38 Burst results for "Depression"

Fresh update on "depression" discussed on COVID-19: What You Need to Know

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

01:23 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "depression" discussed on COVID-19: What You Need to Know

"Thousands. We came out here most summers, and it just became a second home to me. It really is a special place. But when you think of the YMCA, don't you think of a big sweaty building with a swimming pool and a running track? Right? We are not what we call a swim and Jim. YMCA. That becomes obvious when you find out that Karen Lloyd deno frios title at the YMCA of the rockies is historian and director of the wise museum. We were originally set up as a vacation training school for YMCA leaders that were focused and lived in the west. She says that back about 1907 before estes park was a city. The why, having long been looking for a meeting place, decided on a quiet, pristine piece of land in the Rocky Mountains. A few years later, the federal government decided to surround it. With a national park. There were early struggles. The Great Depression was like for many other people, a hard time for the YMCA of the rockies, and there was discussion about selling the land to the park. But two men came together and prevented the site being sold. So it continued as a place for people to gather together for training, meetings, fellowship, and meals, often in large group tents, sleeping at the Y camp, as it was called, was in small private tents against the backdrop of the mountains. Over the last century plus, the crowds have grown. From why staff and retreat to thousands of people from around the world. And those tents have evolved into rustic cabins with plumbing and electricity, and even bigger lodges. I believe we have over 250 cabins. It's the largest North American YMCA period. We can serve 5000 people a night. 40 years ago this summer, Alan Jackson, not the country singer. Became a Wrangler in the stable at the YMCA of the rockies. I was 16 years old, my first summer never been away from home from Kansas and had the time of my life and that was 40 years ago. Since the YMCA first opened in 1907, the livery has been a tradition for generations of why camp families, and for the teenagers who work there as wranglers every summer, helping kids and adults learn to ride horses, teenagers like Allen, who started as a Wrangler, and now owns the business. His wife and son both former wranglers run it with him. We do 20 to 25,000 writers this summer. Moms, dads, and of course thousands of wide eyed kids dreaming of roping, riding, and a big old yeehaw. And we've learned over the years that you always put the kids in front and mom next and dad and back because if you put the kids behind mom, mom turns around the whole time. And they start them young, too. On a little trail across from the stables. What's the pony's name? But on one of 5 or so ponies. What ponies behind you? It is nibbles behind you. That's right. So little cowgirls and cowboys can saddle up for their first ride. It's been really neat to see the kids that I put on their first horse. They're working for me when they're in college. And now I'm putting their kids on their first doors. I've been horseback riding, but we go almost every year, so that's really fun. Elizabeth Crocker from Kansas City didn't just take her first horseback ride at the YMCA of the rockies. I took my first steps in Barclay lodge. There's a lot of memories here. We've been there every year of her life, and it's kind of home away from home for her. Glenn Crocker is her dad, and this year he and Elizabeth went to Y camp a couple of months earlier than usual. It had always been my dream since I was like 7 years old to come here as soon as I turned 18. So she could start her summer job. I work at the front desk, which is handling check ins and answering questions from the guests. Over her lifetime, Elizabeth and her dad have done so many things. At the YMCA of the rockies. Mini golf. The parachute thing where all the kids, you know, have the giant parachute. Swimming. Roller skating. Nature walks for the kids. Volleyball. Night hikes for parents. Basketball. They've got an astronomy program. There's a craft building, mountain bike rentals, and of course, perhaps the biggest draw of all. When I was 11, I did across the park, which is an 18 mile hike. I really fell in love with hiking then. I think my favorite memory with my dad is estes cone, which is about a 6 mile hike. One year Elizabeth and I decided to do these three mountains, Chapin, chiquita, and ipsilon. And it was just us to we had a lot of fun doing that hack together. Then we were completely exhausted. And they'll be back at it. Just a couple of weeks from now. Glenn and his wife will return to the Y and the rockies with their church, which has been taking families to the same lodge, the same week of the year for almost half a century, and Elizabeth is planning to take time off from the front desk to hike with her dad. There was at one time a period where I didn't come out. I'd been away for a few years and came back and just did that. Oh, it's so nice to be back. He's now a fixture at the Y when hiking season kicks into gear. I'm a hike master. I retired two years ago. This is my second year as a volunteer hike master. It's my dream.

Ymca Rockies Karen Lloyd Deno Frios Wise Museum North American Ymca Estes Park Rocky Mountains Alan Jackson Elizabeth Crocker Barclay Lodge Glenn Crocker Federal Government Swimming Elizabeth JIM Depression Kansas Allen Cowboys
Karl Frisch Discusses Biden's Approval Ratings

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:48 min | 1 d ago

Karl Frisch Discusses Biden's Approval Ratings

"Political consultant cap on because I get what everybody's saying that Biden's approval ratings are not good, which I'm sorry. I put directly at the media's feet because he has an extraordinary list of accomplishments, best economy in 50 years. Michael mcfaul just said, it was not inevitable that NATO would be more united and expand as a result of Putin's invasion of Ukraine. Potus played a leading historic role in producing this new NATO bravo mister president. You don't see him get credit for that anywhere. Along with anything else that he is, I mean, he is, as we always said, he inherited a Civil War, essentially, the insurrection, right? One of my thinking of Spanish flu whatever COVID was. And The Great Depression. He inherited all of that from Trump. And I just, I guess I'm not surprised at his approval ratings call, but I guess what it's showing in state by state is it's not affecting fetterman was looking great, obviously Warnock is looking great now. I think you know what's interesting. Tim Ryan's real chance. It doesn't look like that. Something similar with Biden that there was with Trump, although Biden is more popular than Trump was. You know, we all scratched our heads when Trump lost but Republicans did okay in the congressional races. Or in a lot of the congressional races. And I think people can separate their views of different people. I think what Biden has going against him is not that he's unpopular. It's that there are some Democrats who are disappointed that more hasn't been done, right? Because they wanted not only a departure from Trump, they wanted everything they've been waiting for. And then reality it's with what Congress can get accomplished with the margins that it

