i found up stephen. He said let's go out to dinner so we went out and have a lovely evening. He married just three weeks of full and we had a lovely dinner together. Keep in touch miss. Come out in the valley. Some climate ride the bikes. And because you remember the previous times had fun together and that was it. We saw the kept in touch. But you know he was busy with his career. And i did realize how will be was and then number. One day i will into the office on the farm in england and to go on the desk section said we've just had a coal from soda productions summit mike goodness that must be steve and i never thought founding back nikki is over your phone again and the next thing i already had died so i didn't have any communication saturday with than we had in those early days but we know each other not found is extremely weather beginning. He was talking about stephen his his legacy. Marshall let me ask you as his biographer. How do you see this particular film. How do you see lamont in the larger. Context of steve's body of work. I write mainly about his film in his filmography. And mons is it's hard to explain because to me and i don't offend anyone here. It's more of a documentary than a film. I go around the world. And i talk about steve in germany and japan and europe. They don't talk about his films. That talk about the lawns. That's all they wanted to talk about. They don't want to talk about steve. Mcqueen is a person they wanna talk about the making of lamont's and so i find a just as interesting strange dichotomy and i have to tell you this funny funny story that you're only getting because i just recently discovered this about a year ago so when steve did this film he made a deal with gulf oil. The deal with gulf oil was that he would get gas for life. He had a gulf oil credit card. And so as you guys know. He gave up his salary in order for the film to go on which was really an extraordinary move when he moved to malibu. He got away from everything but he started collecting cars. Motorcycles and right across the street from him was a gulf oil station and he became very friendly and he made actually that gulf oil station his office but he used at credit card every single day to fill up all this cars and he got free guests and he didn't have just like ten or twelve cars he like fifty four cars. He had one hundred motorcycles and the owner stay. She told me every single day he came up and he fill the car he fill a bike. Lamont's was the gift that kept on giving to him. What an incredible story. That is really really fantastic. I have a question for all of you. What do you see as the legacy of the film fifty years on there to me. It's a tokyo. Genuine story of motorists. United era is really fantastic. Some piece of history. You watch it. And you'll get a true view of what it was like the mall in nineteen seventy seventy one for a few years around. That is not that different today. Council just different colors. Different sponsors track is much the same the fans are just saying. I'm the grandma show this year. For example wasn't entry last year they didn't have as such and so i'll be back there. Probably driving gulf some said nine seventeen consists silicon lifting which is amazing at. I'll lead the sop round for a couple of laps until they go and stop race. I mean the mall is the mall. That film will go down in history and the will be just put to one side competitor. Because it's real. And steve mcqueen was real stop and with all due respect to james garner who i think was fabulous actor. We never talk about film grand prix. We talk about the film. I think much the same will happen with four verses of harare Goodness but i still think this lalai so legitimate. And it's the story of a race now. As masha saying just now but there was never a switch and he was right. But how the hell can you make scripts about a twenty four hour race. Nothing from people race. This was the race of the race that took place. In one thousand nine hundred seventy and the story is the porsches ferraris in cetera et cetera. That's what films that the people the story of seeing but there was no story of its of romance the treaty. Eating steve tried hub or there wasn't much romance during that mood and believe me even with a free months. Do you need your wife. you'll go into the with you. It's wonderful to have that person with you. You don't take your wife with you when you go to work. So story is about that. Damn car racing against her ari. Adam all twenty four hours over the greatest race in the history of most and that sorta out. That's a fantastic capsule review. I love it. What do you think marshall. What's the film's legacy. I'm just going to give them a simple summation i'm gonna call it. The greatest gearhead movie of all time. And i'm not saying racing to me. Gearhead is beyond racing. The guys that talk about raising this is the ultimate gearhead movie. So that's the legacy. But i want to read you a quote from mcqueen and about the racers but it also talks about the intended audience. I think this will touch derek. He says some of these manner dealing with the unknown that gives a man greatness. I making the monse semi grandmother. Montana knows who knows nothing about cars will understand. I love that quote. That was fantastic. And the thing that i miss it saying was that it'll never be forgotten because i do a lot of confidences goods and pebble beaches and laguna seca. Ze elkhart lake classics hysterics. I go up to the young people. Okay does muslim caused. But generally that classic 'cause from aria identical classic star is but they're not stars anything. That's not racing right now and i won't touch groups of kids. 'cause i'm intrigued. Let's say hold on a minute. Why you here. They say my dad probably did for years. When i was a kid i used to come watch the cosby around. And he doesn't come as much use to icon. Because i love it. I know the sponsors of worried about what about the future. What about the dance. That they're gonna pass away. There is a heck of a future the young people who have a passion for what she needs calls and that mcqueen movie have to call it. That is really about history and they watch it and you talk to nick. That sun testing you. Wherever i go i hear. We watched the movie that mcqueen movie last night. Because it's so real and they can see that car goodwin who will beach wherever it is. They'll be nine seventeen or five one two s or cholera ilk. And it'll be there forever. I believe. I don't think it'll ever go away. And now that bringing oldest electric stuff. Who knows where we'll go with but those laws positive incredible.

