35 Burst results for "Deputy Editor"

El Salvador Leads World in Adopting Bitcoin as Official Currency

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:32 min | 1 year ago

El Salvador Leads World in Adopting Bitcoin as Official Currency

"Salvador is one of the poorest countries in the western hemisphere and relies heavily on remittances payments setback from workers in the united states since two thousand and one el salvador has used the us dollar after ditched its local currency the cologne. The country is not known for leading the world in financial innovation. But on tuesday it's set to become the first nation in the world to accept bitcoin as a national currency. The move has been celebrated by bitcoin fans across the globe but on the ground. The reaction has been different with protests and popping up in the capital. San salvador are deputy editor for latin america. Santiago perez recently visited the country to find out how the government plans to make this transition work. And why it's taken this bold move and he joins us now to discuss high santiago. Hello how are you today. I'm doing well This seems like a pretty big deal. El salvador is a country of more than six million people. Starting today. it's going to be the first in the world to accept bitcoin as legal currency. How is that going to work well to start this giant step for the evolution of bitcoin. So it is quite remarkable that such a tiny country embarking such experiment so as of september seventh of others. We'll have the option to either pay for services with us dollars which that became the national currency almost two decades ago or they can use bitcoin for

Santiago Perez Salvador El Salvador Cologne United States San Salvador Latin America Santiago Bitcoin
Unpacking Fashions Role in Slowing Global Warming

The Business of Fashion Podcast

03:22 min | 1 year ago

Unpacking Fashions Role in Slowing Global Warming

"Week. The united nations intergovernmental panel on climate change released a new report from the world's top climate scientists warning that global temperatures will rise one point five degrees celsius by twenty forty and underscoring that human influences unequivocally responsible for global warming since the late nineteenth century. The fashion industry's greenhouse gas. Emissions are estimated to be between four and ten percent of the global total on this week's peo- of podcast deputy editor. Brian baskin is joined by. Michael szadkowski mrs stain ability advisor and former vice president of sustainability at nike. Leyla petrie chief. Executive of sustainability consultancy twenty fifty and hannah pang head of marketing an advocacy and sustainability consultancy for tara to unpack fashions role in slowing global warming. Here's michael cichowski. Leyla petrie and hannah pang inside passion michael. I'd like to start with you and get a little bit meta. Why is this fashion problem solve. I mean let's say i'm nike or gucci. You look around. And i say i sell clothes. Not making cars not operating a coal fire our plant. Why do i need to be thinking about the surgeon. You sure Thank you brian so I think it's important to note that It's humanities problem solve and fashion as one sector on that needs to be carbonized. Serve regardless of what Sector you find yourself in. We know that we have to reduce emissions vary significantly between now and twenty thirty and then on the way to twenty fifty and so Roughly reducing emissions by half by twenty thirty And and that's by twenty fifty There are a number of estimates of fashions greenhouse gas look rinse We can talk about this in a bit more detail. The data is not ideal But we do know that fashion does have a significant carbon footprint and as with other sectors much reduced that and so You know we know the effects and we. We know the predictions of where we're going if we keep on their business as usual trajectory And so fashion because of because of its impacts and also because it seeing the impacts of climate already happening in the supply chain in particular in places where the impacts of climate are being are happening We know that it's critical. Issue the sector to address. Thank you and love to get into the data question in a little bit on this more than any issue. We're talking about today. Hear a lot about the need for collective action for the industry to work together and you've been involved in. Some of the industry's biggest efforts on front in to tell us how that's going. I how much progress has been made in. Also why some necessary for brands you think of this as an industry problems New problems grand. I mean i think fundamentally this is a problem which no individual company consult when his i you know we have all sorts of invading intractable issues around infrastructure around incentives around policy. No-one acting really occurred within that system without being affected by it so all these brands have supply chains. Good three targets that are also dependent on And really what we realized. Is that everybody in this. Sector is co dependent on each other other actors like policy makers is to

Leyla Petrie Hannah Pang Brian Baskin Michael Szadkowski Mrs Stain Twenty Fifty Michael Cichowski Nike United Nations Tara Gucci Michael Brian
Majority of Covid Misinformation Comes From 12 People, Report Finds

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Majority of Covid Misinformation Comes From 12 People, Report Finds

"Today on point. We're going to talk about the so-called disinformation doesn't and to help us do that. John gregory joins us. He's deputy editor of health at news. Guard a group that rates the reliability of information on six thousand different sites is the co author of another report titled the kuban nineteen vaccine misinformation super spreaders. john gregory. Welcome to on point. Thank you for having me all right. So twelve roughly. Twelve accounts are are responsible for some sixty five percent of all anti vaccine. Disinformation that's from the center for countering digital hate. Does that match with your analysis of where a lot of the anti vaccine untruths are coming from. Those are certainly some of the most prolific and kind of established sources in the anti vaccine world. They're not alone in spreading anti vaccine misinformation on facebook or on any other platform our earlier report which predated when the cove in nineteen vaccines were widely available. They were still in only available to someone in clinical trials. We catalog thirty four pages on facebook not with followings ranging from the a little bit under one hundred thousand to the millions and of those thirty four pages Twenty four of them are still active today and there is some overlap with the disinformation dozen like robert. F kennedy juniors children's health defense and the truth about cancer group but out of the thirty four. We identified a larger subset that were spreading this information about vaccines before anyone. Outside of a trial could get them twenty. Four still active and seventy seventeen of the twenty two of them. We identified outside the. Us are still active. A few more of them were taken down from. They were us-based pages

John Gregory Facebook Kennedy Juniors Robert Cancer United States
"deputy editor" Discussed on Journalism.co.uk podcast

Journalism.co.uk podcast

08:01 min | 1 year ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Journalism.co.uk podcast

"Mike in startup land people like shoot things like unicorns which are billion evaluated a billion dollars or more but we'll try and of us that dragon but then also sticking the nation. Even weiner nice of our readers would understand that. We know that some of our readers. Wyant we're trying to cater to them without dumbing it down too much so i think that's one way we make it approachable. Another way as a lot of south tips quite kind of consumer facing or they are that they're doing things in response to the way we are living our lives differently and people. Are you know everyone is interested in that at the moment hyphen writing about the on demand. Grocery company said these companies as all over the place at the moment that offered to deliver view bananas in ten minutes delivery style but for groceries. An analog just people were interested in that because you can see that africa's will ever say cheese and the investment community very interested in that because heaps of money's going into it so that you kind of writing about something that is of interest to people who coming at it from lots of different perspectives. So that's that's the case of kind of picking those to tell that you know reach beyond this kind of me community. I guess that's kind of the public. Interest factor right people will always be keen to read out things they feel directly impact their lives and i guess the tech industry does even if they don't know it yet. Do you find this poses. Any particular challenges. What i think actually a challenge we have is is to not only writes about those businesses. That are maybe more consumer facing or other kinds of tools. You might use it working. And one of our coaches. My focuses on what is called deep tech. Which is basically kind of the tug of ten. Regina is actually really really hard to understand very scientific. So it's my job. I guess to why about flying cars or drones that can deliver food or kind of solar panel technology or gigafactory which of these like enormous factories. The with batteries of the future. And put that into context while you're not like oop Gigafactory you'll at were. We need this because you know 'cause going in the car. Industry starring in this direction in this industry is going in this direction. So she's kind of hard to ask. I guess we as a company need to make sure where ways writes about those kinds of businesses is. Wow even they might be harder for lots of us journalistic our head around because you know that they're equally important interesting. Just perhaps a little bit harder to understand on the surface and oversees since you launch in two thousand nine hundred nine. You've had absent great success. You've achieved five hundred thousand monthly visitors on your side in eighteen thousand subscribers. Joe news that's what do you think it is about sifted. That makes it stand out and makes it so popular while we want to many many hundreds of thousands more redes- eventually but i think we have tapped into a need which is that The europeans lots been tech ecosystem. Squaring more more investment scouting into this sector companies. Getting bigger than people are leaving those companies to start new companies. And as i said daddy are looks all fake if still on the us. And if we can become kind of the go-to pace for someone who wants to learn about what's going on whether that's because you're investor. Who wants to know what you should be investing in or if you're a person he's interested in joining a startup and wants to know to the cool ones to go work for or if your selling he was started started to up a founder and you want to learn from other founders who like further along and have the kind of challenges what they went through things like that is what we do if off as people. We all hate me becoming a place that you you come to to read about things that will hopefully make you better at your job. Twenty nine thousand nine hundred by treasury found that only one in three uk entrepreneurs is female the access that women have to funding. Networks is a large driver of this problem last year. Only one percent of the total funding spent on startups went to businesses. Run by women. And shockingly women of color received just not point. Two percent of that investment despite initiatives by the likes of stem women and morgan stanley that have tried to bring more women into the tech sector. This is still a very bleak picture. Let's go back to amy. Who can explain how sifted trying to bridge. This gap surviving thought shifted. We said okay so it might be the case. It's mostly men raising money but we don't have to therefore only focus on the companies have raised the most money we can focus on other things instead and we should always strive to make sure that we speak to multiple people an article. At least one of them should be a woman and ideally one of them should be a pessimist color and that we should make sure who say mitchely on site that there were images of those people so if you come to sifted way hopefully sort of shows the kind of visually representing kind of ecosystem system. We would like to see. Even if that's kind of how is at the moment and i think those things are important right. Recently about a company would efforts chicks which creates like heroin bt products for people with cutty had like a lot with africa. And it's run by two black women and they were the i need the ninth Black women to receive funding. Since i can't remember when but for radio on time and that what scooted soup allow like it wasn't it wasn't like massive on fundraise but people care about that night go shed and we could have sort of said owner writing about that because that's too insignificant around but we knew that were kind of the issues at stake. We cover debt. So that's that's one thing cut of how we how we write stories. We'll say for example. We never run what we call a manno so never do a kind of tammy because we want events as well we've never have a panel or of the people in the panel of men and like the journalist from fifty two dozen count because actually of journalists women account for the agenda quite and then another thing is with hiring we definitely not perfect so intensive out balance. We really great shifted in terms of ethnic diversity or mandatory team with really bad at the moment. We know that something. We're trying to change across the whole team that up. And that's which we try to put more effort into recruiting in terms of the job descriptions we right You know that we need someone to have five years of experience. If you've done unite we put that you need to have these tickets skills or you need have had experience in this specific thing. We do actually need to have hour internship program. We pay our interns Things we try and do because we know that the major industries rating not very diverse. And they're very easy things. You can do gene gene. Your beckham proof that we're trying to do. I was wondering. I'm just kind of from that vein. What do you do to kind of engage more Female readers on the site or in order to encourage them to kind of give them opportunities and to to kind of help them. Start that craziness. By i think it comes back to that representation point so recently for example.

Wyant weiner africa Regina Mike morgan stanley Joe manno treasury amy uk us tammy
What the NFT Gold Rush Means for Fashion

The Business of Fashion Podcast

02:16 min | 1 year ago

What the NFT Gold Rush Means for Fashion

"Week b. o. Fs deputy editor brian. Baskin speaks to ben wada goto founder of our which recently raised eight million dollars in funding. From andreessen horowitz coronado abs co-ceo the d. materialized ambush luton co founder and creative director of the fabric cat as well as b. o. Fs editorial associate mc nanda about what. The nfc gold rush could mean for the fashion industry. And whether all the hype will deliver on the promise that this could be the next major growth factor for an industry trying to reinvent itself. I m c explained the most recent development with nafta's in the fashion industry. An t is non fungible token and. That's a unique digital asset that sought chain technology so that contains a digital ledger. That sort of a record of all transactions end woods made this space really exciting and almost every industry has kind of brushed to the market in part. Because it's of within not leisure shows verifiable evidence of price but also ownership of a good that she can't be tampered with or altered that exists forever within this Within this sort of a ledger so this has been really exciting for number of brands. I think the one that sort of gained everyone's attention sort of started. The article was the collaboration between artifact end in eighteen year old digital artists known as ferocious That actually saw. I think it was over six hundred twenty. One at pairs of sneakers were sold from three thousand to ten thousand dollars and three point one million dollars total rhythm Virtual sneakers were sold in under seven minutes which obviously got the acid world looking to to the market. So this has been a really interesting sort of nixon in everyone on this panel. I've spoken with over the past few months as relate shown can to the market. And how what that might look like a starting with sort of the fabrications first entity between eighteen nelson moving forward towards artifacts at inversiones at collaboration that people

Ben Wada Goto Andreessen Horowitz Coronado A Luton Co Mc Nanda Baskin NFC Nafta Brian Nixon Nelson
The Race to Succeed Germany’s Angela Merkel Just Got Exciting