Biden Michael Mcfaul Nato Donald Trump Fetterman Putin Ukraine Tim Ryan Warnock FLU Depression Congress
Fresh update on "depression" discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

00:29 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "depression" discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"God wanted of me was that God was going to bless me with this amazing love story that was going to be beyond anything I could imagine. And I was just a hopeless romantic. And so I had a big imagination and I thought, man, it's going to be amazing. This love story God has for me. Because it's supposed to exceed my own expectations. Turned out a guy who I was good friends with just one day out of the blue told me that God had shown him. I was his future wife. And I didn't feel anything romantic for him. And but I believed him. If I can jump in. Yeah. This sounds like a pick up line. Oh yeah. I am your destiny. Sounds like a setup. Do you get the vibe he was legit and sincere? I mean, I know you can't totally know for sure. Yeah. But I knew him pretty well. And I do think he was sincere as sincere as the other people in my life in my life who said that they believed God led them to do XYZ. He knew the devotion of my of my purity of my fidelity of my intention. We'd known each other for a couple years and had gone to the same youth group together. So he very much, I don't think it was so much a pick up line as much as he probably had a crush on me and figured those feelings must be from God. Sure, the spirit is moving within me and affirming this. Yes, and because I was such a righteous woman. And he was a very righteous guy. I think he could rule out that it wasn't attempting of the flesh that he could get like an easy kiss or a layout of me. It was very he wasn't going to kiss me until our wedding day. That was on the table. And so furthermore, it wasn't just him saying that my father and his mother also affirmed that they'd that God had shown them that Luke is his name in the book that Luke and I were going to get married. And so there was all of this external validation from spiritual elders and in that culture, purity culture, that's what you lean on to make sure that you're not acting on your own fleshly will and desire. So it was not only this guy who said this to me, but it was affirmed by our spiritual elders. And for me, particularly by my father, in biblical terms like the patriarch of our family and I belong to my father until I belong to my husband. My dad wasn't really like that, but that was that was what I grew up in. I didn't really question it at the time. I had no reason to. So it all just unfolded how it did, and we were betrothed for two months. And that whole time, I really wrestled with my honest feelings were of utter devastation, betrayal, anger, and just deep depression, but I could not let myself even acknowledge really that I felt that way because to acknowledge that would mean that I was disappointed in God and that I was angry with God. Now, to be clear, you were feeling these things because you had no attraction to Luke. Yeah, I just felt like I bought in, I'd done my part of the purity culture promise. That if I did X, God would do Y and I'd done X I'd been so, so pure and so faithful and devoted, and then it was like, God, how I rationalized it in my mind at the time was like, oh, of course God would give me someone that I'm not attracted to that way because attraction is shallow, and I need to care more about his character, and he's a godly young man, and that's what matters more. It doesn't matter that I don't have lust for him. Maybe I'm not supposed to until our wedding day and then maybe there were so many ways I tried to rationalize God's betrayal. The love will come someday. That was probably part of it, right? And also other way that I rationalized it was where in the Bible did a woman marry for love. She married out of necessity and she married because she was traded or bought. They were arranged marriages all the time in the Bible. And it felt to me like I was in an arranged betrothal, not in the sense that our parents got together and decided, this is going to happen. But in the sense that this was a biblically led romance and God gave affirmation to these three people and I needed to act on faith to do it or else risk disobeying God, leaving the umbrella of God's safety and exposing myself to the devil and all of the destruction he wanted to do to me. So ultimately, I broke off my betrothal, which I would not have done had my mother, not really encouraged me to do so. 'cause she could tell I was deeply unhappy and she also like myself had not heard from God that I was supposed to marry this guy. But it was still the scariest thing I'd ever done. I thought mom was being used by Satan to deter me from what otherwise looked to be God's very clear will. And that, in retrospect, I can say, was the beginning of my questioning. My period of doubt and what some people today might call deconstruction. I was still a Christian for almost four years after that, but I was the more progressive kind where I decided, no, I'm going to have sex, and I think God's going to still love me. And I don't think my gay friends are going to hell, and I don't think I even need to go to church anymore. So I shit ton of that going on in the culture today, right? There is. There is. And it both I both applaud it and I'm confused by it. So it's like might as well make Christianity a better place as long as it's one of the world's top religions, but I'm also like, is it Christianity? I don't know who's to say what real Christianity is. Don't want to go there, but where I settle to for myself. Eventually, I gave God a test. And I just couldn't doubt anymore. I couldn't keep waffling back and forth of like, is there a God is there not a God? And he failed. And I read about it in the book. So if anyone's curious how that went, you can read it there. But I'll put the link in the description box. You know, it's interesting too. A lot of people heard what you just said about a betrothal. And their mouth drops open and they go, what century is this? Like this doesn't happen today, or at least not in mainstream Christian circles today. And you would beg to differ. Yes, I would say, you know, well, first of all, we need to define what is mainstream. Because admittedly, maybe the types of Christian groups I was a part of could be more French, but they were all I knew..

