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14 Burst results for "Dera Lynn"

"dera lynn" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"dera lynn" Discussed on Worldly

"For some reason despite them having the best Eurovision entry of sometime. Oh, my favorite. He seems not to believe that it's an America's interests to pledge to defend small countries, especially former Soviet Sates that Russia might consider a part of its fear of influence, and so he could possibly put up a stink in congress later this year when they have to approve north Macedonia entry NATO, right and just to be somewhat fair here. There is an argument even among American scholars say look NATO is a bit obsolete. But more importantly, if you want to expand the alliance members, you have to know that you're just going to piss off Russia, more and more and more and more. And that that may actually be counterproductive to American interests there others, of course, would say, no, this is actually strengthens us because it strengthens the transatlantic alliance, and it makes a stronger as we combat rush and other forces. And of course, it shows democratic values it's not only the already mad United still, right? There's not much can be done about repairing that relationship under President Vladimir Putin. So you might as well create a more United front. Europe and make it harder for Russia to make political inroads into more countries that it would want to suborn or somehow influence and being NATO member. Makes it very difficult for Russia to try to take control of your government in the way that it hasn't fast short. But if you if you are President Trump, and what you wanna do is be friends with Russia's consistently said, one of these you could almost give an olive branch out us, if you like, you know, what we won't allow Macedonia and because again, it's not really a big loss to the NATO alliance in terms of military issues. It is a big loss in terms of political and signaling issues, but you could imagine I think the chances of this is extremely low by the way, but you could imagine that Trump is like 'have lad, like here's a little Oliver Ange. Can we improve relations because we are worried that Russia and China are forming some sort of access against America. So it looked to be clear. This is pure speculation. We don't actually know what President Trump's position on this. But if Macedonia had made this name change when Obama was president. It would have been a lot easier to predict what would have ended up happening, and you know, now. Now, I just want to thank our producer for Pinkerton for doing a wonderful job making the episodes happen every week Jen who despite being out this week did a lot of super super helpful research and prep work for the road. And I want you to, you know, send her all of your well wishes, and I want to encourage you to rate subscribe and review to worldly. Wherever you your podcasts. And make sure you Email us wurley at box com. We might take some time in responding, but we will respond. We do like hearing from you. And we do factor in a lot of your thoughts into planning. Hi, I'm Matthew yglesias. I'm the host of the weeds by box in politics. People often tell you don't get lost in the weeds. But our show the weeds is a podcast for people who loved the weeds because that's where politics becomes policy. That's where the stuff that shapes your life and the lives of people and communities around you happens every Tuesday and Friday, I'm joined by a rotating cast of other voices from from box com. We've got Ezra Klein, Sarah, cliff, Dera, Lynn, Jane coast, and and together, we dig into the weeds, unimportant issues, including trade, immigration, taxes, healthcare and more. And then every week on Tuesdays. We unpack research paper of an important policy experiment, trend development, and we try to understand its implications for the country for the world to subscribe to vox, the weeds at apple podcast or wherever you're currently lists. The news today seems really Graham, and it sometimes focuses.

Russia NATO President Trump Macedonia President Vladimir Putin America Eurovision Soviet Sates Ezra Klein Matthew yglesias president Jen congress Oliver Ange Obama Graham Europe Pinkerton Lynn producer
"dera lynn" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"dera lynn" Discussed on Worldly

