19 Burst results for "Depression Substance Abuse"

"depression substance abuse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:20 min | 2 months ago

"depression substance abuse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Many Americans with mental illnesses report long delays in getting care even when they're struggling with severe depression substance abuse or suicidal thoughts In some states the average weight is 5 to 6 weeks But California just passed a law telling health insurers they have to reduce those wait times to no more than two weeks Here's April dembowski from member station KQED in San Francisco When Greta Christina fell into a deep depression 5 years ago it got so bad she couldn't work She called up her therapist in San Francisco Someone she'd had a great connection with in the past And she found out he was now on staff at Kaiser permanente California's largest insurer This meant she wouldn't have to pay out of pocket anymore to see him And so I was like great I have Kaiser I'm just gonna see my therapist through Kaiser That's perfect At first her therapist was able to see her every couple weeks Not ideal but it was enough And then it just started being free weeks Every four weeks now I'm lucky if I see him every 5 or 6 weeks She says it's been like this for a couple years now Medication helps but without regular talk therapy She says the depression is catching up with her She's starting to have memory loss She can't stay focused She can barely get out of bed in the morning To tell somebody with serious chronic disabling depression that they can only see their therapist every 5 or 6 weeks Is like telling somebody with a broken leg that they can only see their physical therapist every 5 or 6 weeks It's not enough It's not even close to enough Then over the summer she was diagnosed with breast cancer And I need to be in therapy I have cancer And still nothing has changed Everything related to her cancer care has happened promptly Her mammogram then biopsy Biopsy she has scheduled for surgery which is in October then had her pre-op appointments Breast surgeon Plastic surgeon oncologist All like clockwork It is a well oiled machine But she still has to wait 6 weeks to see her therapist It is a hot mess It just feels so unethical honestly It feels so unethical Brandi plumlee is a triage therapist at a Kaiser mental health clinic east of San Francisco Every day she takes multiple crisis calls from patients who have a therapist that can't get in to see them She says the typical weight right now is two months Their caseloads are enormous at this point It's heartbreaking It really is heartbreaking and it eats on me day after day after day The new state law aims to change this starting next summer health insurers across the state will have to make sure mental health appointments are available every two weeks If they don't they could be fined What Kaiser simply needs to do is hire more clinicians But Kaiser says they're just aren't enough out there Health insurance companies initially oppose the bill saying a shortage of therapists would make it too difficult to meet the two week mandate Lobbyist Judd Hampton testified in the Senate last spring The COVID-19 pandemic is only exacerbated this workforce shortage simply put mandated increased frequency of appointments without addressing the underlying workforce stores will not lead to increased quality of care But lawmakers pushed back They accused insurers of overstating the shortage They said the therapists are out there and it's up to the insurers to recruit them by paying better and cutting back on paperwork This approach may work in California but it's unlikely to spread nationwide anytime soon Only 7 states have laws limiting wait times for mental health In some states there really isn't the workforce You need to worsen runs the nonpartisan national academy for state health policy She says in places like New Mexico or Montana or Wyoming there really aren't enough therapists out there at any price They don't have the provider so you could find the insurers as much as you want You're not going to be able to in the short term make up those wait times if they already exist In California Greta Christina says she's desperate for the new wait time rules to take effect That will happen in July Knowing that this bill is on the horizon has been helping me hang on She thought about paying out of pocket to find a therapist she could see more often But she says in the middle of a cancer crisis it was too hard to think of starting over with someone new For NPR news I'm April dembowski in San Francisco That story came from in pierce partnership with KQED and Kaiser health news This is NPR news This is WNYC at 7 19 later on morning edition The Ford Motor Company is one of several autumn major auto makers pledging to go all electric by 2040 Folks understand that the urgency of climate change is here right And so what Ford we have a role to play to reduce the impacts on the environment More on how forward plans to do that coming up WNYC is supported by Netflix presenting passing Rebecca Hall's directorial debut examining obsession and the lies people tell to.

Kaiser Greta Christina dembowski depression substance abuse Kaiser permanente California San Francisco depression Brandi plumlee Kaiser mental health clinic cancer California Judd Hampton COVID breast cancer national academy for state hea NPR news Senate Wyoming New Mexico Kaiser health news
"depression substance abuse" Discussed on Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

04:02 min | 3 months ago

"depression substance abuse" Discussed on Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

"They're based off of adapt agenda herbs and plans. They create that homeo- stasis and again you're not gonna find this nature you're not gonna find this in nature is concentrated plant based matter which is wonderful. It's like you pull up a bottle. Lavender's like three pounds of lavender flowers. So when we realized that we do have natural medicine in our disposal by and large it's affordable right. You buy the things that you can afford. You don't need a bottle of rose that's one hundred fifty dollars that's out of your budget so you get a bottle of orange as five or ten bucks right so you think about those things but ultimately once you really start looking into it and we haven't even dive deep. In like the medicinal aspects of how essential oils have been shown to be a acetylcholine industries inhibitors. And how it's been shown to help with alzheimer's like here's a quick little tip. Cinnamon bark has been shown to have an eighty percent efficacy against a of industries. Which is the enzyme. That breaks down to sita calling and the hallmark of dimension alzheimer's our lowest calling levels which is the medical approach is like lower the enzyme level so the levels of acetylcholine up so the brain can function properly. And but the the the risks of these drugs either ineffective and be the risks include everything from dizziness nausea and death and now researchers are actually stating that essential oils can be used to replace those medicines and they're trying to say we need more research. We need to human trials on this stuff. Essential oils have the same neurological effect on the body that the pharmaceutical approached us to help slow down the rate of and even potentially protect prevent against dementia and neurological decline. And that's just one little chapter and we go on the same thing with with blood sugar with weight with obesity with depression substance abuse. With fatty liver. I mean there's so many different things so it's wonderful..

alzheimer's dizziness nausea dementia depression substance abuse obesity
"depression substance abuse" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:47 min | 4 months ago

"depression substance abuse" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Oh one all because of a virus that has a ninety nine point. Five percent survival rate as we now have increased treatments for that but despite that we need to lock down the country shoot people in the back. Keep them at home. make sure they don't talk to people at their walking dogs because it's for their health. The single minded obsession that no one gets sick and died from the chinese corona virus is being paid for by not just a slowly unfolding mental health crisis but social isolation dislocation are taking their toll in terms of suicide. Depression substance abuse and domestic violence. I think some australians are starting to wake up and massive protests are starting. I sure hope so because the polling that has been has been out there shows that eighty percent of australians support this. I really hope that's not the case. Do you run a small business. Are you on an elder board of a church. Are you overseeing organization. That does a lot of credit card processing. Will if you run a conservative faith based nonprofit or business. Listen very carefully to this. Do not expose yourself to being. Shut off because of cancel culture j. p. morgan chase just cancelled lieutenant. General michael flynn's credit cards because they didn't like his politics so on the charlie. Kirk show here. We use cornerstone payment systems to provide uninterrupted credit card processing for the work. We do here at the charlie kirk show so.