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:26 min | 1 year ago

The Race to Succeed Germany’s Angela Merkel Just Got Exciting

"The partnership of germany's christian democrats and its bavarian sister group. The hugh has long been considered one of the most stable imposible politics and for the best part of twenty years. Angela merkel has brought to. This has strong and steady leadership both as chairwoman of the cd you and as chancellor of germany but the race to replace this autumn threatens to uprootal this as the two parties have endorsed rival candidates for chancellor the cd you has backed almond lash. The party's leader. The issue is throwing its weight behind the prime minister of bavaria. Marcus urda well to examine what this will mean for the party. And for germany's future. I'm joined by suited david philp. Who's the deputy director of the german marshall fund berlin and also by kirsten gamla these deputy editor of the parliamentary bureau of the deutsche citing. Now let's begin with you suda. This week has seen a series of stages in meetings to try and work out who will take the helm on friday yesterday. Those a four hour long session wasn't that we're both men set out their stall. Yes i mean this is really something that the cdc issue Are have found themselves in a really difficult situation. Because at this point you have two candidates vying to succeed merkel who are going to come out of this process damaged And it's going to split the party So it'll be really interesting to see how the conservative bloc comes out of this

Germany Marcus Urda David Philp Angela Merkel German Marshall Kirsten Gamla Parliamentary Bureau Of The De Hugh Bavaria Berlin CDC Merkel
The Internet, From Space

Reset

02:06 min | 1 year ago

The Internet, From Space

"The internet. It's how we work. How go to school how we see friends and family but not everyone has a good connection. And that's where a few companies come in with a sort of modest proposal. What have we got our internet from outer space. Adam clark estes deputy editor at recode wrote about this and is here to talk about it. Hey adam so surprising thing in your story that a lot of people probably don't already is that a lot of listeners. Already get through internet via satellite. That's how we get wi fi on planes for instance. So why hasn't this taken off more. Broadly satellite internet has historically been just a little bit subpar. When you compare it to terrestrial wi fi you're down on planet earth. We have fiber optic cables which basically have limited bandwidth and to do satellite internet. You're basically beaming connection from the address. Drill network up to a satellite and back down and technology just hasn't been good enough To to get bandwidth to enough people so that it compares to terrestrial broadband internet you get from verizon or time warner but that's starting to change with a new satellite technology and what are called constellations of satellites and has the pandemic at all sort of raised the stakes for this work and made it more. Urgent less-urgent tell me about that. Dependent is absolutely accelerated development and especially investment in this technology just after the pandemic starting to became incredibly clear. That a lot of people don't have internet access and they're being left behind young students who are able to get online for classes people who aren't able to to to work remotely so once. It became so clear that solving this problem of internet access was urgent a lot. More investment went into xilai broadband initiatives The number of launches went up quite a bit. And i think we're gonna see that. Investment continue and more these networks go online in the near future.

Adam Clark Estes Adam Time Warner Verizon
Racism is Rife in the Royal Family

PM Tampa Bay with Ryan Gorman

04:15 min | 1 year ago

Racism is Rife in the Royal Family

"Deputy editor at OK magazine, Jacqueline Raw to recap Oprah's interview with Prince Harry and Meghan Markle and interview that got a lot of attention last night and has been a big top of conversation all throughout the day today, Jacqueline, Thanks so much for taking a few minutes. To talk to us about this so much to unpack from that interview, But let's start with what you think was the biggest headline. Oh, my God so much, But I think the big headline is that racism is a really big issue within the royal family. I think people don't understand that. You know, the rules only has been around for so long, and they've never had American, let alone You know, a half black American come into this family, and I think that really just turned everything around, and it just makes you feel so many things for me again. You know all this stuff behind the scenes that no one knows anything about and you know she's being treated this way. So crazy that this is happening and no one knew about it. What can you tell us about Meghan Markle before she got involved with Prince Harry and eventually married him when she was just an actress on suits? Was there anything that you heard in Hollywood about her? No. I feel like she was so off the radar like she was such a. You know, She's a big character in this, so but not many people really knew who she was until she started dating Harry. I feel like I remember the date came out and they said Meghan is now dating Harry and I remember everyone saying, Oh, this is the girl on suits, you know? It's crazy, and so on. But he does have a lot of these high profile friends. You know, obviously, yes. Serena Williams now and, um, have Abigail she was on. They were on so together something and they have Gayle King and Oprah like He's obviously been around for a long time. But I just don't think that she was very prevalent. Obviously, if he is now, which is really crazy, and the reason I ask that is because you've got a lot of people wondering First of all, who is this woman? And then is she some Hollywood actress who's prone to a lot of drama? Or is what she's saying? What happened that this is on the royal family? And the palace. I mean to the point where she revealed last night that she was thinking about killing herself. It got so bad that Prince Harry felt he had no choice but to get them out of there. Yeah, I mean, I feel like he I feel like everything that if he was in Hollywood before, but I feel like you know, it wasn't to this certain extent like no eyes were on her as they are now. Our words you know, when she first came into the family, she obviously was living a very much like lower key life. He was like the California girls. She had her own blood called the Pig. She was very, You know, kind of, you know, the boho California vibe like that's what He kind of made herself as and then no one really knew her like I feel like if you walked suits and you, obviously, you know, knew the character, but for the most part, he kind of stayed under the radar, So I feel like it's just Now all eyes are on her. People are just, you know, fasting, her left and right, especially when he came into the family. She's American. You know, Black sees all this stuff like I think he just he couldn't win. No matter how hard he Tried or tried Tol, you know, make nice and say, you know, I am a good person, or I do that all this charity work. I love this stuff. You know, It's just I think it's just became a huge breaking point. At some point. That's why I see You know, wanted to maybe kill herself. I mean, I can't even imagine what it's like waking up and having 100 headlines about you, and they're not good, and you just kind of have to sit back and say, OK, I guess I got to just take it and live my life kind of, but even living it. He said he was in the palace. He couldn't see that he didn't leave for months at a time because They just told her not to, which is so not a way to live and like, they said, with the pandemic now, I think everyone kind of can relate to being trust. At some point. I'm

Meghan Markle Prince Harry Ok Magazine Jacqueline Raw Oprah Hollywood Harry Jacqueline Gayle King Serena Williams Meghan Abigail California Black
A Mexican Belonging

Latino Rebels Radio

05:36 min | 1 year ago

A Mexican Belonging

"I get really excited when i have former contributors go and do great things and i wouldn't say this guesses a former contributor because i think we've had some of his writings within the last year. He's in dallas. Do you want to say hello to everyone. Say who you are. hello. I'm on scientists. I'm a professor of history. I was hoping you weren't saying former rebels. I'm still writing for you. Guys i totally was like former not. You still contribute. So you are a professor history. At mountain view college in dallas. You are the author of homeland which is an intellectual study of ethnic mexican belonging. Since one thousand nine hundred. How geeky is that it is. It is pretty geeky but i think it can be interesting. Sometimes i've i've made some revisions to try to get folks to read it all right now. Listen let's get a couple of things out of the way. You are a contributor to latino rebels. You have written for latino usa. I've known you at least online for like who five six years. You've written some great pieces. You have the best twitter handle ever first world chicano. And you really touched me. When i read the introduction of acknowledgments your family raises you right like you thanked everyone and then you thanked me so i wanna thank you for thanking me in your book. It was a nice little surprise. No i definitely wanted to shout you. Julio and hector out hector salamo. Who was a deputy editor for latino rebels. Yeah i heard. You're going to be on the latin ish podcast so i'm already plugging latin is for him. Yeah shamelessly fell promoted. Yup but i had gotten out of graduate school. You know it kind of is now. And i just didn't know what i wanted to do. Things are tough. I wasn't ready to go back to revision. And then i started writing. And you guys didn't care if i came out of harvard or northwesterners something. Oh hell no yeah you can write come right for us and i was like okay and yeah tell us over miami of how powerful writing can be and also helped me as a writer because i stripped a lot of the academic jargon stuff out of this book is an editor publisher before you talk about the book that makes me super happy because when you started pitching me and pitching hector and then. That was one of the things that i told you. It's like just don't be an academic. Bu and you wrote some fantastic pieces and you've also written an amazing book. It's really really accessible and it speaks to. I think a theme that i wouldn't say it's controversial but it is. How do you begin to frame your experiences for this book that drew you to documenting like ethnic mexican and chicano history in this way like what drove you when you write a book you kind of write about yourself even if it is a history and so a lot of became out of family history personal experiences and and one of my favorite stories that i heard growing up was my mom and her family. They've migrated from quiet and they moved help. Paso anna late sixty s in my grandfather used to pick up my mom when she was a little girl and he used to tell her. I heat the mood noblet glass near less by your picking her up and says oh my little girl. You know you're going to be. You're gonna be without a voice because you don't speak english or spanish and that's and to worry about his family gonna belong right. Did he make the right choice into. It was kind of rooted in a family story like that. My dad used to joke. Us from el paso's well used to joke. He didn't know he was mexican till they join the airforce right because they'll pass everyone's mexican mexican americans everyone's the same and then he goes off to the air force. Suddenly he's different. Wow yeah that's a really good way of looking at it. These family stories. You know you get the then growing up to right when i write about the us in the chest these mexicans who have lost their mexican answer. These wannabe americans right. That kind of touched home of folks as you know like you're a little bit of a virtual not there those feelings the wondering about belonging which again i don't think are isolated just to me. I think that's why i've gotten a few tweets folks like. Hey my family this. Yeah this is my story. This is my family. Yeah and so. That's where the idea about belonging came out of end. I thought a lot of different areas right Politics and poetry and so belonging with the concept with an idea but let me look at all the things that i actually want to look at right. 'cause i i like reading poetry like reading literature. I also like politics and policy. This concept helped me look at all those things. And i think kind of unique way yes so talking about belonging. It's probably not the same experience. But it kind of is from puerto rican perspective. Where i kind of say like you know people that live on the island versus people that live on i asked. There's always been that tension. And i was born and raised in puerto rico but now i live in the mainland. So i'm not seen as like purely puerto rican so when you talk about the divide in the early nineteen hundreds that emerged between ethnic mexicans in the us in us. Born mexicans like you mentioned the which was in the you know that type of idea. How has that evolved throughout the years. And what is your book touch upon in that case. That's really interesting with you. Be boring and then your kid. They're gonna i

Mountain View College Hector Salamo Dallas Paso Anna Noblet Julio Hector Harvard Twitter United States Miami Drew El Paso Air Force Puerto Rican Puerto Rico
"deputy editor" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"And also people have been, you know, kind of filling secrets on Tic tac. There've been several Videos that are like telling them about celebrities and raiding them and how they're like. And you know what celebrities they met. So it's kind of like now, this like secret thing you know, people are really I'm still in all and I feel like people love that. But also think about all the people that broke out from six socks too. Like Sarah Cooper made such a big name for herself. And I remember he tweeted something. You know someone came up to me on the street that would have never happened a year ago. No. I just think more and more people are going to take to it. Especially it seems like you can get some sort of same from it. So, yeah, I think that is definitely gonna just keep growing and growing and on the topic of celebrities. One thing that I know you have covered at OK magazine is the fact that celebrities have really opened up throughout the course of this pandemic. Sometimes, you know, in the past, we've kind of watch them from afar. But things have gotten much more personal recently talk about that. And if you think that's something that will continue moving forward, even maybe after the pandemic Yeah, I feel like because this is such a You know, a seismic event that happened not only to us, but to celebrity do they're going to the same thing they're struggling with, you know, quarantine and weight gain. And, you know, not being able to work and all this stuff, too, and I feel like stands have definitely connected with that as well. I've seen so many things. You know, like I've seen this must wait in quarantine cause I'm stressed, and I've seen you know all these comments just saying, you know, Thank you so much for telling me that and for opening up about that, like I feel like that's just gonna keep continuing on and on. And I feel like this has really made everyone kind of, you know, re evaluate their lives and say, You know what? I'm maybe I'm in all these movies, but I'm I'm really normal person at the end of the day. And I think as time goes on, I think people are gonna still kind of keep that candor going because really important, I feel like that's how they connect with their fans in general, and also it's nice to see a different side to them. You know, maybe they're kind of You know, always harsh and you know have you know, maybe when they're getting interviewed, they're not always that nice or open and stuff like that. So I feel like it's been really nice to see a different side to someone else to. And just on that note. Final question for you celebrities who have become good at that and connect to their fans. Maura on Social Media, Do you find that they're able to gain a greater level of popularity that they're able to grow their careers in a better way than some of the other ones that are more reserved? Yeah, I think so. Because it makes you think like, you know. Oh, wow. They actually have worked through them than just their movies. They're actually a person and to me personally, I think it's nice when someone actually gives you some personal details about their life. You don't feel like they're just Anak ter or just an actress. I think that's definitely a better way of connecting with someone. And I think that it is also going to help them broke, too. And as more and more you know, as time goes on, and more and more platform get popular, and you know the younger generation. I also feel like That really speaks to the younger generation. I like younger generation loves a can like a candid conversation, so I feel like if they can just keep going with that. It's just going to get better and better for them. Jacqueline Ross, deputy editor at OK magazine. You can read all of their reporting on everything. Pop culture and okay mag dot com. Jacqueline. Thanks so much for the time. We really appreciate a great stuff. Of course, thanks for having me. All right, Coming up. Next will dive into the life and legacy of Martin Luther King Jr with historian and author Ken Davis. Free healthcare hundreds to more than $1000 per month and disability compensation and tens of thousands for college tuition. These are just some of the U. S Department of Veterans.