james garner germany ten last year steve mcqueen europe malibu japan one hundred Marshall england masha Mcqueen fifty four cars mcqueen steve twelve cars saturday three weeks thousand nine hundred seventy
"derek bell" Discussed on Cars That Matter

Cars That Matter

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"derek bell" Discussed on Cars That Matter

"But most realistic film you could possibly make in terms of realism. And obviously your role in the film. Making itself derek. What about some of the behind the scenes stuff that happened like the five twelve. Catching on fire during the filming. Love to hear more about that. So stephen i e salama sam. And i'm in the ferrari. We have to overtake the. Gt coltie camerota. Going down into indianapolis. So he'd come down from the end of ozone true the golden moves on conan separating out and steve basically behind me we go through kohlhaas. We get down to the forty km turnaround and speaks jones surged. Think it's still was on the radio. And he says okay come back now because they didn't want to turn round on flight three miles and faces somebody coming down in the safety car or something at that. Point steve's next so he says come on. Let's go flat out a nice okay. This is steve. I should actually steve icon getting together at fox lost my confidence. So he says okay he said i'm to carry on so he storms off flat out on the road like keep trying to turn engine over. Just you get into gear. And as i celebrate out of their subway my own. Because i'm not going that possibility. Seventy mile an hour each imola now south is explosion in the cockpit is flames says come out from the floor beside me and hit me in the face and it goes. We had open face helmets with. Just abandon across under our nose. We'd come goes on. We'll glasses hence we used to get bent so i stopped my comedy. So does he takes a heck of a time to stop even seventy miles an hour because it doesn't have a hamburger chevy time you think. Well i've stopped ninety twenty and out and you have to stop it to get out. So eventually i got it. Stop meanwhile flames coming up on in the cockpit. And i did no. I was just in a hurry to get out. Mitch stepped out. And i stepped out the a hidden. I met a gone on hold left my phases like red hulk as i go out goodness through. The forest comes this husky Get a contract and at the same time the roaring away now the fox to come and then the ambulance came down and was the l. Renna you'll see on the movie and sister bridget. That's hot was on the fill with a glasses. She comes out drop. Your trousers said she gave me a job in the back side. I guess case. I had show that unless you get them. She said an hour she said light out of that so i lay down on the of inside the ambulance. She hits the door and she goes drawing on the driver. Let it flop. And i promise you this like the stretch came out literally straight back out kick back those that rely features. I went out cancer. Leave it over the track over the road with may holding on behind so didn't drop me on the ground nicole's the driver his bang going on by a he puts the brakes on without. Would lie. show batch inside again anyway. That was the beginning client amusing got loss because it was lunchtime. The french don't do much Laid on the role. They came along and slap to hold of cream on my face and said we'll be back off at lunch and stayed came to see me on the considering flying out to paris. Special buttons hospital that they didn't need to an act show into the race the next weekend and fact that sister. Bridget was not only in the film but she actually attended to you in real life. Can't make this stuff up now. Thank goodness e f true story. Thanks for sharing that it credible tidbit. That really is something on medicine. Were still practicing. Joined dr steven tae. Back and bill kurtis for real conversations with the medical professionals who have their finger on the pulse of healthcare in the modern world. Available on all your favorite pod casting platforms produced by media. J let me ask you a question as the porsche guru in a guy who kind of lives breathes eats and sleeps porsche. How has lamont's the film affected Porsche from a brand building perspective. I mean in the ensuing fifty years since the film was made while robert. I don't think we can calculate it. It's something that. I think you know better than i do. In your business and your experience the pr and advertising benefit of the nine seventeen program itself and then you combine it with this film that has become so widely known and so widely followed. You know it has to be worth something in the millions of dollars still to this day. Maybe every year to porsche just the exposure that it gets you know at the time. I'm sure no one was necessarily thinking about that. Although porsche clearly believes strongly that their racing program was their advertising program because they did very little conventional advertising. It's a huge thing for porsche. It just continues on and on here. We are fifty years later. Still talking about it. We're doing things like going to see some of the cars later this summer at pebble beach which will be fantastic event and will probably break the internet. It sounds like the film was actually kind of a test bed for a burgeoning industry. I want to ask you marshall. I watched the film. And it's really a watch lovers i noticed. Derek where ago Tag heuer monaco. And that was part of the allure of the film where these great little details. Marshall i guess is a guy named don knapp who passed away. He was the prop master of lamont's. What can you tell us about him. And his product placement business. It's interesting because that was the really. The first time i wouldn't say the product placement was used in the film but heavily used mcqueen. If i'm not mistaken he wanted to look like joseph. He had a choice a watches and he said. I wanna look like joe and joe was wearing the tag. You're don made a deal with the president attack. You're i know one of them. They gave the heck. I'll tune in the mechanic. I think he probably kept one or two for himself. Because chad i know has one don. I think perhaps kept to a might have sold a couple. Those i go to watson steve. You got one of those as well e off at me. The tack void but in nineteen seventy even for today race drivers face because it was dead square and Track to watch so she so loved to give your watch so he went on to see dumb and he got me around one wishes. You'll take you fifty as of subsequent atty cleaned at some point. I headed back in mislaid. It how the hell could mislead at derek from state but always regretted losing a low behold four years ago. This watch arrived in about the beverage. This says the dairy from chad. And there's a notion that saying. I understand you lost one. My dad debut so it's very special to wow lovely stores is it. Yeah that's a million dollar gift study special. I mean had never said it. I wish i had the original robert. I have a funny story so when i initially interviewed. Hey tune in. This would abandon in nineteen eighty nine or ninety. He told me all the things that he had gone. Through with a amman's. Steve gave integrate watch and said thank you for saving my life and i thought at the time. This is my thinking like steve. You make millions of dollars you got these watches for free you in grave it to give it to them. That's not much of a gift. Well lo and behold how. Many years later haig cells to watch. I think it sells for two million dollars. I- retracted my thought. Well steve. you're pretty generous guy. What a great story. Who could have thought that would be the case back so at a years ago. I'd like to ask you derek. Can you tell us about your relationship with him. After.