"So and in some of it actually, we've talked about. So the first one is like this is just a deal Taliban has one for a long time. They just may wanna make a deal and end the war the US at the end of the day of the Taliban wants, which is control over the military forces that are backing the Afghan government. And if the US leaves NATO probably will follow. So we do have a big card to play debate car to play these negotiations. A second one is that just we have seen the Taliban. Moderate there. Chances in the past even if temporarily, so for example, there have been instances where like the Taliban will burn down village. And then some local say, hey, you know, guys like that may be a step too far, and they kind of go, okay, we won't do that again, and it sort of pushed back and a famous example is from last summer where basically at the behalf to the Afghan government. They were like just have three days of no fighting and that happened like the Taliban stop fighting for days, which showed the men's control still has over its fighters. That's a very good sign when it comes to these kinds of negotiations. And then finally, the Taliban is seems to be coming to a realization that it knows that can't govern of ghanistan like a used to write the community would just be against it. And so it might be willing to make some sort of deal where doesn't get the grand prize. But a pretty big one that's not necessarily very palatable. Right. When we put all those things together. But this seems like we're in a rail of best bad option. It's just difficult to tell how serious that kind of signaling is when they have again, a tremendous incentive to. Symbol and have frequently said time is on their side. So they could be talking to western analysts and observers and reporters telling them, we're willing to compromise. They could signal through things like these three day breaks that they're actually willing to compromise. When in reality on comes to the big issues that are not and they can win militarily if the US and NATO get out and they won't come back in that could be their calculation, and they could be lying all of us. The question is how much trust can we put into the reporting and the expert analyses based on talking to Taliban people, and it's it's tough to say, it's just sometimes you may have to take a leap of faith in governance. And I think that's where we're at right? When we've heard from cellmate Khalilzad kind of say and the State Department who I've talked to about this look nothing is agreed to until everything's agreed to. So I think everyone is aware that this is just the very initial stages, but to to be clear like this is the furthest we've gotten in nearly twenty years, right? So yeah. Yeah. To certain extent. But like, let's be very cautious with up. So we're take a break. And when we come back, we're gonna talk about a country that literally changed its name to get into NATO. Hi, I'm Matthew yglesias. I'm the host of the weeds by box in politics. People often tell you don't get lost in the weeds. But our show the weeds is a podcast for people who love the beads because that's where politics becomes policy. That's where the stuff that shapes your life and the lives of the people and communities around you happens every Tuesday and Friday, I'm joined by a rotating cast of other voices from from FOX com. We've got Ezra Klein, Sarah, cliff, Dera, Lynn, Jane coast, and and together, we dig into the weeds important issues, including trade, immigration, taxes, healthcare and more. And then every week on Tuesdays. We unpack a research paper of an important policy experiment trend development. We try to understand its implications for the country for the world. Subscribe to vox is the weeds at apple podcast or wherever you're currently listening. Welcome back. Now, we're gonna talk about a country that went to incredible lengths to join NATO, and that country is Macedonia or should I say north Macedonia 'cause that's their new name..

Taliban NATO US Macedonia Afghan government Matthew yglesias State Department Ezra Klein FOX Lynn Sarah twenty years three days three day
"dera lynn" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"dera lynn" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Replace he is peer today with Dera Lynn and Alex making his we'd state you Alex's. Joining us from the worldly podcast, the farm pod. He covers national security and military issues, and we are doing a strategic redeployment of our resource. Yes. This surge say there's a surge they're dealing with an upcoming on rush of news. And so we are preparing. Yes, news of an unconventional variety. Now. If you listen to yesterday's episode. You will know that the weeds did its due diligence as instructed by George Soros and others did not get distracted talked about healthcare talked about the pre existing conditions. But today, I'm feeling a little a little distracted. The president tweeted this morning that the caravans are made up of some very tough fighters and people. They fought back hard and viciously against Mexico at northern border before breaking through. Mexican soldiers were hurt were unable unwilling to stop caravan should stop them before they reach our border. But won't our military is being mobilized at the southern border many more troops coming. We will not let these caravans which are also made some very bad thugs gang members into the US. Our border is sacred must come in legally turn around exclamation point. So I think there's a there's a picture being painted here that there is a group of. I don't know tough fighters who have defeated the Mexican army, and that we need to send troops on an emergency basis to sort of turn back and Alex. This is your field that what is actually happening as the military deploys to the southern border. Sure. So it's the best kind of way to think about it is the pre-positioning, right? So in case this like white Walker level thread shows up as it's being portrayed. The military will be in in relations or bases in Texas. There's own elsewhere. And they will just kind of be there ready to go on the chance that the caravan shows up, and we're talking about right now, it's five thousand two hundred thirty nine or so troops are no more than that. But basically, you'll see a mix of national guard active duty troops in the whole point of this. In theory, is the fact that they're actually there should deter this caravan from coming because they'll also be able to kind of use lethal forces the insinuation. But no they can't right because that's like those are the rules of engagement. So they're really just kinda hanging out in helping patrol agents at the end of the day. Okay. So I do have a question about this. Because you know, this is something that the two of us have explained to the public a bunch. You know when the national guard gut sent in April. Yes, posit Comitatus makes it really clear that you don't get to do domestic law enforcement as a branch of the US military. However, my understanding is that the order from secretary of defense Mattis involves a clause about there's an expectation that people will be engaging with migrants and protesters, and that is what throws me because it does kind of seem that while the primary purpose is this kind of mission support backfill role to allow border agents to be doing line enforcement at the border rather than having to do both line enforcement and paperwork, and engineering and all that kind of thing that they're also kind of building in a possible. Ability that some kind of crowd control might be needed. So my understanding of that is because it is a title ten authorisation mean that these forces are active duty, they are under the department offense with they're allowed to do is if they come into contact with a mob of sorts that they can defend themselves. They are armed. They can push back if needed, but they're not encouraged to kind of go out and stop and destroy right? They're not dropping bombs or not shooting people. They are there and they have rules of engagement. There. Are these rules that do exist and their standardize across the board for this kind of situation. So if the need arises and this caravan decides to storm the gates, then yes, the military could engage if necessary, of course, I think they would do everything short of shooting until they had to wait. Let's let's. Posse comitatus. This is a nineteenth century law, and it bars the use of the.