OK magazine Jacqueline Ross Sarah Cooper Martin Luther King Jr U. S Department of Veterans Ken Davis Maura deputy editor
Answering Mail From Our Listeners

The Book Review

04:53 min | 1 year ago

Answering Mail From Our Listeners

"To any us i to answer questions from listeners. To editors many of you are familiar with tina jordan. Who is the deputy editor of the book. Review and elizabeth egan and editor at the book. Review our group text columnist and the author of a novel of her own called a window opens. Listen tina thanks so much for being here. Hi pal hi pamela. Thanks for having us all right. Let's take our very first question. It comes from ingeborg moran and she asks i'd like to know everyone's thoughts on the kindle. Has anyone become a kindle convert during kovic. She writes to us from pittsburgh pennsylvania. Alright tina ou. I will say this is a tough one for me because one thing the pandemic has meant for all of us on the books desk is that we're reading everything. Digitally and i have zero problem with an e reader. I actually use an ipad and not a candle. If say. I'm going on vacation but for constant everyday reading i will admit it has been a real drag i liz. I don't know if you feel the same way. But i cannot wait until the day when i'm only holding real books in my hands again. Tina i agree. I was actually a very early adopter of the kindle when it was first invented and i feel that it serves a purpose and has a place in my reading life but i feel like it is way more clinical than holding a physical book. You're missing the pge feel and the smell of the book. I have two very simple tips for anyone who is looking to weed into the world of e-readers one is to experiment with the font and find one. That feels most appealing to you. There are a few fonts on my kindle that makes me feel. They remind me that. I'm reading on screen and i have a couple that are more palatable than others. Here's my other tip. When i'm reading a book. I am an underlying her and appeared full folder and interactor which is a hard thing to replicate on the kindle. Even though you can highlight. So i put a post it on the back of my kindle and take notes that way. It's not quite as rewarding as doggy ring and taking notes in the margins but it does allow you to have the same vibe. All you actually raise an important point. Which is that on e-readers. You can increase the font size and for anyone who has trouble seeing tiny print for example. No one is in that age category around here tonight thinking of in my mother. I hope she's not listening. Shoot uses an ipad down loves it. You know because she can make the print big enough so that when she's reading in bed at night she doesn't have to have her glasses. You know i'm surprised. Neither of you is brought up for me. The controversial element of the raider experience. Which is the percentages rather than pages. I i feel like for me. That that's like the fitbit it's sort of both too much information and also not the right information. You know i feel like it would. It would take me down a very bad path. If i were to rely on things like percentages because i am finisher and a complete list in general and and i i do like to check things off and somehow that percentage thing i feel like i'd just become very focused on the numbers rather than what you should be focused on when you're reading which is in the words. Does that bother other view. Know it definitely bothers me and sometimes mind will say location instead of percent and it'll say location and then a number and that is baffling to me. I don't understand it. But i have learned how to use the go-to feature on mine which allows me to skip around a book and read the end before the beginning which i will admit i m prone to do. Oh i know. Don't ask but the other thing that i find problematic about an e reader as a as a reviewer who's who's reading a ton of books and kind of waiting a ton of books at once when i look at something on an easy reader reduces my recall like i can't remember the name of the author when i have a book in my hand i have almost a savant like ability to connect the title and the author and even the color of the spine forever in my in my memory i read. It is that that have shown this to be true. This it's a disadvantage for me. Because i can't remember what i've read and i can't place it in the same way which is also can be a good thing because it gives all book sort of an equal beginning in my mind.

Tina Jordan Elizabeth Egan Ingeborg Moran Tina Ou Pamela Tina Pittsburgh LIZ Pennsylvania
"deputy editor" Discussed on Journalism.co.uk podcast

Journalism.co.uk podcast

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Journalism.co.uk podcast

"Aaron welcome to the journalism dot k. Podcast what's the working situation like for you. At the moment. I working situation right now. Is i have just needed a slot conversation where we're trying to figure out coverage for a major snowstorm that is about to hit the the northeast. Us potentially epic snowfall <hes>. So we're just coordinating with a metro desk in new york and the national desk in new york trying to figure out what that looks like and your here in the uk. Where where i am too. Yes i am. It's it's nearing the end of my day and the earlier part of the new york day. So i've moved on from waking up finding out. If there are any fires. I need to put out any fires at a broken out anywhere in the world that it does to cover them erin. Of course we hit stays talk about the breaking news team which mealtimes <hes> launched back in february and then of course a month later the coronas pandemic took hold of the world so foster was announced december. Things probably happened in between. Let's go retrace steps and take us through kind of the timeline of events that happened from february. Oh yeah we were. We were announced to great fanfare. I started thinking about packing up my life and moving over here and what a summer would be like in england and <hes>. Than everything shut down as as you are aware and we basically spent the summer triaging coronavirus coverage in watching the world tried to reopen and fail to reopen and then finally. There is a window <hes>. Late summer early. Fall where i and my team could all finally get here launch in earnest in october eight months after we were meant to so now. We've been here about two months and we're still kind of now. We landed and then the us election was happening. And then the vaccines started rolling out. And there's never ever heard dull moment but we are finally kind of getting our sea legs and figuring out what we look like and and how. We work so what was happening in between february in october exactly. There was a lot of learning how to be flexible to give you some background on the breaking news hub. We are sort of an evolution. An expansion of a team that still exists has existed at the times for four or five years called the express team. We are at our core. That team always has been which is fast quick twitch digital centric journalism avenir. Tynan's kind of making sure that the time on things that are trending and things that are breaking <hes>. Which are often the same thing or one turns into another. Basically that thing that is dominating. The conversation of the internet <hes>. Often it would have been expressed ascot jumped on that and so this time last year they started talking about expanding the express task kind of giving us a more resources and a larger remit within the new york times <hes>. In that kind of evolved into we all the breaking news hub and the conversation then turned toward. Okay so the breaking news hub. Existing in new york for senator would come on at six thirty in the morning. Our last editor would logoff at midnight. We had one reporter who was based in hong kong but largely. We were kind of unstaffed between midnight eastern and the next day in the us and so the plan to expand into london was to get closer to having something like twenty four seven coverage for the type of things that the expressed asking the breaking news. Hub in new york had always focused on. So let me understand this clearly. What others having a london office actually gives you that you didn't have before it gives us so many more hours in the work day. How okay we are able to have is on the world for nearly the entire day and we're constantly replenishing with fresh eyes. You'll take advantage of the times. There's a night editor on my team. In new york. Who logs off around midnight or one am when he's had a busy night and i'm up early. We overlap. I feel terrible when that happens on. But basically you know. He's he likes the entire newsroom. In new york is getting to the end of their day. they're trying to wrap up <hes>. And i come in two hours later with fresh eyes <hes>. The world looks a little bit different to me in my morning than it does to my colleagues in new york the end of the day it midnight ride and so putting a team putting my team here in london expands expands the time zones for us expand the number of working hours that we have in the day <hes>. I can start something. I can hand it off to a colleague in new york. Who's about to logon. I can awake up here. And i'll see a story. That's maybe not urgent for us to cover but i. I think that we should cover it. But i not have reporters over here. I can say right before. I got on this call with you. I was on a call with my new york colleagues who are all starving their day and i kind of ran down. Here's here's the three or four things that i saw out there. That weren't urgent. And i know you have more reporters coming on in the day. I've tree ozlem for you. Mom and then they're coming in. They're doing their own scans and kind of often finding the same stories <hes>. I love when we back each other up in like i can say i saw this over here and i think we could do this with it. And then somebody logs in at eight thirty and it was like i see that same thing and i love it. Let's do it.

new york cassie bloomberg london us Tynan new york times Aaron erin hong kong uk england Houston China
Erin McCann, deputy editor, express desk at NYT, on managing a remote breaking news team

Journalism.co.uk podcast

05:41 min | 1 year ago

Erin McCann, deputy editor, express desk at NYT, on managing a remote breaking news team

"Aaron welcome to the journalism dot k. Podcast what's the working situation like for you. At the moment. I working situation right now. Is i have just needed a slot conversation where we're trying to figure out coverage for a major snowstorm that is about to hit the the northeast. Us potentially epic snowfall So we're just coordinating with a metro desk in new york and the national desk in new york trying to figure out what that looks like and your here in the uk. Where where i am too. Yes i am. It's it's nearing the end of my day and the earlier part of the new york day. So i've moved on from waking up finding out. If there are any fires. I need to put out any fires at a broken out anywhere in the world that it does to cover them erin. Of course we hit stays talk about the breaking news team which mealtimes launched back in february and then of course a month later the coronas pandemic took hold of the world so foster was announced december. Things probably happened in between. Let's go retrace steps and take us through kind of the timeline of events that happened from february. Oh yeah we were. We were announced to great fanfare. I started thinking about packing up my life and moving over here and what a summer would be like in england and Than everything shut down as as you are aware and we basically spent the summer triaging coronavirus coverage in watching the world tried to reopen and fail to reopen and then finally. There is a window Late summer early. Fall where i and my team could all finally get here launch in earnest in october eight months after we were meant to so now. We've been here about two months and we're still kind of now. We landed and then the us election was happening. And then the vaccines started rolling out. And there's never ever heard dull moment but we are finally kind of getting our sea legs and figuring out what we look like and and how. We work so what was happening in between february in october exactly. There was a lot of learning how to be flexible to give you some background on the breaking news hub. We are sort of an evolution. An expansion of a team that still exists has existed at the times for four or five years called the express team. We are at our core. That team always has been which is fast quick twitch digital centric journalism avenir. Tynan's kind of making sure that the time on things that are trending and things that are breaking Which are often the same thing or one turns into another. Basically that thing that is dominating. The conversation of the internet Often it would have been expressed ascot jumped on that and so this time last year they started talking about expanding the express task kind of giving us a more resources and a larger remit within the new york times In that kind of evolved into we all the breaking news hub and the conversation then turned toward. Okay so the breaking news hub. Existing in new york for senator would come on at six thirty in the morning. Our last editor would logoff at midnight. We had one reporter who was based in hong kong but largely. We were kind of unstaffed between midnight eastern and the next day in the us and so the plan to expand into london was to get closer to having something like twenty four seven coverage for the type of things that the expressed asking the breaking news. Hub in new york had always focused on. So let me understand this clearly. What others having a london office actually gives you that you didn't have before it gives us so many more hours in the work day. How okay we are able to have is on the world for nearly the entire day and we're constantly replenishing with fresh eyes. You'll take advantage of the times. There's a night editor on my team. In new york. Who logs off around midnight or one am when he's had a busy night and i'm up early. We overlap. I feel terrible when that happens on. But basically you know. He's he likes the entire newsroom. In new york is getting to the end of their day. they're trying to wrap up And i come in two hours later with fresh eyes The world looks a little bit different to me in my morning than it does to my colleagues in new york the end of the day it midnight ride and so putting a team putting my team here in london expands expands the time zones for us expand the number of working hours that we have in the day I can start something. I can hand it off to a colleague in new york. Who's about to logon. I can awake up here. And i'll see a story. That's maybe not urgent for us to cover but i. I think that we should cover it. But i not have reporters over here. I can say right before. I got on this call with you. I was on a call with my new york colleagues who are all starving their day and i kind of ran down. Here's here's the three or four things that i saw out there. That weren't urgent. And i know you have more reporters coming on in the day. I've tree ozlem for you. Mom and then they're coming in. They're doing their own scans and kind of often finding the same stories I love when we back each other up in like i can say i saw this over here and i think we could do this with it. And then somebody logs in at eight thirty and it was like i see that same thing and i love it. Let's do it.