Steve Porsche steve two million dollars three miles indianapolis forty km pebble beach joe don knapp Marshall fifty two today Bridget seventy miles an hour derek robert nicole Seventy mile an hour
"derek bell" Discussed on Cars That Matter

Cars That Matter

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"derek bell" Discussed on Cars That Matter

"The actual genuineness of the mood in a genuine film. It turned out to be but it's also legendary for a lot of minute details regarding its creation. That's why it's fascinating hearing these stories from you. Derek marshall can you comment on that. I hear that so. Many things went wrong during production. There was no script per se. What about that is true. Well all i can tell. You is from the conversations that i had robert railway mcqueen's partner at solaar that was the complaint is that the movie had no script by that i mean it had no storyline and that was always going to be the main complaint and that was the main complaint from sturgis but sturgis from what rarely told me had this habit of. He didn't really care about that. Necessarily because on the great escape they showed up with a script and he said poor. John sturgis what he would do was take a part of script deconstructed again. He worked on the great escape. But it didn't work on the months. And i also think there might have been on steve's part some i'm gonna leave it as vague as possible because he wanted really in his words to make a pseudo documentary and he wanted to try and bend reality with movie making and it was a first attempt that i know of in film to do both of that. He would film with the way that he wanted to film it. He might have even given the movie studio a different script while he was gonna shoot something else. That wasn't passed. Steve mcqueen to do with steve. Always that was this movies in my head. That always worried the movie executives. We'll take a short break but we will be right back. Best travel experiences are more than just vacations. They shape who we are and they bring us closer to the people places we love. This is the magic of travel. I'm bruce swollen and in my twenty plus years as an editor and writer at covered. The world's most extraordinary travel experiences. Places like rob report national geographic and departures and. I met some incredible people along the way the people who make that magic happen for the first time. I'm inviting you to join me. In a little known world of luxury travel. Innovators connoisseurs tastes makers and exclusive group of industry leaders with a passion for the very best of travel with every episode of travel. That matters you'll get access to insider knowledge secret getaways unforgettable luxury hotels and one of a kind travel experiences to expand what you thought was possible like venturing into the jungle and coming face to face with breyer wildlife. He's very said we had lives it within my heart. I don't think i'll ever believe incredible moment. Gentle giants all around us paying for an extravagant vacation. Having no.

Derek marshall John twenty plus years Steve mcqueen steve first attempt both first time solaar robert railway mcqueen
Admiral Michael M. Gilday Defends Racist Critical Race Theory for U.S. Navy

Mark Levin

01:27 min | 1 year ago

Admiral Michael M. Gilday Defends Racist Critical Race Theory for U.S. Navy

"Admiral Department of Defense undertook the stand down because they understand that extremism detracts from military readiness. So if sailors except Candies argument that America and the United States Navy are fundamentally racist. As you've encouraged them to do. Do you expect that to increase or decrease morale and cohesion or even recruiting into the United States? Navy? I do know this. Our strength is in our diverse Nobody said our strength is in our diversity You smell If our strength is in our diversity, Why are you proposing racist reading material? For our Navy. Candy. This is amazing. Kenny doesn't believe our strength is in our diversity. This is Marxism. They don't believe in diversity of thought. Diversity of anything If you disagree with them, whatever your race. Here is the enemy. He doesn't believe in diversity. In fact, as I've explained before it as well discuss much greater length in about three weeks. They reject Martin Luther King. They reject the civil rights movement. They reject Brown versus Board of Education. That's what Derek Bell taught. One of the more modern So called icons of critical race theory. And this admiral is pushing this pushing it.