Depression substance abuse morgan chase michael flynn Kirk charlie charlie kirk
"depression substance abuse" Discussed on Love and Compassion Podcast with Gissele Taraba

Love and Compassion Podcast with Gissele Taraba

05:51 min | 4 months ago

"depression substance abuse" Discussed on Love and Compassion Podcast with Gissele Taraba

"Topic today is on psychedelics. Incompassion using psychedelics to assist in healing is such a hot topic right now. We brought someone special to talk about the important issue. Please welcome our guest. James w chessel with an author international speaker and podcast host of adventures through the mind or he engages in dialogue are on psychedelics and their role in social developments is work is inspired by his healing path through depression substance abuse trauma and focuses on translating the profound insights of the psychedelic experience into a higher quality of life for both the individual and society. Please join me in welcoming james. I james is all thanks for having me. Thanks for being here. Can you begin by sharing a little bit about what got you into psychedelics. And how that specifically helped you heal from your.

James w chessel depression substance abuse tra james
"depression substance abuse" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:55 min | 5 months ago

"depression substance abuse" Discussed on Fresh Air

"It's you know it's an important part of your experience If you work in a in a place that you feel bad about or you feel unsafe in. You're probably a lot less likely to talk about it. Did you find this among rosengard. I mean i think that I think that's certainly true. I think it's really hard to get people to talk. And i should say that in the case of dade i didn't just talk to harry it. I talked to several other people. Many of whom were had gone through equally difficult experiences. One woman who witnessed a stomping incident where a group of guards stopped on a prisoner who was badly badly injured and she said to me. I wanted to scream. I wanted to do something. But i i didn't even report it and said nothing about it Because i needed my job And this was You know A puerto rican woman who Who was surviving as a consequence of the work. She did so so yeah i think. There's there's reluctance which is compounded by a kind of dependence that that if this is your livelihood but i should also say that There are plenty of people both guards and mental health aides. Who would probably tell you. I have no trouble at all with my job. I i don't see it as troubled. I don't see it as troubling. I'm not stressed out by it. And what what. I find really interesting about that. I took a tour of jail in colorado at one point when i was researching this subject and the warden said to me You know the guys. I worry about are not the guys who tell me. This is really hard and stressful job. It's the guys who never say that and who say they're totally fine with it. Explain what you mean. I mean what's what are the ones who don't complain do well. I mean if you again if you look at if you look at the patient health literature on prison guards. You have alarming rates of hypertension of divorce. Depression substance abuse suicide. I one study that that found I think the suicide risk among corrections. Where was thirty nine percent higher than for the rest of the working age population so somewhere that stress and that The some kind of emotional and psychic toll is playing out It may not be verbalised. As i'm distressed by this job but i don't think that means it's not there and indeed in the chapter on corrections officers. I also talk to a woman who ended up setting up a mental health hotline And then kind of outreach center. It's called the desert waters correctional outreach center And because she kept getting calls from the partners of corrections officers in this area of colorado that is just full of prisons and jails Saying you know. I'm concerned about my partner. And she got so. Many of these calls in her own background was intriguing. Trauma victims that she thought you know. This is a traumatic job. This is a this is a really high risk potentially traumatizing job. So i think what's really difficult is to measure and quantify the kinds of psychic and emotional wounds that doing job like this has but that doesn't mean those wounds are not there and it doesn't mean they're not debilitating we need to take another brick here. Let me reintroduce you we're speaking with. Aol press he writes for the new yorker and other publications and the author of two previous books. His new book is dirty work. Essential jobs and the hidden toll of inequality in america. He'll be back to talk more after this break. I'm dave davies. This is fresh air. This message comes from. Npr sponsor.

rosengard Depression substance abuse sui harry colorado desert waters correctional out hypertension Trauma Aol dave davies america Npr
"depression substance abuse" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"depression substance abuse" Discussed on BrainStuff

