35 Burst results for "Deputy Editor"

A Mexican Belonging

Latino Rebels Radio

05:36 min | 3 weeks ago

A Mexican Belonging

"I get really excited when i have former contributors go and do great things and i wouldn't say this guesses a former contributor because i think we've had some of his writings within the last year. He's in dallas. Do you want to say hello to everyone. Say who you are. hello. I'm on scientists. I'm a professor of history. I was hoping you weren't saying former rebels. I'm still writing for you. Guys i totally was like former not. You still contribute. So you are a professor history. At mountain view college in dallas. You are the author of homeland which is an intellectual study of ethnic mexican belonging. Since one thousand nine hundred. How geeky is that it is. It is pretty geeky but i think it can be interesting. Sometimes i've i've made some revisions to try to get folks to read it all right now. Listen let's get a couple of things out of the way. You are a contributor to latino rebels. You have written for latino usa. I've known you at least online for like who five six years. You've written some great pieces. You have the best twitter handle ever first world chicano. And you really touched me. When i read the introduction of acknowledgments your family raises you right like you thanked everyone and then you thanked me so i wanna thank you for thanking me in your book. It was a nice little surprise. No i definitely wanted to shout you. Julio and hector out hector salamo. Who was a deputy editor for latino rebels. Yeah i heard. You're going to be on the latin ish podcast so i'm already plugging latin is for him. Yeah shamelessly fell promoted. Yup but i had gotten out of graduate school. You know it kind of is now. And i just didn't know what i wanted to do. Things are tough. I wasn't ready to go back to revision. And then i started writing. And you guys didn't care if i came out of harvard or northwesterners something. Oh hell no yeah you can write come right for us and i was like okay and yeah tell us over miami of how powerful writing can be and also helped me as a writer because i stripped a lot of the academic jargon stuff out of this book is an editor publisher before you talk about the book that makes me super happy because when you started pitching me and pitching hector and then. That was one of the things that i told you. It's like just don't be an academic. Bu and you wrote some fantastic pieces and you've also written an amazing book. It's really really accessible and it speaks to. I think a theme that i wouldn't say it's controversial but it is. How do you begin to frame your experiences for this book that drew you to documenting like ethnic mexican and chicano history in this way like what drove you when you write a book you kind of write about yourself even if it is a history and so a lot of became out of family history personal experiences and and one of my favorite stories that i heard growing up was my mom and her family. They've migrated from quiet and they moved help. Paso anna late sixty s in my grandfather used to pick up my mom when she was a little girl and he used to tell her. I heat the mood noblet glass near less by your picking her up and says oh my little girl. You know you're going to be. You're gonna be without a voice because you don't speak english or spanish and that's and to worry about his family gonna belong right. Did he make the right choice into. It was kind of rooted in a family story like that. My dad used to joke. Us from el paso's well used to joke. He didn't know he was mexican till they join the airforce right because they'll pass everyone's mexican mexican americans everyone's the same and then he goes off to the air force. Suddenly he's different. Wow yeah that's a really good way of looking at it. These family stories. You know you get the then growing up to right when i write about the us in the chest these mexicans who have lost their mexican answer. These wannabe americans right. That kind of touched home of folks as you know like you're a little bit of a virtual not there those feelings the wondering about belonging which again i don't think are isolated just to me. I think that's why i've gotten a few tweets folks like. Hey my family this. Yeah this is my story. This is my family. Yeah and so. That's where the idea about belonging came out of end. I thought a lot of different areas right Politics and poetry and so belonging with the concept with an idea but let me look at all the things that i actually want to look at right. 'cause i i like reading poetry like reading literature. I also like politics and policy. This concept helped me look at all those things. And i think kind of unique way yes so talking about belonging. It's probably not the same experience. But it kind of is from puerto rican perspective. Where i kind of say like you know people that live on the island versus people that live on i asked. There's always been that tension. And i was born and raised in puerto rico but now i live in the mainland. So i'm not seen as like purely puerto rican so when you talk about the divide in the early nineteen hundreds that emerged between ethnic mexicans in the us in us. Born mexicans like you mentioned the which was in the you know that type of idea. How has that evolved throughout the years. And what is your book touch upon in that case. That's really interesting with you. Be boring and then your kid. They're gonna i

Mountain View College Hector Salamo Dallas Paso Anna Noblet Julio Hector Harvard Twitter United States Miami Drew El Paso Air Force Puerto Rican Puerto Rico
Fresh update on "deputy editor" discussed on Rusted Culture Podcast

Rusted Culture Podcast

00:32 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "deputy editor" discussed on Rusted Culture Podcast

"So on cnn and msnbc this morning there's a lot of talk about how much less disinformation there is out there with. Donald trump being off his twitter platform and parlor being out of the picture. And just how much less there is out there. But it's still there. And i just wanted to take a look and show you some of the different examples of where it still exists and and then what one group is going to be doing about it namely the lincoln project but on fox news yesterday martha mccallum had dan henninger on board to discuss the inauguration. This was the point where they were walking down. I believe it was pennsylvania avenue and they were offering commentary on that and dan is the conservative commentator and the deputy editor page director at the wall street journal so have listened to what they said audit people.

Martha Mccallum Yesterday Dan Henninger Donald Trump CNN DAN Msnbc This Morning Twitter One Group Fox News Pennsylvania Avenue Street Lincoln
Answering Mail From Our Listeners

The Book Review

04:53 min | 2 months ago

Answering Mail From Our Listeners

"To any us i to answer questions from listeners. To editors many of you are familiar with tina jordan. Who is the deputy editor of the book. Review and elizabeth egan and editor at the book. Review our group text columnist and the author of a novel of her own called a window opens. Listen tina thanks so much for being here. Hi pal hi pamela. Thanks for having us all right. Let's take our very first question. It comes from ingeborg moran and she asks i'd like to know everyone's thoughts on the kindle. Has anyone become a kindle convert during kovic. She writes to us from pittsburgh pennsylvania. Alright tina ou. I will say this is a tough one for me because one thing the pandemic has meant for all of us on the books desk is that we're reading everything. Digitally and i have zero problem with an e reader. I actually use an ipad and not a candle. If say. I'm going on vacation but for constant everyday reading i will admit it has been a real drag i liz. I don't know if you feel the same way. But i cannot wait until the day when i'm only holding real books in my hands again. Tina i agree. I was actually a very early adopter of the kindle when it was first invented and i feel that it serves a purpose and has a place in my reading life but i feel like it is way more clinical than holding a physical book. You're missing the pge feel and the smell of the book. I have two very simple tips for anyone who is looking to weed into the world of e-readers one is to experiment with the font and find one. That feels most appealing to you. There are a few fonts on my kindle that makes me feel. They remind me that. I'm reading on screen and i have a couple that are more palatable than others. Here's my other tip. When i'm reading a book. I am an underlying her and appeared full folder and interactor which is a hard thing to replicate on the kindle. Even though you can highlight. So i put a post it on the back of my kindle and take notes that way. It's not quite as rewarding as doggy ring and taking notes in the margins but it does allow you to have the same vibe. All you actually raise an important point. Which is that on e-readers. You can increase the font size and for anyone who has trouble seeing tiny print for example. No one is in that age category around here tonight thinking of in my mother. I hope she's not listening. Shoot uses an ipad down loves it. You know because she can make the print big enough so that when she's reading in bed at night she doesn't have to have her glasses. You know i'm surprised. Neither of you is brought up for me. The controversial element of the raider experience. Which is the percentages rather than pages. I i feel like for me. That that's like the fitbit it's sort of both too much information and also not the right information. You know i feel like it would. It would take me down a very bad path. If i were to rely on things like percentages because i am finisher and a complete list in general and and i i do like to check things off and somehow that percentage thing i feel like i'd just become very focused on the numbers rather than what you should be focused on when you're reading which is in the words. Does that bother other view. Know it definitely bothers me and sometimes mind will say location instead of percent and it'll say location and then a number and that is baffling to me. I don't understand it. But i have learned how to use the go-to feature on mine which allows me to skip around a book and read the end before the beginning which i will admit i m prone to do. Oh i know. Don't ask but the other thing that i find problematic about an e reader as a as a reviewer who's who's reading a ton of books and kind of waiting a ton of books at once when i look at something on an easy reader reduces my recall like i can't remember the name of the author when i have a book in my hand i have almost a savant like ability to connect the title and the author and even the color of the spine forever in my in my memory i read. It is that that have shown this to be true. This it's a disadvantage for me. Because i can't remember what i've read and i can't place it in the same way which is also can be a good thing because it gives all book sort of an equal beginning in my mind.

Tina Jordan Elizabeth Egan Ingeborg Moran Tina Ou Pamela Tina Pittsburgh LIZ Pennsylvania
"deputy editor" Discussed on Journalism.co.uk podcast

Journalism.co.uk podcast

05:41 min | 2 months ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Journalism.co.uk podcast

"Aaron welcome to the journalism dot k. Podcast what's the working situation like for you. At the moment. I working situation right now. Is i have just needed a slot conversation where we're trying to figure out coverage for a major snowstorm that is about to hit the the northeast. Us potentially epic snowfall <hes>. So we're just coordinating with a metro desk in new york and the national desk in new york trying to figure out what that looks like and your here in the uk. Where where i am too. Yes i am. It's it's nearing the end of my day and the earlier part of the new york day. So i've moved on from waking up finding out. If there are any fires. I need to put out any fires at a broken out anywhere in the world that it does to cover them erin. Of course we hit stays talk about the breaking news team which mealtimes <hes> launched back in february and then of course a month later the coronas pandemic took hold of the world so foster was announced december. Things probably happened in between. Let's go retrace steps and take us through kind of the timeline of events that happened from february. Oh yeah we were. We were announced to great fanfare. I started thinking about packing up my life and moving over here and what a summer would be like in england and <hes>. Than everything shut down as as you are aware and we basically spent the summer triaging coronavirus coverage in watching the world tried to reopen and fail to reopen and then finally. There is a window <hes>. Late summer early. Fall where i and my team could all finally get here launch in earnest in october eight months after we were meant to so now. We've been here about two months and we're still kind of now. We landed and then the us election was happening. And then the vaccines started rolling out. And there's never ever heard dull moment but we are finally kind of getting our sea legs and figuring out what we look like and and how. We work so what was happening in between february in october exactly. There was a lot of learning how to be flexible to give you some background on the breaking news hub. We are sort of an evolution. An expansion of a team that still exists has existed at the times for four or five years called the express team. We are at our core. That team always has been which is fast quick twitch digital centric journalism avenir. Tynan's kind of making sure that the time on things that are trending and things that are breaking <hes>. Which are often the same thing or one turns into another. Basically that thing that is dominating. The conversation of the internet <hes>. Often it would have been expressed ascot jumped on that and so this time last year they started talking about expanding the express task kind of giving us a more resources and a larger remit within the new york times <hes>. In that kind of evolved into we all the breaking news hub and the conversation then turned toward. Okay so the breaking news hub. Existing in new york for senator would come on at six thirty in the morning. Our last editor would logoff at midnight. We had one reporter who was based in hong kong but largely. We were kind of unstaffed between midnight eastern and the next day in the us and so the plan to expand into london was to get closer to having something like twenty four seven coverage for the type of things that the expressed asking the breaking news. Hub in new york had always focused on. So let me understand this clearly. What others having a london office actually gives you that you didn't have before it gives us so many more hours in the work day. How okay we are able to have is on the world for nearly the entire day and we're constantly replenishing with fresh eyes. You'll take advantage of the times. There's a night editor on my team. In new york. Who logs off around midnight or one am when he's had a busy night and i'm up early. We overlap. I feel terrible when that happens on. But basically you know. He's he likes the entire newsroom. In new york is getting to the end of their day. they're trying to wrap up <hes>. And i come in two hours later with fresh eyes <hes>. The world looks a little bit different to me in my morning than it does to my colleagues in new york the end of the day it midnight ride and so putting a team putting my team here in london expands expands the time zones for us expand the number of working hours that we have in the day <hes>. I can start something. I can hand it off to a colleague in new york. Who's about to logon. I can awake up here. And i'll see a story. That's maybe not urgent for us to cover but i. I think that we should cover it. But i not have reporters over here. I can say right before. I got on this call with you. I was on a call with my new york colleagues who are all starving their day and i kind of ran down. Here's here's the three or four things that i saw out there. That weren't urgent. And i know you have more reporters coming on in the day. I've tree ozlem for you. Mom and then they're coming in. They're doing their own scans and kind of often finding the same stories <hes>. I love when we back each other up in like i can say i saw this over here and i think we could do this with it. And then somebody logs in at eight thirty and it was like i see that same thing and i love it. Let's do it.