Luke Depression Satan
Who Is the Force Behind Transgender Mutilation? Jay Greene Explains

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:09 min | Last week

Who Is the Force Behind Transgender Mutilation? Jay Greene Explains

"Have you found because as that quote from Hemingway, things happen very, very slowly, and then suddenly things happen. What was the, who was driving this? Who in 2010 says, yes, we're going to cut the breasts off 12 year old girls. Who's the force behind this doctor green? So yeah, I mean, you're right. It did happen gradually and then all of a sudden. And the gradually was that it started actually in the Netherlands around 1990 at a clinic and then kind of spread from their very gradually and it's not really until 2015 that it ramps up dramatically in the U.S. and it's probably Bruce Jenner changing to Caitlyn Jenner that was the impetus for this very dramatic increase in the interest in changing one sex or gender identity as a way of potentially of solving one's problem. So the issue going on here is that it's largely girls and girls unfortunately suffer from an unusually high rate of depression and anxiety, especially these days. It's hard being a girl growing up. But we've seen this before. I remember in the 80s and 90s, it was bulimia. It was anorexia. And this seems to be the next version of the group dynamic of the precious of being a pubescent girl. This is the new thing, but Bruce Jenner being on TV screens is one thing doctor. They have to be medical professionals who say, we're going to do this to children. So have you identified a focal point or scent of gravity professionally? I mean, there are some gender ideology advocates who really helped spread this. But honestly, this is largely the initial interest in this among teenage girls is peer to peer. And they're getting interested in learning about it in the same way they learned about and got interested in eating disorders or cutting. They're just looking for ways of regaining control of their lives and getting on top of problems of depression and anxiety.

Bruce Jenner Caitlyn Jenner Hemingway The Netherlands Bulimia Anorexia U.S. Depression Anxiety
Fresh update on "depression" discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

01:07 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "depression" discussed on Filmspotting

"In fact, it did make my top 5 movie flight scenes, a lot of groundbreaking special effects for 1939. It also made years ago a top 5 we did breaking up the boys club. Jean Arthur, obviously the character doing that in this great film, which is available on the criterion channel, but Amazon Prime iTunes and voodoo as well. Can I add another one to this category? Please do. Adventure. So you mentioned Errol Flynn in captain blood, which is just fantastic. I have always loved him in adventures of Robin Hood as well. I can remember this was when I was really young, but those who grew up around Chicago maybe recall. I think it was on WGN. There would be family classics, and they were usually Sunday afternoons. I believe, which is when we were often at my grandparents house. So a lot of the times family classics would be put on, we'd plop in front and frequently it seems to me adventures of Robin. No kidding. And I got to watch Errol Flynn in those sword fights and some great action scenes and obviously all the charm as well. So yeah, really strong genre in the 1930s action and adventure. All right, so number two, well, Charlie Chaplin kind of had to be on this list because the 1930s held two of his greatest features, modern times, and city lights. Modern times is in my top ten of all time. So that's going to have to be my pick. The movies enduring relevance is why I value modern times so much. This story of Chaplin's little tramp and this was his last screen appearance as the tramp. Just watching this figure being gobbled up by the societal, the economic and the technological forces of labor. Certainly spoke to the years right after The Great Depression, but every time I watch it, whether it was 25 years ago or shortly after the 2008 recession or now in the tumult of today, it just seems to ring even truer. It's like, oh, the movie's about now. It was made then, but it's about now. And plus this has some of Chaplin's all time great visual gags, which never get old. The tramp frantically trying to keep up with an assembly line. That moment where he's stuck in a factory machines, giant gears, or even when he's trying to survive a meal via that monstrous feeding machine that keeps stuff in his face. So this is all brilliant comic material and set pieces, as I said, really still applies today. And modern times is streaming on the criterion channel, Amazon Prime, and you can find it via Canopy. So some overlap for us at number two, I have Charlie Chaplin as well, but I am going with his other masterpiece at least one more from the period city lights in 1931. It was his prior film to modern times. There was a 5 year gap between the two, but what a back to back set of movies. I think about this movie coming off of human bondage again, talk about it here in a little bit on the show, but it's the uplifting counter to a human bondage and that you've got a character, the tramp, who falls in love with, this blind girl, and kind of becomes obsessed with trying to help her. He finds out that she's going to be evicted. And even though he doesn't have any money himself, he tries to scrape together whatever he can eventually does come into some cash so that he can try to help them and maybe improve their lives. Now, I have a confession. I haven't seen modern times or city lights since 1998. I can't actually tell you which one I think is the better film. I'm going with city lights here because of my memories of it, especially that ending. And I'm not going to rehash my essays. I wrote back in 1998 when I took a class on silent comedy. They compared the films of Chaplin and Keaton. I could do it. We could get into the place of sentimentality in silent comedies like this and whether or not it truly belongs. I mean, that is the key distinction, really, between Chaplin and Keaton. Is that use of sentimentality? And I think it's why for a time. And maybe we're still in that time. It's become way more fashionable to prefer Keaton to chaplain because the sentimentality seems a little bit overdone, perhaps, or a little bit schmaltzy. And also, many people live, it's easy to do. You could argue that when you pull at the heartstrings a little bit, anybody is going to fall for that, whereas Keaton was more inventive and maybe more ambitious. That might be the case, but when you've got that perfect blend as I think you do here in city lights and in modern times of pathos and comedy, then that's chaplain at his Pinnacle. And of course, there's also that great element here as it is in modern times of social commentary. I mentioned the really famous ending of this movie, but what about the opening, right? Where he is riffing a little bit on the advent of talkies. This had happened three years earlier. He doesn't want to make the shift yet. Doesn't think cinema necessarily needs it. He can still tell his stories with the camera. And so he has a nod to that by having this big public forum where statues are being unveiled in honor of peace and prosperity and keeping in mind this is 1931. We know what period America is in. And yet there's this big civic display of everyone's benevolence. And basically paying tribute to themselves, all these wealthy people as they unveil this statute and when they talk when they make their speeches, there is sound, but it's like Charlie Brown parents talking, right? It doesn't matter what they're saying as far as Chaplin is concerned..