"For over a century. America has been described as a melting pot in which immigrants from a variety of cultural and ethnic backgrounds slowly simmered together melding into an all americans do but is that really the way it works or even how it should work is total assimilation. The only way to be an american and is it healthy for individuals to abandon their cultural heritage in whole or in part an order to adopt the customs of their new home. We spoke with sess schwartz a professor of public health sciences at the university of miami. Who that it's time to shelve the melting pot metaphor schwartz studies acculturation which is the process by which a person's cultural sense of self changes. As when you move to a new country or are raised an immigrant home and the effects of acculturation on physical and mental health it turns out that assimilation is only one type of acculturation and that fully simulated americans have some of the worst health outcomes. Immigrant families are actually most likely to thrive in america if they embrace aspects of both their native culture and their doctor land public health. Researchers like schwartz. Call it the immigrant paradox. He said there's a whole literature that suggests that foreign born americans are doing better than us. Born individuals on many different health indicators heart health weight and obesity diet depression anxiety substance. Use you name it. So what are the alternatives to assimilation. There's an old joke. That's well known in europe. What do you call a person who speaks two languages bilingual. What do you call person. Who only speaks one. Language american schwartz said in the united states unlike a lot of countries in the world. We actively discourage people from having multiple cultural identities we just want people to be american even the fact that we equate acculturation and simulation says a lot about our culture and how we think people should behave however it is important to note that acculturation is a two way. Street is cuban and tori behavior based on immigrants race or ethnicity by the receiving country can make it much harder for immigrants to achieve healthy by cultural integration traditionally. There's been an assumption that the acculturation process in the united states ran in a straight line at one end of the spectrum stood the recently arrived immigrant still carrying around the language traditions and customs of the so called old country but as the immigrant moved along the line over time did slowly discard their foreignness. As they gradually acquired language and customs of america but starting in the nineteen eighties researchers began to question the straight line assimilation assumption. Psychologist john berry came up with a pioneering model that showed four different responses or strategies including assimilation. The emigrants used to navigate life in their new home. So i got a simulation but that being that you're willing to discard your culture of origin and fully identify with the new culture. The sort of opposite is separation. Wherein you hold onto your original culture at all cost and don't want to adopt the new culture then there's marginalization in which you don't identify with either your heritage culture or the new one. It's a rare situation and finally there's integration sometimes called them you want to maintain a strong connection with your heritage culture while interacting with enquiring traits from the new culture according to schwarz there's strong evidence that the assimilation strategy is bad for your health. The worst psychological effects of assimilation are felt by second generation americans children of immigrants who were either born in america or raised here from a young age second generation. Kids are sometimes so eager to fit in that. They turn their backs on their parents. Customs and traditions entirely schwartz explained. They basically reject their families culture and that tends to produce pretty negative results higher rates of anxiety and depression substance abuse and worst family relationships. The best psychological and health outcomes on the other hand are achieved by individuals who embrace by cultural ism. A balanced integration of their heritage and received cultures short says that people who are able to comfortably blended their native and acquired cultures. Have quote much better outcomes. In terms of higher self-esteem lower depression lowering zaidi and better family relationships immigrants who learned to successfully habit to cultural worlds are the same people who drive the immigrant paradox in americans born outside the us achieve at significantly better physical and mental health outcomes compared to their native born or assimilated neighbors. But why is this diet is one simple explanation says schwartz because immigrant families are more likely to prepare home cooked meals than the typical american family which tends to eat out a lot and consume more processed foods but there are also significant psychological factors at play the most important has to do with the values of american culture versus just about everybody else. Schwartz said the. Us consistently ranks as the most individualistic country in the world. Were more self. Reliant and less reliant on other people in basically any other country on the planet so most people who come here from other places are more collectivist than we are. Let's break that down. What does collectivism look like. As a cultural value it stresses the importance of family above all else. It places an emphasis on the greater good and doing what's best for the community. Not just yourself and it's a less competitive way to look at the world. Schwartz says that cultural values the promote close knit families and selfless service can protect against a lot of the mental health issues. That plague many americans. He said there's a reason why we have so much anxiety. Because we're so highly individualistic and competitive. We have to compete against other people for everything. And if you can't keep up there's less of a support system ready and waiting to help you in this country when we talk about helping other people. Some people want to shout socialism. I think that's one of the issues that we have.

schwartz us Lauren bogle sess schwartz depression anxiety substance university of miami john berry depression substance abuse obesity schwarz europe zaidi Schwartz depression
What Is the Immigrant Paradox?

BrainStuff

06:31 min | 1 year ago

What Is the Immigrant Paradox?

"For over a century. America has been described as a melting pot in which immigrants from a variety of cultural and ethnic backgrounds slowly simmered together melding into an all americans do but is that really the way it works or even how it should work is total assimilation. The only way to be an american and is it healthy for individuals to abandon their cultural heritage in whole or in part an order to adopt the customs of their new home. We spoke with sess schwartz a professor of public health sciences at the university of miami. Who that it's time to shelve the melting pot metaphor schwartz studies acculturation which is the process by which a person's cultural sense of self changes. As when you move to a new country or are raised an immigrant home and the effects of acculturation on physical and mental health it turns out that assimilation is only one type of acculturation and that fully simulated americans have some of the worst health outcomes. Immigrant families are actually most likely to thrive in america if they embrace aspects of both their native culture and their doctor land public health. Researchers like schwartz. Call it the immigrant paradox. He said there's a whole literature that suggests that foreign born americans are doing better than us. Born individuals on many different health indicators heart health weight and obesity diet depression anxiety substance. Use you name it. So what are the alternatives to assimilation. There's an old joke. That's well known in europe. What do you call a person who speaks two languages bilingual. What do you call person. Who only speaks one. Language american schwartz said in the united states unlike a lot of countries in the world. We actively discourage people from having multiple cultural identities we just want people to be american even the fact that we equate acculturation and simulation says a lot about our culture and how we think people should behave however it is important to note that acculturation is a two way. Street is cuban and tori behavior based on immigrants race or ethnicity by the receiving country can make it much harder for immigrants to achieve healthy by cultural integration traditionally. There's been an assumption that the acculturation process in the united states ran in a straight line at one end of the spectrum stood the recently arrived immigrant still carrying around the language traditions and customs of the so called old country but as the immigrant moved along the line over time did slowly discard their foreignness. As they gradually acquired language and customs of america but starting in the nineteen eighties researchers began to question the straight line assimilation assumption. Psychologist john berry came up with a pioneering model that showed four different responses or strategies including assimilation. The emigrants used to navigate life in their new home. So i got a simulation but that being that you're willing to discard your culture of origin and fully identify with the new culture. The sort of opposite is separation. Wherein you hold onto your original culture at all cost and don't want to adopt the new culture then there's marginalization in which you don't identify with either your heritage culture or the new one. It's a rare situation and finally there's integration sometimes called them you want to maintain a strong connection with your heritage culture while interacting with enquiring traits from the new culture according to schwarz there's strong evidence that the assimilation strategy is bad for your health. The worst psychological effects of assimilation are felt by second generation americans children of immigrants who were either born in america or raised here from a young age second generation. Kids are sometimes so eager to fit in that. They turn their backs on their parents. Customs and traditions entirely schwartz explained. They basically reject their families culture and that tends to produce pretty negative results higher rates of anxiety and depression substance abuse and worst family relationships. The best psychological and health outcomes on the other hand are achieved by individuals who embrace by cultural ism. A balanced integration of their heritage and received cultures short says that people who are able to comfortably blended their native and acquired cultures. Have quote much better outcomes. In terms of higher self-esteem lower depression lowering zaidi and better family relationships immigrants who learned to successfully habit to cultural worlds are the same people who drive the immigrant paradox in americans born outside the us achieve at significantly better physical and mental health outcomes compared to their native born or assimilated neighbors. But why is this diet is one simple explanation says schwartz because immigrant families are more likely to prepare home cooked meals than the typical american family which tends to eat out a lot and consume more processed foods but there are also significant psychological factors at play the most important has to do with the values of american culture versus just about everybody else. Schwartz said the. Us consistently ranks as the most individualistic country in the world. Were more self. Reliant and less reliant on other people in basically any other country on the planet so most people who come here from other places are more collectivist than we are. Let's break that down. What does collectivism look like. As a cultural value it stresses the importance of family above all else. It places an emphasis on the greater good and doing what's best for the community. Not just yourself and it's a less competitive way to look at the world. Schwartz says that cultural values the promote close knit families and selfless service can protect against a lot of the mental health issues. That plague many americans. He said there's a reason why we have so much anxiety. Because we're so highly individualistic and competitive. We have to compete against other people for everything. And if you can't keep up there's less of a support system ready and waiting to help you in this country when we talk about helping other people. Some people want to shout socialism. I think that's one of the issues that we have.