new york cassie bloomberg london us Tynan new york times Aaron erin hong kong uk england Houston China
Erin McCann, deputy editor, express desk at NYT, on managing a remote breaking news team

Journalism.co.uk podcast

05:41 min | 2 months ago

Erin McCann, deputy editor, express desk at NYT, on managing a remote breaking news team

"Aaron welcome to the journalism dot k. Podcast what's the working situation like for you. At the moment. I working situation right now. Is i have just needed a slot conversation where we're trying to figure out coverage for a major snowstorm that is about to hit the the northeast. Us potentially epic snowfall So we're just coordinating with a metro desk in new york and the national desk in new york trying to figure out what that looks like and your here in the uk. Where where i am too. Yes i am. It's it's nearing the end of my day and the earlier part of the new york day. So i've moved on from waking up finding out. If there are any fires. I need to put out any fires at a broken out anywhere in the world that it does to cover them erin. Of course we hit stays talk about the breaking news team which mealtimes launched back in february and then of course a month later the coronas pandemic took hold of the world so foster was announced december. Things probably happened in between. Let's go retrace steps and take us through kind of the timeline of events that happened from february. Oh yeah we were. We were announced to great fanfare. I started thinking about packing up my life and moving over here and what a summer would be like in england and Than everything shut down as as you are aware and we basically spent the summer triaging coronavirus coverage in watching the world tried to reopen and fail to reopen and then finally. There is a window Late summer early. Fall where i and my team could all finally get here launch in earnest in october eight months after we were meant to so now. We've been here about two months and we're still kind of now. We landed and then the us election was happening. And then the vaccines started rolling out. And there's never ever heard dull moment but we are finally kind of getting our sea legs and figuring out what we look like and and how. We work so what was happening in between february in october exactly. There was a lot of learning how to be flexible to give you some background on the breaking news hub. We are sort of an evolution. An expansion of a team that still exists has existed at the times for four or five years called the express team. We are at our core. That team always has been which is fast quick twitch digital centric journalism avenir. Tynan's kind of making sure that the time on things that are trending and things that are breaking Which are often the same thing or one turns into another. Basically that thing that is dominating. The conversation of the internet Often it would have been expressed ascot jumped on that and so this time last year they started talking about expanding the express task kind of giving us a more resources and a larger remit within the new york times In that kind of evolved into we all the breaking news hub and the conversation then turned toward. Okay so the breaking news hub. Existing in new york for senator would come on at six thirty in the morning. Our last editor would logoff at midnight. We had one reporter who was based in hong kong but largely. We were kind of unstaffed between midnight eastern and the next day in the us and so the plan to expand into london was to get closer to having something like twenty four seven coverage for the type of things that the expressed asking the breaking news. Hub in new york had always focused on. So let me understand this clearly. What others having a london office actually gives you that you didn't have before it gives us so many more hours in the work day. How okay we are able to have is on the world for nearly the entire day and we're constantly replenishing with fresh eyes. You'll take advantage of the times. There's a night editor on my team. In new york. Who logs off around midnight or one am when he's had a busy night and i'm up early. We overlap. I feel terrible when that happens on. But basically you know. He's he likes the entire newsroom. In new york is getting to the end of their day. they're trying to wrap up And i come in two hours later with fresh eyes The world looks a little bit different to me in my morning than it does to my colleagues in new york the end of the day it midnight ride and so putting a team putting my team here in london expands expands the time zones for us expand the number of working hours that we have in the day I can start something. I can hand it off to a colleague in new york. Who's about to logon. I can awake up here. And i'll see a story. That's maybe not urgent for us to cover but i. I think that we should cover it. But i not have reporters over here. I can say right before. I got on this call with you. I was on a call with my new york colleagues who are all starving their day and i kind of ran down. Here's here's the three or four things that i saw out there. That weren't urgent. And i know you have more reporters coming on in the day. I've tree ozlem for you. Mom and then they're coming in. They're doing their own scans and kind of often finding the same stories I love when we back each other up in like i can say i saw this over here and i think we could do this with it. And then somebody logs in at eight thirty and it was like i see that same thing and i love it. Let's do it.

New York Aaron Erin United States Tynan London UK England New York Times Hong Kong
"deputy editor" Discussed on Media Voices

Media Voices

05:22 min | 2 months ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Media Voices

"We sort of tipped that but the thing is that. I did an interview with an ai for the world in two thousand twenty last year. So my background is in computer science. And i originally wanted to go build a is in the ninety s but didn't work in the s so i went into journalism instead and so this was a fun thing to do. Which is i rigged up. Gt too so that. Which is this language model. So that i could ask a question to interview with it. And i did an interview with it and asked about whether i was going to take all of our jobs and then did a few few predictions for twenty twenty one and it said that there would be the world economy would see volatility that that would be. There would be a big changes in china and that donald trump lose the election. It was spot on and say the the funny thing about this. Is that futurologists. They tend to all about the fourth industrial revolution. At how the machine's gonna come and take all of our jobs which they never have by the way and so what. I found quite abusive. Is there to the alps worried about the wrong people's jobs about they should be worried about that road. Obviously that i was was a joke it was not meant to be taken seriously but the the the already is that it's ended up actually doing a better job the forecasted. Oh god i follow this flow. This woman just pure curiosity. She's called the monster and she predicts the future using asparagus help. I know and she predicted that trump was going to win a second term. And obviously there hasn't come true so now i don't know what to believe. You can't believe you can't trust asparagus. Unreal you can have to switch the tea leaves. Will you mentioned you mentioned that. And i just wanted. Where do new editorial products come from internally at the economist i remember you used to do hackathon so i don't know if you still do them and we have a slight ebor fobel process now so thousand. Ucla came in a bit of the year ago. we have There's been a big expansion. A big big investment in in all products of technology organizations. So historically we we. We didn't have a product organization or dating. We have a tool for while we were quite late to that. I think news organizations generally struggle with. Where do you put product the relationship between editorial products and technology. So you've got this confounding factor that you don't have any kind of classic tech startup for example that you were does aditorial fit in. So historically quite a lot of ideas for new products came from editorials and things like espresso was an idea that i had an i prototype it and then took the idea to the board we funding. We launched in six months and it was an internal startup and it was great fun to do that. But ultimately you can't you need to have a innovation as a business as usual process going on and that's really where we're getting to now until we have a much more professionalized approach to developing and testing new products. Now there's a bunch of that we've got underway right now that we're working on developing some of which i voted. But it's great because there's a much larger number of people working on those things now. And i feel that we do get you too much more rigorous way we were the past where it tended to be more sort of oil someone else in editorial would come up with an idea and say what about this and give it a try at so i just..

donald trump trump china Ucla
Much-Hyped News Startup 'The Correspondent' Closes 15 Months After Launch

Media Voices

03:22 min | 2 months ago

Much-Hyped News Startup 'The Correspondent' Closes 15 Months After Launch

"There was one new story dominated twitter discourse this week. I think it's important that we kinda flag up white so important so hayden christensen is back. Staff fada in disney plus new won't kanobi spent also the correspondent has announced its closure so before we get. I mean i've never seen a page of notes this long for one of our votes so peter. Why don't you take us through all of the nets. All of the notes. Finish you explain the correspondent closing you sitting comfortably. This is really sad this. Is you know we talked a media crushes and this is definitely be of my media. Crushes for a long time yet. You need to disclose about the you subscribe. Yeah i'm going to talk about. Because i think it has direct. I'm responsible. My behavior is indicative of a certain course of behaviors that i think of impacted the course one. Let me start with death. Correspond correspond was a dutch news. Launched in two thousand thirteen or Yeah it launched off over kurt funded campaign reseau indoors. Which team was massive. The success of the dutch say in sort of inspired the guys to to another kurt funding campaign in two thousand eighteen degrees two point sex mowing dolls to launch english language. Version of the correspondent called that correspond which be massively excited. The tame i said contribute to all campaign. They had this. I mean the idea of debt. Correspond correspondent is idea the titling the us was on breaking news. And it's us. John nauseam approach. Thank you see in magazines delayed gratification. That taught toys has has has delivered on tree member funded those transparency in the report in the really involved the journalists wealthy audience who you could actually correspond with it. John member owned thing. Isn't it not own. But certainly the funding dire from members when the defunding campaign the code funding company in two thousand eighteen. The go along. Us and florence was involved. thought legals. i'm trying to remember some of the names but they were very. Us in jail. Jay rosen was did not charter through the member. The member puzzle project and and it was clear that they were targeting. The us market distinguished publishing market. So very clearly. That's where they wanted them. Embassy come from Bought the impression was given that they were going to have a new york piece. I think John toast moved to new york and it was just cannot overcome until medica idea and then it transpired the well going to america that they were going to run most of it from hall where the original headquarters where they didn't they have to just while we're talking about facts and they actually apologize basically saying that they eventually. Yeah i was going to eventually. They misled

Kanobi Hayden Christensen John Nauseam Nets Disney Twitter Kurt Peter America Jay Rosen John Toast John New York Medica
The Last 4 Years Have Tarnished U.S. Image In Europe. Will Biden Be Able To Improve It?

Marketplace

03:41 min | 3 months ago

The Last 4 Years Have Tarnished U.S. Image In Europe. Will Biden Be Able To Improve It?