Errol Flynn Chaplin Charlie Chaplin Jean Arthur Keaton Boys Club Amazon WGN Robin Hood Robin Chicago Depression America Charlie Brown
Franklin D. Roosevelt Was an American Dictator

Mark Levin

01:08 min | 2 weeks ago

Franklin D. Roosevelt Was an American Dictator

"Now the great Milton Freeman explained many times over and deposited in my view That it was monetary policy that took us from a bad recession under Hoover and moved us from the depression that went on for ten years on needlessly But it was an opportunity for the American marxists to vastly expand the power of the central government and to do grave damage to our constitutional order His name is FDR FDR in many ways was an American dictator The way I use the IRS the way I use the FBI The way he centered information and on and on and on But they loved him because he was a radical lefty And we also had a war going on certainly starting in 1941 And so he got a pass on many things He's not rated Is one of our great presidents certainly not by me

Milton Freeman Hoover Depression IRS FBI
"depression" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

05:38 min | 2 weeks ago

"depression" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"Day. Some important vitamins for hair health are B vitamins, vitamin C, and vitamin D and the essential fatty acid GLA can also support hair growth and tissue health, so think shiny hair, glowing skin. So if you are experiencing hair thinning, we suggest making an appointment with one of our dietitians or nutritionists to develop an individualized plan that addresses your concerns. Give us a call at 651-699-3438 and get our schedule. So when we left and went to break, we were talking about some of the symptoms and side effects of going through these hormonal changes with perimenopause and menopause, many of us may not realize that our hormones are connected to our brain. The same hormones that control the menstrual cycle also affect your brain chemicals, the neurotransmitter serotonin is affected by your hormones. Serotonin supports your feeling of well-being and happiness. We love serotonin. And when your serotonin level is low, you may feel sad, lack of motivation, you may have trouble sleeping when a deficiency of serotonin occurs, women often become irritable, anxious and sad. So brandy and I will hopefully provide some solutions this morning to ease this unnecessary misery. Yes. And something that can really throw off your serotonin levels are those high sugar foods, those processed carbohydrates. And that can surprise a lot of people. But really, these foods will block the receptors for those neurotransmitters, serotonin in the brain. That's brilliant. Say that again. Those processed carbs, sugar, blocks the receptors in the brain for serotonin. It's wild, but it's true. So maybe you're starting your day with a high sugar drink, like a mocha latte. And while you're at the coffee shop, you grab a muffin for your break later that morning. So already, you are starting your day with a lot of sugar. Already, you're blocking serotonin from making a connection to those active cells in your brain. This is going to leave you feeling down. Maybe a little anxious. Depressed. So, as women in perimenopause or menopause, not only do we want to make sufficient serotonin, but we want to be able to use the serotonin that we made. Absolutely. And I am seeing more in clinic than I've ever seen in practice more anxiety, more depression, but we are a nation eating more processed foods than we have ever eaten in history. Let's give listeners some meal ideas on making the making of serotonin. I love teaching this to people in recovery so they can learn to make and use their neurotransmitters. Serotonin, dopamine, and all other neurotransmitters do not come from a medication..

depression
Mortgage Origination Activity Drops to a 22-Year Low

The Trish Regan Show

00:55 sec | 3 weeks ago

Mortgage Origination Activity Drops to a 22-Year Low

"We got news today that mortgage originations are the lowest they've been in 22 years. I mean, you'd expect them to dip a little, right? Because mortgage rates are going up, but they're the lowest they've been in 22 years. You got targets saying, wow, we have all this inventory that we can't move. They're actually going to slash prices, which may bode well, I should point out for inflation, but you get a lot of other things out there now. It suggests we've got problems primarily. I would argue because of energy prices being as high as they are. You can't have a 122 bucks on a barrel of oil and not expect that that's going to have some repercussions on the overall economy in everyday people. There was a study out today actually a Rasmussen pull that showed 34% of Americans say quote a depression is not likely depressed. I mean, that's how bad I think sentiment

Rasmussen Depression
Protecting Black American Communities With Maj Toure

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:50 min | 3 weeks ago

Protecting Black American Communities With Maj Toure

"People talk about Vietnam as something very, very negative. They talk about the unfair draft, the unfair, perhaps focus on black draftees. You look at the figures for how many people died, there were less than 4000 black Americans who died in 15 years in Vietnam as draftees. Then we look at the crime stats for America, and we look at the mortality rates. The highest mortality, the most dangerous thing for a white young man in America is accidents is car crashes or drownings. The highest mortality factor, the most dangerous thing for black young man is to be shot by who, not a police officer, but another black man, young man, 9000 a year, multiples of 15 years in Vietnam. There's no one we can wave. There's no gun lord that's going to fix that. However, will you talk to us about what will have to change in terms of culture and especially the focus? Do you talk in your speeches, traveling the country? Is there a focus on the fact that more than 72% of black children are born into father's homes? Because I think that's got to be part of it. So there are several things. The culture piece is absolutely critical. But I want to step back and I want to make sure that we're not making it seem as if that's just happening in a vacuum. There are other things that democratic policies over time specifically did, especially after, let's say in the 60s, going into the 70s, even when you're talking about welfare, which was created right after The Great Depression and overwhelmingly white women are on welfare more, but one of the things that happened in the black community was, if you took welfare, you were as a woman, you were not allowed to have a husband or a man in the house. Right. Because you'd lose your welfare. Right. And these are and again, I have friends and family that I love dearly, but the policies are the policy. These were democratically pushed policies. So then you have, okay, we're going to drop drugs in a community. Then we're going to drop guns in the community after we've removed follow listeners. And this isn't like all within a week. This is a targeted situation over time. Now, does that mean that there's no accountability for the individual? Absolutely not. I have to make sure that that's very clear. However, these things by design were there to do a thing. And we're seeing the remnants of it now. We're seeing a space in conjunction with the fact that in those same areas where that diabolical scheme by the lefties was