Schwartz United States Sess Schwartz Depression Anxiety Substance University Of Miami John Berry Depression Substance Abuse Obesity Schwarz Europe Zaidi Depression
"depression substance abuse" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:38 min | 1 year ago

"depression substance abuse" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Your genesis retailer regarding gv eighty availability. Welcome them to brainstorm a production of iheartradio brain stuff. Lauren bogle bomb here for over a century. America has been described as a melting pot in which immigrants from a variety of cultural and ethnic backgrounds slowly simmered together melding into an all americans do but is that really the way it works or even how it should work is total assimilation. The only way to be an american and is it healthy for individuals to abandon their cultural heritage in whole or in part an order to adopt the customs of their new home. We spoke with sess schwartz a professor of public health sciences at the university of miami. Who that it's time to shelve the melting pot metaphor schwartz studies acculturation which is the process by which a person's cultural sense of self changes. As when you move to a new country or are raised an immigrant home and the effects of acculturation on physical and mental health it turns out that assimilation is only one type of acculturation and that fully simulated americans have some of the worst health outcomes. Immigrant families are actually most likely to thrive in america if they embrace aspects of both their native culture and their doctor land public health. Researchers like schwartz. Call it the immigrant paradox. He said there's a whole literature that suggests that foreign born americans are doing better than us. Born individuals on many different health indicators heart health weight and obesity diet depression anxiety substance. Use you name it. So what are the alternatives to assimilation. There's an old joke. That's well known in europe. What do you call a person who speaks two languages bilingual. What do you call person. Who only speaks one. Language american schwartz said in the united states unlike a lot of countries in the world. We actively discourage people from having multiple cultural identities we just want people to be american even the fact that we equate acculturation and simulation says a lot about our culture and how we think people should behave however it is important to note that acculturation is a two way. Street is cuban and tori behavior based on immigrants race or ethnicity by the receiving country can make it much harder for immigrants to achieve healthy by cultural integration traditionally. There's been an assumption that the acculturation process in the united states ran in a straight line at one end of the spectrum stood the recently arrived immigrant still carrying around the language traditions and customs of the so called old country but as the immigrant moved along the line over time did slowly discard their foreignness. As they gradually acquired language and customs of america but starting in the nineteen eighties researchers began to question the straight line assimilation assumption. Psychologist john berry came up with a pioneering model that showed four different responses or strategies including assimilation. The emigrants used to navigate life in their new home. So i got a simulation but that being that you're willing to discard your culture of origin and fully identify with the new culture. The sort of opposite is separation. Wherein you hold onto your original culture at all cost and don't want to adopt the new culture then there's marginalization in which you don't identify with either your heritage culture or the new one. It's a rare situation and finally there's integration sometimes called them you want to maintain a strong connection with your heritage culture while interacting with enquiring traits from the new culture according to schwarz there's strong evidence that the assimilation strategy is bad for your health. The worst psychological effects of assimilation are felt by second generation americans children of immigrants who were either born in america or raised here from a young age second generation. Kids are sometimes so eager to fit in that. They turn their backs on their parents. Customs and traditions entirely schwartz explained. They basically reject their families culture and that tends to produce pretty negative results higher rates of anxiety and depression substance abuse and worst family relationships. The best psychological and health outcomes on the other hand are achieved by individuals who embrace by cultural ism. A balanced integration of their heritage and received cultures short says that people who are able to comfortably blended their native and acquired cultures. Have quote much better outcomes. In terms of higher self-esteem lower depression lowering zaidi and better family relationships immigrants who learned to successfully habit to cultural worlds are the same people who drive the immigrant paradox in americans born outside the us achieve at significantly better physical and mental health outcomes compared to their native born or assimilated neighbors. But why is this diet is one simple explanation says schwartz because immigrant families are more likely to prepare home cooked meals than the typical american family which tends to eat out a lot and consume more processed foods but there are also significant psychological factors at play the most important has to do with the values of american culture versus just about everybody else. Schwartz said the. Us consistently ranks as the most individualistic country in the world. Were more self. Reliant and less reliant on other people in basically any other country on the planet so most people who come here from other places are more collectivist than we are. Let's break that down. What does collectivism look like. As a cultural value it stresses the importance of family above all else. It places an emphasis on the greater good and doing what's best for the community. Not just yourself and it's a less competitive way to look at the world. Schwartz says that cultural values the promote close knit families and selfless service can protect against a lot of the mental health issues. That plague many americans. He said there's a reason why we have so much anxiety. Because we're so highly individualistic and competitive. We have to compete against other people for everything. And if you can't keep up there's less of a support system ready and waiting to help you in this country when we talk about.

schwartz us Lauren bogle sess schwartz depression anxiety substance university of miami john berry depression substance abuse obesity schwarz europe zaidi Schwartz depression
Miami - Florida bans on conversion therapy for children voided by U.S. appeals court

Glenn Beck

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Miami - Florida bans on conversion therapy for children voided by U.S. appeals court

"A ruling on conversion therapy in the state of Florida A federal appeals court ruled Friday that bans on conversion therapy in Florida are a violation of the First Amendment. This now reverses a lower court's ruling upholding ordinances in the city of Boca Raton and also Palm Beach County. Both prohibited therapist from attempting to change the gender, identity or sexual orientation of minors. Conversion therapy is highly controversial with all major medical Mental health organizations in the U. S opposing it, saying the harm it causes increases the risk of depression, substance abuse and suicide. That's correspondent Lionel More years with that