"He will work to rebuild relationships with European leaders. But as NPR's Eleanor Beardslee reports, the last four years may have permanently tarnished America's image in Europe. Welcome to the third edition off the Paris Peace Forum you have. The Paris Peace forum opened this week more than 150 nations and organizations looking for ways to solve the world's problems through multilateralism and international cooperation. Director and founders used on Vase says even though it's virtual this year, the U. S still sent no official representative. So in 2018. When the forum was founded, Donald Trump was actually in Paris because he was there for the 100th anniversary off World War one, and even though he was present in Paris, he didn't show up at the forum, even though leaders like Merkel, putting twiddle and many others where actually present Aside from a few liberal populist governments on Europe's eastern flank, most of Europe is breathing a sigh of relief over the change in administration and nowhere more so than in Germany. So I used to be a fan of Merkel. I used to think she was terrific. A big leader, great leader. I think what she did to Germany is a disgrace. President Trump loved toe lash out at Germany and its chancellor, Angela Merkel, Even on the campaign trail suited David will of the German Marshall Fund says German opinions of the U. S have never been lower. Just a quarter percent of Germans have a positive view of the United States at the moment. There have been other low point, says David Wilt, like during the Iraq war, But America's image quickly rebounded with the election of Barack Obama. This time, David Wilkes says America's image may not recover so fast. Germans have become very savvy to US politics and also realized that although President Trump lost, he did better than expected and Trumpism is here to stay for the near future. Trump's tariffs on European food and wine and his threats to withdraw from NATO have made many in Europe feel they can't count on the U. S as before excitedly. And then Dylan's off. I'm not in 2017 Miracle proclaimed that Europe must depend on itself. Sylvie Kauffmann, deputy editor of French newspaper, Le moaned, says Biden will make the transatlantic relationship positive and amicable again. And she says Europeans were impressed by the U. S election when we so that the turnout was so high That people were going to vote in droves or had made their votes. The fact that the turnout was so high I gave the impression that you know democracy was working. But Kaufman says political events since the election do not bode well for America's image, the fact that President Trump is refusing to concede Calling for demonstrations that the Republican leadership is not backing down either. Four years of populism and isolationism in America have had an impact in Europe. 29 year old Parisian Martin Cangelosi says after Trump he doesn't see America the way he used to. When I was a kid, I used to think America was a great players like a dream. You know the American dream that something in Europe We think about you know with, for example. Now, I don't even think America is still a great country. I feel really sorry about that a regret shared by many Europeans who worry that the United States and Europe have grown permanently further apart. Eleanor Beardsley. NPR NEWS PARIS

Paris Europe Eleanor Beardslee America U. Merkel President Trump Germany Donald Trump David Wilt David Wilkes NPR German Marshall Fund Vase Sylvie Kauffmann Angela Merkel Le Moaned Barack Obama
The Internet, From Space

Reset

05:42 min | 5 months ago

The Internet, From Space

"The Internet, it's how we work how go to school, how we see friends and family. But not everyone has a good connection and that's where a few tech companies come in with a sort of modest proposal. What have we got our Internet from Outerspace Adam Clark estes deputy editor at recode wrote about this, and is here to talk about Adam. Surprising thing in your story that a lot of people probably don't already know is that a lot of listeners already get through Internet via satellite. That's how we get wi fi on planes for instance. So why hasn't this taken off more broadly satellite Internet has historically been and? Just. A little bit sub par When you compare it to terrestrial Wifi, you're down on planet earth. We have fiber optic cables which basically have limited bandwidth and to do satellite Internet. You're basically beaming connection from address Joe Network up to satellite and back down and technology just hasn't been good enough to to get with to enough people so that it compares to terrestrial broadband. Internet. You might get from a variety inner time Warner A, but that's starting to change with new satellite technology and would call constellations of satellites and has pandemic at all sort of raise the stakes for this work and made it. More, urgent less-urgent. Tell me about that depend epic is. Really accelerated development, and especially investment in the technology. Just after the pandemic started, it became incredibly clear that a lot of people don't have Internet access and they're being left behind young students who aren't able to get online for classes, people who aren't able to to to work remotely. So once it became so clear that solving this problem of Internet access was urgent a lot more investment went into Xilai. Broadband initiatives the number of launches went up quite a bit and I. Think, we're GONNA see that investment continue and more these networks go online in the near future Gotcha. So who exactly is trying to do this? What are the different companies that see a future in? Internet for space, the two companies being talked about both right now our space x and Amazon both of them are launching what are called low earth orbit constellations into space this year, and in addition to them, there are companies that have had satellites These are the companies that. You. Probably. Use to get a connection on a plane or a train and via sat and Hughes two big players in that space and part of the idea is tabby satellites be sort of a low orbit, right? So there are two main types of satellite broadband setups. One is geosynchronous satellites geosynchronous satellite. Okay. So A geosynchronous satellites as above one place on earth and spins with the earth so that it can be connected down to to anywhere on the surface at any given time. The second kind and this is sort of the the newer more exciting type according to some. This is what spacex, Amazon or doing. These are called low earth orbit satellites. Geosynchronous satellites are thousands of miles above the earth surface low orbit satellites. However, as the name implies are much closer, they might be as little as three hundred miles above earth surface. I think it SPACEX, they're going to be about three, hundred and. Forty miles above the surface, and that means that the distance that the signal has to travel is much less, which means you get lower latency that means you won't get a lag on a connection and because there are a lot of different satellites, Elon Musk, and spacex say that you'll have a bandwidth that will be able to compete with terrestrial broadband and even fiber optic networks, Gotcha and SPACEX and Amazon are doing this. I assume just because there's money to be made right I. Mean I got think. There's a bounty at the end Elon. Musk has said that he just wants to get into the business and he wants to disrupt the telecom business and he believes that he can make enough money doing. So to help fund his mission to colonize Mars. Amazon hasn't said that much about why they're doing it It might also be just to get into the telecom business in compete in an industry that is is fairly monopolized. Others have hypothesized at Amazon wants to get into the satellite broadband business because then they could be their own first customer, Amazon web services, of course, offers a lot of cloud computing technology and the ability. To be connected to the Internet anywhere on Earth, could do a number of different great things, aws. Got It. So the answer is a mix of just straight up capitalism money to be made if we don't make it someone else will, and then another incentive is that this could be pretty synergistic with the main business and I'd add a third thing and and everybody mentions this. Bridging the digital divide is not only good for business. It's sort of good for mankind connecting more people to the Internet stands to have great unforeseen benefits space experts didn't says. The connecting people that previously could not get Internet access in parts of the rural United States and southern Canada. Like the Pacific Northwest Region is where they've had Beta, testers and I think that a lot of different companies have really pursued the dream of satellite broadband because it can reach people in areas that no one else can these are areas that aren't served by big telecom companies where there aren't fiber optic cables and in fact, would be expensive to build that infrastructure that no one has ever going to do it.

Amazon Spacex Elon Musk Adam Clark Deputy Editor Warner A Joe Network Pacific Northwest Region Xilai Hughes Canada United States
Worldwide COVID-19 Cases Soar as Scientists Scramble for Response

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:59 min | 5 months ago

Worldwide COVID-19 Cases Soar as Scientists Scramble for Response

"This week in America a grim and telling number. More than two hundred, thousand people have now died officially of Covid nineteen the House of Representatives held a moment of silence yesterday to acknowledge that painful milestone more people have been infected there than in any other country. Cases continue to climb states that suffered the most are recovering but infections and others are rising, which seemed to have been making progress in tackling the virus is against infections spreading fast and in Britain, and elsewhere there were expectations warnings of a second wave. I'm sorry to say that as in Spain and France and many other countries we've reached a perilous journey. With a vaccine still well down the line preparations are being made for an uncertain and tragic winter. And many governments have squandered precious time failing to prepare for what's to come. I think it's important to realize that each country experiences curb in its own way. Edward Car is the economists deputy editor. Europe. At the moment is going through a second wave cases in. India. Very high but overall it's been a consistent increase relentlessly such that they're announced note two million recorded cases day. And that reflects I think the both the nature of the disease and the insufficient grasp of the basic public health policy response that's required and are there any bright spots? Any positives to look too at this stage? Well, of course, in the background, which is hugely important has been fantastic and really impressive work by scientists and doctors, both to kind of work on the treatment protocols to find various medicines and to do research on vaccines. So that's all that's also entering in the background and it is beginning to have an effect on fatality rates, but there's a lot more to come on that. And what are the improvements on the medical side specifically. Well quite a lot of it's kind of really basic medicine. So when people first presented with what was thought to be essentially a respiratory illness, the focus was on the lungs people were put on ventilators in very large numbers vary eilly and that that wasn't always very good for them and didn't help them as much as was needed. Now it's realized this is a disease that attacks many organs in the body has stroke is a big problem that kids can suffer the heart damage and doctors a much better at keeping an eye on fluid levels on oxygen levels on treating the symptoms that might be harming various organs. So just in sheer sort of management of the disease that being big improvements. And then, of course, the medicines of and POPs one of the most important decks and methods zone is a is a very cheap steroid that can be bought and supplied in large quantities in that has for people who need oxygen and to need ventilation can lead to substantial declines in mortality of twenty to thirty percent. And the hope is that over the coming months, there'll be more medicines and. Vaccines which will bring that fatality rate down still more. and. What's your sort of overarching take on the the public health response. For the Public Health Response has been just much much more variable for a number of complex reasons. I think one problem political problem has been some differences on on what the priorities should be. Some countries have a ticket only favored keeping the economy open and Sweden's often held up as an example there possibly an idealized example because in fact, actually there were restrictions others have tried to keep the death rate down to zero by having a blanket. On the economy I personally think the both of those extremes are wrong. Sweden's actually had quite high death rate and quite a big blow to its economy compared with the neighboring countries, Finland Norway. Denmark. He's done some worse on both those measures. New Zealand has had a stunningly successful. Ability to keep the deaths right down but it's paid a very high price because it's shot the the whole country down and if you look at a country like Taiwan been even more successful on deaths and paid a much much smaller price in terms of the economy. And I think that that's because the countries that have been prepared to make trade offs and have had good public health can succeed in both reducing fatality rates and in keeping bits of the economy open. But what does that look like in detail? How should that that trade off actually be made you think? I think are two or three key components, and the first of those is a really granular testing and tracing operation. The second thing that's important is being sensible about the trade offs and then the third thing that's important is how to communicate this. I think people are quite goods in an emergency at taking difficult steps to change their lives but it's very hard to sustain and this will need to be sustained already need to stay for nine months but this'll go on for a long time yet before supplies all vaccines are plentiful enough for everybody to being vaccinated and even then the vaccines might not work that well or they're affect might be temporary so we're going to be living with this disease for a long time yet. I mean a lot of this advice was was starting to become clear even even months ago, and why do you think it is at different countries responses continue to be so divergent when the the best practice seem. To, be converging. I think that's a hard question to answer I. Think part of it was the enormous relief when countries have had a bad first wave came out of lockdown at the end of the spring, and in the summer. And there was a sense of cough people just thought thank goodness and governments having got through that desperate first phase of the disease themselves were relieved are never quite caught up. I mean the countries that have done this really really well, and I I think Taiwan is absolutely top of the class here have been good from the very beginning. and You perhaps feel at some other countries catching up in other places. In the United States, I think has to stand ups an example of this, the poor communication and the changes in rules reflect the politicization of the disease. There are too many people who have a stake in it working one way or another, and it's it's a tragedy. I think that the Centers for Disease Control and prevention which went into this pandemic as perhaps the most highly regarded public health body in the world has suffered from errors and poor leadership and denigration from the White House. That's that's just done nothing tool for the overrule effort. Are you hopeful are you more hopeful about the the post vaccine era and the experience today has made us all. Yes I think people, and I think people learn and learn more slowly than than baps they ought to but they do learn and you know I say the scientific response to this disease has been incredible and and that's something to feel cheerful about is just the even the best scientific response will take longer than people might like I did that time many people will suffer?