New York Aaron Erin United States Tynan London UK England New York Times Hong Kong
Much-Hyped News Startup 'The Correspondent' Closes 15 Months After Launch

Media Voices

03:22 min | 1 year ago

Much-Hyped News Startup 'The Correspondent' Closes 15 Months After Launch

"There was one new story dominated twitter discourse this week. I think it's important that we kinda flag up white so important so hayden christensen is back. Staff fada in disney plus new won't kanobi spent also the correspondent has announced its closure so before we get. I mean i've never seen a page of notes this long for one of our votes so peter. Why don't you take us through all of the nets. All of the notes. Finish you explain the correspondent closing you sitting comfortably. This is really sad this. Is you know we talked a media crushes and this is definitely be of my media. Crushes for a long time yet. You need to disclose about the you subscribe. Yeah i'm going to talk about. Because i think it has direct. I'm responsible. My behavior is indicative of a certain course of behaviors that i think of impacted the course one. Let me start with death. Correspond correspond was a dutch news. Launched in two thousand thirteen or Yeah it launched off over kurt funded campaign reseau indoors. Which team was massive. The success of the dutch say in sort of inspired the guys to to another kurt funding campaign in two thousand eighteen degrees two point sex mowing dolls to launch english language. Version of the correspondent called that correspond which be massively excited. The tame i said contribute to all campaign. They had this. I mean the idea of debt. Correspond correspondent is idea the titling the us was on breaking news. And it's us. John nauseam approach. Thank you see in magazines delayed gratification. That taught toys has has has delivered on tree member funded those transparency in the report in the really involved the journalists wealthy audience who you could actually correspond with it. John member owned thing. Isn't it not own. But certainly the funding dire from members when the defunding campaign the code funding company in two thousand eighteen. The go along. Us and florence was involved. thought legals. i'm trying to remember some of the names but they were very. Us in jail. Jay rosen was did not charter through the member. The member puzzle project and and it was clear that they were targeting. The us market distinguished publishing market. So very clearly. That's where they wanted them. Embassy come from Bought the impression was given that they were going to have a new york piece. I think John toast moved to new york and it was just cannot overcome until medica idea and then it transpired the well going to america that they were going to run most of it from hall where the original headquarters where they didn't they have to just while we're talking about facts and they actually apologize basically saying that they eventually. Yeah i was going to eventually. They misled

Kanobi Hayden Christensen John Nauseam Nets Disney Twitter Kurt Peter America Jay Rosen John Toast John New York Medica
"deputy editor" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

06:28 min | 1 year ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Join Marie Mackenzie about some entertainment possibilities for you for this holiday season. Netflix so much content to choose from. Netflix is like the gift that keeps on giving right. They have so much original content from Comedy that kid friendly films. But there's two projects in particular that I'm really excited about. He remembers seeing Jennifer Lopez embodies Selina back in the day on the big screen, right? Well, now there's a theories all about Selena's life coming to the small screen, thanks to Netflix, and The best thing about it is that Salinas family eyes backing this project. We all know Selena as the one with the amazing voice whose life was cut short thanks to her manager who shot and killed her. When she was only in her twenties. She had such an amazing legacy. And so her family is ensuring that her voice and her story lives on. Thanks. It's Selina, the Syria and I've already got a chance to see it. It's very heartwarming. And if you are a fan of music and a fan of Selina, you will love this. Now, when it comes to the Syriza is there more that we get to learn about Selina compared to what we saw in the movie right? There's more to the story in the very first episode. I don't want to spoil it, but we learn about just how much her father struggled to put together her band. As you know. Her sister was the drummer. Her brother was a guitarist in her fan. And so we really see how that family struggled to even put themselves together in a band that would rock it. Selina's career and insider. We got a chance to talk to the actress who plays Alina's onscreen sister, Naomi Gonzalez, and so that's available for you to read Right before he's been Selena. She tells us all about her time being on set and really playing on iconic person in music and tell us about my Rainey's black bottom. Yeah, So I mean, this film was going to be a must watch. Regardless. Right. You have Viola Davis, You have been so Washington Producing you have the late playwright August Wilson's words on screen. But it's also a little bit bitter, sweet right? Because it's Chad with pollution and final film ever. I'm sure you remember where you were. When you found out that the actor lost his battle with cancer he was battling privately on Do so. I've also got a chance to see this film beforehand. It is hauntingly beautiful. Biola is the star, of course, right. She plays Ma Rainey, but Chadwick character, you can't take your eyes off of them. And I think I would be saying that if he was still with us, but because he's not with us. It just makes it so much more special, and it's it's causing. Um, but it's beautiful, and it's already getting tons of Oscar buzz. So it's definitely a must watch. I am still in awe. At what Chadwick Boseman was able to do while he was battling cancer. That is just one of the most incredible stories that people had no clue what he was going through, and he just kept working and working and working and some of the films and some of the projects he was working on. They were physically taxing. Yeah, yeah, very physically taxing. Also on Netflix is the five blood is a likely joint, and Chadwick also stars in it and and spike after try to look past bike spoke about how they were filmed in 100 degree weather, just brutal, brutal weather doing these up the season stunts in them, and Chad would never miss a beat. On and even in Martini's black bottom, you know, I was sort of looking, You know, now that I know what I don't know what sort of looking at the screen to see. What does he look ill? And you know what he didn't see had a light in his eyes. He just plays this vivacious, ambitious trumpets here who really wants to make his own music on and not just be in the band, and, um it's just It's really bittersweet. So watch because you see just how much potential this man has. And But you know what you're gonna do. It is a beautiful film. I'm joined by Joy Marie Mackenzie, deputy editor of Entertainment for Insider, and Finally, we Get to Wonder Woman, 1984. I didn't see the original Wonder Woman film, but I did notice. Did this kind of get released out of nowhere? You know, Actually, people have been awaiting with bid breath or there's some. I think people in general just want to see a superhero film this year. They have all been pushed back right, because both of the films that everyone flocks to see and so we were sort of wishing and waiting to see what they were going to do with Wonder Woman 1984, But they recently announced that not only will be released in theaters, you know the few that are open, but it'll be available on HBO. Max, which I suggest people watch. With their families safely on their couch in the comfort of their homes. And you know you might not be wonder Woman, you know God. Adele is embodying Wonder Woman during the Cold War in the sequel, So you're not here on the big screen, but you'll still get a chance to see this like really important stories helmed by a woman, a female director Patty Jenkins. Um, And I think it just sort of check the box because people were waiting to see a superhero on screen And so you know, we're getting it on Christmas day. Um, so it's like, super appropriate just in time. Got that in right before the end of 2020. And I will say for those who have HBO Max, we're thinking about getting HBO. Max. I've been watching the undoing. Now, this isn't necessarily family friendly. But boy, that is a fantastic show with Nicole Kidman and Hugh Grant. You know what? I have not seen that yet. But every single time I see it trending on Twitter. I'm like, Oh, my God. Should I just go ahead and didn't get it? But you know, each kill Max at some amazing offerings that one that you can see euphoria or didn't Dale with? She earned her her first ever any award for that portrayal that's on the steel maxim. So many more other offerings. Um, So, yeah, It's definitely one that you should subscribe you again. I wouldn't sit down with the kids and watch the undoing. Probably not gonna let's not not the not family friendly show, but if you've got some downtime some alone time, it's definitely worth checking out. Right right. Deputy editor of Entertainment for Insider Join Marie Mackenzie running through some family friendly entertainment offerings for Thanksgiving and the rest of this holiday season. Joy. Thank you so much for taking a few minutes to talk to us. We appreciate it. Yes. And thank you so much for having me happy holidays, So hopefully that was helpful Joy, breaking down some of the.

Selina Netflix Selena Joy Marie Mackenzie Marie Mackenzie Chadwick Boseman HBO Ma Rainey cancer deputy editor Jennifer Lopez Viola Davis Naomi Gonzalez Salinas Biola Chad Oscar Twitter
The Last 4 Years Have Tarnished U.S. Image In Europe. Will Biden Be Able To Improve It?

Marketplace

03:41 min | 2 years ago

The Last 4 Years Have Tarnished U.S. Image In Europe. Will Biden Be Able To Improve It?

"He will work to rebuild relationships with European leaders. But as NPR's Eleanor Beardslee reports, the last four years may have permanently tarnished America's image in Europe. Welcome to the third edition off the Paris Peace Forum you have. The Paris Peace forum opened this week more than 150 nations and organizations looking for ways to solve the world's problems through multilateralism and international cooperation. Director and founders used on Vase says even though it's virtual this year, the U. S still sent no official representative. So in 2018. When the forum was founded, Donald Trump was actually in Paris because he was there for the 100th anniversary off World War one, and even though he was present in Paris, he didn't show up at the forum, even though leaders like Merkel, putting twiddle and many others where actually present Aside from a few liberal populist governments on Europe's eastern flank, most of Europe is breathing a sigh of relief over the change in administration and nowhere more so than in Germany. So I used to be a fan of Merkel. I used to think she was terrific. A big leader, great leader. I think what she did to Germany is a disgrace. President Trump loved toe lash out at Germany and its chancellor, Angela Merkel, Even on the campaign trail suited David will of the German Marshall Fund says German opinions of the U. S have never been lower. Just a quarter percent of Germans have a positive view of the United States at the moment. There have been other low point, says David Wilt, like during the Iraq war, But America's image quickly rebounded with the election of Barack Obama. This time, David Wilkes says America's image may not recover so fast. Germans have become very savvy to US politics and also realized that although President Trump lost, he did better than expected and Trumpism is here to stay for the near future. Trump's tariffs on European food and wine and his threats to withdraw from NATO have made many in Europe feel they can't count on the U. S as before excitedly. And then Dylan's off. I'm not in 2017 Miracle proclaimed that Europe must depend on itself. Sylvie Kauffmann, deputy editor of French newspaper, Le moaned, says Biden will make the transatlantic relationship positive and amicable again. And she says Europeans were impressed by the U. S election when we so that the turnout was so high That people were going to vote in droves or had made their votes. The fact that the turnout was so high I gave the impression that you know democracy was working. But Kaufman says political events since the election do not bode well for America's image, the fact that President Trump is refusing to concede Calling for demonstrations that the Republican leadership is not backing down either. Four years of populism and isolationism in America have had an impact in Europe. 29 year old Parisian Martin Cangelosi says after Trump he doesn't see America the way he used to. When I was a kid, I used to think America was a great players like a dream. You know the American dream that something in Europe We think about you know with, for example. Now, I don't even think America is still a great country. I feel really sorry about that a regret shared by many Europeans who worry that the United States and Europe have grown permanently further apart. Eleanor Beardsley. NPR NEWS PARIS

Paris Europe Eleanor Beardslee America U. Merkel President Trump Germany Donald Trump David Wilt David Wilkes NPR German Marshall Fund Vase Sylvie Kauffmann Angela Merkel Le Moaned Barack Obama
"deputy editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Can do for a couple of months, and it's not ideal, but it's better than it's better than nothing. It's it's probably better than assume Colin. It's also better than getting sick. So I think, be willing to make some compromises and then get creative. Like Can you get an outdoor space heater? Can you you know? Can somebody build a fire that you could gather around like again? These options kind of vary depending on where you live and what access you have. But thinking about what are small things that I can Diogo To be able to connect on some level with people on. I think outdoor activities like snowshoeing and cross country skiing and ice skating are also going to be big this winter. So if you've never done it before, maybe let yourself embrace it and try things like that. Just be willing to step outside your comfort zone a little bit in order to to not isolate yourself. Rachel Miller is the deputy editor of Vice Life and the author of the Art of Showing Up How To Be There For Yourself and Your People. Rachel, Thanks so much. Thank you so much for having me have a great day. And we want to hear from you, our listeners. How are you approaching the holidays this year? What conversations have you had, if any, with loved ones leave us a message at 8778698253. That's 8778698253. Thank you Take away we'll be right back. I want to bring us with you on the go subscribed to the takeaway as a podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Thanks, Ginger. Attorney General Bill Barr told US attorneys this week they could investigate allegations of election fraud. It's not the first time he's fallen in line with the.

Rachel Miller US Bill Barr Colin Ginger deputy editor fraud Attorney Vice Life
"deputy editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Joining me is Rachel Miller, deputy editor of Ice Life, Rachel. Some folks will not have family to gather with some folks are live alone. We know that a lot of Americans live alone increasingly. How are people who live alone going to manage this holiday season, which is really you know, the past couple of months have really shone a light on isolation in particular. Yeah, It's very real, and it's really difficult. So I actually have a lot of experience with this will be my first Christmas. Not alone. I think since 2014 and so I've sort of mastered how to be alone on Christmas, and I think it's really important to have a plan going into it. If you wait until Christmas Eve to start making plans, you're gonna realize Oh, I can't go to the grocery store and get food and they don't have Any activities, and maybe I would have done laundry. So plan ahead. Don't wait, and I think it's important to do something, even if it's not something related to the holiday. If you decide I'm gonna watch movies all day and pretend this isn't happening totally fine, but just know going into it what you're going to do. I think it's helpful to have like, make a special meal. To have a recipe that you've picked out doesn't have to be a holiday recipe. I would always make this lasagna soup, which takes a few hours. Feels really special in fancy isn't really christmassy but always made me feel. You know, a little bit more faster than gave me something to do. I think that was a really important thing. Another small thing I always do is wait to open any gifts I received until Christmas morning, so I got packages in the mail. Oh, just put them under the tree and then be sure to reach out to people like you don't have to be alone alone. You should Joe check in with a couple of friends just because they're gonna be worried about you, too. It's a strange day and let yourself be sad. If you're feeling sad like this is this is a rough year. You don't have to be excited about it, and it feels it can feel bad to be alone on a big holiday but know that you are not alone in the sense that a lot of other people are going through this, too, and have gone through it in the past and Don't feel shame about it because it is more common experience, and I think people realize and it will definitely be common this year, so trust that you will get through it. It's just a single day. That's the other thing I think could be hard to remember. It's just that one day and then life does sort of resume and you'll have gotten through it by the end of it. Of course, there's also this idea that you know, being indoors is not ideal, which is the reason why we're having this conversation. Largely a lot of our activities.