Florida Palm Beach County Boca Raton U. Depression Lionel More
"depression substance abuse" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"depression substance abuse" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"In produce, facing run offs toehold on their seats after the races against their Democratic opponents turned out to be too close to call. 6 18. There's also a new push tonight for financial info from the president's company. The New York Times reports. The New York State attorney General and Manhattan D. A have sent subpoenas to the Trump Organization looking for records about consulting fees paid to Ivanka Trump. It follows times reporting on decades worth of the president's tax filings in the paper says, Mr Trump reduced his company's tax liability by deducting some consulting fees as a business expense. On Twitter, Ivanka Trump called it harassment. Pure. And simple Steve Cave and CBS News and it's 6 19 back here in Massachusetts, the state appeals court ruling today on the case that was based in the North Shore man. They're convicted of exposing himself to an undercover Salem police officer. But he appealed, saying the officer shouldn't have been shocked by the behavior. 31 year old Jonathan Pastorelli was convicted of open and gross lewdness and lascivious behavior after exposing himself in the winter of 2018. Went undercover female Salem Police officer Charlene Sando at trial officer Santo testified she was shocked when he did it and for a conviction, it's necessary that the victim be shocked. But Pastorelli appealed, arguing he did with the officer expected him to do so. She shouldn't have been shocked with the court disagreed. Ruling an officer is not immune to feelings of fright. Carl Stevens, WBC Boston's news radio and today in Florida. A ruling on conversion therapy. A federal appeals court ruled Friday that bans on conversion therapy in Florida are a violation of the First Amendment. This now reverses a lower court's ruling upholding ordinances in the city of Boca Raton and also Palm Beach County both prohibited therapist from attempting to change the gender identity or sexual orientation of minors. Conversion therapy is highly controversial with all major medical and mental health organizations in the U. S opposing it, saying the harm it causes increases the risk of depression, substance abuse and suicide. Lionel Boys, ABC News Miami and today is the transgender Day of remembrance, wrapping up the end of transgender awareness Week. To stay honors the memory of transgender people who were killed in acts of hate and violence. The Human Rights Commission says. At least 37 transgender or gender nonconforming people were killed so far this year. Most of them were black and Latin next transgender women. Senator Elizabeth Warren, weighing in on this today and on Twitter, saying, We have to re commit to ending the violence, discrimination and poverty. Too many transgender Americans experience each day you're listening to W B Z 10 31 7.9.

officer Ivanka Trump Jonathan Pastorelli Twitter Trump Organization president The New York Times Florida Senator Elizabeth Warren Salem Steve Cave Salem Police New York State Charlene Sando Boca Raton CBS News Lionel Boys harassment Massachusetts
"depression substance abuse" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"depression substance abuse" Discussed on KOMO

"1000 FM 97 7 Good afternoon it is 1 31 I'm Kelly Bleyer with the top local stories from the Coma, 24 7 News Center. A state health department reports 576 new covert cases and 15 additional death since Saturday. Today, our status scene 67,400 infections Within the last day, more than two dozen people were hospitalized, bringing the total to more than 6200 people in Washington who have needed that level of care during the pandemic. Local researchers say the state is making headway in the fight against Cove in 19 the Institute of Disease Modeling says Washington's overall case count is plateau owing institute credits mask mandate statewide, including cities like Yakima, leading to a drop in the transmission rate. Behavioral health experts warn of the coming crisis. The ongoing pandemic they feared would lead to more depression, substance abuse and domestic violence and his comas. Carleen Johnson reports Those experts were right. The Washington State Department of Health has been warning providers to expect the behavioral health impacts of the pandemic to peek around six months after it started. We're just reaching that point. Dr Campus. Meilan is the chief medical officer at Compass help CDC is anticipated. That would be an object in suicide, ality and substance use disorders, depression anxiety. The department expects three million people in our state to experience clinically significant behavior health symptoms over the next few months. The Bellingham hailed reports most of the symptoms are likely to manifest as depression, which can potentially affect 30 to 60% of the general population. Compass Health saw a 750% increase in the number of services they provide via Tele Health. In what come county. They had to train 500 Clinicians Organization wide in April just to meet the demand. Carleen Johnson Coma News and the Cove in 19. Pandemic is changing the look of our litter. Cuomo's Nick Lens, Frank Lindsay explains. We still got soda bottles, plastic bags and food wrappers along the curb signs and stuck in bushes. But the Skagit Valley Herald reports cleanup cruiser now also finding more and more facemasks, sanitary wipes and disposable gloves, a member of a volunteer group that picks up letter tells the paper people Wipe down their shopping carts, then leave the wipes in their carts. And when they take those carts outside the wipes dry out and blow away. Meanwhile, EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler reminds us tow. Put that stuff in the trash, personal protective equipment or pee pee like mass gloves and wipes. As well as all medical waste should never go in the recycling bin. Speaking of recycling and trash. We're producing more of both these days since more of us are staying home at one Skagit County transfer station drop offs were up 10 and 11% in April and May, respectively. Frank Lenzi. Camo news Coming up new target for the defund movement..

Pandemic Carleen Johnson Coma Washington State Department of depression Washington Compass Health Skagit County Skagit Valley Herald Kelly Bleyer Frank Lenzi Compass help CDC ality Cove Administrator Andrew Wheeler Bellingham Yakima News Center Dr Campus
"depression substance abuse" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"depression substance abuse" Discussed on KOMO

"Meteorologist Kristen Clark. We've got sunshine and 70 in Olympia up to Bellingham, 71 Sunny and currently ceatec Airport. 69. Mostly sunny skies. Come on, Whose time 10 36 new data. Released by the State Department of Health shows 15 additional Koba deaths in Saturday. In fact, we've seen a large rise in cases from Friday into the weekend Saturday, another big increase in the past day, the state confirming 576 new cases. Anouk over 19 tests that would require only saliva instead of the nasal swab used now could be coming soon The FDA is granting emergency use for this new test has been developed with the help of the MBA. The National Basketball Association is already using it to test players and staff who show no symptoms. It doesn't need the same re agents and swabs that have been the rate limiting step to being able to create testing. It's Gail. In this country. It really could be a game changer. If we can deploy it with his new test, saliva is collected in a sterile container. The test is proving to be highly sensitive. It's also delivering results in just three hours. Up to 32 samples could be tested at once and laps are expected to charge Just $10 per sample. That's a big break in price as well from what we have now, Health officials say this new test could be a game changer in bringing the numbers down nationwide. That's Como's Denise Whitaker reporting. Behavioral health experts are warning of the coming crisis. The ongoing pandemic they feared would lead amore depression, substance abuse and domestic violence and his commas Carleen Johnson says those experts are right. The Washington State Department of Health has been warning providers to expect the behavioral health impacts of the pandemic. To peek around six months after it started. We're just reaching that point. Dr Campus. Meilan is the chief medical officer at Compass help CDC is anticipated that would see an uptick in suicide. Ality and substance use disorders. Depression Anxiety department expects three million people in our state to experience clinically significant behavior health symptoms over the next few months. The Bellingham hailed reports most of the symptoms are likely to manifest as depression, which can potentially affect 30 to 60% of the general population. Compass Health saw a 750% increase in the number of services they provide. Viet Telehealth in what Come county. They had to train 500 Clinicians Organization wide in April just to meet the demand. Carleen Johnson Coma News Gonzaga University in Spokane, getting ready to welcome a couple 1000 students to campus before the end of the month. Officials at the private university considered remote on ly instruction, But after surveying students and families, they decided in person instruction was preferred, the spokesman review reports. Whitworth anticipates About 1180 students living on campus is fall. Both schools hiring staff to conduct contact tracing in the event of a Corona virus outbreak, and some dorm rooms are being kept empty so that any infected students could isolate there. Biggest concern about students social interaction outside of class. At least 117 students living in university Washington fraud houses tested positive for the virus last month. The pandemic is adding new kinds of litter to our landscape. Volunteers tell the Skagit Valley, Harold are seeing more.