Taiwan Centers For Disease Control Covid Sweden Spain Britain America House Of Representatives Europe India United States Edward Car Deputy Editor France White House Denmark New Zealand Finland
Everybody Do Less

The Struggle Bus: Self-Care, Mental Health, and Other Hilarious Stuff

03:17 min | 7 months ago

Everybody Do Less

"Rachel Wilkerson Miller, welcome to the struggle bus. Thank you for having me. I'm so excited to be here I am so thrilled You are a friend of the show. You are one of my best friends in Hawaii. World and you're here to guest co host. Catherine has the week off. And so before we get into it I'm GonNa tell our audience a little bit about you. You know her. You love her Rachel Carson Miller is the deputy editor vice life and the author of two books, DOT journaling a practical guide, which was published in twenty, seventeen and her most recent book, the art of showing up how to be there for yourself and your people which came out in May. And, a big Fan. I'm a big Fan of your writing big Fan of the art of showing up I feel like I've learned a lot about what what it even means to show up. and. We're GonNa talk about that today. but Rachel before we get into the show and I didn't tell you I was going to do this. I didn't know I was going to some very sorry about but. Can you just like talk for a second about like what what is showing up like? How? How do you think about it? How do you define it? and just like. Maybe you're a quick like elevator pitch for like why it's important to think about. Yeah, definitely so I. Say this right mantra that it's one of those things that can be a little bit hard to describe you know when you see it. to me, it starts. Starts really with the active Barron witness to something, and this applies to showing up for other people are showing up for yourself so being an active observer to what's happening around you and like really taking it in, and then naming what you're saying, so running it through the lens of your past experiences in your own life with this person everything you know naming it kind of giving it a sort of starting to make sense of it I think naming his really powerful, and and then reacting accordingly, so if it's a friend, it might means sang them Oh my gosh. I'm so sorry that happened to you. or how are you feeling? If it's something you're going through, it might be a little bit more of like. How am I feeling about this thing that just happened. Which I've now realize wasn't great so some kind of response and the response sometimes is just the. The naming it's realizing a bad thing happened, I just need to sit with that other times. The response is going to be doing some kind of self care or taking action in some way. spent kind of the basics, but I think we kind of recognizing people are showing up for us when they're fully present fully there and I think we know when we're showing up for ourselves to and and when we're not showing up for ourselves. Okay? Well I think that was the episode. Anyone for tuning in. That was awesome. That was such a beautiful elegant, like explanation of what it means to show up, and also like I gotta say man like I. Feel like the struggle bus. Is You know we describe it? As like mental health shown advice show we, we sometimes like struggle with like exactly how to describe it, but I think that like what you just described about talking about how to show for yourself and other people is like kind of the mission of the show and Sal I, Yeah, so I'm. Very excited that you're here. I'm very excited to I. Feel like you get showing up on a deep level. You always have that I. Think is why we're so close in large part so this show the show gets it. The audience gets it. I'm excited.

Rachel Wilkerson Miller Rachel Catherine Rachel Carson Miller Sal I Hawaii Deputy Editor Barron
Tech Companies Aim To Stop COVID-19 Disinformation

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:37 min | 1 year ago

Tech Companies Aim To Stop COVID-19 Disinformation

"Now the emergency we face is a medical crisis and economic crisis and a crisis of information. That is how the World Health Organization's director-general Ten Ratnam put it recently. Fake news spreads faster and more easily than this bias and is just as dangerous. So how big tech fighting? Npr's Tim Mech has more. The Corona virus is the first epidemic that has received much attention in the social media age. It's definitely unprecedented. I've never seen something like this that the medical and scientific communities have had to address in real time. John Gregory is the deputy editor of Health at news guard which views news platforms for their credibility and trustworthiness says there are three big buckets of Corona virus misinformation circulating. Right now number. One conspiracies about the origins of the virus too bad healthcare's either ineffective or both ineffective and harmful and three minimizing the outbreak. Saying it's not as big of a deal as the media's making it out to be big tech firms have been grappling for years with foreign coordinated. Disinformation campaigns like the one launched by Russia to interfere with the two thousand sixteen election but misinformation about the corona virus seems to be organic and domestic in fact much of it appears to be spread by. Americans interested in profit. Gregory said some are promoting their own phony health cures for the corona virus. Other people are selling other like survivalist kind of supplies and using this news as a way to essentially scare people into thinking. They need all of that. They need buckets of of food. Supplies or big supplies of masks. Tech companies are trying to elevate trusted sources of information while removing false information on a rolling basis when users search for crossovers. Facebook and twitter have put a link to the Centers for Disease Control as the first result. Google is doing the same with information from the World Health Organization available more than twenty languages. Youtube says it is removing videos promoting dangerous and false cures and to crack down on the scaremongering for profit motivation. Facebook is limiting the way that hand sanitizer can be advertised as well as temporarily banning ads for medical masks. Lindsey Gorman is the fellow for emerging technologies at the Alliance for securing democracy. She's been a critic of how social media companies have dealt with political disinformation but his now praising tech companies for proactive steps like these. I think this is really a serious response. And it shows what aggressively confronting disinformation challenge. Actually looks like and what are big tech platforms can do when there is a strong willed. Act Big Tech firms have not wanted to be arbiters of political truth but with the corona virus both the dangers and the truth are much clearer. Said GORMAN THE PLATFORMS POLICIES. All talk about the threat of serious harm to the public as being sort of a higher order than than fact checking around the political context. I think it's a clearer call for them in many cases and they don't have to get into this role playing editor. In the meantime disinformation experts. Tell the public to remain skeptical of information online and diversify their news sources to minimize the threat of false information. Tim Mack. Npr News

Lindsey Gorman World Health Organization Big Tech Facebook John Gregory Tim Mech Ten Ratnam Director-General NPR Tim Mack Deputy Editor Youtube Russia Editor Google Centers For Disease Control
Suspect killed in deputy-involved shooting in Sacramento County

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Suspect killed in deputy-involved shooting in Sacramento County

"A man was killed in a Sunday shooting that involved the Sacramento county sheriff's deputy care for his Joe Michaels joins us live in studio with the latest job Mike the first call of the sheriff's department came in around quarter after two from the thirteen thousand block of Bennett road near Herald the caller indicated that there was a known mail application sitting in front of the callers property and that the subject was possibly on drugs that color also indicated that the suspect is known to carry weapons sergeant tested earnings as a deputy found the man unresponsive in a ditch I think that I woke and began talking with the deputy at which time the deputy observed a hand gun in the suspect waistband and immediately began giving the suspect verbal commands that deputy editor of the suspect and reach for the handgun in his waistband and of course fearing that he would be shot by the suspect that he fired his weapon and striking the suspect the man was pronounced dead at the scene he's now being identified as a fifty five year old man from Harold after the scene was process it was determined that the hand and that the deputies on the suspects we stand was in fact a Glock style airsoft the deputy involved in the shooting is a nineteen year veteran of the sheriff's office will be on paid administrative leave all the Sacramento county DA conducts an independent incident review Getty all right thank

Joe Michaels Mike Harold Sacramento County Deputy Editor Sacramento County Da Fifty Five Year Nineteen Year
For U.S. Navy destroyers, old controls might be safer than new tech

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:19 min | 1 year ago

For U.S. Navy destroyers, old controls might be safer than new tech

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by harness wealth a digital platform that helps you find the best financial advisers c._p._a.'s and trust and estate attorneys for your unique needs visit harness. This wealthed dot com slash marketplace to learn more. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the michigan economic development corporation evan lyle of rush enterprises is a big fan of michigan as he put it. The future of mobility is going to be decided right here in the state is a planet them dot com to find out why that's p. L. a. n. e. t. m. dot com the when piloting massive navy destroyers old school controls might be safer than new tech from american public media. This is marketplace attack demystifying the digital economy. I'm jed kim in for molly would in june twenty seventeen the u._s._s. fitzgerald collided with the philippine containership killing seven sailors us then just two months later the u._s. Mccain collided with the liberian merchant vessel ten sailors died. Meghan eckstein is deputy editor for the u._s. News which is part of the u._s. naval institute she says the national transportation safety board found that the u._s. mccain collision was caused by a helmsmen and he was confused by his touchscreen displays. He meant to slow down the ship but instead made a sharp right turn. An investigation led to more than a hundred hundred recommendations to improve safety and readiness on ships turns out. The touchscreen controls for speed are not preferred by a lot of personnel. They want physical throttles instead. The navy has taken note for new ships and will roll out a retrofit to change existing ones. Meanwhile eckstein says it's not just the control screens but also deficiencies in training that have caused confusion. I think one of the challenges is simply that there's not a lot of commonality from ship to ship of the way everything is currently allocated to the fleet so if you're a sailor in your on one ship you served there for two or three years when you go to your next assignment it might it not have the same bridge controls and might not have you know you might be moving from a physical throttle to a touchscreen or you might be moving from touchscreens at touchscreen but they're not the same aim and all the same controls aren't where you thought they were so this kind of comes down to you know with these touch screens in an emergency everything's muscle memory and if you're not sufficiently trained on them and the buttons aren't where you think they are and it's not consistent every time. He used that system in emergency. You're not going to know how to do it right. Why and when did the navy switch to touch screen throttles when the navy goes through its shipbuilding programs and it's ship modernization programs it really doesn't specify a lot of detailed detailed requirements for the shipbuilders so and a lot of cases you have shipbuilding companies who <hes> when they're making their pitches to the navy they want the most up-to-date technology they want you know the latest and the greatest that they can provide to sailors and a lot of cases that has involved moving to more digital systems more touchscreen type systems <hes> and and so this really isn't anything the navy kind of intentionally went towards. It's something that was really driven by industry and just sort of this desire to innovate and incorporate the latest and greatest technology. Oh gee what are they doing with the touchscreen now. There's a lot of ways that the trudge screens can be useful for example. There are certain <hes> cruise with smaller followership. I'm sorry ships was smaller crews where it's actually quite useful to have so much control at your fingertip on touchscreen so i don't think the navy fully wants to pull away from those <hes> also with the combat systems having a fully digitize system means that you can update it faster. You can blast out software updates over satellite relate. Even if you have a ship that's deployed so there are some cases where having fully digitized touchscreens are really useful. It just turns out you have to do that with a purpose. This one of the admiral's told me this kind of falls in the bucket of we did it because we could and i think that's becoming clear that that's not a good enough reason to have touch screen ship controls. Meghan eckstein is deputy editor for u._s. News she says about sixty destroyers old and new will get the physical throttles hopefully starting next summer and now for some related links meghan epstein recently interviewed retiring navy admiral john richardson's he he had a lot to say about how technological advances played out during his tenure. Essentially the navy he left behind is very different from the one he inherited something. I i learned from reading it is that three hundred fifty five ships is the minimum fleet size the lead necessary for achieving the pentagon strategic guidance and he guesses how many they'd really like six hundred fifty three now. You're ready for jeopardy. An article in forbes looks at two different navy ships that are incorporating and bishop new technologies in their designs one. The author says is likely headed for a lot of criticism when issues inevitably arise because it's been touted as bad bad already when it launches the other is given more leeway on performance because military officials and lawmakers have been told. It's more experimental something to learn from an incorporate into future ships. Maybe a lesson they're on the importance of managing expectations matt pretty and stephanie hughes-produced marketplace tech yvetot is our senior producer server gear and robin edgar engineer the show our intern is hey shoes alvarado. I'm jed kim and that's marketplace. Take this is a p._m. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by entercom intercom. What's it's more of the nice people visiting your website to give you money so they took a little chat bubble in the corner website and packed it with conversational bots product tours n._p._s. Surveys all sorts of things that amplify your team and help you reach more nice people inner calm customer unity got forty five percent more loyal users with entercom in just twelve of months go to intercom dot com slash podcast to start making money from real time chat then see everything else intercom can do. That's intercom dot com slash podcast.