Vietnam America Depression
Why Don't More Doctors Use EEG in Their Practices? Dr. Emory Explains

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:32 min | Last month

Why Don't More Doctors Use EEG in Their Practices? Dr. Emory Explains

"You look at the brain's and the brain waves of people who are healthy, who are asymptomatic. Correct. And then when you have a patient come in and you see some anomaly, you say, aha, this is off. This may be a key to their symptoms, to their problems, to their seizures, to whatever it is that they're experiencing. So you have this database. Yes. So, but very few people do what you do. Now why is that? I can't speak for other people. I think that my earlier experience as a general medical doctor made me comfortable with examining people and I can remember from the beginning of my psychiatric practice there were two men who had persistently fast pulse rate. They were and they were depressed, but what I realized was the pulse rate was the thing that needed to be corrected and perhaps if I did it, their so called depression would reduce or resolve. And in fact, that's what happened. Right, but what you're talking about is because you have so much experience that you kind of have an instinct. And this is what good diagnosticians do.

Seizures Depression
Naomi Osaka at French Open news conference: 'I think I'm OK'

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last month

Naomi Osaka at French Open news conference: 'I think I'm OK'

"Osaka has won four grand slams since her withdrawal in Paris There have been questions about her well-being For the most part I think I'm okay Osaka said last year she experiences huge waves of anxiety before speaking to the media and has suffered long bouts of depression I think everyone's been really positive for the most part I'm not really so sure Osaka also sat out Wimbledon and later in the season took another mental health break after losing at the U.S. open She lost in the third round of the Australian open which takes her to Paris Where I am right now like I've I wouldn't want to say that it's like it hasn't left my mind of course I'm still thinking about it Osaka's world ranking has fallen to number 38 mostly because of a lack of action I'm Ed

Osaka Paris Depression U.S.
Florida Was an Unbelievable Success Story During the Pandemic. Why?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:34 min | Last month

Florida Was an Unbelievable Success Story During the Pandemic. Why?

"So Florida was an unbelievable success story. During the pandemic. By remaining open and defying federal government, pressure, Ron DeSantis, the courageous Ron DeSantis was able to keep Florida free, businesses from closing down. He was able to taper and hedge against mental health issues, depression, suicide, social isolation, alcoholism, Florida became kind of a Beacon of liberty and hope, and you see it with the real estate values around here. You see it with the new businesses that are moving here. It's almost synonymous with self government. Ron DeSantis deserves credit and Ron DeSantis has received some incredibly well earned praise for doing this. But the question is, why was he able to do it? The reason is in the structure of our government. We talk a lot about the United States Constitution here on this program. And James Madison, in the federalist papers, argued that the structure of the constitution was one of its defining elements. James Madison Alexander Hamilton and John Jay, the three authors of the federalist papers and one of the three most involved in designing our constitution, James Madison being the most involved. Why is America able to be free not because of our Bill of rights every banana republic has a Bill of rights? No, the structure of checks and balances and consent of the governed. Allows a bottom up structure, a grassroots centric way of governing.

Ron Desantis Florida James Madison James Madison Alexander Hamilt Depression America John Jay Banana Republic
Social Security Is Becoming Worth Less & Less

The Dan Bongino Show

01:30 min | Last month

Social Security Is Becoming Worth Less & Less

"But I owe you the truth If you're a senior to me and you've lived the longer and you have great life experience with humility and respect and I use those words very deliberately to your life experience and all the suffering you went through for this country and world wars The Great Depression and everything I owe you the truth And the hard reality is the government made promises to you they can never keep The reason the social security check you're getting right now is worth less and less and less every month And to the 50s and 60 year olds now were expecting social security in the next 20 years It's going to be worth less and less and less because that money was already spent The reason you can't afford dinner in the rent anymore if you planned on living off these things and the reason it doesn't buy those services and products is because you already bought something You just didn't agree to it You bought decades of Jefferson spending Where the government spent the money a bunch of money on bailout programs and all this other stuff you already bought it I'm not kidding when I tell you this Please when you're done with this show today go to a search engine preferably not Google the most evil company in America Go to a search engine and put understanding monetizing the debt You'll get a bunch of articles by conservatives and you'll see that exactly what I'm telling you is 100% accurate

Depression Jefferson Google America
The Decline of Male Masculinity

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:58 sec | 2 months ago

The Decline of Male Masculinity

"When you went to college, Dennis, do you think that the males were more manly and chivalrous than now or was it bad that do? It was bad, but it wasn't like today. It was the first generation of bad, so there was still a residue. Of the past. But it. Had already the devolution had begun. As I have always said, the greatest generation, that's what the generation of World War II and the depression is cold. I think there are many great generations, but I'm certainly going to agree they were a great generation. They made a Greek tragedy error. In the way they raised my generation, not me, my father was old school. You earned respect in my family. You earned your way through life.