Admiral Department Of Defense United States Navy America Kenny Brown Versus Board Of Educatio Martin Luther King Derek Bell
Critical Race Theory: What Is It?

On The Media

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Critical Race Theory: What Is It?

"Is critical Race theory? Yes. So critical Race theory began around the 19 seventies with the law professor Derrick Bell and a couple of other legal scholars trying to understand the ways. That race and American law intersected how history of slavery and segregation was sort of codified and continue to influence American law Today. Adam Harris is a staff writer at the Atlantic. His most recent article was titled The GOP S Critical Race Theory Obsession, Harris says. One of the first instances we started to see critical race theory being used as a political bludgeon was in the early 19 nineties, President Bill Clinton nominated Atlantic near to the Justice Department. She was a legal scholar who done a lot of work and voting rights and conservatives effectively used her previous work in voting rights to sort of tag her as someone who was arguing for racial quotas in voting for the amount of seats that people should hold on city councils. They also tagged her as championing a radical school of thought. Called Critical Race Theory. Amid mounting pressure from conservatives, President Clinton has withdrawn his nomination of Lani Guinier to head up the Justice Department's civil rights division, claiming veneers writings lent themselves to views that he could not embrace the president cut her loose rather than fight a divisive battle on Capitol Hill. From there you have A kind of dormant period. It's not really until after George Zimmerman was acquitted in the murder of Trayvon Martin, the Jesse Jackson like race profiteer race grievance industry says everything's about race. America's a racist nation. You see a mention of critical race theory after a video surfaces of President Barack Obama hugging Derek Bell in 1990, you know When he was a law student at Harvard Law. The president is actually kind of aligning himself here with a well known campus radical. There is a conservative back last thing that he believes in this radical critical race theory. And then they're a kind of a couple of mentions up until 2020 shortly after George Floyd is murdered, You start to see a

Derrick Bell Adam Harris President Bill Clinton Atlantic Justice Department Lani Guinier GOP Harris George Zimmerman Trayvon Martin Capitol Hill Jesse Jackson Harvard Law Derek Bell President Barack Obama America George Floyd
"derek bell" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

The Workr Beeing Podcast

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"derek bell" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

"He'll ization in really the value in micro moments from her. And i'd already been talking thinking about it that i hadn't coined it as a micro moment and so for me. Micro-moments are how. I get there every day whether it's with my my family with the teams. I'm coaching if i can get you. Know like at ascension get leadership development to create a wellness tab on their page that excites me because that means a removing things in a direction that makes the world a better place. I don't surgery question a lot of thoughts on dead. No i thought. I think everything you've said has been very motivating. You're clearly really passionate about this. And so are we. And so i feel like just hearing you talk about it. I'm like all right. Let's keep going doing it. We're doing the thing You're also probably the first person i've ever heard. Say that they want to run fifty miles to be in their head. Most people are like. I'm trying to get through it and i can't think because that's the harder part so good for you. That is not me. But i totally get how. The exercise piece can be a very big mental release. So i that's a good call out for a lot of folks But we're at the time we want to start wrapping things up a little bit. And so i wanna make sure that we give you some space to tell us anything else about yourself your work or wellness at work that we haven't covered today I i was thinking about you. Know in a way that how this ties together in a i think you know we had talked a little bit about previously about something. Maybe i've learned from coaching in that. I could use at work. And i think there's there's a short story you know i think ultimately what i learned from my soccer coach that i've been able to translate into my professional..

fifty miles today first person
"derek bell" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

The Workr Beeing Podcast

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"derek bell" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

"A well that started with i- islas working with one of the greatest people on the planet Shaun foy who has been Ah leader in the field for a while. And i worked with him on a couple of projects and worked with him in the welcoa team on a wife on the move programme and so he had asked me to to put together a kind of a personal like a personal wellness initiative and it was a this five week project of articles that i needed to put together to help people make a change and i thought i kept thinking about when we talk about wellness. So how how can we talk about it. In a way that helps people understand that we've kind of moved beyond like your traditional six and seven dimensional models. I'm very aware of that history by by you know by the part national wellness institute and being an advocate for our six dimensions of wellness. It always felt a little shortsighted to me. Because i couldn't. I couldn't connect my values to that in the way that i really wanted to. Then i and then ryan pick in the group awhile cola a few years ago started working on more values based idea loudness that it's wellness more about human needs and also our values like resiliency in strength in growth in all these things that started. Make more sense to me. But i still felt like i wanted to figure out a way to really explain it so along that way. I was starting to think about a what. What are some ways that we can help people really think about their values and kind of their self definition of their cell. Because that's where it all really starts for them. So i started doing this this workshop where i would ask people to down of values or start doing sorry start with career. Map burst so they write down all these different arenas that they feel like a part of their lives so their work. Or they're they're a rider or they're a engineer..