Navy Meghan Eckstein Jed Kim Mccain Deputy Editor Michigan P. L. Rush Enterprises Evan Lyle Meghan Epstein U._S. Naval Institute Forbes Pentagon Molly John Richardson Producer
Hatice Cengiz's mission: Don't forget Jamal Khashoggi

FT News

09:55 min | 1 year ago

Hatice Cengiz's mission: Don't forget Jamal Khashoggi

"I'm with ruler Caliph the deputy editor of the F. T. and she's had recently rather astonishing interview. She met recently Hattie's challenges who of course found herself at the center of an international drama indeed something of a horror story last October. This is when the young Turkish academic were seen waiting outside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul for her fiance who never appeared that man of course was the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi details of whose murder at the hands of Saudi the thugs would leak out over the coming days and weeks so so really just start by telling us. What is the state of the investigation into Khashoggi's death? Well depends what you mean by investigation and which investigation in Saudi Arabia Arabia a group of people are being put on trial but we know very little about this trial elsewhere. There has been a U._N.. report by a U._N.. Expert on the murder however that report does not or have any legal basis it only makes recommendations and it has recommended an impartial international investigation for that to happen however you would need you on Security Council approval and I don't expect that exactly exactly 'cause you're touching on the really important point of the sort of full out of this whole saga namely. It doesn't look as if we're going to be many repercussions for the Saudi regime does it and why is that. I think that there were initially some repercussions for the. The Saudi regime mainly reputational a lot of business. People and political figures stayed away from Saudi Arabia. There was a bit conference. That was a flop but I think over time things of return to normal. I don't think the reputation of the Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman the man we know as and BS will ever really fully recover but I think that once Western governments and especially the U._S. government can't say that doing business with Saudi Arabia's fine he was for example at the g twenty in fact Saudi Arabia is going to be hosting the g twenty next year that is kind of rehabilitation Saudi Arabia hosting the g twenty year stunning given all that happened and imagine particularly appalling news for your lunch companion. The other day had tease Chang who is campaigning passionately for Kashoggi's motorists to be brought to justice. is is Here a clip now so I want to know who gave the order to kill them out and who else knew I want to know. Where is his body? I implore you to take action darkness essay. It is time for sanctions so that was her tease. Chang is speaking at the U._N.. Human Rights Council in Geneva last month. The Agnes was referring to as Agnes Calamar the special reporter on extrajudicial killings who had in fact just revealed called the results of this investigation you talking about ruler which found quote credible evidence clothes quotes that senior Saudis implicated in Mr Kashoggi's murder but let's turn to at t's challenges this was a powerful and really poignant. Poignant interview you had to do rule tell us what impression did you make. It was obviously a painful interview. It's painful for her to speak about Sharma but I think she's also now very driven. She is so frustrated by the silence she so frustrated by the fact that there has been no action that she's now turned this into her mission. Jomo Hachioji was essentially fighting for human rights. It's this is what he was writing about and she now feels that she has to take up that fight as I write in my lunch with the F. T. she now knows that she is part of the story. She's been studying the Middle East for a long time and now she feels that she's become one of its victims and there are so many of them so she was fighting back tears the whole lunch at one point when she tells me about the nights when she knew for sure that Jamal was dead. That's when her tears came rushing down one of the many things that struck me about her accounting hug conversation with you was relatively brief had in her relationship with Jamalco. Gee I mean they don't known each other for a few months. I wonder if you could just say a little bit about how they met in the nature of their relationship yes they only met in May of last year they met at a conference about the Gulf in Istanbul. Jamaa was speaking at that conference and she had only known him as someone who should seen on T._v.. She'd read him. She was very interested in Saudi Arabia and she was very keen to interview him about what. What was going on in Saudi Arabia what he was writing about and so she just goes up to him and introduces herself and says can we talk? Can you give me a few minutes and she speaks to him in Arabic because she speaks pretty fluent Arabic and I think that impresses impresses Jamal and so they meet up he asks her by Turkish awesome about Saudi and then she contact him again to tell him when the story is going to be published and two. I think check some quotes that's next time he goes to Turkey. They meet up again but this was a very quick romance in many ways but from what she told me this also has to do with the fact that Jemaah was in a very uncomfortable place ace at the time he was sort of looking for a new life. He'd been exiled in the U._S.. He was on his own so he was looking for a companion and he was very depressed and I think that they found in each other. You know the person she understood him. He understood her and so yes. This was a marathon romance. When he was murdered? He was writing columns for the Washington Post but as his then fiancee points out in this interview he actually in previous part of his life. He'd been an advisor to some members of the Saudi Royal Family Herself says in this interview one of the many powerful lines she says Jamal was from the palace not from outside it. He was not their enemy. Can you tell us why were they so frightened of him. Why did they have to kill him well? It's a very good question Alec. I don't think that anyone really knows why they were so frightened of him but it is also possible that they weren't that frightened of him. They had a strategy. Ah of silencing anyone who was critical of the Crown Prince Jamal wasn't the only one many of journals friends who stayed in Saudi Arabia are in jail and this new regime demint Saudi Arabia requires not only that you don't criticize they require that you approve the reason Jamal had left was because he did not want to engage and to support award a very hostile strategy towards cutter he was required to write in support of the strategy and that's where he drew the line and so there is such an intolerance that even someone who is only a writer actually not a writer who schooling for revolution a writer who wants Saudi Arabia to correct and to move on a better path. I mean you can even argue that much of what he was. Writing was advice to the crown prince but there is zero tolerance. It's not going to be easy for her. T snow is it nearly a year has passed as you said earlier for some parts of the sort of Western business in foreign policy establishment is not quite business as usual but they are going to re apply some of those ties to Saudi. What do you see happens to her now to? She pursue this cause at U._N.. How does she make any headway? I found and her to be very determined. I think that she wants to use the Kalama a report to try to put pressure on Western governments but may be more broadly she. Will become a voice that is just fighting for human rights at some point. I imagine she would even have to address that in Turkey. Because of course there are a lot of journalists who are jailed elden Turkey for hottest today. Her cause is Jamal but I think that she may also in the future want to broaden her course that it's not Jamaa and the Truth About Jamaa which I'm sure she will continue to fight for but YEP. She may very well be campaigner for human rights all is thrust upon her shoulders after just knowing him for a few months extraordinary I think we should end with a clip from Matisse which is also something of a call to arms from in her and she said this at the U._N.. Session in Geneva last month echoing what she said to you in this remarkable interview it's not only my below Jamal who was more that they but also democracy human rights and freedoms the failure to punish murderers F._X.. Also Mr Chair the truth always wins. He's story. We'll take note of those who stood with through and those who did not police take action.

Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia Arabia Prince Jamal Saudi Consulate Jamal Khashoggi Saudi Royal Family Murder Istanbul Turkey Geneva F. T. Human Rights Council Hattie Deputy Editor Chang Middle East Gulf Mr Kashoggi Security Council
 The Latest: Likud, main rival nearly even in Israel election

Clark Howard

00:52 sec | 2 years ago

The Latest: Likud, main rival nearly even in Israel election

"It's a dead heat so far between Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's Likud party and the rival blue and white party. But it's expected that Netanyahu can't form a coalition government and win a record fifth term is the country's leader following balloting today from the times of Israel deputy editor Joshua davidovich says a Netanyahu victory may make things difficult for the Middle East peace process out a message talking about wanting to a next all less thing settlements, not just in the main settlement blocks, but isolated settlements as well. Which would essentially make a Palestinian state impossible. It's not clear yet whether it was an election ploy. But since he's been in power is pretty much no movement on the two states, loosen. And I don't see it moving forward in any meaningful way.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Joshua Davidovich Likud Party White Party Deputy Editor Middle East Israel
"deputy editor" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Then there are additional pitch and trim computer programs that can point in those too far down sounds like a problem with the plane's computer program. Sure does but Forbes magazine's aerospace and defense deputy editor Jeremy Bukovsky says there's another potential culprit pilot inexperience the rate of affluence in the world is going up, especially in developing nations, like Ethiopia, China, Mexico and Mongolia. Yes, Mongolia has its own airline, which has some of these flames. And with new airlines developing nations adding flights at a furious rate. They have to add new planes. But here's the rub demand for pilots in sky is skyrocketing. And the number of highly experienced pilots weren't wide is small in a developing country with only a small air force or not at all getting experiences hard in. The United States to be a co pilot. You have to have fifteen hundred hours of playtime. But the co-pilot of the Ethiopian air flight on Sunday had only two hundred hours of experience instant tardily possible Howard that those pilots were not trained enough to pull out of this mess. But like you said the software in the computer system could be a big problem. Boeing said yesterday that they're going to upgrade it by April. Here's my big question to you should the FAA step in right now for passenger safety and to calm them down in simply say, these planes are grounded until we find out what's going on. Well, they should for a simple reason the entire European Union has forbidden the use of this plane in their airspace in their skies. Is you can't fly over Europe? How can you do worldwide trips while also, you know, you just heard about New Zealand? They're out China's out everybody's out here. Let's keep in touch in Canada monitoring this story for us. It's a it's a horrible situation. You know, I fly a lot. I mean a lot and I'm on seven thirty sevens. Allot are they have not been on one of the max h yet? But I gotta tell you. I would be very skittish. If I was ready to get on a plane, and it was that plane at this point. I think the FAA is doing a great injustice right now to the American people and travelers and they simply need to say, look, we're going to sit back. There aren't a lot of those planes, by the way at the airlines the ones that are flying these so take a modest service. Get the old seven thirty sevens. Put back in to replace them and figure out what the heck is going on. Here's another bizarre story. What would you do to get your kid in college? I know what I would do. I'd help them with the tuition if dot pay the whole thing which I've done, but that's it. They'll take their own SAT tests. They'll get in or they won't on their own merits. Well, listen to this story and a lot of people have been arrested today actresses, Felicity Huffman, and Laurie loft bed were among more than four dozen people charged in a nationwide college, admissions cheating scandal that involved wealthy. Individuals purportedly pain up to six point five million dollars to place their children into elite universities. This is crazy. The scam. It said to a place students in top colleges including Yale Georgetown, Stanford University of southern California UCLA in the university of Texas was run by followed by the name of William Rick singer of California who helped parents get their children's college admission through bribes, according to court documents officials have been investigating the case named operation varsity blues for more than a year. Dick's sporting goods said that it will stop selling firearms at one hundred and twenty-five of its stores further pulling back from the business after the retailer decided last year to tighten its policies around gun sales. A woman in Slovenia has been.