Rachel Miller deputy editor Joe
"deputy editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"How do we adapt our lives for what? Potentially could be a dark cove it winter? Gonna talk us through all this is Rachel Miller, the deputy editor of Vice Life and the author of the Art of Showing up how to Be there for yourself. And your people. Rachel. Thanks for joining us. Thank you so much for having me. So difficult times right now, On top of difficult times, it's the holidays are quickly approaching, and some folks were having someone awkward conversations with their family. About not to attend holiday celebrations. How do you suggest approaching those conversations? Well, I think the first thing to do is if you're the one who is deciding not to go home like you normally water you're the one kind of requesting the change of plans. I think it's really important to give yourself permission first, because it can feel really hard to have these conversations. If you're not confident in what you're saying, or If your partner is the one pushing for it, it could be easy to kind of throw them under the bus versus owning your decisions. So I think it's important to think through why you're doing this and to feel really good about the choice you're making. Even if you don't feel good about it in the sense of it's not a positive thing. You're not happy about it. You should at least try to feel confident in it so that you can approach the conversation from a more grounded place and just not get sort of overwhelmed if you get a lot of pushback. Are there any other creative alternatives to an in person holiday gathering other than eating turkey in front of a zoom? Yeah, I mean, I think that it really depends on your family and the traditions that you all love the most. I think figuring out how to replicate those is really important and also talking to your family about what they're going to miss most and figure out how you can do that. So if they, you know, love taking a big family photo every year. Is there a way that you can replicate that outside? Um, I edited a piece from a freelancer who suggested doing as I'm cooking lesson with a family member who always makes the beloved favorite recipe. Have them teach everyone how to make it over Zoom and walk you through all the steps So you're seeing them make it themselves. You can record it so you all have that is a keepsake. Those are the things that make you feel more connected, maybe even more so than actually eating the meal together. It's being in the kitchen together, so Hearing out what things were going to feel really special and memorable. And, you know, sometimes imitating the former thing can feel worse. So it could feel strange to have a holiday with only four people there instead of 20. So if you're gonna be upset by that, maybe it's time to do something entirely different and not make the traditional meal have untie, really different menu. So you don't feel that sense of sadness because this just can't hold a candle to past years. I think finding something else to get excited about helps a lot. Of course, Public health experts are recommending, not tow have gatherings this holiday season. But there may be folks who insist on doing it anyway. Even if you yourself are not going to attend, is it We're trying to change their mind, sending them articles and saying, Look at this who's or is that just not helpful? I think it's worth having a conversation about it because I think you'll feel better if you say your piece, but I do think it's important to go into it with the understanding that you know your relatives with their own people. They have agency that they're your grand parents aren't sweet little old people who are being conned unnecessarily. They're adults who can make decisions for themselves, and I think it's important to treat them as such, versus kind of condescending them and coming in with all these facts and data, which might not actually move them. I think that's a really hard thing to recognize that the holidays are super emotional, super fraud. So what is the more emotional argument to make here? How can you say to them? You know, I'm really worried that if we gather I won't be able to relax and enjoy myself and have a good time because I'm gonna be worried.

fraud Rachel Miller deputy editor partner Vice Life
"deputy editor" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Much better analogy. Planet is now warmer than in the entire history of human civilisation. It's like we've landed on a new planet with a new set of climate conditions. We have to figure out what of the civilization that we brought with us to this point can survive these conditions. David Wallace Wells is the deputy editor of New York magazine and the author of the Uninhabitable Earth, a book that explores what will happen if we don't cut our carbon emissions soon. He says. It's not just about warmer weather. It changes the whole system. Rainstorms going, the more intense the oceans air heating up, which means that hurricanes are going to become more intense and more frequent as they already are. There. Going to be on extreme droughts, as well as extreme rain falls is just a kind of a scrambling of what had been a very stable system on which we have erected all of human civilization, and it's not just unstable weather. It's unstable. US. Agricultural yields could fall by half more over the course of the centre if we don't change Course it effects respiratory illnesses. Cancer. It affects cognitive performance development of Children. If you've been paying attention, none of this is news. What is new is that public opinion about the climate crisis is finally changing. So when you see these headlines, 70% of Americans are now at least mildly curious. That's not something to brag about. It still seems really loaded me to me something like 70, or 75% of the country, Expressing concern about an issue seems really high. We live in an incredibly polarized world, where most of these issues if you can nudge it past 50%, you're doing incredibly well. So what took us so long to become alarmed until quite recently, people didn't see the effects in their lives. I think almost no one now can look at their TV screens and think to themselves. Climate change isn't real federal government has done virtually nothing about climate change in the last few years. But in many ways the country is marched right ahead anyway..

US New York magazine David Wallace Wells deputy editor Cancer
"deputy editor" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"To 66 68 68 got a couple special guests. Coming your way. One gentleman from bright part coming on shortly to kind of break down last night's one and only vice presidential debate. But let's go to Bill in Mattapan right now, who wants to weigh in himself on last night's debate? What do your thoughts Bill? A nice meeting you then Vinny. So what did you do You think won the debate last night? Well, it's a loaded question, and it shouldn't be. I do mornings in Connecticut to bill, so I watched some of it. Not all of it. I don't like the whole who won, Who lost thing. It's just who fared well and and who was armed. It's not even if they stump the person they won't have a since. You don't have a Ah, definitive answer to the question. I just asked you some. I'll tell you what I saw. I think that the vice president with his bank Really called me and then the pills. Because he told me what What? What did he tell you? He told me that he didn't hear what I heard. Him and his regime with Trump Say, Hey, hey, he's telling me I have been here. What I heard. He's telling me that my eyes didn't see what I saw. Okay, So that's calling me a Nydia. That's calling me blood Blind, deaf and dumb. Okay, how don't it how hope it Can the Trump beginning administration think that the American people are that big? They're going to say that they didn't see what they saw or hear what they heard. How damn dunking and you're going to call. You're going to say your followers a damn dumb like they are because Trinity. Let me ask you then, Bill. I mean, that's how you felt. That's how you felt. And would you feel better? Do you feel that Kamala Harris? Came across a someone you feel would be more respect. Miller Harris did not have my boat. I originally wanted war enough here, but he has my vote now because I know she could take them embassy. Ls that are up there right now. And I'm going to tell you something. You young people have a note to talk about God. They need people that represent and 11 thing. The war. The Warren thing really hurts. Your hurts your case there, Bill. I appreciate the call. Look, you felt the way you felt we do have Ah, special guests lined up here that I have to get to and and I respect that. I think to be that. Ah! Flip with your vote while they had it up until this minute are she didn't have it up until this minute and she's getting it because the other one just ticked you off that that that's not the way I go about making my decisions. When it comes to voting. It's a precious right and too few of us show up actually turnout at the polls to do it. The numbers will still astonish come November, when we see how many people actually how many Americans actually did not get out and vote even though it looks allow the turn out's going to be bigger than it's ever been, and it probably will be bigger, but it was still astonish. We do have a special guest to get to them. Welcome to the show. John Hayward, Breitbart's national security deputy editor. I'm wondering if we can actually get through this exchange aboutthe one and only vice presidential debate..

Bill Miller Harris vice president Kamala Harris Vinny Trump Mattapan Connecticut deputy editor John Hayward Warren Breitbart
The Internet, From Space

Reset

05:42 min | 2 years ago

The Internet, From Space

"The Internet, it's how we work how go to school, how we see friends and family. But not everyone has a good connection and that's where a few tech companies come in with a sort of modest proposal. What have we got our Internet from Outerspace Adam Clark estes deputy editor at recode wrote about this, and is here to talk about Adam. Surprising thing in your story that a lot of people probably don't already know is that a lot of listeners already get through Internet via satellite. That's how we get wi fi on planes for instance. So why hasn't this taken off more broadly satellite Internet has historically been and? Just. A little bit sub par When you compare it to terrestrial Wifi, you're down on planet earth. We have fiber optic cables which basically have limited bandwidth and to do satellite Internet. You're basically beaming connection from address Joe Network up to satellite and back down and technology just hasn't been good enough to to get with to enough people so that it compares to terrestrial broadband. Internet. You might get from a variety inner time Warner A, but that's starting to change with new satellite technology and would call constellations of satellites and has pandemic at all sort of raise the stakes for this work and made it. More, urgent less-urgent. Tell me about that depend epic is. Really accelerated development, and especially investment in the technology. Just after the pandemic started, it became incredibly clear that a lot of people don't have Internet access and they're being left behind young students who aren't able to get online for classes, people who aren't able to to to work remotely. So once it became so clear that solving this problem of Internet access was urgent a lot more investment went into Xilai. Broadband initiatives the number of launches went up quite a bit and I. Think, we're GONNA see that investment continue and more these networks go online in the near future Gotcha. So who exactly is trying to do this? What are the different companies that see a future in? Internet for space, the two companies being talked about both right now our space x and Amazon both of them are launching what are called low earth orbit constellations into space this year, and in addition to them, there are companies that have had satellites These are the companies that. You. Probably. Use to get a connection on a plane or a train and via sat and Hughes two big players in that space and part of the idea is tabby satellites be sort of a low orbit, right? So there are two main types of satellite broadband setups. One is geosynchronous satellites geosynchronous satellite. Okay. So A geosynchronous satellites as above one place on earth and spins with the earth so that it can be connected down to to anywhere on the surface at any given time. The second kind and this is sort of the the newer more exciting type according to some. This is what spacex, Amazon or doing. These are called low earth orbit satellites. Geosynchronous satellites are thousands of miles above the earth surface low orbit satellites. However, as the name implies are much closer, they might be as little as three hundred miles above earth surface. I think it SPACEX, they're going to be about three, hundred and. Forty miles above the surface, and that means that the distance that the signal has to travel is much less, which means you get lower latency that means you won't get a lag on a connection and because there are a lot of different satellites, Elon Musk, and spacex say that you'll have a bandwidth that will be able to compete with terrestrial broadband and even fiber optic networks, Gotcha and SPACEX and Amazon are doing this. I assume just because there's money to be made right I. Mean I got think. There's a bounty at the end Elon. Musk has said that he just wants to get into the business and he wants to disrupt the telecom business and he believes that he can make enough money doing. So to help fund his mission to colonize Mars. Amazon hasn't said that much about why they're doing it It might also be just to get into the telecom business in compete in an industry that is is fairly monopolized. Others have hypothesized at Amazon wants to get into the satellite broadband business because then they could be their own first customer, Amazon web services, of course, offers a lot of cloud computing technology and the ability. To be connected to the Internet anywhere on Earth, could do a number of different great things, aws. Got It. So the answer is a mix of just straight up capitalism money to be made if we don't make it someone else will, and then another incentive is that this could be pretty synergistic with the main business and I'd add a third thing and and everybody mentions this. Bridging the digital divide is not only good for business. It's sort of good for mankind connecting more people to the Internet stands to have great unforeseen benefits space experts didn't says. The connecting people that previously could not get Internet access in parts of the rural United States and southern Canada. Like the Pacific Northwest Region is where they've had Beta, testers and I think that a lot of different companies have really pursued the dream of satellite broadband because it can reach people in areas that no one else can these are areas that aren't served by big telecom companies where there aren't fiber optic cables and in fact, would be expensive to build that infrastructure that no one has ever going to do it.

Amazon Spacex Elon Musk Adam Clark Deputy Editor Warner A Joe Network Pacific Northwest Region Xilai Hughes Canada United States
Worldwide COVID-19 Cases Soar as Scientists Scramble for Response