depression Dr Campus Carleen Johnson State Department of Health Bellingham Washington State Department of Coma News Gonzaga University Compass Health Kristen Clark National Basketball Associatio Olympia Anouk Compass help CDC Skagit Valley Ality Gail Denise Whitaker Como FDA
"depression substance abuse" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"depression substance abuse" Discussed on KOMO

"NEWS time. 8 36 New data from the state Department of Health shows 15 additional Covad deaths and Saturday. In fact, we've seen a large rise in cases from Friday into the weekend Saturday and other big increase in the past day. The state confirms 576 new cases, Behavioral health experts warned about a coming crisis. And this pandemic they feared would lead to more depression, substance abuse and domestic violence runs out. Those experts were rights and here's call Most Carleen Johnson, the Washington State Department of Health has been warning providers to expect the behavioral health impacts of the pandemic. To peek around six months after it started. We're just reaching that point. Dr Cama smile. Um, is the chief medical officer at Compass help CDC is anticipated. That would be an uptick in suicide. Ality and substance Use disorders. Depression Anxiety department expects three million people in our state to experience clinically significant behavior health symptoms over the next few months. The Bellingham hailed reports most of the symptoms are likely to manifest as depression, which can potentially affect 30 to 60% of the general population. Compass Health saw a 750% increase in the number of services they provide. Viet Telehealth in what Come county. They had to train 500 Clinicians Organization wide in April just to meet the demand. Carleen Johnson COMA News Xavier University in Spokane is preparing to welcome a couple of 1000 students to campus before the end of the month. The university considered remote, only instruction. But after surveying students and families, they decided in person instruction was preferred. Whitworth College anticipates about 1180 students living on campus this fall. Both schools have hired staff to conduct contact tracing in the event of a Corona virus outbreak, and some dorm rooms are being kept empty so that an infected student will have a place to isolate the pandemic is having new kinds of litter to our landscape. Volunteers tell the Skagit Valley Harold. They're seeing mohr disposable gloves, masks and wipe So when they're out, picking up trash, EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler has this reminder when you do take trips to central businesses like grocery stores and pharmacies. Please make sure to properly disposed of your P p. Hey says you should not put that stuff in the recycling bin. Make sure it's makes it to the garbage Can. The man at the top of Snohomish County is Planning Commission is facing some ethics questions. Details from comas Bill O'Neill. Those questions raised after the way was cleared for a controversial development opponents of the plan to build more than 100 homes on 22 acres near picnic points. A moral ash supported the elimination of a buffer zone requirement. Despite what they described as a conflict of interest. Critics also say county executive Doug Summers acted unethically by endorsing the code changes than accepting campaign donations from ash as well as the project's developer. Ash denies is used his position for personal gain, He tells the Herald he is active in politics, but says the timing of the donations is only a coincidence. The portion of the complaint against Summers was dismissed earlier this month. The ethics commission will decide whether Ash broke any rules and one if any penalties will be imposed..

Ash depression Carleen Johnson Department of Health Washington State Department of Doug Summers Xavier University Compass Health Covad Snohomish County Ality Dr Cama Whitworth College medical officer Skagit Valley Harold Compass help CDC Bellingham Administrator Andrew Wheeler Clinicians Organization
"depression substance abuse" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"depression substance abuse" Discussed on KOMO

"In fact, we've seen a large rising cases from Friday into the weekend to Saturday, another big increase in the past day. The state confirms 576 new cases of behavioral health experts are warning of the coming crisis. The ongoing pandemic they feared would lead to more depression, substance abuse and domestic violence. Almost Carleen Johnson reports Those experts were right. The Washington State Department of Health has been warning providers to expect the behavioral health impacts of the pandemic. To peek around six months after it started. We're just reaching that point. Dr. Campus Mile. Um, is the chief medical officer at Compass help CDC is anticipated that would chip in suicide, ality and substance use disorders. Depression Anxiety department expects three million people in our state to experience clinically significant behavior health symptoms over the next few months. The Bellingham hailed reports most of the symptoms are likely to manifest as depression, which can potentially affect 30 to 60% of the general population. Compass Health saw a 750% increase in the number of services they provide via Tele Health. In what come county. They had to train 500 Clinicians Organization wide in April just to meet the demand. Carleen Johnson Coma news. We're adding new kinds of litter to the landscape during the pandemic, Volunteers are telling the Skagit Valley Harold They're seeing more and more disposable gloves, masks and wipes when they're out picking up trash. EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler has this reminder when you do take trips to central businesses like grocery stores and pharmacies. Please make sure to properly dispose of your pee pee. He says. You should not put that stuff in the recycling bin put it in the garbage Can. The man at the top of Snohomish County is Planning commission is facing ethics questions. We get more from comas, Bill O'Neill. Those questions raised after the way was cleared for a controversial development opponents of the plan to build more than 100 homes on 22 acres near picnic Point. Same moral ash supported the elimination of a buffer zone requirement despite what they described as a conflict of interest. Critics also say county executive Doug Summers acted unethically by endorsing the code changes than accepting campaign donations from ash as well as the project's developer. Ash denies he's used his position for personal gain. He tells the Herald. He is active in politics, but says the timing of the donations is only a coincidence. The portion of the complaint against Summers was dismissed earlier this month, The ethics commission will decide whether ash broke any rules and what if any, penalties will be imposed? Hello, Neil come only after 128 years of business and ever. It is saying goodbye to the downtown district. Goldfinch Brothers has been at the corner of California and Rucker since 18 92. In 1999 the company added a second location on Holly Drive. It's a glass and glazing company, The Rucker office focused on residential window and door stale door sales. The other office focused on commercial business in this summer Herald says the two halves of the business have finally emerged in the new building on Beverly Park Road just minute away from a camo sports update. It's 6 39 Right now, Savings count more.