FAA Mongolia China United States Forbes magazine Boeing deputy editor Jeremy Bukovsky Ethiopia Europe New Zealand European Union Slovenia Felicity Huffman Stanford University of souther Canada Howard California Dick
Two for the show: Trump meets Kim

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:35 min | 2 years ago

Two for the show: Trump meets Kim

"Starting tomorrow in Vietnam. North Korea's leader Kim Jong Hoon will meet with President Donald Trump for a second time. We're going to have a very interesting two and a half days in Vietnam. And we have a chance for the total de nuclearization of an area of the world that was very dangerous that may sound like a grand and concrete ambition, but there's some confusion as to what total denuclearisation really means. It seems that since the pair I met in Singapore last June. Mr. Trump has lowered his sights of it yesterday. He said he was not in a rush to denuclearization as long as North Korea. Does no more weapons testing. How much diplomatic progress has been made since that Singapore summit, and what the two sides expect to achieve this time around Kim to Donald Trump pledge to establish a PanAm peace regime on the Korean peninsula and to leave the fold you. Nuclearization of the peninsula, but they didn't really agree on what that meant for the past few months progress on any of those goals has been hampered by the fact that they haven't been able to agree on definitions of any of those things are sold bureau chief, Lena Schipper is in Vietnam ahead of the summit. Lena. What's the mood like in Vietnam? Well from what I could see on the road and from the airport. Everybody is extremely excited. This Vietnamese government we should say extremely excited. There are lots of American North Korean flags lining the road. They're all sorts of LED displays saying Hello. Welcome to noise such peace. So that can effort even though they didn't have very much time to Pat, what about your sort of home bureau, what what has the feeling in in Seoul. And so the mood is much less excited than it was before the Singapore. Some of the before Singaple you had the the to inter-korean summits that people very moved buying South Korea because you had. Kim's shaking hands across the dividing line in the demilitarized in the board of between North Korean South Korean people was very brilliant and hopeful and this time the mood was in is a lot more subdued. I think people have much lower expectations than they did in the run-up syncopal. Not very much as happened for few months there. The it's more wait-and-see. I think than it was. Some big promises were made at the last meeting, but since then not much as happened to fulfil them. What should the world expect this time around? I didn't think we should expect too much. Edward car is the economists deputy editor, but we have to see more than we saw from Singapore, which is really just a sort of handshake and a smile, so their various things that people are talking about one is an opening of liaison offices at the moment. There's no formal diplomatic contacts. There could be an opening of liaison offices in each other's capitals. It may be that North Korea is willing to shutdown temporarily or permanently its Yongbyon react to where a lot of immunity materials being created. It may be that they'll allow the inspection of its test site, which it said it's closing descend like significant Justice, but they're really less significant than they they see one high profile North Korean Coldham, like painting an old car for resale. These are really. Decrepit places 'institutions at all particularly useful to the north again on the other side in old even to get that far the United States may have to relax some sanctions. Now, this is a long way from eliminating the North Korean nuclear threat. But it is a movement of of some sort that is the the pointed question, do you believe that Mr Kim would ever completely denuclearize? I think it's unlikely, but he doesn't really have to listen to me, both America's intelligence services and more recently senior military commander in Asia. Have both said they think it's unlikely that North Korea will give up all its nuclear weapons. Their assessments is much more likely that careers willing to give up some weapons in exchange for a relaxation of sanctions, a recognition by the United States of the Kim regime, but Trump doesn't agree with that. And he called his security services naive and told them that they were totally wrong. And. There's a great deal to be had with North Korea, which he thinks has the opportunity become one of the fastest growing economies in the world. If only they tried so the discussion of denuclearization that came about during the Singapore meeting. What exactly does that mean? Well, I think that's a big problem because each side means different things by complete DeLuca is Asian the Americans made getting rid of all North Korea's nuclear weapons in a verifiable fashion. The North Koreans. We think mean getting rid of American troops as well as their own weapon. So it means getting rid of the entire threat to both career, which they would argue is the result of having US troops in South Korea protected by the US nuclear umbrella. So both sides in Singapore were able to agree on this formula because it meant fundamentally different things to each of them that at some points going to have to be resolved. This seems like a repeat of a situation the world seen before diplomatic attempts that result in North Korea getting concessions, but the west not getting the security that. Angling for that's possible. Certainly it's what many people think, but there is a difference. This time Kim Jong relatively young man around thirty would hope to have many decades in power. He has to think about what's what's the future? How can he survive for decades in power in lessee has economic growth? That's Mr. Kim's guarantee of maintaining power over decades. Yes. I mean, the economy is small and not doing terribly. Well, it'd be a long time before the economy can finance huge weapons expenditure. Even now devotes a massive show GDP to buy weapons, but it's clear that it's the technological level is conventional weapons is pretty rudimentary. So it depends to defend itself against the highly sophisticated weapons of his enemies all who thinks is enemies in in the region and the United States the way it defends itself against those visted weapons is with the nuclear deterrent will quite I mean, how do we escape the feeling that North Korea is? Getting more and more of it what it wants. But never any moves on on denuclearization. I think that's a hard question to answer. One thing that has been gained is that the haven't been more tests. So there's some feeling that for as long as north doesn't test than it's becoming slightly less dangerous is not completing the miniaturization of the warhead one hopes. And so there's a there's a feeling that perhaps. It's less dangerous if it's not testing, that's that's kind of some gain that the rest of the world is getting. But you're right. They have to think quite hard about how much they're willing to relax sanctions without seeing really concrete steps towards denuclearization. And the thing that's really key. I think some point the north is going to have to come up with a complete inventory of everything that it has. And we, you know, you'll know that it serious when the north has come out with his infantry Tillett does with just dancing around. Really? I mean, there is some sense that perhaps this is perhaps a bit of theater on. On both parts right on on Mr Kim, looking to to be seen to be getting concessions from the west Mr. Trump being seen to be a, you know tackling extremely thorny longstanding problem of diplomacy as it just the what is he's to make fun of some bits of it. The Trumpian tweets and of Trump's Egan's to be nominated for the Nobel peace prize. But I think there's something very serious at St. to the first of these is the north Trump was warned was a growing threat when he was coming into office. I and we've seen the cessation of tests. And that's something that's really worth having the second is that it's unacceptable to have North Korea able to hit the United States with a nuclear armed ICBM. No, president can stand for that. And so this something deadly serious here as well as the kind of grandstanding and the style in which Trump does. That's very Trumpian. But he is grappling with a fundamentally important issue for the security, nited states and for the security of the entire part of Asia.

North Korea Mr. Kim President Donald Trump United States Singapore Vietnam Denuclearization South Korea Kim Jong Hoon Donald Trump Kim Jong Asia Seoul Lena Schipper Bureau Chief Inter-Korean
Government Shutdown: Updates on Where Things Stand

Dave Ramsey

02:34 min | 2 years ago

Government Shutdown: Updates on Where Things Stand

"Not a wall builder. And so we returned to our guest. Jake Russo deputy editor at the DC examiner online at Washington Examiner dot com, and you have written a piece called wall to wall politics. If you could summarize for folks, just exactly what you've had to say about the wall in this commentary. Well, we. The basic premise behind the pieces that is is the importance of the walls from in a symbolic. Meaning to to Krizan Trump. I compared it to. I like, Jim you, and I are old enough to remember George H W Bush when he was running for president in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight at the Republican national convention, eagerly speech, and he talked about how Democrats we're gonna ask him to to raise taxes e cig. No. And he'd ask enemy said, no it has again finally said he would tell them read my lips, no new taxes and that fabric. You know, promise became became something that you know, defined. Whether you think it's fair to find his presidency. And when he broke that promise two years later, and he did cite a a budget Bill that increased tax rates. Destroyed a good part of his base of support. You know, there's there's no there's no correlation from point a to point B as to whether or not it cost him the election Nike ninety two possibility that was and faces the same situation. He's he's in tire. The core base of his supporters built around not so much the wall, but immigration, but the wall is central to that. And what they see is. They see him giving up on this. And they see him kind of giving in and saying, okay. Well, I. Yeah. I've government open and kind of gives into Nancy Pelosi. That that they're going to see that as some kind of capitulation in that regard, and it could cost him dearly. Reelection efforts now on the same side, the Democrats nature just as much in just as much riding on this. There is a new, you know, very far left wing of the Democratic Party that it started getting elected to converse that they see any kind of you know. Border wall construction. It's something that they're they're they're opposed to and they don't

George H W Bush Dc Examiner Krizan Trump Jake Russo Democratic Party Deputy Editor Nancy Pelosi Washington JIM President Trump Two Years
US military strength not enough for national security, commission warns

Slate's The Gist

04:11 min | 2 years ago

US military strength not enough for national security, commission warns

"Testifying before the Senate today here discuss the report and the state of the military is Aaron meta the deputy editor and senior Pentagon correspondent for Defense News, by the way when you're senior Pentagon correspondent of defense knew. That's like being treasury reporter for the Wall Street Journal. Hello, erin. How are you? I'm good. How are you? I'm good. Okay. So let's talk about the hearings that are going on today. Which is the military's preparedness to win a war or several wars at once. That's right. So there's a kind of an ongoing question for last couple of years really since Russia's invasion of Crimea about hey is a US really capable of handling. What's called a great power competition, essentially going to war with a major competitor? The next logical question would be okay is US capable of handling major more with two competitors high Russia and China. And then is it capable of handling a war with one major competitor, Russia, China and a lesser competitor North Korea, which is now even trickier with their nuclear capabilities a lot of moving parts, right? The big thing that's happened. Last couple of weeks is that a congressionally formed panel of experts. These are twelve experts six Democrats and six Republicans who are very well known in kind of wonky national security circles, people seen is very serious people. Yeah, they came out with a report on November fourteenth. Which essentially said the US military is in a quote crisis of national security and the US military would quote suffer unacceptably high casualties and loss of major capital assets things like major ships plans in the next conflict. It might struggle to win or perhaps lose a war against China or Russia. That's kind of a shocking statement, and the type of thing that secretary Jim Mattis has in the past said he felt we shouldn't be saying such kind of broad statements about America's capability. Because it could embolden enemies to potentially try to do something, essentially. With report says, hey, we might win a war against Russia, China, we are not going to be able to win a war against both in the same time. And if we win that war, we ended that war even with just one of them. It means essentially America can't keep doing the things that we're doing around the world at the same time. We just don't have the assets. Okay. Couple things. What's the standard? Has it always been the standard that the United States should be able to win two major wars at the same time? I don't know always since World War Two have we funded the military or run our military with the understanding that if the United States got into two major wars, we'd be able to win them that's been the standard for a long time that standard has kind of faded in the post nine eleven era because you know, as you came out of the Cold War. There was a draw down sprout. Speaking of the military assets the peace dividend. It's called essentially ever looking at and saying, hey, we won the Cold War. Everything's fine. This new piece century, then you. Into nine eleven you start getting tough ghanistan Iraq. And those are different types of fights. There's the type of fights where you can use low end stuff. It's not the commitment of a high end war that would be needed and those high in assets have kind of dried up in the strategy has dried up as a result. The last couple of years thought had been okay, we won't have to fight to big wars. Not worry about that. When Russia kicked up in Ukraine, and then China kind of revealed some new capabilities and geographical ideas that perhaps hadn't been expected all of a sudden everyone's looking this and going do we need to go back to that two or contract?