Alex US Mexican army George Soros Dera Lynn Mexico Texas Mattis president Comitatus secretary
"dera lynn" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"dera lynn" Discussed on Worldly

"Hello and welcome to worldly. It's me Beecham. Here's usual with word. Jen millions is on a richly earned vacation, but we've got the excellence Dera Lynn from the weeds with us. Hello, Alexandra, you fade there. So and you to listeners Hello to you guys, too. So today we're going to talk about Trump's deals. He loves deals, but when he was running for president, he liked to tear down the agreements that the United States had made with other countries like during this debate with Hillary Clinton, but we have horrible deals. Our jobs are being taken out by the deal that her husband signed NAFTA one of the worst ever. But in the past two years, we've seen Trump try to make deals like his own version of an actual deal. And there's a sort of template that's emerged in his negotiations. The president gets in other country to agree to something minor. He then claims on Twitter or in some PR availability that he solve the entire problem. And then his aides have to clean up the obvious mess that the situation creates. And we saw this a lot in the past week because there was big deal news on two fronts, the nuclear negotiations with North Korea and conversations with Mexico and Canada about NAFTA this week will dig into how the revelations on each of those issues illustrates the real art of the. Trump deal Blitzer with North Korea, Alex. You kick us off with what the news this week actually was. Sure. So it turns out based on reporting that I did, I guess you did do I did I, you know, it's all blurred. Now it turns out that Trump told North Korean leader, Kim Jong that he would sign what's called a peace declaration soon after their Singapore summit in June, a peace declaration is affected Lee where the US North Korea and maybe other countries join in and say, the Korean war is over right. The war still continued since fighting ended in nineteen Fifty-three. And by that you mean it hasn't been undeclared, right? Not actually fighting North Korea. We have agreed to technically in the war yet, correct. But you'll still see at the demilitarized zone, the inter-korean border South Korea, North Korean troops are still there. There's a weapons of mass. I mean, it still looks like a Cold War possibly turning hot at some point. But no, there've been no real warlike moments since nineteen fifty three. And so what this. Declaration would do is make it so North Korea feel safer, right? And then might be willing to give up some of its nuclear weapons in declare part of its nuclear arsenal a, which is something that the United States once in order to kind of get even more concessions. So it would start a longer cycle. So the question there is whether that's actually going to happen given that we didn't know anything about it until Mr.. Alex ward reported it, you know there wasn't like a big Trump like, yes, we are ending the Korean war. So why haven't we seen that kind of revelation from Trump that the Korean war is over? He's kind of part of the reason I follow this is because he's, he's insinuated that something like this had happened before in public comments. We made these secret deals that may lead to peace and we'll get there and so north rewatch for like we wanted what that is. But part of the reason he hasn't done it yet is there's a larger worry which is if we signed this deal to things might happen. One North Korea may ask us to remove our troops out Korea which would therefore weaken our relationship with. South Korea, a staunch ally. And then two is rightfully North Korea has cheated on past deals before and has lied about nuclear negotiations. And so what the US wants is a large up from payment, so to speak before the US decides, hey, everything's cool with North Korea and that large up payment is show us where you are, where your missiles Arbor, all your facilities are allow inspectors, cetera. Trump wasn't aware of any of these important policy details when he agreed. Right, correct. North Korea, severally Trump did not himself say we will do this. If you do x, y, and z Trump saw this as an easy thing he could offer. Yeah, we're just signing away. Peace agreement who cares..