five week Shaun foy ryan pick one few years ago six i- islas seven national wellness institute six dimensions cola projects
"derek bell" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

The Workr Beeing Podcast

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"derek bell" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

"I love your idea. And your your opportunity of having wellness leaders coming into oranization to really help build this structure and it reminds me a lot of what cotinine i often talk about when it comes to diversity equity inclusion as well which you know is is a pillar to all of these different wellness concepts to is having somebody in the organization that has that has expertise knowledge and is at an executive or senior senior leader level that can derive and the change based on the experience and knowledge that they have and really make it core and central. It's the entire organization. I completely agree like the wellness side is a really important one to do the same thing. Because if it's not there at the core if we're not seeing good practices in terms of structure culture then no matter. What other atoms you add. It's not going to actually be truly addressed. So i really love that opportunity in that idea. That's a great one. Yeah i mean it's it is one of those situations where we find ourselves sometimes marginalized because of the organizational structure so a lot of times. Your wellness program runs through your hr benefit plan so it's really tied to health. Risk management. Health cost containment strategies to mitigate manage disease so then we ended up talking about wellness only provincia well and then suddenly like something like code comes along and we find out that all of our employees are really stressed. But we weren't prepared for that because we spent all of our wellness energy looking at what it looks like under only our benefit plan because it was a side was a off to the side in a silo and into some degree. That's explainable on k. Because we do need to talk about containing costs and we need to manage. Healthcare organizations ought to be responsible and helpful to their employees. But that's that's only part of the picture and we haven't really gotten to the full park or for example. I know i've had a lot of conversations with companies over the past year about their mental wellbeing programming so historically we've relied on e. ap as our as our cornerstone for that organizational on fulfilment of. What is what we talked when we talk about mental wellness become a turn and look at a p and say okay help. Well in the big picture. Ep's utilization is fairly small and at at the company level. It's only about a two two to three percent usage. Rate and a lot of people don't self refer or they also might not want to participate in the ap because it's still at the worksite. And so a lot of a lot of people have really crisis. Level issues may not want to use that as their key. Key support system. We also discussed you know i. I think i should say. I don't say we discovered but during kovin the conversation was elevated that mental wellbeing. A lot more than just what. Yippee is typically been provide and so companies are now under trying to wrap their hands around. How can we provide better support. Hecklers and mechanisms and structures like choice architecture that grows to include more help and support for stress anxiety..

three percent one of those situations past year two
"derek bell" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

The Workr Beeing Podcast

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"derek bell" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

"I had this incredible opportunity to become the director there. we had go where going through some staff turnover and and i was an interim director for a short while and was given the chance to lead the organization for a while so i got to work hand in hand with the leaders in the wellness field and at the time it was incredibly difficult time for the organization because the industry was changing and there are a lot of economic factors that were putting stress on the organization so i needed a pivot at to grow and become a stronger revenue generating organization so i work with leaders to try to look ahead and see what was going to happen in field in. How can we match some different programming and educational opportunities build the national walls conference to continue to be the central point. Where all these crossroads contained through an working the kind of like i had this opportunity to to get a phd kind of level education wellness. And that helped me really grow as a person in a professional in the field and it also has given me a chance to build a career team of people that i can rely on when i have questions about things or if i need to do something within the scope of my work now i have a great relationship with a lot of people that i can call in to help me learn more about the field so as so as i continue to work there than i wanted to focus more on instead of of broad casting everything out in the field really wanted to take a step back and become a practitioner and so i started within the wellness field of work sites in organizations because for me that took me back to what i saw in my home growing up and trying to build organizations that are that that allows the opportunity to be love our work but also that our organization support us on just showing up that they are creating environments where we can thrive in grow and learn and so all these things kind together for me..

walls a lot of people
"derek bell" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

The Workr Beeing Podcast

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"derek bell" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