Dennis Depression
Naomi Judd, of Grammy-winning duo The Judds, dies at 76

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

Naomi Judd, of Grammy-winning duo The Judds, dies at 76

"The the the the family family family family of of of of musician musician musician musician Naomi Naomi Naomi Naomi Judd Judd Judd Judd of of of of the the the the Judds Judds Judds Judds says says says says she she she she died died died died of of of of mental mental mental mental illness illness illness illness at at at at the the the the age age age age of of of of seventy seventy seventy seventy six six six six near near near near Nashville Nashville Nashville Nashville Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee details details details details were were were were not not not not given given given given our our our our margins margins margins margins are are are are a a a a letter letter letter letter with with with with a a a a look look look look at at at at her her her her career career career career Naomi Naomi Naomi Judd Judd Judd was was was a a a single single single mom mom mom working working working as as as a a a nurse nurse nurse when when when she she she teamed teamed teamed with with with her her her daughter daughter daughter Wynonna Wynonna Wynonna to to to form form form the the the jobs jobs jobs they they they had had had a a a string string string of of of country country country hits hits hits including including including love love love will will will build build build a a a bridge bridge bridge mama mama mama he's he's he's crazy crazy crazy and and and girls girls girls night night night out out out judge judge judge other other other daughter daughter daughter is is is actor actor actor Ashley Ashley Ashley Judd Judd Judd and and and John John John had had had quit quit quit performing performing performing when when when she she she was was was diagnosed diagnosed diagnosed with with with hepatitis hepatitis hepatitis C. C. C. she she she had had had also also also written written written about about about her her her struggles struggles struggles with with with depression depression depression and and and anxiety anxiety anxiety Judd Judd Judd said said said in in in the the the nineteen nineteen nineteen ninety ninety ninety three three three a a a P. P. P. interview interview interview being being being on on on stage stage stage was was was her her her happy happy happy place place place is is is fifteen fifteen fifteen thousand thousand thousand strangers strangers strangers in in in this this this stealing stealing stealing concrete concrete concrete building building building I I I felt felt felt as as as if if if we we we levitate levitate levitate at at at that that that stage stage stage

Judd Judd Nashville Tennessee Naomi Naomi Naomi Naomi Judd J Judds Judds Naomi Naomi Naomi Judd Wynonna Wynonna Wynonna Bridge Bridge Mama Mama Mama Ashley Ashley Ashley Judd John John John Hepatitis Hepatitis Hepatitis Depression Depression Anxiety Anxiety Judd Judd Judd Depression
How Inflation Created the Conditions for the Rise of the Nazis

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:15 min | 2 months ago

How Inflation Created the Conditions for the Rise of the Nazis

"Inflation is not just a monetary issue. I mean, I know you know this. I'm saying this for the benefit of my listeners. When I think of terrible inflation, I think of what brought the Nazis to power. I know a lot about that era, and it was not anti semitism, that brought the Nazis to power. It was, in my opinion, the inflation in the Weimar Republic, the republic that was created after World War I in Germany. So when people think inflation, they should understand the social repercussions of terrible inflation. Have I overstated the case? No, you haven't. And you're right, the German hyperinflation of the early 1920s created the conditions for the rise of Adolf Hitler. You combine that with a great depression and you had this horrible near collapse of civilization in the west. And in terms of inflation's impact, you make a very important point and we do so in this book, which we try to write in a very reader friendly jargon free way. It's not just economics rising prices, but also with undermines what we call social trust.

Weimar Republic Adolf Hitler Depression
Why Are American Teens So Sad?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:49 min | 2 months ago

Why Are American Teens So Sad?

"This segment and the one following is not going to be the most uplifting segment that we ever do here on the Charlie Kirk show. But arguably one of the most important. This is a segment that you're not going to want to hear and you might not think it's real, but I could tell you from my experience with young people, it's absolutely real. And it's a story that actually starts in the publication for lorene Powell jobs, the Atlantic, quote, why American teens are so sad. Four forces are propelling the rise of rates of depression amongst young people. Now before you kind of just roll your eyes and say, oh, whatever, toughen it up. This is a huge problem with our nation's young people. I know at least two young people in my general circle, periphery, I did not know them personally, that committed suicide in the last week, to serious issue. Young people are, by definition, now the most alcohol addicted drug addicted, depressed, sad, suicidal, anxious, medicated generation and history. Now there's many reasons as to why this is the case. One of the reasons, of course, would be our imprudent response to the Chinese coronavirus, locking down our entire society. It was not the pandemic that did it. It was our reaction to the pandemic. Now, if you're listening to this right now and you're a parent or a grandparent, an ant or an uncle, I hope you listen to these words very carefully, because if you have a young person in your life, they might not be telling the truth about how sad they actually are. This generation will be the most suicidal generation of history when the numbers come out. In fact, the numbers already show it, we don't know how this year is going to shake out. The Atlantic dot com writes, quote, the United States is experiencing an extreme teenage mental health crisis. From 2009 to 2021, the share of American high school students who say they quote feel persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness, rose from 26% to 44%,

Charlie Kirk Lorene Powell Atlantic Depression American High School United States
We've Talked About Biden's Spending, Debt & Inflation for a Long Time

Mark Levin

01:17 min | 2 months ago

We've Talked About Biden's Spending, Debt & Inflation for a Long Time

"The fed has been slow to act that Democrats have been doing this You know we could actually go back to the Mark Levin radio archive We're not going to mister producer don't worry It will bore everybody Just take my word for it And folks you can do it too I'll Mark Levin show dot com Our mothership website We could go back And see that when the Democrats came into power and Biden took control of the Oval Office And all the spending was taking place you didn't hear many conservative commentators talk about spending and debt It's so boring It might affect by radio ratings It was crucial to talk about it and we did We talked about inflation deflation a recession it potential depression and moreover The difficulty the difficulty it is to get out of inflation or deflation It is incredibly difficult It's incredibly painful Because Reagan had to do that when he came into office inflation was going through the roof Under Carter then it hit even higher during Reagan's first year and he wrestled it to the ground with the fed

Mark Levin FED Oval Office Biden Depression Reagan Carter
Richard Morrison Describes the Role of the SEC