Trump North Korea South Korea United States NAFTA president Beecham Dera Lynn Alexandra Jen Twitter Hillary Clinton Alex ward Kim Jong
"dera lynn" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"dera lynn" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Thing on. Welcome to another episode of the weeds box media podcast network. Matthew yglesias here with Jane Costa and Dera Lynn, and we are going to talk about scandals got some big, some big Trump scandals this week, and conveniently, the president in his effort to wriggle out of the encroaching tentacles of scandal is sort of raising some policy issues about how the criminal Justice system works. Perhaps unprincipled way driven more by his own needs than by systematic thinking about what the country needs, but you know, good jumping off point as any week by week. There is another aspect of the criminal Justice system that like America's getting introduced to, which actually strikes me as much more systematic way to deal with things like law and order where you know, it's the variations of the facts of the case. I think that that this has been a more educational reality show. Then many of the reality shows that we get on the legal system. However, this. I feel a little bit as if someone committed arson and via that arson, you learned a lot about housing regulations. Oh, I had no idea what it was allowed start with the basics. So what happened here? We had an amazing split-screen day in which simultaneously at a federal courthouse in Alexandria. Paul Manafort is found guilty on eight of the charges against him. We later learned that the sort of hung jury on the other counts. It was all one single holdout juror who did an interesting interview after the fact Mer? She talked about being a Trump supporter and really wanting it to be the case that metaphor was innocent, but he was just really guilty of these eight other things. But you know the fact that it was eleven to one and the other charges underscores the fact that the government's odds retrial are not terrible. He so he's under additional legal pressure, right? There's another trial in Washington, D, C, coming out, it shows to be said he appeared to have. Drawn a fairly sympathetic judge in this case. So again, I mean his odds of being found guilty of more stuff are kind of fairly high, and everyone is waiting to see face with all this pressure faced with the conviction faced with the possibility of a retrial facing the necessity of a second trial is like, will Manafort try to make a deal. And then in New York, Michael Kohn, the subject of apparently our most downloaded episode ever the many scandals of Michael Kohn episode, very good episode. He pled guilty to a range of crimes most of which relate to his taxi business and some fraudulent loan applications, tax malfeasance, stuff like that. But the did include two counts of campaign finance violations, which was how we originally sort of got Michael Kohn in the news..