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:59 min | 2 years ago

Worldwide COVID-19 Cases Soar as Scientists Scramble for Response

"This week in America a grim and telling number. More than two hundred, thousand people have now died officially of Covid nineteen the House of Representatives held a moment of silence yesterday to acknowledge that painful milestone more people have been infected there than in any other country. Cases continue to climb states that suffered the most are recovering but infections and others are rising, which seemed to have been making progress in tackling the virus is against infections spreading fast and in Britain, and elsewhere there were expectations warnings of a second wave. I'm sorry to say that as in Spain and France and many other countries we've reached a perilous journey. With a vaccine still well down the line preparations are being made for an uncertain and tragic winter. And many governments have squandered precious time failing to prepare for what's to come. I think it's important to realize that each country experiences curb in its own way. Edward Car is the economists deputy editor. Europe. At the moment is going through a second wave cases in. India. Very high but overall it's been a consistent increase relentlessly such that they're announced note two million recorded cases day. And that reflects I think the both the nature of the disease and the insufficient grasp of the basic public health policy response that's required and are there any bright spots? Any positives to look too at this stage? Well, of course, in the background, which is hugely important has been fantastic and really impressive work by scientists and doctors, both to kind of work on the treatment protocols to find various medicines and to do research on vaccines. So that's all that's also entering in the background and it is beginning to have an effect on fatality rates, but there's a lot more to come on that. And what are the improvements on the medical side specifically. Well quite a lot of it's kind of really basic medicine. So when people first presented with what was thought to be essentially a respiratory illness, the focus was on the lungs people were put on ventilators in very large numbers vary eilly and that that wasn't always very good for them and didn't help them as much as was needed. Now it's realized this is a disease that attacks many organs in the body has stroke is a big problem that kids can suffer the heart damage and doctors a much better at keeping an eye on fluid levels on oxygen levels on treating the symptoms that might be harming various organs. So just in sheer sort of management of the disease that being big improvements. And then, of course, the medicines of and POPs one of the most important decks and methods zone is a is a very cheap steroid that can be bought and supplied in large quantities in that has for people who need oxygen and to need ventilation can lead to substantial declines in mortality of twenty to thirty percent. And the hope is that over the coming months, there'll be more medicines and. Vaccines which will bring that fatality rate down still more. and. What's your sort of overarching take on the the public health response. For the Public Health Response has been just much much more variable for a number of complex reasons. I think one problem political problem has been some differences on on what the priorities should be. Some countries have a ticket only favored keeping the economy open and Sweden's often held up as an example there possibly an idealized example because in fact, actually there were restrictions others have tried to keep the death rate down to zero by having a blanket. On the economy I personally think the both of those extremes are wrong. Sweden's actually had quite high death rate and quite a big blow to its economy compared with the neighboring countries, Finland Norway. Denmark. He's done some worse on both those measures. New Zealand has had a stunningly successful. Ability to keep the deaths right down but it's paid a very high price because it's shot the the whole country down and if you look at a country like Taiwan been even more successful on deaths and paid a much much smaller price in terms of the economy. And I think that that's because the countries that have been prepared to make trade offs and have had good public health can succeed in both reducing fatality rates and in keeping bits of the economy open. But what does that look like in detail? How should that that trade off actually be made you think? I think are two or three key components, and the first of those is a really granular testing and tracing operation. The second thing that's important is being sensible about the trade offs and then the third thing that's important is how to communicate this. I think people are quite goods in an emergency at taking difficult steps to change their lives but it's very hard to sustain and this will need to be sustained already need to stay for nine months but this'll go on for a long time yet before supplies all vaccines are plentiful enough for everybody to being vaccinated and even then the vaccines might not work that well or they're affect might be temporary so we're going to be living with this disease for a long time yet. I mean a lot of this advice was was starting to become clear even even months ago, and why do you think it is at different countries responses continue to be so divergent when the the best practice seem. To, be converging. I think that's a hard question to answer I. Think part of it was the enormous relief when countries have had a bad first wave came out of lockdown at the end of the spring, and in the summer. And there was a sense of cough people just thought thank goodness and governments having got through that desperate first phase of the disease themselves were relieved are never quite caught up. I mean the countries that have done this really really well, and I I think Taiwan is absolutely top of the class here have been good from the very beginning. and You perhaps feel at some other countries catching up in other places. In the United States, I think has to stand ups an example of this, the poor communication and the changes in rules reflect the politicization of the disease. There are too many people who have a stake in it working one way or another, and it's it's a tragedy. I think that the Centers for Disease Control and prevention which went into this pandemic as perhaps the most highly regarded public health body in the world has suffered from errors and poor leadership and denigration from the White House. That's that's just done nothing tool for the overrule effort. Are you hopeful are you more hopeful about the the post vaccine era and the experience today has made us all. Yes I think people, and I think people learn and learn more slowly than than baps they ought to but they do learn and you know I say the scientific response to this disease has been incredible and and that's something to feel cheerful about is just the even the best scientific response will take longer than people might like I did that time many people will suffer?

Taiwan Centers For Disease Control Covid Sweden Spain Britain America House Of Representatives Europe India United States Edward Car Deputy Editor France White House Denmark New Zealand Finland
"deputy editor" Discussed on The Struggle Bus: Self-Care, Mental Health, and Other Hilarious Stuff

The Struggle Bus: Self-Care, Mental Health, and Other Hilarious Stuff

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on The Struggle Bus: Self-Care, Mental Health, and Other Hilarious Stuff

"Rachel Wilkerson Miller, welcome to the struggle bus. Thank you for having me. I'm so excited to be here I am so thrilled <hes>. You are a friend of the show. You are one of my best friends in Hawaii. World and you're here to guest co host. Catherine has the week off. And so before we get into it I'm GonNa tell our audience a little bit about you. You know her. You love her Rachel Carson Miller is the deputy editor vice life and the author of two books, DOT journaling a practical guide, which was published in twenty, seventeen and her most recent book, the art of showing up how to be there for yourself and your people which came out in May. And, <hes> <hes> a big Fan. I'm a big Fan of your writing big Fan of the art of showing up I feel like <hes> I've learned a lot about what what it even means to show up. and. We're GonNa talk about that today. <hes> but Rachel before we get into the show and I didn't tell you I was going to do this. I didn't know I was going to some very sorry about but. Can you just like talk for a second about like what what is showing up like? How? How do you think about it? How do you define it? <hes> and just like. Maybe you're a quick like <hes> elevator pitch for like why it's important to think about. Yeah, definitely so I. Say this right mantra that it's one of those things that can be a little bit hard to describe you know when you see it. <hes> to me, it starts. Starts really with the active Barron witness to something, and this applies to showing up for other people are showing up for yourself so being an active observer to what's happening around you and like really taking it in, and then naming what you're saying, so running it through the lens of your past experiences in your own life with this person everything you know naming it kind of giving it a sort of starting to make sense of it <hes>. <hes> I think naming his really powerful, and and then reacting accordingly, so if it's a friend, it might means sang them Oh my gosh. I'm so sorry that happened to you. or how are you feeling? If it's something you're going through, it might be a little bit more of like. How am I feeling about this thing that just happened. Which I've now realize wasn't great <hes> so some kind of response and the response sometimes is just the. The naming it's realizing a bad thing happened, I just need to sit with that other times. The response is going to be doing some kind of self care or taking action in some way. <hes> spent kind of the basics, but I think we kind of recognizing people are showing up for us when they're fully present fully there and I think we know when we're showing up for ourselves to and and when we're not showing up for ourselves. Okay? Well I think that was the episode. Anyone for tuning in. That was awesome. That was such a beautiful elegant, like explanation of what it means to show up, and also like I gotta say man like I. Feel like the struggle bus. Is You know we describe it? As like mental health shown advice show <hes> we, we sometimes like struggle with like exactly how to describe it, but I think that like what you just described about talking about how to show for yourself and other people is like kind of the mission of the show and Sal I, <hes>. Yeah, so I'm. Very excited that you're here. I'm very excited to I. Feel like you get showing up on a deep level. You always have that I. Think is why we're so close in large part so <hes> this show the show gets it. The audience gets it. I'm excited.

Rachel Catherine Rachel Wilkerson Miller Rachel Carson Miller Sal I Hawaii deputy editor Barron Ryan
Everybody Do Less

The Struggle Bus: Self-Care, Mental Health, and Other Hilarious Stuff

03:17 min | 2 years ago

Everybody Do Less

"Rachel Wilkerson Miller, welcome to the struggle bus. Thank you for having me. I'm so excited to be here I am so thrilled You are a friend of the show. You are one of my best friends in Hawaii. World and you're here to guest co host. Catherine has the week off. And so before we get into it I'm GonNa tell our audience a little bit about you. You know her. You love her Rachel Carson Miller is the deputy editor vice life and the author of two books, DOT journaling a practical guide, which was published in twenty, seventeen and her most recent book, the art of showing up how to be there for yourself and your people which came out in May. And, a big Fan. I'm a big Fan of your writing big Fan of the art of showing up I feel like I've learned a lot about what what it even means to show up. and. We're GonNa talk about that today. but Rachel before we get into the show and I didn't tell you I was going to do this. I didn't know I was going to some very sorry about but. Can you just like talk for a second about like what what is showing up like? How? How do you think about it? How do you define it? and just like. Maybe you're a quick like elevator pitch for like why it's important to think about. Yeah, definitely so I. Say this right mantra that it's one of those things that can be a little bit hard to describe you know when you see it. to me, it starts. Starts really with the active Barron witness to something, and this applies to showing up for other people are showing up for yourself so being an active observer to what's happening around you and like really taking it in, and then naming what you're saying, so running it through the lens of your past experiences in your own life with this person everything you know naming it kind of giving it a sort of starting to make sense of it I think naming his really powerful, and and then reacting accordingly, so if it's a friend, it might means sang them Oh my gosh. I'm so sorry that happened to you. or how are you feeling? If it's something you're going through, it might be a little bit more of like. How am I feeling about this thing that just happened. Which I've now realize wasn't great so some kind of response and the response sometimes is just the. The naming it's realizing a bad thing happened, I just need to sit with that other times. The response is going to be doing some kind of self care or taking action in some way. spent kind of the basics, but I think we kind of recognizing people are showing up for us when they're fully present fully there and I think we know when we're showing up for ourselves to and and when we're not showing up for ourselves. Okay? Well I think that was the episode. Anyone for tuning in. That was awesome. That was such a beautiful elegant, like explanation of what it means to show up, and also like I gotta say man like I. Feel like the struggle bus. Is You know we describe it? As like mental health shown advice show we, we sometimes like struggle with like exactly how to describe it, but I think that like what you just described about talking about how to show for yourself and other people is like kind of the mission of the show and Sal I, Yeah, so I'm. Very excited that you're here. I'm very excited to I. Feel like you get showing up on a deep level. You always have that I. Think is why we're so close in large part so this show the show gets it. The audience gets it. I'm excited.

Rachel Wilkerson Miller Rachel Catherine Rachel Carson Miller Sal I Hawaii Deputy Editor Barron
"deputy editor" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

06:24 min | 2 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on KGO 810

"The use of Nonmedical cloth face covering as an additional voluntary public health measures. So it's volunteer. You have to do it. They suggested for a period of time. But this is voluntary. I don't think I'm gonna be doing it, kid. You already owe Chip Franklin here with with the obviously, the that was the president talking about not wearing a mask. And the really story here is how effective masks are at stopping the spread of covert 19 of course, And now I've read from some infectious disease specialist that if everybody worth 95% of the population, war masks, we could cut this thing at the niece. I don't know how true that is. So I'd like to bring on people that are smarter than me. And unfortunately, that's pretty simple. Angela Fritz is not only the deputy editor of general assignment news desk at The Washington Post, Kiss this. She's an atmospheric scientist. Was formally deputy weather editor at the Capital Bureau capital Weather Gang that's in the Washington Post and has worked off for The weather underground and here in San Francisco as well. So that's a local connection has a B s and meteorology and MSN earth and atmospheric science. Please don't use too big awards with me, Angela. How you doing? I'm so great. Thanks for having me. All right. So these masks that we've been talking about Well had a rush lesson in these over the last six months. The surgical masks that Hawkeye used to wear in the operating room and mash versus the N 95 which the painter used to have when he was inside. Which one is the best one toe have today to protect yourself and or others? You know, I think the best thing that we can do right now is where the simple cloth masks and not necessarily the ones that the painter's air wearing but the ones that you can't even make yourself with a few layers of cloth. Or if you can get your hands on. I mean, you know, I've seen a lot of people with just a really basic medical masks out there, not the N 95 but the more basic ones they're usually blue. It's got some elastic around the edges for your ears. But those are honestly the best things that we could do because like you said, it's true. Research Research has shown that if we all just, you know, kind of sucked it up in war masks. We could really dio a lot stop the spread of this thing. Even more so than you know, shutting down cities and states. We could actually do a lot of help keep things Moving in the economy and also keep you healthy. Have you have you seen the latest news about how it's mutated a bit and become a bit more contagious because of its ability to attach itself to a cell? I don't know what that means. But we did speak to someone recently talking about, you know, they got it. They have no idea how they got in. They were they were, they occasionally would take walks outside. So it was a mild version. So it appears that you could get a little bit of this. And get sick, as opposed to you know, again. We're not a very nuanced society and I say it all the time. Right now we sell. This thing is, you know totally healthy or dead. And obviously a rate that's less than half of 1% fatality. We don't know how low but pretty low it did seem. Li Lo Mass. Could be the thing that really makes a difference, right? It could be. This thing's a difference. And, yeah, it is that scale. Of the way that it affects people. You know, For some, it can be deadly. For others. You might not have any symptoms at all. But what we're doing by wearing our masks is making sure that we're not infecting people that Could have serious effect that could have serious symptoms that could put them in the hospital. So me wearing my mask is helping you stay healthy and helping other people that are more at risk and more vulnerable than I am. I talked to. Ah, doctor to his affair. Who was NBC correspondent got real sick. He was middle forties and he was flying and he thinks he caught it in his eyes. Have you ever heard of that before? Yes. So that's something that's really interesting there. I don't think there's a lot of research yet because obviously we're still learning a lot about the virus. There has been a lot of research yet on whether you can really catch coronavirus through your eyes like you can with other viruses. This is why you know, health officials will tell you not to touch your face because you can get sick when germs Enter through the eyes just like he could get sick when you breathe in the virus. While there's not a lot of research on that, I think you know the face. That would be to say, Let's assume So we can catch it to our eyes and her nose and her mouth and make sure that we're protected there. So, yeah, it is possible. Yeah, I guess the thing that really find remarkable About this is that you know, with all of our technology and advanced science that this is something that again I don't want overuse the word nuance, But it seems to me like it could be a whole bunch of factors. Obviously, the better your immune system is and the better you take care of yourself. Your genetics. Your You know your proximity to other people that might be spreaders all comes into play here, so there's not. There's not a silver bullet answer for not getting it as much as you know, until we have a vaccine. That's the only thing we can do to protect ourselves a socially distance and where these masks What about like, you know, I have a bandanna that I looked at the Billy the kid thing, right? And it covers. Of course, my nose. Is that pretty effective. I think that that is pretty effective. I think having a few layers of cloth, you know, I would caution against just using one layer. But a lot of these masks that you khun by online or that you can make it home are going to have a couple layers and that does a lot too. Filter the the large respiratory particles right because it's not going to totally filter your breasts. But it is going to prevent bigger particles from escaping through the mask when you cough or sneeze or even speak, because we've seen that even when we're speaking, we can emit some some larger droplets from our speech, so that's what that's protecting against is protecting those from escaping out into the air. You know, I'm going to Costco and I feel like I'm walking into a human Petri dish, right?.