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:03 min | 3 months ago

Richard Morrison Describes the Role of the SEC

"What is the SEC? What is their intended role in this marketplace? So the security and exchange commission was created in the 1930s after The Great Depression where a lot of people thought the 1920 non stock market crash meant that the markets needed more government supervision. So Congress passed two laws one in 33 and one 34 that basically are the basis of the modern institution of the SEC today. So they regulate public companies publicly traded companies that you can buy shares from. And most of what they do is requiring companies to issue information, make truthful disclosures about their company. So there's a bunch of different regulations and forms that they have to follow. These form, it's called a ten K form, or they have to fill in all sorts of information. And it's a lot of the sort of things that you would find in a company's annual report. You know, if you're a shareholder, you just go to a company's website, you know, you can almost always find their annual report there. So it's a description of the company and what they think their opportunities for the future are and possible threats. So the other thing is the policing fraud. And so there have been as long history of investment fraud, get rich quick schemes, people that are trying to take your money with false promises. So the SEC is in charge of policing that as well. So it's a little bit like the Federal Trade Commission also protects consumers from fraud and lots of different areas. The SEC does it specifically when it comes to investments, things like stock trading and whatnot. So I think there's even if you are sort of a libertarian who are freedom loving person, small government person, there's certainly a role to play for an agency like the SEC because we don't believe in force and fraud. You know, we don't believe in people stealing your money. Under false pretenses. And so I'm glad that the SEC is there, you know, stopping people from defrauding the widows and orphans of

SEC Depression Congress Federal Trade Commission
'The Dumbest Generation Grows Up' With Professor Mark Bauerlein

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:12 min | 3 months ago

'The Dumbest Generation Grows Up' With Professor Mark Bauerlein

"Your book is titled the dumbest generation grows up from stupefied youth to dangerous adults. So what do you mean by the dumbest generation? Well, that refers to the millennials. Born in the early 80s up to, say, year 2000. And I wrote this previous book, the dumbest generation in 2008, and the thesis there was, hey everybody, this web two is taking off. And we are letting teenagers lead the way on social media on texting, the handheld devices, all the tools of participation and chatting and Instagram and YouTube, which whose media whose motto was broadcast yourself. And we're letting teenagers dive into these screens surrounding themselves in youth culture, peer pressure, adolescence, and the mentors are not trying to compensate for that by insisting you learn religion, you learn history, you learn politics, you read some great literature, good books, civics, geography, they're just letting them go and that this is going to be a horrible intellectual spiritual and emotional formation for young people. Now we're 15 years later, and we all heard about how amazing the millennials were. How are they doing now? They're in middle age, millennials are in a sour mood. Anxieties up, depression is up suicide rates are up. They have sort of a vindictive sense of their fellow Americans. They have high levels of social mistrust. And when they see what they think is an injustice going on, even a micro aggression, they want to see that that culprit punished. That's why millennials lead the way on cancel culture in America and I saw you last week speak eloquently about cancel culture that this is really a demonic trend in American life. I fully agree with you on that. But the millennials feel quite righteous, indignation. They will sign a petition with 2000 others to get someone fired.

Instagram Youtube Depression America
A Look Back at the Life of Dwight Eisenhower

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:37 min | 3 months ago

A Look Back at the Life of Dwight Eisenhower

"Of course, was the 34th president of the United States. He served from 53 to 61. Sort of the capstone of his career, you know, most do knowing his president, but most know him again as he is being the supreme ally commander in Europe at the end of World War II and leading the offensive of all of our allies against the axis forces and Hitler and Nazi Germany. These all playing together for this became his final speech and there's a lot written about Eisenhower and I would encourage you just to the wood of Washington. If you want to know more about the man themselves, you want to know about how they grow up how they came about, I would encourage you to read their several books out there to go read about them because they're fascinating in their where they came from and how they got there. In fact, it's a really interesting correlation between sort of three presidents in a row and this is an extra for you podcast listeners today. For listening, you know, if you look at the middle of the century in the United States during the came out of the FDR presidency coming out of the great depression moving into World War II, you had a person who was in essence grown for politics. He was groomed in many ways and his family from his cousin to everybody to be a politician to be a leader of governor or president. That's what FDR Franklin Roosevelt was sort of groomed to be. And then you have the one who became president one of the biographies of his accidental president. Harry Truman was one who was not groomed. He came from very humble backgrounds. He came from a very working class middle of the country background and Missouri to know to the presidency. And took those took that office very seriously because of where he came from and in the desire to serve the country. And then you transition to another midwesterner in Eisenhower. So in the middle of our time frame there in which we went through The Great Depression World War II into what began the use of the atomic bomb, the use of the beginning of the Cold War. And then the space race toward the end of Eisenhower's term that was beginning, again, this buildup of nuclear power, this buildup of military power through Eisenhower's administration and even the beginnings of what we say we see the battle of Korea. And then we see the start of what would be known is from our perspective later in Eisenhower's administration owning the candidates and then Johnson's is the Vietnam War.

Eisenhower Fdr Franklin Roosevelt United States Hitler FDR Germany Europe Washington Harry Truman Depression Missouri Eisenhower's Administration Korea Johnson Vietnam
Who Was Responsible for the 2008 Economic Recession?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:23 min | 3 months ago

Who Was Responsible for the 2008 Economic Recession?

"We obviously all know that the gas prices and the inflation are Joe Biden's fault. They are direct result of his energy policies. Along with all the other blunders of his administration. Something that popped into my head earlier today though was I wanted to know why you think the 2008 economic collapse happened was that president Bush's fault or was that president Clinton's fault? Who do you think was at fault for that? God bless you and thank you for all you do. The 2008 crash began in the real estate sector and then reverberated more broadly through the economy. It wasn't as bad as the crash of 1929. It didn't throw the country into a great depression, but it did create a recession that created the economy and it took quite a while, in fact, a few years to get out of it. Now, for the left and for the progressives, this reflected the greed of Wall Street bankers, the greed of the mortgage brokers and the real estate industry generally, and the solution, of course, was more government regulation and more government regulation was in fact imposed on the banks on the financial sector on Wall Street after the 2008 crash. But all of this missed the real cause of the crash. And to understand the cause of the crash, you got to understand how bank lending practices changed.