Michael Kohn Paul Manafort president Dera Lynn arson Matthew yglesias Trump America Alexandria Washington Jane Costa New York
"dera lynn" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"dera lynn" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Hello, welcome to another episode of the weeds vox media podcast network here today with Julia blues and Brian Resnick from the science team as well as Dera. Lynn. It has definitely been like a number of days since we last recorded a podcast. Yes, definitely much time has passed were not just banking episodes. I'm on evergreen topics while amazingly both, Matt, and I are recording this podcast despite the fact that both of us are on vacation right now. Yes, it's it's Moraga. No. So we have been talking about broaching this subject for a while because you know on the weeds, we often talk about different kinds of studies and papers and things and social science. We get a lot of sort of interesting empirical results that you know, smart people kind of cook up with different experimental designs and we talk about them. And then we kind of just like move on. We like have good discussion about like what's true, and then. Just kind of dropped the subject. And I guess this turns out to be like not great scientific practice today's out. Oftentimes things are discovered in hamic studies. And then when people look back is maybe not true, begin undiscovered, right? And this is getting like asterisk asterisk asterisk, tag fake news, fake science, do fake news. I mean, this is what's called replication, right? It's like I do an experiment and say, have a result and in theory like you should go be able to do it and get the same reproduce the result. It's a real thing that exists in the world and not just like thing that I observed in the past tense during this one time that Iran my study using this, these particular set of methods on a particular group of people. Yeah, you wanna try to see whether you can reproduce the findings or not, and that's kind of, you know. One of the bedrock ideas, the scientific method that you don't just run a study. Once you try to run it multiple times in different people at in different settings and see whether the results reproduce as theirs. That there is a replication crisis. I have heard that phrase. Yeah, you're probably into it a little what that might mean. But like can expect like how how how did we, if this is one of the bedrock principles of the scientific method? Like is Julia was saying, how did we get to a point where the scientific community has like suddenly started, you know, like decided that it has a problem here. I think we're hearing about today. A lot of it. You know, we're hearing about the power pose studies not reproducing or the marshmallow test, which Bryan his as written so nicely about recently. But a lot of a lot of what we think about now is replication crisis like it has its origins in discussions that have been happening for decades in medicine. So it kind of hit the mainstream more recently. But like you know, when eighties nineties people in the medical community were talking about how you know you really can't trust the result of single.

Julia blues vox media Moraga Lynn Brian Resnick Matt Iran Bryan his
"dera lynn" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"dera lynn" Discussed on Pod Save America

"Last question for you. You've got a story out today about the president's travel ban in about a new lawsuit, alleging that admits the administration's waiver system for worthy families. Looking to come into the United States is essentially a sham who are the families who filed the suit and what are they saying happened here. So this is about a few dozen people in it's a mix of US citizens and permanent residents who are petitioning for family members. Some of whom are living in the US. Some of whom are actually like one a US citizen. I talked to his has now moved to Djibouti to be with his wife because his wife can't be brought to the US because she's Yemeni on. So he's been living with her. Their son was born there. They're sons a US citizen by birth, but he's never been to the US and they're just kind of borrowing money from friends in waiting to come back over. There are some people in the case who are who should be should have been able to come over on the investor visa. They've invested tens of thousands of dollars in US businesses. They are. Helping to manage the businesses, but they can't come over to do it because they are from, you know, affected countries, Iran, Libya Somalia, Sudan, Syria, new Yemen is in there. I believe that one of the others is not, but I wanted to say that you have made us feel embarrassed having you on the show. Yes, no. Absolutely. It is absolutely. The worst thing that has ever happened to me in my entire public career as journalist, I will. I will justify this by saying that the criteria have changed several times. But anyway, all of these are families or people who think that they should theoretically be able to qualify for waivers because the Trump administration said that in particularly sympathetic cases where there was undue hardship to somebody or you know where the national the US national interest was to let this person into the country that they should be able to sign a waiver and let the person come in. But the people in this case, either they've just been flatly denied or they were said, yeah, you're waiver. We're considering you for a waiver. It's pending and it's been like seven months and they haven't heard anything. And because the Trump administration a has never actually created an application process for the waiver. They just say, oh, at your visa interview, the consular officer will figure out if you deserve a waiver or not. And be they've never defined. The actual standards are and how say not being a threat to national security is different in a waiver case than the fact that they're justifying the travel ban by saying this country doesn't provide us with enough information to say whether anyone is national security. There are lots of unanswered questions about the process. And so the hope with this lawsuit is that rather than kind of striking down the travel ban entirely like the last round of litigation was about that this will, you know, go through discovery and force the government to actually lay out here is what we were thinking. When we put together this process here is how it actually works. And if they can't answer that question to judge the satisfaction, you know, have the judge order them to put together the process that they say exists now, right? I have a feeling that what they were thinking was nothing and they'll have to be ordered to do is begin thinking. Maybe this policy wasn't really connected to national security, but that's just a guess malevolence and incompetence all the way down. Darah. Thank you so much for joining us. We really appreciate it, and thanks for all the great reporting you're doing out there. Thank you team. That's our pod for today. Thanks to Dera Lynn to for joining us and on Thursday. I will be on vacation. Hami will still be on his honeymoon, and so it's Jetsons Flintstones. John Lova tan five for coming to a pod near you. It's gonna be. It's gonna be great, Dan, and I are gonna catch up to find out what his last name is. I'm very excited. We'll see..