Ash Carleen Johnson depression Doug Summers Andrew Wheeler Washington State Department of Compass Health Snohomish County Bellingham Compass help CDC medical officer Rucker Dr. Campus Mile EPA Skagit Valley picnic Point Bill O'Neill California ality
"depression substance abuse" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"depression substance abuse" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"First degree murder child abuse and tampering with the deceased human seven-year-old, Cade, McWilliams died in part from maltreatment the child's mother was. Charging the case earlier this year, the next court hearing has been scheduled for next month. Chad Hoffman, KOA, NewsRadio and President Trump is most probably committed impeachable offenses, according to Senator Michael Bennet. But the congress needs to very carefully. Think about how to move forward to impeach. If we go down the road tomorrow and impeach. President Trump actually giving him a favor. That's what he wants to be able to say he was railroaded to, and then to have the impeachment from the house, go to the Senate, where urine in team, Mitch McConnell, and the Republicans are not going to convict Donald Trump in. It's been appearing on CNN's townhall yesterday. The democratic presidential candidate saying Bob Muller making it very clear congress needs to do its job, President Trump announcing more import taxes via Twitter this time against Mexico house, homeland security committee, Democrats calling the president's latest, Mexico import tariffs, quote, asinine, Mr. Trump saying he will tax all Mexican imports five percent until that nation stops illegal immigrants. From reaching the US border. Mexico is America's third largest trading partner, and they've actually increased selling to the US since the president impose tariffs on China. Andy field. ABC news, Washington. President touting military's the latest endeavors with space for artificial intelligence nuclear weapons and modernization and space superiority, the president's speaking at the air force academy. Graduation yesterday he says he hopes his proposed new military branch will never have to be used. He called it peace through strength. President Trump also said the US must continue to rule the skies. Meanwhile, some Denver educators are heading into the summer break uncertain, if they'll be back next school year, Maria Morales is one of them a Dhaka recipient whose temporary protected status could change this summer with the vote on the dream and promise acts. Wrapping up the school year and. My question for next year and saying the final goodbye. She plans on tending career development workshops this summer. But says planning beyond that has been nearly impossible, she's hopeful. I'll makers will pass the dream and promise acts this summer which would create a way for dreamers to earn citizenship. And if you've been waiting to clean up the leaves leftover from hailstorms earlier this week, you're on your own Denver's not organizing any kind of special cleanup efforts, or running street sweepers outside, usual times, but says you can put leaves in your trash or compost, bins. To better use so you can Denver resins can take them. Torture creek recycling drop off center. Well, they'll be recycled for free, and there's no limit on how many bags of leaves you bring to the drop off center Burke, with Denver public works says you can also leave the leaves on your curb for extra trash service which runs every four weeks, but those bags need to be under fifty pounds. Eight children around the world that are reportedly significantly better off than a generation prior Caroline, miles CEO of the save. The children organisation says the United States ranks thirty six though in the world for children are treated. Thirty six this year. Last year and last year's rankings in the United States. The rate of teen births, dropping by over half since two thousand and high school dropout rate's fallen by almost two-thirds on Tuesday, the, save the children organisation released their third annual global childhood report, which studies the children of today's world and finally. John's new rocket man. Biopic is out today that dome showcases his transformation into the ones most iconic figures in pop culture and his struggles with depression, substance, abuse, and acceptance of his sexual orientation, cast includes Edgerton, Richard Madden, Bryce, Dallas Howard, and Jamie bell. Is that a movie you would wanna go? See interest is does does Jon speak to you. You know what he didn't until I saw him about ten years ago. Right. Live in South Dakota one of the best shows I have ever seen. He played South Dakota played South Dakota, and he did it on a tour where he was in South Dakota, Wyoming. And I think he finished in Colorado Springs..

President Trump president United States Denver Maria Morales congress South Dakota Andy field Jon First degree murder Senator Michael Bennet Mexico Chad Hoffman CNN Mitch McConnell ABC Cade KOA Senate Twitter
"depression substance abuse" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:15 min | 3 years ago

"depression substance abuse" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Eating disorders association. Runs a helpline at national eating disorders dot org. We get calls we take shots. And this is a a major issue that comes up from people who are contacting us, you know, people who are motivated to seek help and cannot either because of cost or geography cannot find treatment or get treatment covered by their insurance companies. So this is another big area for advocacy for us, and as you pointed out, you know, another big barrier barrier is the stereotypes and the stigma. So when we when we talk about eating disorders as major public health issue. We have to talk about the broad range of people who are affected and really move away. From those stereotypes. There's a big spectrum. And I think you've just intimated that but also linked to other issues. I mean, anxiety, depression, substance abuse disorder. All these are often tied into eating disorders. Yes. And many people in fact, most people who contact us and talk about their eating disorder behavior. They're they're struggling with other issues as well as you pointed out anxiety depression. There's a strong link to substance use. We we also hear from people who have experienced trauma. There are communities all kinds of communities who are affected by these illnesses. So it's important that we really highlight and move away from as you noted that that typical stereotypical picture of who struggles with an eating disorder. I can't tell you, you know, the number of people who contact us who have waited a very long time to reach out for help because they don't see themselves reflected in the way eating disorders are portrayed in mainstream media. You know, we we hear often people say, well, I'm not that sick. Or you know, I haven't lost that much weight. I'm so, you know, again from a from a public health standpoint, we really need to talk about the range of of people who are affected, and as you pointed out, this affects men and women girls and boys. The people of all socioeconomic status as people of all races genders. Body size. So so busting through those myths is is really important as we advocate for better coverage and more research funding with others, not only research and busting through. The MRs also the importance of education to ameliorate those kinds of concerns as best. They can be mealy rated and the whole problem of stigma, and we've got also psychological difficulties when say young man or young woman looks in the mirror, and the body image is one they may be skeletal. But that's not what they see in their minds. I and we're going to talk more about eating disorders in about anorexia nervosa specifically, and I want to remind you that we're really trying to not only educate here. But dispel some of these myths that have been, unfortunately too, much a part of this illness, and it is an onus. It's difficult often to treat that can be deadly. Let me invite your calls. You can join us at our toll free number and talk about eating disorders..