Russia United States China Pentagon America Wall Street Journal Defense News Reporter Senate Aaron Meta Deputy Editor Jim Mattis North Korea Secretary Iraq Ukraine
"deputy editor" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Leo, Shane deputy, editor deputy editor the military times. Congressman I I wanted to get your response to the president's attacks on Admiral mcraven. First of all, the president regularly derides military officers many of whom have spent long careers in the military when they retire. They provide objective assessments of national security in the president's conduct or misconduct. And then he throws him under the bus. But in this case, not only belittles the reputation of Admiral mcraven, but the entire special operation community, the intelligence community the State Department community when he suggested that the under the admiral's leadership that we didn't move out with do deliberate speed in tracking down and eliminating Osama bin Laden that is an insult to the hundreds of thousands of men and women who worked on that operation. It's time consuming. It's difficult. It's tedious. And when you do it you have to get it. Right. The president has no understanding of what he's asking our military to do and that criticism yesterday. Is a reflection of that lack of understanding empathy? N even sympathy for our men and women who serve Leo I'm curious about the euro reporting indicates about this sort of sentiment around this troop deployment. I mean. This is a lot of people on the outside. So I was just dump. It's fifty eight one hundred active duty servicemembers really do have to go down there who really do have to lay out concertina wire and sleep in warehouses. What is the sentiment been like a folks experiencing that or or sort of Jason to it? We really haven't had much response from the folks down there yet because it's really managed how much interaction we had with them. But a lot of concern among the military about this deployment. And just what it what it means. These are active duty folks who are in a situation, they usually wouldn't be in on the border doing duty while guardsmen done before it's really unusual for the active duty force to see that. So a lot in the military looking business saying it feels like it could be stunned. It feels like maybe it's misguided. They're not sure how to deal with it. Now with the reports that may be ending it feels like. Was was her point of this. The secretary Mattis went down visit and talk to troops just a just a couple of weeks ago and the questions he got were are we putting up this barb wire for no reason, how long are we going to stay is there a point to our mission? And he told them look just do what you're told look at the job heavy. Yeah. One of the questions, you are we gonna have to take this concertina wire down that we just put up which was a pretty pretty indicative one congressman bunch of things that that presidents particularly in wartime, which it continues to be now for seventeen years long as a war in the history of the Republic. There's certain things they do as sort of just displays symbolic displays of gratitude appreciation honor going to Arlington cemetery. Visiting deployed troops overseas in the field that this president has shooed. How important do you think? That is look I think it's really important soldiers. Don't wake up every day in Afghanistan wondering when the president is going to visit. But when. You spend two years not visiting any soldier in any combat zone or theater of operation. It sends a signal. Remember, we've increased the troop strength in Afghanistan under the Trump administration. We hear through his his team that he doesn't believe in the mission Afghantistan, and as a result he doesn't visit the soldiers. I mean, you're sending a bed signal, and it's demoralizing for soldiers and their families, their one point three million men and women who are in certain uniform, the president calls them my military, but he doesn't understand that behind every one of them. There's a family they've got asked perations they've made sacrifices. They're separated. This is they love our country, but to him it's just one one point three my military that he fails to understand he's indifferent to the culture. He lacks understanding of what motivates me. Men and women in uniform to serve and we've seen it time and time again and on full display this week to the.

president Admiral mcraven Leo Osama bin Laden Congressman deputy editor Afghanistan Mattis Shane deputy State Department editor Jason Arlington cemetery secretary seventeen years two years
Tesla investor says SEC asked it about 'funding secured' tweet

FT News

03:41 min | 2 years ago

Tesla investor says SEC asked it about 'funding secured' tweet

"Elaine furnace up to speed on what's been going on at tesla and with Elon Musk the summer, yes. So if you remember Elon Musk sent out his tweets, this infamous funding secured tweet suggesting that he was considering taking his company private, and he didn't seem to have discussed the precise wording of that tweet with his bold or actually with anybody. He said he was in one of his 'cause driving on the way to you and imports at the time sued this created a huge drama and the SEC is still scrutinising. What went on. We at the f. t. will completely fascinated by it. How would it work? Who who was this funding has been secured from what nothing's going on it, ten dot. The funding wasn't completely one hundred percent secured and so ill, musk and tesla. And has this board have decided that it's better for the company stay public. What's happened since then is that rather than sort of quieting down and get on with the running of the come. And getting the model threes out. You know, musk has spent a lot of his time and energy in tweeting increasingly on krizner Roddick topics. He's come back to this issue of the tie cave Daiva insulting him. Then he'll sort of suddenly took about the colors for the 'cause he went on a Polk cost where he was videoed smoking a joint. This is off to there was some speculation about whether he had been in some way and he breaks it or intoxicated when he sent out this funding secured tweet, all of this adds up to a loss of uncertainty for investors in tesla. They have always sort of taken it for granted that Elon Musk as a larger than life charissa. He has a big ego. He warrants that big ego by setting huge ambitions and actually meeting them. He runs it also companies. He's doing lots of things that people thought went possible. And for the most part, stock prices sent have gone with him in the last couple of months that has turned around. So, but one of those crucial pieces to the tesla story, particularly before early August, the search for profitability and the fact that if I've got this correct has la- hasn't actually made an annual profit since it's been in operation. And so the company has just in order to try to get closer to some of these production targets, particularly for the model three, the just been hemorrhaging cash and that is of particular interest to bond investors will. That's right. So on invest is can mostly about getting their money back. And so Tessa issued a bond last year and it was okay, but the price is actually went down fairly quickly afterwards. That usually means that confidence in the company has gone down and the willingness of other investors to pay up to you, take the bundle of your hands has evaporated. That's largely what's been happening since and it's it's sort of acceleration the last few months. The question about whether that means that tesla will have some trouble raising money and bull markets. In the near future, the amount you would have to pay. I think that the yield is around eight percent now it would be extremely expensive to to borrow via the bull market, but then there's also the question of whether it actually needs to test yourself says it doesn't need to have any cash raised immediately. It could possibly do an x rays instead you right that it is burning through its cash and it's not profitable, but it insists that it has enough cash cushion to go through rations, at least in the Nigam. And then on the equity side of things. All of this, I'll say volatility, if you will be at on social media, Beit chief executive, Elon Musk doing what he does on a podcast, it's head a bit of an effect on the stock itself.

Tesla Elon Musk Elaine Dell Amy Keen Chief Executive Deputy Editor Blazers Trail Goldman Sachs Stokes Polk SEC Daiva Tessa LA Roddick Beit
"deputy editor" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Unorthodox

"You and by deputy editor Stephanie button peace. It also means Hello and goodbye. I'm saying Shalom, but I'm saying goodbye. Are you at the week? Is writer Andre awesome on whose novel call me by your name was the basis for the recent movie and our Godoi gentle of the week is wine expert. Kevin Vigo's we all need to catch up. It has been. It's been a four week and and much much water under the bridge. Stephanie has it been a good week in but Nick land? So he's a good week in button England. I have to say, I'm gonna make you guys really, really jealous. When I tell you what I'm doing this weekend, we'll buy. What are you doing this weekend? I am visiting a farm on the North Dakota, Minnesota border. Spend the weekend with Malia friend of the show and her husband, but an IRA going, I will be bringing. We've got some brand new recording equipment. Thanks to our donor drive, and I am bringing it with me to test it out. First of all donor drive, you're, you're shekels at work at work. J. crew that's vote would UP bringing back like lots of pastries, maybe. I don't know. I, I'm just a guess I'm just happy to be there. If you're one of the listeners who joined our show in the month or two, since we last talked about Molly as she's been on the show several times, she's a food writer and blogger. Cookbook author extraordinaire. She is a Juilliard trained musician who moved with her husband to his ancestoral farm in North Dakota where they farmed sugar beets, sugar beets. Thank you anyway. She's had she has this food network show. She's really, really blowing up. So I will maybe if listeners like want me to ask her anything while I'm there the on the farm with Appleby in the kitchen. And so like, I don't know if you care as many, anything won't like tips for how to make your Hala extra moist. I don't know. Send them on. So we're building up to the the really important news of the Jews, but but in the less important news, the Jews, Seth Rogan is the new voice of in Cougars up public transit system, buses subways at cetera..

writer Stephanie North Dakota Nick land deputy editor Andre Seth Rogan Shalom Kevin Vigo Malia Godoi Appleby Minnesota four week
"deputy editor" Discussed on Download This Show

Download This Show

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Download This Show

"Very big welcome to this week she is the deputy editor of gizmodo taking giants and she is a senior editor for saint recently back from taipei klay riley welcome back thank you for having made is a lot colder over here compared to thirty six degrees taipei hello kitty nor i went back to the airport right now kitty chicken station because they have hillock eighty ilan's over there so i went to a novelty restaurant last year it's a great city new plan dump everything else in the shot just hokey valid from here on at least we would if it went for gigantic conglomerations conglomerate ing and there's about to be huge changes in the way media and technology intersecting particularly in the us but how does it affect us so there was a magic court ruling this week that the company that has the likes of hp are warner brothers say n n time warner is now allowed to merge with telecommunications company in the us at and t doesn't sound like it impacts us very much but it might clear riley what's happened well basically this is a classic case of legacy telecommunications company and legacy media company wanting to kind of conglomeration is as you say i wanna make thing and they essentially want to take on the tech giant's because the giants are both carry a services in a way and content providers so i think.

deputy editor ilan us hp warner brothers warner giants klay riley thirty six degrees
"deputy editor" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

"Tipins mallory ribbon deputy editor of the relaunch check it out joining me today now that he's finish man's spleen in while i'm trying to share vital unknown meant intel that some people have quite literally been waiting to here stringer staff writer and your maistre jas concepcion pillow jason yeah we can all become slavering murderous embassy houses and suraj evil incarnate as long as we can have access to the four guard ex high subs and mainers fifteen thousand seven hundred eighty two shifts smell it is those numbers steps sorry turn to pay attention when there's this much going on in and have said you now gas if your new to benjamin proudly part of the ring or podcast network we have episode breakdowns of all sixty four previous game of thrones installments waiting for you to listen to during year next carriage ride back north and were keeping our throws discussion going through out season seven were deep dive in one episode of the time one week at a time speculation warning as always even though we no longer know what the future holds we will still be going deep on details from the show and the books alike are going and discussed the scenes for the upcoming episode we're gonna share our predictions were gonna speculate pretty freely about theories of future happenings but while we never do jason never ever ever will we traffic in leaks never keep that should away from us people hit vet library grab a similar reading road which one sir i pick of the millions of books five at you can reach should be the right ones probably it's time to break down seasons seven episode five the divisive and that's putting it mildly.

intel staff writer jason deputy editor suraj benjamin one week
"deputy editor" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

"And welcome to binge mode mallory riven deputy editor of the rare dot com joining means now that he's finished requesting some soon to be brotherinlaw's advice about fingers in the bum to try it first before you have an opinion on it ever chat you know it's a wringers staff writer in your may start yeah jason concepcion jason yes wise man once said that you should never believed thing simply because you want to believe which wiseman said this and remember are you trying to present your own statements as ancient wisdom again i would never do that see you you i well however castro guys if you are new to benjamin proudly on me ringer podcast network we will catch you up very quickly we have episode breakdowns of all sixty two previous game of thrones episodes waiting for you to listen to during your next uncomfortable family gathering and we are going to keep our thrones discussion going throughout season seven we're going to deep dive one episode at a time one week at a time spoiler slash speculation warning is always even though we no longer know what the future the story holds we will still be going very deep on details from the show and the books alike discussing the scenes for next week's episode sharing our predictions speculating freely about series and future conscious so put on your lipstick and give us a kiss.