United States Trump administration Djibouti president undue hardship Hami John Lova Dera Lynn Dan officer Yemen Iran Libya Somalia Sudan Syria seven months
"dera lynn" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"dera lynn" Discussed on Pod Save America

"Last question for you. You've got a story out today about the president's travel ban in about a new lawsuit, alleging that admits the administration's waiver system for worthy families. Looking to come into the United States is essentially a sham who are the families who filed the suit and what are they saying happened here. So this is about a few dozen people in it's a mix of US citizens and permanent residents who are petitioning for family members. Some of whom are living in the US. Some of whom are actually like one a US citizen. I talked to his has now moved to Djibouti to be with his wife because his wife can't be brought to the US because she's Yemeni on. So he's been living with her. Their son was born there. They're sons a US citizen by birth, but he's never been to the US and they're just kind of borrowing money from friends in waiting to come back over. There are some people in the case who are who should be should have been able to come over on the investor visa. They've invested tens of thousands of dollars in US businesses. They are. Helping to manage the businesses, but they can't come over to do it because they are from, you know, affected countries, Iran, Libya Somalia, Sudan, Syria, new Yemen is in there. I believe that one of the others is not, but I wanted to say that you have made us feel embarrassed having you on the show. Yes, no. Absolutely. It is absolutely. The worst thing that has ever happened to me in my entire public career as journalist, I will. I will justify this by saying that the criteria have changed several times. But anyway, all of these are families or people who think that they should theoretically be able to qualify for waivers because the Trump administration said that in particularly sympathetic cases where there was undue hardship to somebody or you know where the national the US national interest was to let this person into the country that they should be able to sign a waiver and let the person come in. But the people in this case, either they've just been flatly denied or they were said, yeah, you're waiver. We're considering you for a waiver. It's pending and it's been like seven months and they haven't heard anything. And because the Trump administration a has never actually created an application process for the waiver. They just say, oh, at your visa interview, the consular officer will figure out if you deserve a waiver or not. And be they've never defined. The actual standards are and how say not being a threat to national security is different in a waiver case than the fact that they're justifying the travel ban by saying this country doesn't provide us with enough information to say whether anyone is national security. There are lots of unanswered questions about the process. And so the hope with this lawsuit is that rather than kind of striking down the travel ban entirely like the last round of litigation was about that this will, you know, go through discovery and force the government to actually lay out here is what we were thinking. When we put together this process here is how it actually works. And if they can't answer that question to judge the satisfaction, you know, have the judge order them to put together the process that they say exists now, right? I have a feeling that what they were thinking was nothing and they'll have to be ordered to do is begin thinking. Maybe this policy wasn't really connected to national security, but that's just a guess malevolence and incompetence all the way down. Darah. Thank you so much for joining us. We really appreciate it, and thanks for all the great reporting you're doing out there. Thank you team. That's our pod for today. Thanks to Dera Lynn to for joining us and on Thursday. I will be on vacation. Hami will still be on his honeymoon, and so it's Jetsons Flintstones. John Lova tan five for coming to a pod near you. It's gonna be. It's gonna be great, Dan, and I are gonna catch up to find out what his last name is. I'm very excited. We'll see..