Eating disorders
"depression substance abuse" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"depression substance abuse" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Treatment covered by their insurance companies. So this is another big area for advocacy for us, and you know, as you pointed out, you know, another big barrier barrier is the stereotypes and the stigma. So when we when we talk about eating disorders as he major public health issue. We have to talk about the broad range of people who are affected and really move away. From those stereotypes there's a big spectrum. And I think you've just intimated, but also linked to other issues. I mean, depression, substance abuse disorders. Order all these are often tied into eating disorders. Yes. And many people in fact, most people who contact us and talk about their eating disorder behavior. They're they're struggling with other issues as well as you pointed out anxiety depression. There's a strong link to substance use. We we also hear from people who have experienced trauma. There are communities all kinds of communities who are affected by these illnesses. So it's important that we really highlight and move away from as you noted that that typical stereotypical picture of who struggled with an eating disorder. I can't tell you the number of people who contact us who have waited a very long time to reach out for help. Because they don't see themselves reflected in the way eating disorders are portrayed in mainstream media. You know, we we hear often people say, well, I'm not that sick. Or you know, I haven't lost that much weight. So again from a from a public health standpoint, we really need to talk about the range of of people who are affected, and as you pointed out, this affects men and women girls and boys. The people of all socioeconomic status as people of all races genders body size. So so busting through those myths is is really important as we advocate for better coverage and more research funding, others, not only research and busting through. The message also the importance of education to ameliorate those kinds of concerns as best. They can be mealy rated and the whole problem of stigma, and we've got also check logical difficulties when say young man or young woman looks in the mirror, and the body image is one they may be skeletal the test on what they see in their minds. I and we're gonna talk more about eating disorders in about anorexia nervosa specifically, and I want to remind you that we're really trying to not only educate here. But dispel some of these myths that have been, unfortunately too, much a part of this illness, and it is an onus. It's difficult often to treat and that can be deadly. Let me invite your calls you. Join us at our toll free number and wanna talk about eating disorders..

"depression substance abuse" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:55 min | 3 years ago

"depression substance abuse" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Air combat through combat exposure, it's cetera. One has to have. Significant level of severity of symptoms and that then they're diagnosed with PTSD we've mentioned before there could be other co morbid conditions such as depression. Substance abuse is widely associated with it is depression, a cause or a result of the PTSD. Well, I think the cause of the PTSD would be considered the actual a specific incident. Trauma, basic, okay, I got ya. And then the depression. Would be associated with it. There are several items for instance, that are depression related on the caps interview is well as sleep problems. All right. Let's take a call from Steve and bay city Michigan next up and get after good evening. Steve. Welcome. Jim, I'm a psychologist ideal DSP related issues. I just wanted to fill, you know, little bit the process involved with PTSD the. People experience a sort of traumatic experience because the way our nervous system works. You come. So, hyper aroused. The language processing and cognitive understanding parts of your brain tend to get turned off. So now, you're kind of relying on more primitive parts of your brain to deal more with emotions and impulses impulsively in that nature. And so the sense that the trial Kennedy gets locked into your nervous system. So you have to find a way to get that out and have the higher level parts of the brain catch up with it being able to process it. Along with that the person learns to become an observer of their past trauma, rather than continuing to be a victim of it. And that's part of the problem with exposure type therapies, people are reliving re experiencing the trauma over and over and over again. All right. Can't tolerate that. But but but but if you can tolerate it this could be a pathway to benefit. Yes. It could be it could be. All right. Very good comments from. Documents. Marinol is a medically derived cannabis tyrod that that I gathered comments from our guest Dr. Yes. Well, thank you for those comments. There were very important generally the. What makes up the PTSD diagnosis is hyper arousal is one important factor in that includes hyper vigilance. Another major factor in PTSD is avoidance in avoidance of shopping malls. Because people what to avoid being in crowded experiences because maybe their traumatic experience was related to be in a major shopping area or being around a large group of people where the experience happened. And then the third is intrusive thoughts. He's your thoughts on unwanted thoughts. They continue for the individual to have. And it's not a very pleasant experience. It was. Well, did you have another comment? Add before we go to the break or. They say that. Oh, go ahead. But we quickly. I'll tell you what I'm going to go to just take the break. We're way overdue for it. At if Steve which is to add a further comment, we could do. So after these messages. Less worked hard to make his dream of playing in the NHL come through every day. He'd be out playing street hockey constantly tones people would drive by. Straight. But west never gave up until one day when somebody else. Car you're going to work because west was a forty three year old accountant and he commuted with that guy downtown..

PTSD depression Steve Dr. Yes intrusive thoughts NHL Marinol accountant Jim Michigan Kennedy hockey forty three year one day
"depression substance abuse" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"depression substance abuse" Discussed on WTVN

"It's the most wonderful time of the year. A time for family friends and time off to relax for many though, the holidays. Bring added stress depression, substance abuse, you don't have to fight alone. Columbus springs offers inpatient and outpatient services for adult mental health and chemical dependency treatment. Call us now at six one four six nine eight one five four zero we're available twenty four seven to help. You can find out more by visiting Columbus springs dot com. Message and data rates may apply. Individual results may vary. See website for details. But hey, I'm buying a huge flat screen TV. So I can finally see without my glasses. Why not just get sick at the logistic vision institute. That's what I'm doing. My glasses and contacts are a pain love to finally get rid of these. But who can afford Lasix you can because the Lazic vision institute is offering dramatically low prices and an absolutely free consultation just taxed happy to three five zero three five zero. The vision institute has already performed over a million procedures. They use the latest FDA approved Lasik technology that helps the majority of patients achieve twenty twenty vision for a fraction of what others charge better vision, better value the Lasik vision institute make this the year you finally get Lazic for a free consultation. Plus an extra twenty percent discount. Taxed pappy two three five zero three five zero. You'll see for free. If is right for you. That's H A P P Y two three five zero three five zero until using credit karma. Andrew Higgins had always been indecisive. Is online shopping cart a seven hundred ninety three items damn second guessing is for amateurs, try guessing. But when Andrew learned that credit karma can help him save money on auto insurance. He finally made a decision now his online shopping cart only has seven hundred and ninety two items. Congratulations, Andrew credit karma. Here's the progress may not be available in all states credit. Come insurance services LLC insurance services? LLC Sierra license. You're one seven two seven four eight. now back to Todd Herman guest hosting for Rush Limbaugh on the EIB network. Ravin me and someone wrote me a note on Twitter, Claire Bartlett's the walls already law show.

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