deputy editor brotherinlaw staff writer wiseman jason concepcion castro benjamin one week
"deputy editor" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

"The man valerie riveted deputy editor of luring your data joining me today now that he's finished rightness wrongly worded letter to his could see it's wringers staff writer your maistrejasconcepcion come and see this shit jasonyeah we're here to podcast straight come and say okaywe are watching all 60 episodes game of throneswe are deep dive in one time spoiler warning as always we will be going deep on details from the show and the books from this episode and beyond so stay your demands clearly because it's time to break down season's six episode four book of the stressor jason yes maybe will die better deals good i think that's true better them 'let us yes we need to be here to offer up a brief refresher on what actually happened in this 4th installments let's take a quick trip down our very own king'sroad butcassell black ed lights into john for abandoning him a banning watch all this in their time of need just then the gates fly open and it's sanzabryanne and patrick size and john embrace in a moment that extremely beautiful and also their first real interaction on the show credible sadza later on pushes john on the next move the next move of the starks and she says it should be this winning back winter fell and she tells them that she's gonna do with or without him winter fell she says is our home davos questions melsandra on her next move and only what happened at the battle of winter fell by the way rianne walks up soared out and tells them heyi haven't forgotten what happened to renlynn readily admits to executing stance surely owns it was an ramsey's pink letter arrives for john it announces in stomachturning language recounts captivity the death of his dire wolf and demands sons as return under penalty of death torture and everything else.

valerie deputy editor staff writer john starks ramsey patrick size davos renlynn stomachturning
"deputy editor" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

"Well the word mallory riveted deputy editor of the winger dot com joining me today now that he's finished wishing me good fortune in the worst it's wringers staff writer your maistre jason concepcion and now it begins and never ends just like we are relaunching all sixty episodes of the thrones we are deep dive in one of the time and we're getting close somalia spoiler warning we've lost our minds spoke linked perdue we will be going deep on details from the show and the books this episode and beyond so watch your back specially of halland read is close though because it's time to break down season's six episode three oath breaker jason yeah john's watch maybe ended but ours is and yet quite a while we're still taken let's offer april refresher what actually happened in this third instalment by taking a quick trip down our very own king's road of a castle black john snow is risen it's pretty good mel wants to know what lies beyond the domain a living in raises the possibility that john as the prince that was promised the later torment tells john that he can't be god because you you'll pirker asleep buckle you must do pickles much too small john hangs the traders bells rally kim now okay then he names and ed fucking head acting lord commander and he takes off his black cloak and he's like peace.

mallory deputy editor staff writer jason concepcion john mel commander somalia perdue
"deputy editor" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

"Anwell it would walk mallory riveted deputy editor of thewringercom joining me today now that he's finished wishing me good fortune in the worst it's wringers staff writer your maistrejasonconcepcion and now it begins and never ends just like we are relaunching all 60 episodes of the thrones we are deep dive in one of the time and we're getting close somaliaspoiler warning we've lost our minds spoke linked perduedo will be going deep on details from the show and the books this episode and beyond so watch your back specially of halland read is close though because it's time to break down season's six episode three oath breaker jasonyeahjohn's watch maybe ended but ours is and yet quite a while we're still taken let's offer april refresher what actually happened in this 3rd instalment by taking a quick trip down our very own king'sroad of a castle black johnsnow is risen it's pretty good mel wants to know what lies beyond the domain a living in raises the possibility that john as the prince that was promised the later torment tells john that he can't be god because you you'll pirker asleep buckle you must do pickles much too small john hangs the traders bells rally kim now okaythen he names and ed fucking head acting lord commander and he takes off his black cloak and he's like peace at.

mallory deputy editor staff writer mel john commander
"deputy editor" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

"The man valerie riveted deputy editor of learning your data joining me today now that he's finished rightness wrongly worded letter to his could see it's wringers staff writer your maistre jas concepcion come and see this shit jason yeah we're here to podcast straight come and say okay oh many we are watching all sixty episodes game of thrones we are deep dive in one time spoiler warning as always we will be going deep on details from the show and the books from this episode and beyond so stay your demands clearly because it's time to break down season's six episode four book of the stressor jason yes maybe will die better deals good i think that's true better them 'let us yes we need to be here to offer up a brief refresher on what actually happened in this fourth installments let's take a quick trip down our very own king's road but cassell black ed lights into john for abandoning him a banning watch all this in their time of need just then the gates fly open and it's sanza bryanne and patrick signs and john embrace in a moment that extremely beautiful and also their first real interaction on the show credible sadza later on pushes john on the next move the next move of the starks and she says it should be this winning back winter fell and she tells them that she's gonna do with or without him winter fell she says is our home.

valerie deputy editor staff writer john starks jas concepcion patrick
"deputy editor" Discussed on Pop Shop

Pop Shop

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Pop Shop

"Everybody hand welcomed the billboard dot com pop shop podcast my name is keith hall and i am the codirector of charts at billboard joining me as always is billboards deputy editor digital katie atkinson hello katie you oh hey keith coming up today on the show we've got must here music with billboards deputy either digital joe lynch a couple deputy editor digital's vehicle i think they're exactly two or visit today at its joe it just it's like a union gary trust or voter as of chart co arcos wiring up code deputy editor i'll that just seemed like a lot lot too many worry many way filled well anyways at the billboard pops up podcast is your one stop shop for all things pop on billboards weekly charts in addition you can always count on a lively discussion about the latest pop news titles at billboard fun chart stats and stories new music an guest interviews with music stars in folks from the worlds of pot today on the show we got must here music joe in the team will be chatting about the new lavish re issue of prince on the revolutions purple rain album and more so stay tuned but first before we get started if you enjoy the podcast subscribe to the show on i tunes so you won't miss and episode and give us a rating or review while you're out it if you have any questions for us feel free to tweet us at keith underscore caufield or at k t atkinson and if you want to explore more podcast from billboard visit i tunes dot com slash billboard podcasts you know i think we have actually mentioned this before on an earlier pop shop podcast about the purple rain reissue was actually overseen by prints.

keith hall codirector deputy editor katie atkinson keith joe lynch keith underscore caufield
"deputy editor" Discussed on Pop Shop

Pop Shop

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Pop Shop

"Everybody hand welcomed the billboard dot com pop shop podcast my name is keith hall and i am the codirector of charts at billboard joining me as always is billboards deputy editor digital katie atkinson hello katie you oh hey keith coming up today on the show we've got must here music with billboards deputy either digital joe lynch a couple deputy editor digital's vehicle i think they're exactly two or visit today at its joe it just it's like a union gary trust or voter as of chart co arcos wiring up code deputy editor i'll that just seemed like a lot lot too many worry many way filled well anyways at the billboard pops up podcast is your one stop shop for all things pop on billboards weekly charts in addition you can always count on a lively discussion about the latest pop news titles at billboard fun chart stats and stories new music an guest interviews with music stars in folks from the worlds of pot today on the show we got must here music joe in the team will be chatting about the new lavish re issue of prince on the revolutions purple rain album and more so stay tuned but first before we get started if you enjoy the podcast subscribe to the show on i tunes so you won't miss and episode and give us a rating or review while you're out it if you have any questions for us feel free to tweet us at keith underscore caufield or at k t atkinson and if you want to explore more podcast from billboard visit i tunes dot com slash billboard podcasts you know i think we have actually mentioned this before on an earlier pop shop podcast about the purple rain reissue was actually overseen by prints.

keith hall codirector deputy editor katie atkinson keith joe lynch keith underscore caufield
"deputy editor" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

"In welcome to mood mallory remain deputy editor of the wringer dot com joining me today now that he's finished planning and extremely ambitious rescue attempt and then abandoning it me insent ramsey opened the door to the kennel it's ringer staff writer in your maistre jas concepcion who let the dogs out it was ramsey and many what a waste of a speech really brutal for they cannot torture operates with the pierre to got go the other guys bureau jason we at least remained loyal we are relaunching all sixty episodes game of thrones were deepdiving one at a time spoiler warning as usual we will be going deep on details from the show and the books from this episode in this season and beyond to climb into the bath that you work soon martin's earn bring me my brown pence is it's time to break down season four episodes six the laws of god's and men jason yes various believes that the phrase the king was uttered king plus sacrilege but as far as we know noone said anything about fuck in the king's ray so let's offer briefer fresher on what actually happened in this sixth instalment by taking a quick trip down our very own king's road in bravo's o stana sendaula seref in the wealthiest of the free cities for their lone meeting with the bank it goes poorly for king steny until dabo's bears his nerves and makes an impassioned powerpoint presentation on stance behalf coin in hand davos visits sex pirates solid door dorasan mid hot tub bath.

mallory deputy editor insent ramsey staff writer jas concepcion pierre martin noone bravo dabo
"deputy editor" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

"I'm love and welcome to binge mad mallory riven deputy editor of the ring r dot com in joining me today now that he's tracked down his war nemesis unsealed them in a crate it's ringer staff writer and your maistre jason concepcion at check the tracking number on my sourcerer is the gps indebted into his like mouth stitching ya are jason we are chasing that symbolic revenge around here swee are reacting all sixty episodes game of thrones were deep dive in one episode at a time spoiler warning for all of you we will be going deep on details from the show in the books from this season nba beyond so through your foes parts into the it's a smell watched that flame turn blue listen for that special voice for because it is time to break down season three episodes four and now his watches and jason yes you know i find that uh influences largely matter patients so before we plow had let's let's pause for second here and let's refresh ourselves on what actually happened in this episode so let us take a quick trip down our very own king's road on the road to her hauled jamie is in very bad shape his rotting hand is tied round his neck the stump of his former hand is probably infected pretty gross jamie is depressed over the mutilation of his hand loss of identity bryanne schools him on the everyday suffering the rome's common people in ten of us insults him into getting his backup.

deputy editor staff writer jason concepcion gps jason swee nba jamie rome
"deputy editor" Discussed on Mag Heroes

Mag Heroes

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Mag Heroes

"A message from that and that's like a 90s magazine in which a guy coach phil campbell had seen at a there was a town coteaux campbell on tv the he was watching and then he had decided like gather up all the other people who feel campbell in the united states it was that before social media and got them to go together and meeting map town i feel campbell and they so decided nice time at the end of the his but then we if we found the real cart dave campbell and to see if there's anything going on since then and it turns out that that this whole new crazy story had gone on in which he do social media and found a bunch of more like philly pay campbell's and everyone all over the world a nato organiz like a new uh meet with the new reinforce show campbell's an and just before like that a hurricane destroyed destroyed the town but then they went unlike sticks that will the folk anvils so that was one way yeah and we have these the strange editorial meeting the kind of surreal of sit round whiteboard him like play top trump's with highs near has the most ducks in the world like rubberduck so like someone who's dream is to uh to be like a a dead extra in hollywood movies and then joined like balances out so it's not all just like insane stories it's really a read of concept amazing i think people enjoy his on his own fooled previous issues so don't right sunny than lost one of the citadel yet yet they i mean they will so doubt proves popular it is i think has a definitely happy with the.

phil campbell united states social media dave campbell philly hollywood