Angela Fritz The Washington Post Chip Franklin atmospheric scientist Costco Research Research NBC deputy editor president weather editor San Francisco Hawkeye MSN Capital Bureau
"deputy editor" Discussed on Grant’s Current Yield Podcast

Grant’s Current Yield Podcast

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Grant’s Current Yield Podcast

"Hey, this is Kurt. Yield grant interest rate observer of the year. I'm Jim Grad, talking to you from upstate New York stone's throw from the baseball hall of Fame Cooperstown and our special guest today is Jim Bianco who's talking to you from the State of Michigan, but that is an area part of the contiguous. Cubs Zone Eric Whitehead Matt Control Panels in Suffolk, county and Evan Lorenzo. The great deputy editor of grass is talking to you from Brooklyn dodgers used to play, so that's kind of a baseball themed introduction, because there's no baseball, and before we get into the manipulation of the yield curve by the federal, these I would like to propose a project for the listeners of the grants podcast, and that is to form an informal resistance to this notion. That is now. Getting some traction that we mustn't sing or have choirs or let alone opera, because of the expectation of the singing voices, now ladies and gentlemen, what is life about except song like nothing? Right so that you'll kerr well is about yield curves, but song precedes yield curves, and the order of importance in living a human life, and here is what I propose. We all go on wine and familiarize ourselves with the great flower duet for the Opera Lock may eighty three. Signed my favorite rendition by the being a D., v. l. and Mary on Rebecca. French Sopranos respectively color and Messo. Youtube, listen to it, and you will be activated to write to Congress Man Mayor de Blasio whoever's in charge of this cruel and unusual and most unhelpful notion that we ought not to sing less. We spit all right. That is the opening rant and I will now say Hello Jim Bianco. Himself of an operatic person. Christina Bianco so, Jim Welcome to our podcast. Thanks for having me. Yeah, so this. Somebody idea good ideas come from. And this is one of his ideas. Yeah, let's have Jim. Who is one of the most knowledgeable and most? Most imaginative and helpful commentators on national markets, doing business they even when he's doing it from home or Michigan. Who wearing a t shirt or something?.

Jim Bianco Christina Bianco Jim Grad Jim baseball Michigan Kurt deputy editor Youtube Evan Lorenzo New York Eric Whitehead Cubs kerr Mayor de Blasio Mary Suffolk Brooklyn
"deputy editor" Discussed on Grant’s Current Yield Podcast

Grant’s Current Yield Podcast

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on Grant’s Current Yield Podcast

"Ladies and Gentlemen Welcome to current you'll grants interest rate observer of the Air I am Jim Granton with me. as usual I. Had the panel and Evan Lorenzo the grace deputy editor of grants, and we have a guest today who introduced in just two minutes? He's at all the distinguished student and scholar of the credit markets, especially the speculative grade end of things, and we'll be talking about credit broadly and narrowly, but I. I WANNA welcome back to the land of the Living Eric and his family had a little bit of a bout with the bug which. And you know we were scared. But Eric I can't help the thing that if you had not taken the entire family of your adventure vacations to what was having. Was it maybe down? A. Sudan. Yeah? We've been quite a number of places by the way. Thank you very much. Jim Invited me on. Before we get into the credit situation I would like to you know it's been customary during this period of. Of not on we so much and not even principally annoyance of just disorientation. It's been our custom on this program to announce some new discovery something constructive come out of this most irksome period of so called lockdown and my announcement. Today has to do with a new website. At all the for all I know, you're kind of Eric. A, and Eric I I suspect is because he's a nasty guy. I have come across on called space, weather, dot, com and space weather dot com is a website that tells you all about the heaven, and did you know for example, Eric and Evan and Ed. That's e the third power that tonight we'll bring a mercury Venus conjunction. West step outside I of course. Look West and you'll see Venus and you'll see mercury, and they are almost like going to be one thing that is available to you on space with dot com, and it's also something I find most helpful way of thinking about risk. There's a feature on this it has to do with potentially hazardous has asteroids you know and everybody is worried about the bug. Right? Walk around with masks on, and of course thinking of asteroids colliding. Colliding with well if you're if you want to branch out you WANNA diversify your worry and even your obsession i..

Eric I Jim Granton Evan Lorenzo deputy editor Eric Sudan
"deputy editor" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

11:41 min | 2 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Dick that deputy editor of roll call newspaper and you can take we found out this weekend that speaker Pelosi wants a fourth stimulus bill moved in a matter of weeks on Capitol Hill how is that received by the White House and by Republican leaders in the Senate so you're they've been talking about a a fourth stimulus package for over a little bit a little bit and trading you know ideas about what might be in such a attack Eje even missing Connell those kind of your leader who is typically one of Nancy Pelosi's antagonist with with us your choices like this I said before they even passed the third stimulus that they were going to need a fourth one since then they've both camera Carthy who is the house minority leader and Mitch McConnell who is the Senate Majority Leader had said we want to see how this phase three the third package that they that they passed recently and the president signed late March and see how it's going seeing how it's being implemented but right off the bat we've been hearing from particularly small businesses that you almost three hundred and fifty billion dollars in the last ten is not enough to keep them afloat you know it anyone ever from restaurants to bookstores kids anything like that is you know get you really can have difficulty making payroll and paying people's insurances of course so the you know the the speakers said that they're gonna need to you know maybe double that amount in the next stimulus package the speaker had floated some us some ideas last week with her own colleagues about whether or not they want to do a stimulus around infrastructure package in this next English package the the president himself and said we should go big we should spend up to two trillion dollars on infrastructure you know it's infrastructure week is is one of those sort of things it gets routed out every once in awhile as it's almost become a you know as a signal that we're gonna have a weird week I mean this is I was in a regular times but that was that was bandied about is simply the president wanted to do it the speaker wanted to do it there publicans in Congress said like Hey let's focus on health care workers let's focus on some things so right now this the speaker sent out a letter over the weekend in which she said that the next round is going to be focused on small businesses and healthcare workers in particular so it's still taking shape you know Congress both both chambers and said that they're not going to necessarily be back here until April twentieth unless something is extraordinary is were choirs them to be back in Washington also that this is they've got a little bit of time to trade these are these things these things back and forth a story from roll call on some of the leverage and lobbying efforts Lindsey McPherson when your colleagues with this story state request for more systems probably the biggest leverage for a phase for stimulus according to pelo see talk us through a little bit about what what governors and mayors are doing sort of the the bottom up lobbying campaign here yeah I mean I I think that because the president and his task force are are are do these briefings every single day and talking about CDC guidelines it seems like they're the ones who were directing most of the response and that's you know that's just simply not true mayors governors county executives these are the people who are direct responses including you know from the National Guard you know they're they're little they got as governors who are activating their national guards to serve and and these for the prompt to testing sites and in hospitals and so forth we even have some members of Congress who responded to that you know they they're quickly running out of money in a lot of states a lot of cities can't run deficit spending insane with the federal government can and so they're going to they're going to need help pretty quickly particularly with you know it as does the C. some first responders get sick and then have to deal with it spindles in in areas that are on the front lines I mean the big cities like New York obviously I've been at the epicenter of this and and we've we've we've seen the kind of response that Andrew Cuomo the governor New York is designed to serve Courtney for not just his city the New York City but the rest of the state to minorities to disturb very distinct kind of regions upstate and and in the city but he's kind of you know sort of corny all this stuff all at once in the middle of it being sort of the epicenter something with New Jersey so these governors and these mayors who are dealing with quarantines and and sort of you know lock downs and so forth and they're the ones who are are going to pressure the the you know Congress and the White House the most isn't that joining us this morning from his home on Capitol Hill usually with us when he can be but sat covering it off for a capital hometown newspaper roll call roll call dot com is the website if you want to see all of their work and chasing Dick we we found out that last week that it too close he wants a a new select committee overseeing a corona virus response a would be headed she wants by congressman James Clyburn of South Carolina Carson Cliburn was on CNN's state of the union yesterday he talked a little bit about that role that that that his select committee would have here's what he had to say my understanding is that this committee will be forward looking and we're not going to be looking back on what the president may or may not have done back before this crisis yet the crisis is with us American people are now out of work it is a vampire the work the question is whether or not the money there's appropriate it will go to support them and their families well not this money will end up in the pockets of a few profiteer is terrorists and that's what I understand we are to do we are pattern in this after the trump a minute and I spent the weekend looking deeply into the Truman committee and what happened since March one nineteen forty one everything was stood up and stayed up for five years and what would be very very successful and I'm trying to base my work on this committee on the history that's found that with the work of that committee James Clyburn on CNN yesterday case index what does it take to get a committee like that up and running and what's been the reaction since need to close he unveiled his plan last week salute I mean the reaction from the the the leadership in one of the reasons that Nancy Pelosi wanted Jim Clyburn to leave this committee is that he does he is one of the people who commands a lot of mutual respect us so far Republican's deeply Kevin McCarthy the minority leader you have been skeptical about the need for a select committee to look into you know pandemic spending of the stimulus spending their as as the engine cover was saying on CNN and you also spoke to us for a crown of our special report podcasts on Friday he said that you know this is about making sure that people spend this money wisely not not it's not just any taxpayer money you know expect as this is you know this could be the difference between life and death and is modeled over the the Truman committee during World War two which is really the the sort of platform that launched every two minutes the vice presidency and then the presidency Ken McCarthy and other Republicans are said you know I I don't think that this is necessary it seems kind of redundant there are some oversight authorities that are that are baked into this last stimulus package the phase three you know including a panel of inspector general's inspector a special inspector general for the for the stimulus spending that the president's nominated and and then there's the congressional oversight commission that would need to be selected by the the leaders in the in the house and Senate that's and that does sound like there could be some redundancies asked the majority whip Jim Clyburn about this and he said that well it you got to remember that the day that the president signed the legislation he also issued a signing statement the that he was going to feel free to ignore some of those oversight requirements such as inspector general of sharing information with Congress this is the the the sort of a a consistent conflicts between the administration and Congress I think that what it seems that what Nancy Pelosi and and Russians press one is that they want to be able to say no I mean when the president doesn't even let the ink dry on the signature of the of the bill before saying that he's going to ignore some of it you we want to make sure that we can you know make sure that the money is spent wisely and it gets the people who need it the most so it is I I hesitate to say that it's gone into part typical partisanship but that seems like a fairly partisan reaction I would think that eventually that this will get through the I mean you do need to vote to stand up in a committee that that that being said when I can be back at least until April twentieth in in the house and Senate the house though it eventually will get its way just like they did with the stimulus spending we can it doesn't seem it it seems like a long time ago was only last week or two weeks ago I'm not quite two weeks ago that the house voted the another member of the house had to come back because one of their members didn't want to use unanimous consent of a voice vote to pass that third package so it will eventually get this but you do need you need to vote on it but that doesn't mean that some of the groundwork can't be started and I'm guessing that the the speaker has plenty of ideas about how to start some of that J. as in Jack here to take your phone calls via zoom in this morning that's how he's joining us and you could even maybe ask about some of the books on that very crowded shelf behind him Donald's up first I let me give the phone number so before we get to Donald eastern or central time zone this is a recorded programme from earlier today no phone calls at this time please two seven four eight eight thousand one now Donald from Michigan go ahead good morning America god bless your better front lines battling this over nineteen us to see thank you thank you all I would like to say to all of these Republican polisher color name saying that trump's done a good job only slow growth J. yet at the end Sir we are there three months back in January in the second Merican people know what was going on and get stuff prepared foods epidemic deaths from China we did not so one more thing I like to sleep on the home and then who are you now central time mountain time and he need to get back to the Republicans Democrats clients and are independent so we can get zero zero among the people called in there and one more quick thing in a bar one of trump's the bills in the majors me how Republicans never seen a tax breaks for the one percent did they didn't have any problems passes but when we got legislation for the working poor and middle class and people trying to survive due to September they won debate debate debate list these bills get this country back on and get rid of Donald Trump the twenty twenty tablets in there that's Donald in Michigan I'll take the.