"That's what helps make actual change in live a happy life. I love that story so much. And what a what. A great note for us all to make that lessons that are important can come from anywhere places. You're not thinking places you're not looking and just a great reminder that you know inspiring people to proactively do do the right thing instead of just not do the wrong thing is a really great way to keep people motivated towards getting better every day so i love that. We usually ask a final question. But your question. Your question was about what lessons learned from coaching. And you just told that so. I have a new fun question for you. Which is what we show has been sustaining you over the course of the pandemic and is it ted. Lasso ted ted last he. He's been my spirit animal since twenty thirteen so a lot of people i love ted last i was getting all the well-deserved attention and he is by far the best advocate for soccer. That we've ever asked. I appreciate that. But but i would also tell anyone who loves ted. Lasso is to pull up on. Youtube is early. Commercials for nbc. Sports when they. I got the premier league contract because those are absolutely hilarious so all my soccer friends. We we've been in love with. Ted lassos since two thousand thirteen. So were That's applauding that. Everyone is caught up to to the brilliance of what this man brings to our lives. Yeah so i mean by all means ted lasso. Ted lasso is absolutely amazing. You know but but i will say what would has also been keeping me going is this is..

ted Lasso ted ted soccer Ted lassos Lasso nbc Youtube ted lasso Ted lasso
"derek bell" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

The Workr Beeing Podcast

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"derek bell" Discussed on The Workr Beeing Podcast

"A well that started with i- islas working with one of the greatest people on the planet Shaun foy who has been Elite or in the field. For a while and i worked with him on a couple of projects and worked with him in the welcoa team on a wife on the move programme and so he had asked me to to put together a kind of a personal like a personal wellness initiative and it was a this five week project of articles that i needed to put together to help. People make a change and i fought. I kept thinking about when we talk about wellness. So how how can we talk about it. In a way that helps people understand that we've kind of moved beyond like your traditional six and seven dimensional models. I'm very aware of that history by by you know by the part national wellness institute and being an advocate for our six dimensions of wellness. It always felt a little shortsighted to me. Because i couldn't Connect my values to that in the way that i really wanted to. Then i and then ryan pick in the group awhile A few years ago started working on more values based idea wellness that it's wellness more about human needs and also our values like resiliency in strength in growth in all these things that started. Make more sense to me. But i still felt like a wanted to figure out a way to really explain it so along that way. I was starting to think about a what. What are some ways that we can help people really think about their values and kind of their self definition of their cell. Because that's where it all really starts for them. So i started doing this this workshop where i would ask people to write down a set of values or start doing sorry start with career map burst so they write down all these different arenas that they feel like a part of their lives so their work or they're they're a rider or their engineer.

Shaun foy islas national wellness institute ryan
"derek bell" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"derek bell" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Everywhere it was. It was unbelievable and I still remember Eddie Thomas C bending down Mike Simms on the turf like you would pin down your Seven year old where you're holding his hands on the ground, and you're on top of him, and he can't move. And I was in Eddie was was going crazy. I've never seen any was a very quiet guy was not like that. But He was strong like a bull. As it showed you competitors, you get fired up. Grabbed was trying to get and, you know, they tell you all the time. Don't grab your own teammate in a brawl because if you grab your own teammate, then you're putting them in a vulnerable situation and I don't know. I guess it was just reaction. I knew better. I did it anyway. I grabbed Eddie by the shoulder. I was like, Hey, And at that point in time I put myself in a vulnerable position because I wasn't looking around. You know, you're supposed to keep your head on a swivel man was not Mom was only on Eddie Thomas. See at that time. And Derek Bell grabbed the back of my jersey and at the same time his fist was coming towards my face. And I remember thinking this is going to hurt and about that time out of nowhere. Lenny Harris just took him out. I mean, took him out and his arm having his fist. I mean, I could just see his hand right in front of my face, and then it just disappeared. And I was like Oh, wow. He just saved you because he was just going to blindside me. And I thought, Well, that's gotta sorry to blindside somebody that had nothing to do with you to begin with. I wasn't even part of the brawl. I wouldn't do anything to him, but he didn't like me know well? We'll do what? Why didn't he like you? Um, probably knocked him down one. Okay. All right. Fair enough. That is our Twitter banana phone for the day. So certainly appreciate everybody. Chai Ming in a lot of questions still here and ah Hopefully, we'll get into some of these once the game gets going, and we can answer some of your questions as we do on a nightly basis at Red's radio booth. We are still in a rain delay. The rain has let let up, but Ah, we do not have a further update on when we might get this killing game going so we will transition. Into our rain delay coverage after a quick break on the Cincinnati Bell Reds radio network. Western and Southern is committed to helping make Cincinnati the best place to live work and play. That's why we're proud to sponsor the strikeout Cancer.