United States Trump administration Djibouti president undue hardship Hami John Lova Dera Lynn Dan officer Yemen Iran Libya Somalia Sudan Syria seven months
"dera lynn" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"dera lynn" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Two minutes on the board on the clock who who today's episode of today explained is brought to you by mattress firm, your friendly neighborhood mattress store. You can go to mattress firm dot com slash podcast and save ten percent off your next mattress. Using the discount code podcast, ten. During Barack Obama's presidency. The United States made it easier to come and live here by pleading asylum, especially if you're coming to America to escape domestic abuse or gang violence. Since taking office, Donald Trump has been making it harder to get asylum, and his attorney general Jeff Sessions took another big step in that direction on Monday. The United States will no longer grant asylum to victims of domestic abuse or gang violence. In most cases. Attorney general Jeff Sessions decision reverses a twenty fourteen US policy. He says that policy has been applied to broadly, and that quote, the asylum statute does not provide redress for all misfortune sessions. Overruled a case from two thousand fourteen from the board of immigration appeals called the matter of AB and in the process overturned a twenty fourteen precedent and a bunch of other unspecified precedents as well. All with the intention of making it harder for domestic violence victims and victims of gang violence to seek asylum claims in the United States. Dera Lynn reports on immigration bucks. He didn't straight up say you will not be eligible to apply for asylum in the United States. If you're a domestic violence survivor getting violence or viper, what he did was he tightened legal terms under existing asylum law that those groups had been using. But it also wasn't instruction to immigration judges and to the screening officers at. The border who interview people to see whether they even meet the threshold to make asylum claims that they should be much more restrictive in granting these cases. What was the case that sessions ruled on this case of a b? What is that about? This is a woman from El Salvador who is subject to domestic abuse from her husband. The woman is referred to by our initials, Ms. AB. The kind of summary of the case by some of the lawyers who have argued, it says that he beaten raped MS AB. So many times that she lost count. He also frequently threatened to kill her often brandishing a loaded gun or a knife MS Abie's husband was violent even during her pregnancies on one occasion threatening to hang her with a rope from the roof of their house. She sought protection from the Salvador and authorities, but they were unable or unwilling to protect her. This kind of raises two separate questions and asylum law. One of them is the question of, you know, does being a victim of domestic violence mean you're in a particular social group, and the other one is because it's not the government itself. It's doing this to you is the government essentially condoning this because persecution is usually defined as being something the government does. So the standard has been that if the government is unwilling or unable to protect you that that's the basis for an asylum claim. That's also kind of getting tightened sessions as saying that just because the government doesn't answer your call for help doesn't mean they are okay with what's happening and that you have to show that the government is essentially condoning what's going on. These are both really hard questions of asylum law, right? Like the kind of common sense understanding of asylum is if someone's afraid that they're going to die, we should let them in. That's not what the actual text of the law says. The text of the law says that. There's more to persecution than just being afraid that it has to be, you know, this deliberate targeting based on something in particular. And so these really do get into questions of in countries that can don'- gender-based violence or in countries where gang violence is so widespread that it's extremely difficult to be an adolescent boy and not be in a gang. At what point does that turn into a matter of persecution. And who is he sort of targeting here? It sounds like there's lots of cases from Central America. Is this something that will exclusively affect central Americans? Not exclusively, but largely most of the people who are coming to the US border and seeking asylum right now are central Americans where President Trump and Jeff Sessions coming from how many people are actually coming to the United States and trying to get asylum. So the numbers that the administration uses are that in two thousand nine homeland security conducted more than five thousand credible fear reviews by twenty sixteen that number had increased ninety four thousand. They came to the US told officials that they had a credible fear of persecution and we're allowed to pursue asylum claim. The administration kind of frames it as evidence. That too many people are passing their initial interviews that if there is such a huge change, it must. I mean that we're being too generous and that clearly some people must be taken advantage of the system and that means we need to change it. Credible fear process was intended to be a lifeline for persons facing serious persecution, but it is become an easy ticket to illegal entry into the United States.

United States Jeff Sessions government President Trump Barack Obama attorney El Salvador America MS Abie Central America Salvador Dera Lynn Ms. AB Two minutes ten percent
"dera lynn" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"dera lynn" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