Dick deputy editor Pelosi White House Senate
Tech Companies Aim To Stop COVID-19 Disinformation

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:37 min | 2 years ago

Tech Companies Aim To Stop COVID-19 Disinformation

"Now the emergency we face is a medical crisis and economic crisis and a crisis of information. That is how the World Health Organization's director-general Ten Ratnam put it recently. Fake news spreads faster and more easily than this bias and is just as dangerous. So how big tech fighting? Npr's Tim Mech has more. The Corona virus is the first epidemic that has received much attention in the social media age. It's definitely unprecedented. I've never seen something like this that the medical and scientific communities have had to address in real time. John Gregory is the deputy editor of Health at news guard which views news platforms for their credibility and trustworthiness says there are three big buckets of Corona virus misinformation circulating. Right now number. One conspiracies about the origins of the virus too bad healthcare's either ineffective or both ineffective and harmful and three minimizing the outbreak. Saying it's not as big of a deal as the media's making it out to be big tech firms have been grappling for years with foreign coordinated. Disinformation campaigns like the one launched by Russia to interfere with the two thousand sixteen election but misinformation about the corona virus seems to be organic and domestic in fact much of it appears to be spread by. Americans interested in profit. Gregory said some are promoting their own phony health cures for the corona virus. Other people are selling other like survivalist kind of supplies and using this news as a way to essentially scare people into thinking. They need all of that. They need buckets of of food. Supplies or big supplies of masks. Tech companies are trying to elevate trusted sources of information while removing false information on a rolling basis when users search for crossovers. Facebook and twitter have put a link to the Centers for Disease Control as the first result. Google is doing the same with information from the World Health Organization available more than twenty languages. Youtube says it is removing videos promoting dangerous and false cures and to crack down on the scaremongering for profit motivation. Facebook is limiting the way that hand sanitizer can be advertised as well as temporarily banning ads for medical masks. Lindsey Gorman is the fellow for emerging technologies at the Alliance for securing democracy. She's been a critic of how social media companies have dealt with political disinformation but his now praising tech companies for proactive steps like these. I think this is really a serious response. And it shows what aggressively confronting disinformation challenge. Actually looks like and what are big tech platforms can do when there is a strong willed. Act Big Tech firms have not wanted to be arbiters of political truth but with the corona virus both the dangers and the truth are much clearer. Said GORMAN THE PLATFORMS POLICIES. All talk about the threat of serious harm to the public as being sort of a higher order than than fact checking around the political context. I think it's a clearer call for them in many cases and they don't have to get into this role playing editor. In the meantime disinformation experts. Tell the public to remain skeptical of information online and diversify their news sources to minimize the threat of false information. Tim Mack. Npr News

Lindsey Gorman World Health Organization Big Tech Facebook John Gregory Tim Mech Ten Ratnam Director-General NPR Tim Mack Deputy Editor Youtube Russia Editor Google Centers For Disease Control
Suspect killed in deputy-involved shooting in Sacramento County

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

01:12 min | 3 years ago

Suspect killed in deputy-involved shooting in Sacramento County

"A man was killed in a Sunday shooting that involved the Sacramento county sheriff's deputy care for his Joe Michaels joins us live in studio with the latest job Mike the first call of the sheriff's department came in around quarter after two from the thirteen thousand block of Bennett road near Herald the caller indicated that there was a known mail application sitting in front of the callers property and that the subject was possibly on drugs that color also indicated that the suspect is known to carry weapons sergeant tested earnings as a deputy found the man unresponsive in a ditch I think that I woke and began talking with the deputy at which time the deputy observed a hand gun in the suspect waistband and immediately began giving the suspect verbal commands that deputy editor of the suspect and reach for the handgun in his waistband and of course fearing that he would be shot by the suspect that he fired his weapon and striking the suspect the man was pronounced dead at the scene he's now being identified as a fifty five year old man from Harold after the scene was process it was determined that the hand and that the deputies on the suspects we stand was in fact a Glock style airsoft the deputy involved in the shooting is a nineteen year veteran of the sheriff's office will be on paid administrative leave all the Sacramento county DA conducts an independent incident review Getty all right thank

Joe Michaels Mike Harold Sacramento County Deputy Editor Sacramento County Da Fifty Five Year Nineteen Year
For U.S. Navy destroyers, old controls might be safer than new tech

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:19 min | 3 years ago

For U.S. Navy destroyers, old controls might be safer than new tech

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by harness wealth a digital platform that helps you find the best financial advisers c._p._a.'s and trust and estate attorneys for your unique needs visit harness. This wealthed dot com slash marketplace to learn more. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the michigan economic development corporation evan lyle of rush enterprises is a big fan of michigan as he put it. The future of mobility is going to be decided right here in the state is a planet them dot com to find out why that's p. L. a. n. e. t. m. dot com the when piloting massive navy destroyers old school controls might be safer than new tech from american public media. This is marketplace attack demystifying the digital economy. I'm jed kim in for molly would in june twenty seventeen the u._s._s. fitzgerald collided with the philippine containership killing seven sailors us then just two months later the u._s. Mccain collided with the liberian merchant vessel ten sailors died. Meghan eckstein is deputy editor for the u._s. News which is part of the u._s. naval institute she says the national transportation safety board found that the u._s. mccain collision was caused by a helmsmen and he was confused by his touchscreen displays. He meant to slow down the ship but instead made a sharp right turn. An investigation led to more than a hundred hundred recommendations to improve safety and readiness on ships turns out. The touchscreen controls for speed are not preferred by a lot of personnel. They want physical throttles instead. The navy has taken note for new ships and will roll out a retrofit to change existing ones. Meanwhile eckstein says it's not just the control screens but also deficiencies in training that have caused confusion. I think one of the challenges is simply that there's not a lot of commonality from ship to ship of the way everything is currently allocated to the fleet so if you're a sailor in your on one ship you served there for two or three years when you go to your next assignment it might it not have the same bridge controls and might not have you know you might be moving from a physical throttle to a touchscreen or you might be moving from touchscreens at touchscreen but they're not the same aim and all the same controls aren't where you thought they were so this kind of comes down to you know with these touch screens in an emergency everything's muscle memory and if you're not sufficiently trained on them and the buttons aren't where you think they are and it's not consistent every time. He used that system in emergency. You're not going to know how to do it right. Why and when did the navy switch to touch screen throttles when the navy goes through its shipbuilding programs and it's ship modernization programs it really doesn't specify a lot of detailed detailed requirements for the shipbuilders so and a lot of cases you have shipbuilding companies who <hes> when they're making their pitches to the navy they want the most up-to-date technology they want you know the latest and the greatest that they can provide to sailors and a lot of cases that has involved moving to more digital systems more touchscreen type systems <hes> and and so this really isn't anything the navy kind of intentionally went towards. It's something that was really driven by industry and just sort of this desire to innovate and incorporate the latest and greatest technology. Oh gee what are they doing with the touchscreen now. There's a lot of ways that the trudge screens can be useful for example. There are certain <hes> cruise with smaller followership. I'm sorry ships was smaller crews where it's actually quite useful to have so much control at your fingertip on touchscreen so i don't think the navy fully wants to pull away from those <hes> also with the combat systems having a fully digitize system means that you can update it faster. You can blast out software updates over satellite relate. Even if you have a ship that's deployed so there are some cases where having fully digitized touchscreens are really useful. It just turns out you have to do that with a purpose. This one of the admiral's told me this kind of falls in the bucket of we did it because we could and i think that's becoming clear that that's not a good enough reason to have touch screen ship controls. Meghan eckstein is deputy editor for u._s. News she says about sixty destroyers old and new will get the physical throttles hopefully starting next summer and now for some related links meghan epstein recently interviewed retiring navy admiral john richardson's he he had a lot to say about how technological advances played out during his tenure. Essentially the navy he left behind is very different from the one he inherited something. I i learned from reading it is that three hundred fifty five ships is the minimum fleet size the lead necessary for achieving the pentagon strategic guidance and he guesses how many they'd really like six hundred fifty three now. You're ready for jeopardy. An article in forbes looks at two different navy ships that are incorporating and bishop new technologies in their designs one. The author says is likely headed for a lot of criticism when issues inevitably arise because it's been touted as bad bad already when it launches the other is given more leeway on performance because military officials and lawmakers have been told. It's more experimental something to learn from an incorporate into future ships. Maybe a lesson they're on the importance of managing expectations matt pretty and stephanie hughes-produced marketplace tech yvetot is our senior producer server gear and robin edgar engineer the show our intern is hey shoes alvarado. I'm jed kim and that's marketplace. Take this is a p._m. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by entercom intercom. What's it's more of the nice people visiting your website to give you money so they took a little chat bubble in the corner website and packed it with conversational bots product tours n._p._s. Surveys all sorts of things that amplify your team and help you reach more nice people inner calm customer unity got forty five percent more loyal users with entercom in just twelve of months go to intercom dot com slash podcast to start making money from real time chat then see everything else intercom can do. That's intercom dot com slash podcast.

Navy Meghan Eckstein Jed Kim Mccain Deputy Editor Michigan P. L. Rush Enterprises Evan Lyle Meghan Epstein U._S. Naval Institute Forbes Pentagon Molly John Richardson Producer
"deputy editor" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"David Wallace wells a New York magazine deputy editor an offer of the on habitable earth life after warming express frustrated with the network's framing a climate change during the first two democratic presidential debate the moderators focus he said was on matters of costume budgeting rather than getting the candidates to make their case as to why they have to take action now. and these left wing groups will have. great effect that is the left wing media will have great effect. on the debate they're already trying to influence in in advance she can see. CNN Washington bureau chief tram Feist a knowledge that every viewer is not going to watch every candidate and every minute well seen and produces one badly look at the numbers five said the ratings aren't the motivation behind the van this is an important subject that we think deserves the time. so they'll be no real debate. which when the climate change. idol worshippers. and physicists and other advanced scientists have done an enormous amount of study and research and scholarship on the subject. really thousands of men but there are many top individuals. they will never. he put on a camera on MSNBC or CNN or meet the press. and even if they were they never have an opportunity to explain their findings. so you're gonna have seven hours on CNN you're gonna have two days parts of two days on MSNBC you're gonna have the media pushing this pushing this pushing this. Xing the Democrat party some of the Republicans are going to start falling in line pressuring them to advancing the cause. of socialism. the destruction of capitalism. the D. gross movement the de industrialization movement. how may I mention this briefly. but the other week I watch this mini series on the history channel. about these genius entrepreneurs who created. fast food our process to which course now we're supposed to hate but it said America. in the inner cities with the meat was rancid where people didn't have enough food there wasn't any way to start. and they help feed America and then I've been watching reruns of the weekend. of the so called robber barons which were not brought us oil and electricity in light steel. more when I return..

CNN MSNBC David Wallace wells New York magazine deputy editor America. Washington bureau chief Democrat party Xing two days seven hours
"deputy editor" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Magazine deputy editor an offer of the on habitable earth life after warning express frustrated with the network's framing a climate change during the first two democratic presidential debate the moderators focus he said was on matters of costume budgeting rather than getting the candidates to make their case as to why they have to take action now. and these left wing groups will have. great effect that is the left wing media will have great effect. on the debate they're already trying to influence in in advance she can see. CNN Washington bureau chief Sam Feist acknowledge that every viewer is not going to watch every candidate and every minute well seen and produces one deadly look at the numbers five said the ratings aren't the motivation behind the van this is an important subject that we think deserves the time. so they'll be no real debate. between the climate change. I don't worshippers. and physicists and other advanced scientists have done an enormous amount of study and research and scholarship on the subject. really thousands of men but there are many top individuals. they will never. be put on a camera on MSNBC or CNN or meet the press. and even if they were they never have an opportunity to explain their findings. sure gonna have seven hours on CNN you're gonna have two days parts of two days on MSNBC we're gonna have the media pushing this pushing this pushing this. arching the Democrat party some of the Republicans are going to start falling in line pressuring them to advancing the cause. of socialism. the destruction of capitalism. the D. gross movement the de industrialization movement. how may I mention this briefly. but the other week I watch this mini series on the history channel. about these genius entrepreneurs who created. fast food are processed food which course now we're supposed to hate but it said America. in the inner cities with the meat was rancid where people didn't have enough food there wasn't any way to start. and they help feed America in I've been watching reruns over the weekend. of the so called robber barons which were not brought us oil and electricity in light steel. more when I return. well.

CNN MSNBC deputy editor Sam Feist Washington bureau chief America. Democrat party two days seven hours
"deputy editor" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"deputy editor" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Magazine deputy editor an offer of the on habitable earth life after warning express frustrated with the network's framing of climate change during the first two democratic presidential debate the moderators focus he said was on matters of costume budgeting rather than getting the candidates to make their case as to why they have to take action now. and these left wing groups will have. great effect that is the left wing media will have great effect. on the debate they're already trying to influence in in advance she can see. CNN Washington bureau chief champ Feist had knowledge that every viewer is not going to watch every candidate and every minute well seeing him produces one deadly look at the numbers five said the ratings aren't the motivation behind the van this is an important subject that we think deserves the time. so they'll be no real debate. between the climate change. I don't worshippers. and physicists and other advanced scientists have done an enormous amount of study and research and scholarship on the subject. really thousands of men but there are many top individuals. they will never. be put on a camera on MSNBC or CNN or meet the press. and even if they were they never have an opportunity to explain their findings. so you're gonna have seven hours on CNN you're gonna have two days parts of two days on MSNBC you're gonna have the media pushing this pushing this pushing this. arching the Democrat party some of the Republicans are going to start falling in line pressuring them to advancing the cause. of socialism. the destruction of capitalism. the D. gross movement the D. industrialization movement. I may mention is briefly. but the other week I watch this mini series on the history channel. about these genius entrepreneurs who created. fast food. says food which course now we're supposed to hate but it felt America. in the inner cities with the meat was rancid where people didn't have enough food there wasn't any way to start. and they help feed America in I've been watching reruns of the weekend. of the so called robber barons which were not brought us oil and electricity in light steel. more when I return. in.

CNN MSNBC deputy editor America. Washington bureau chief Feist Democrat party two days seven hours