Derek Bell Eddie Lenny Harris Eddie Thomas C Eddie Thomas Mike Simms Cincinnati Bell Reds Twitter Cincinnati Chai Ming Southern
"derek bell" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"derek bell" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Did. Okay. You got to, but Derek Bell says you're a tough guy to beat. Yes, very much. So, all right, and what we learned. You have to listen to the show More often. That's what we've learned here, Dave. I listened to your show from the time I get in my work feeling vehicle until it I might get all just give. I got to get out and see customers. I'm just giving you some grief. Thanks for listening, Dad. Thanks for playing the are you smarter than Bill said. Thank you very much. You guys have a great day. Stay safe and healthy out there. And you are a tough gotta beat. Did you do what you think of the other questions today? Fair? Ah, there are fair but that I don't know. Little little too much of the To show him a showy slanty show. It's tough for people like Dave who clearly listens. You Thies air once you really had to listen to the show. I mean, you had to be plugged in, and I I know we have some fans governor. One was too easy for me because I was involved. Well, ever since I told you stick on that thing. All right. Well, thank you, Dave. That was fun. What is Sean from before I get to bring if if nobody else Pizza beats Bill stood out right by the end of the year, I want to be on the show for a showcase showdown. Dad that Sean, but I think I have been beaten out right more than once. Yeah, it's not many not just not just handful, not just young. What do you want to take up Sean on the challenge of the end of the year, But what about the other is he wasn't the only one. I know. Well, maybe maybe you have like a winner's cavalcade or whatever. You know what they bring in all the windows. We have 20 questions. You'd have them go against each other who was the ultimate champion? Maybe we give him a point, something we should switch this up, and we asked Steve questions that we do something like that joint way. Stay. We're going to that this week. We were going to do it for April. Fool's. Oh, that's right. But then I think something happened. All right. Well, I'm gonna leave that to you Two guys to figure that out. But just let me know. So I don't waste my time writing five questions. Okay, Let's do that. In the future. We still got 15 minutes to show Who knows we're going to talk about. We'll get to it. Next. Tom Nichols.

Dave Sean Bill Fool Two guys Derek Bell Tom Nichols Steve
"derek bell" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