matthew yglesias dera lynn officer new york times jane ben shapiro jordan peterson bari weiss christina hoff
"dera lynn" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"dera lynn" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Hello welcome to another episode of the weeds on the box media podcast network i'm matthew yglesias today joined by at dera lynn and the great jane coast him and at we would like to talk about some issues that are in the air around political correctness and what people feel they can't say and the idea that may be a smug and or intolerant progressives are causing radicalization of conservatives but if you are if you were extremely online as i am and many of us here at the officer i think a starting point for a lot of this was a a recent bari weiss article in the new york times about which she called the intellectual dark web which is a provocative but i think sort of grandiose term and jane can you like what is dark web so there's like the actual web is where you get like illicit child get elicited child porn and like try to order hits on people but this is this is not that dark web and honestly i really enjoyed a moment in my head in which the two intersected and you had hilarious moment which jordan peterson tries to buy like machine guns but that's not what this is so the quote unquote intellectual dark web is supposed to be these group of people who are having the conversations that no one else will have about really terrifying subjects and it includes people who consider themselves more on the rate like ben shapiro and people who think of themselves as being more on the left there couple of other figures i think jordan peterson would probably consider himself he's very concerned about the left but i don't think he considers himself conservative disastrously let's see christina hoff sommers i believe and a couple of other people and it's all has to do with people who are willing to say terrifying things like feminism is bad.

matthew yglesias dera lynn officer new york times jane ben shapiro jordan peterson bari weiss christina hoff
Vox's The Weeds talk about the Intellectual Dark Web

Vox's The Weeds

02:00 min | 2 years ago

Vox's The Weeds talk about the Intellectual Dark Web

Matthew Yglesias Dera Lynn Officer New York Times Jane Ben Shapiro Jordan Peterson Bari Weiss Christina Hoff
"dera lynn" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"dera lynn" Discussed on Worldly

"Walk the worldly boxes guide to the most important stores in the world part of ox media podcast network jen is out so is that are joined by friend dera lynn the weeds there hello so i'm monday amanda alec munc in plowed his van into a crowd of pedestrians in downtown toronto he killed ten and wounded dozens more and canadian law enforcement found a facebook post he wrote just before the attack it called for revolution and appraise the mass murderer he saw an inspiration but here's the thing missing didn't belonged isis he wasn't praising osama bin laden he was member of something else entirely and online subculture called incell short for involuntarily celebrate the man he praised elliot rodger had killed six women in california in two thousand fourteen and wrote a long antiwoman manifesto today we're gonna talk about what insult is what insult isn't and whether we need to change how we think about terrorism so zack accu of very good very long piece about in cell walkers through it's an internet subculture but very specific kind of internet subculture right so insult people hang out on a variety of different places right there they've dedicated sub retz called brain cells they have a specialized part of four chan which is like a super trolley cruel internet website the end of their own websites like in cells that emmy so they talk to each other and what unites them as the name suggests is a shared sense of frustration and alienate with not being able to have sex not be able to convince women to have sex with these are virtually all heterosexual males with a few exceptions and for some of them this is kind of like a self help group it's just they're expressing deep sadness alienating but for others of them kernels into this kind of deep misogyny and angry resentment at the rest of.

jen amanda alec munc elliot rodger california ox media dera lynn toronto facebook osama bin laden zack accu
"dera lynn" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"dera lynn" Discussed on Planet Money

"Of kids themselves having grown up in the us has been more comfortable being out as unauthorized emigrants more comfortable standing up for themselves more comfortable interacting with american institutions then say their parents were that is a dera lindh she's a reporter for box and she's done a lot of really great reporting on this topic we decided bring thera odd because she wrote this great historical view of of dhaka an immigration as it affects these young people it really pointed out that the whole reason this was a problem in the first place was because of congress because of a string of unintended consequences that came from changes in immigration policy so ninety ninety six congress mentor bill clinton they're in a mood to be tough on crime tough on immigration so they pass this law which makes it a lot harder to cross the mexican border yeah you know more surveillance more officers patrolling the sort of thing it was meant to reduce undocumented immigration but dera lynn says when you build a wall you don't keep people out you keep people in three dare explains it is like this for decades people mostly men flowed back and forth between mexico and the united states they came for work and then when the work was over when they had enough money they would go back the families in mexico when congress locked down the borders people still came over what was different was that it became too dangerous to come and go and go back and forth so when undocumented immigrants when men came here to work they stayed and they brought their family they brought their young kids with them so what you end up having is a population of people who are.

reporter congress bill clinton mexico united states dhaka dera lynn