10:26 min | 2 years ago

"derek bell" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"I just came across this very funny video that was tweeted out yesterday I guess is a part of the April fools look back so remember Derrick bell the great Derrick bell spent some time with the Mets living on a boat yes so do Derek bell apparently when he was a member of the Toronto Blue Jays got pranked by the great Joe Carter is Joe Carter and the people in the side of the skydome at that point who were talking over the you know making the announcements they pretended to raffle off his truck to some one in the stands so so Joe Carter comes out driving his truck around the outfield and they're talking about all right here's a trucker to raffle off to a fan and Derek bell fulls totally forties completely miffed I just tweeted out the video the visuals a lot better than me explaining it to you but it is absolutely hilarious and it just made me think about Derrick bell Hey Derek bell is one of the most bizarre players is that I can ever remember he lives on that boat when he was with the the Mets he had that famous quote when he's with the pirates were he said he was going to go into operation shut down if there was a competition out in left field he thought that he was just get the starting position without even completing forty because if there's a competition going to be an operation shut down and then of course this prank out there so it's if you're looking for some the laugh at today if you didn't need a laugh go to my Twitter account check out the great Derek bell and and and Joe Carter it's it's definitely worth it hello yet hello I think you know what about a ten or eleven year career yeah yeah I mean absolutely I mean he he was he he was a guy who was good enough to hang for a decade but he was just like all these like ridiculous stories always follow him I was just reading now or read more of it next week but Parker breaks are not as long as it used to be I can usually read a full article but not not right now but I hi I was reading something in the in New York times magazine a profile on Derek bell so what he did is he kept his is fifty eight foot sea ray eight hundred and he had all his stuff from Tampa on there he brought to New York and he was still living on it in April and take it we kept it in the Hudson and he used to commute to shake it up in the summer how big was the boat fifty eight foot sea ray I'm it's a big boat I mean you know it's a big it's all about no I know I know it's a really big part but just him living on a boat and commuting from the holds him over to queens in Shea Stadium and then he would tie it up get off and go play a baseball game is just absolutely amazing so anyway that memories of Derrick bell it made me smile today all right eight seven seven three three seven sixty six sixty six the number to join the show to go out to amity ville and welcoming Scott Hey Scott what's happening today not much got a bill in it's got so it's only with the malicious every totally reminds me of the old like Chris Farley show like you know grade B. like let's say you don't really like governor Cuomo allegedly called the Jerry remember I got you run the numbers don't let's talk about that yeah it's awesome yeah that was awesome he would answer questions and then the other hit you so right about that the other thing you would do Scott was when he would mess something up and then you go also stupid so stupid hard hitting his head all right wonderful we got to keep my garments upon the couple weeks ago and I was still over and I kind of shut down and and thankfully a of the five point a resume that's what I actually got a job but now I'm going grocery store the grocery store the distribution up trying to get people to get out of the frying pan in the private thank you guys keep me laughing everyday and I stay safe and try out their voice absolutely you to Scott and and best of luck to you yeah that's that's something I mean there's definitely if you're out of work there's jobs to be had right now for these jobs as he mentioned I mean it's a perfect phrase out of the frying pan into the fire I use some of these jobs you have to go out there and put yourself at risk whether supermarket or delivery stop or whatever it is so if people have to make that choice but there are you know these places that are hiring that's for sure there's a lot of places that are not that they're certain industries in certain businesses we talked about former that are are doing really well right now yeah there there there are and you know not not all the economy is shut down I I and I understand why people would want the whole thing shut down and and be even more aggressive than we are but you know we're living in the middle of it right so the US in California are really being hit hard right now as we speak so you know we we feel a different set of anxiety and stress and pressure here then some other people around our country do and they're not always here a number of people comparing us to South Korea we need to do with South Korea does we need to do this well South Korea is a much smaller country both geographically and and also population wise and like I would say it's more of a homogeneous I was a population that our population and you know we're we're so diverse were so different and you know we tend to live on top of each other here in New York one of the reasons why we're dealing with as many problems as we are that in the public transportation system and a lot of front line people that have to be exposed like the NYPD and FDNY so it's a totally different set of circumstances here then it may be somewhere else and and I do think for the most part the politicians you know I I give them the pluses in terms of how they're handling this this goes from the federal government all the way to the state government maybe not the city government but I would say that for the most part everybody's doing their job but if there are portions of this got conned me that are just exploding and and I would probably say the supermarkets probably are leading the way right now with the amount of things that are gone on over the last two months and will continue to go on for the next couple of months and I know that our buddy Joe G. who does have a couple of supermarket three or four supermarkets out in the Hamptons has said that you know they can stock their shelves and they have to restock them every night and it's almost as if he's like in the middle of August and we're only in April so you know he he is seeing it out in the Hamptons and I know many are seeing it all across Long Island just how scared some of the supplies or James in north Arlington New Jersey and now on the families of James okay what washed up or say it's hard to believe that you guys did that hockey game there does a special center it's been almost a month I mean it's actually unbelievable how fast time goes and we're not on this this problem but what you can recycle I've been in the role without press coverage of boomers right I'm a witch she reminds me it's like how it was always you want every autumn so you'll get someone like I was at the Bridgeport microphone James he's a team guy I got I had a woman come upon the interchange fort and one thing we don't want what we talked about his great places they have to have that team concept I mean you guys can call seven I mean guys do it all well I appreciate that I I just you know from my own personal experience and and watching these players over the last twenty five years since I've been out of the league you know there are there more buttoned up than we ever were when we were flying I can tell you that it's just simply because they have to be more careful with the way that they carry themselves of what they say because of all the social media scrutiny that they're dealing with these days but there are still ways of doing things and going on the right way and when you're it's all about you know tolerance of productivity and you'll tolerate the nonsense as long as the guys productive events Antonio brown is probably the the the poster child for that in in the sense that you know a great football player a dynamic football player a football player who changes the game when he's on the field but because of the antics and because of all the nonsense that's around him nobody wants to touch him he's radioactive right now I'm not saying that cam Newton as radio active I'm just saying that for the Carolina Panthers it wore itself out he wore it out he was injured there was a lot of questions about him it's all about him it's not about the team and the one thing I will say that I appreciate more so than anything else about the attributes that both Tom Brady and drew Brees bring to their football teams is that there's no drama around them at least one time for twenty years under bill Belichick shell does he go and dealt with all the nonsense that he had a deal with behind the scenes that we never saw any never publicly complained about any of it the same thing I can say for drew Brees with Sean Payton never complains about anything they just go about their business they lead by example they're paying a lot of money to lead by example and they do that and there are there are some other quarterbacks out there that are getting paid a lot of money that don't lead by example and I I think that you know more more you'll see guys that are going to be let loose part from their teams if they're not winning because they don't want to deal with all the drama that's surrounding them so that's where I'm coming from from cam Newton and the Carolina Panthers broken up relationship yeah I don't see as much drama I am not saying that he's drew Brees or Tom Brady or dak Prescott or any of these guys that is not yours just basically the face of the franchise and and not bring any sort of waves to the team but I don't see as much drama there but the biggest issue I would have with campuses health I mean that's you know I know these press conferences are crazy and he's got the scars is going to have to do that the sunglasses I know that's not much but yeah I just didn't see as much drama I like I there's so many other players in the NFL and pro sports not just the NFL in pro sports I could point to that it brought a lot more drama and negative news to their team without having it nearly the amount of such success on a campaign ad you know the Carolina Panthers for the most part off the field cameras been great he's been a part of the community down there is raised a lot of money he's given a lot of money away.

Derrick bell Mets Derek bell Toronto Blue Jays Joe Carter