Joe Biden President Clinton President Bush Depression
"depression" Discussed on Mentally Yours

Mentally Yours

05:48 min | 5 months ago

"depression" Discussed on Mentally Yours

"Job <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> of <Speech_Male> acting <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> and that's <Silence> true of what it looked like <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> 40 years ago. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But right now when I <Silence> watched it, it was <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> it was just like a <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> being like a dental <Speech_Male> surgery and <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the patient doesn't <Speech_Male> move. 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So <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> it's more like <Speech_Male> a <SpeakerChange> tiny <Speech_Female> little surgical unit. <Speech_Female> I suppose what I'd <Speech_Female> like to finish <Speech_Female> up with is <Speech_Female> well actually <Speech_Music_Female> a couple of things. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> First of <Speech_Female> all, what have you found <Speech_Music_Female> most helpful <Speech_Music_Female> to the big one <Speech_Female> in terms of <Speech_Music_Female> you and your <Silence> depression in terms of <Speech_Music_Male> managing it? <Speech_Music_Male> But <Speech_Music_Female> then also <Speech_Female> having <Speech_Female> written the book, what sort <Speech_Female> of response have you had <Speech_Music_Female> from friends and <Speech_Music_Female> family <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> also you said you <Speech_Music_Female> have this family <Speech_Male> history <Silence> of mental illness. <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So in terms of treatment, <Speech_Male> I think, <Speech_Male> why I've found <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> antidepressant that works <Speech_Male> for me. <Speech_Male> And that <Speech_Male> I can <Speech_Male> fall back on <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> during <Silence> tougher times. I <Speech_Male> think <Speech_Male> I take the practice <Speech_Male> of CBT <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and use that in my <Silence> daily life, <Speech_Male> but <Silence> that <SpeakerChange> doesn't seem <Speech_Male> to be <Speech_Male> as <Speech_Male> effective, I think if <Speech_Male> I was to remove <Silence> any of the treatments, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> or therapies that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I use now, I think <Silence> the one that would be most <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the one I would miss <Speech_Male> most and the one that my <Speech_Male> partner would miss most <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> the antidepressant. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But that's just <Speech_Male> my <Speech_Male> personal cycle that people <Speech_Male> might not respond <Speech_Male> to it. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> it's just a <Speech_Male> shame that I have to be on <Speech_Male> another antidepressant <Speech_Male> for two years <Speech_Male> when I was starting <Speech_Male> right in this book and <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> just didn't happen to be <Speech_Male> that wasn't a <Speech_Male> suitable match. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> yeah, I wish <Speech_Male> it was meditation <Speech_Male> or I wish it <Speech_Male> was <Speech_Male> a really <Speech_Male> good therapist <Speech_Male> yeah for me it's <Speech_Male> the <SpeakerChange> antidepressant. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> And I <Silence> <Advertisement> think <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> I've <Speech_Male> become more comfortable <Speech_Male> to that fact. I <Speech_Male> think it's quite difficult where <Speech_Male> you have to <Silence> accept <Speech_Male> that this is <Speech_Male> what's making <Speech_Male> your life function <Speech_Male> is taking this <Speech_Male> pill every day or <Speech_Male> every evening. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> that's still difficult. <Speech_Male> I still <Speech_Male> sometimes <SpeakerChange> think <Speech_Male> that I shouldn't <Speech_Male> have to do that <Silence> <Advertisement> to be <Speech_Male> well, <Speech_Male> but I think <Silence> that I think back <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> my <Speech_Male> cousin, my grandmother, <Speech_Male> my mother, and <Speech_Male> all the <Speech_Male> problems <Speech_Male> we have, <Speech_Male> my cousins <Speech_Male> on a very, very <Speech_Male> strong antipsychotic <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and he has <Speech_Male> to have regular blood tests <Speech_Male> to check his immune <Speech_Male> system and <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> I just <Silence> think that <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you have to just see <Speech_Male> the benefit <Speech_Male> of that and just think <Speech_Male> is an amazing <Speech_Male> that we have this <Speech_Male> drug <Speech_Male> that can keep me stable <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> that can keep me alive <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> right now and <Speech_Male> I'm always <Speech_Male> trying to come <Speech_Male> off it and I came off it early <Silence> this

depression
"depression" Discussed on Mentally Yours

Mentally Yours

03:16 min | 5 months ago

"depression" Discussed on Mentally Yours

"Past words endorphins of ETFs and endorphins so they will go and fling themselves at really serious heavy exercise regimes and like you say, maybe make things worse without realizing because you do sort of pick up that as being something that might help because obviously you're just looking around for anything that might help. Were there any other sort of big surprises for you in doing your research just maybe in terms of the different perspectives there's been in terms of depression through the ages or just different opinions people have about it in different cultures? Yes, I think one of the biggest surprises for me was this idea that depression is malleable. It changes depending on which culture you live in. So I didn't know this at all but when I started the book and then I started researching depression through the ages and depression around the world today..

depression
"depression" Discussed on Mentally Yours

Mentally Yours

04:16 min | 5 months ago

"depression" Discussed on Mentally Yours

"But both were helpful to some extent, but neither really did did much. And that's why I saw further therapies and also what inspired this book was the hope that there was something more that there was something that the doctors weren't giving me. So I think it's interesting that the books title is a cure for darkness. And I think were you looking for a cure? Would you say, rather than a treatment? No, I think that would be naive, but I think I was hoping for something that was nearer to a cure than it was to just management. Yeah. And because I couldn't keep facing the future if it was just the sort of monthly recurring depressions so I think that the title comes from because it's a historical book primarily in fitting around my own experience these words popped up time and time again. So it was cure was used not in the sense that we use it now where it's a complete removal of a disease without any further treatment required. It was more of a this is care is actually the etymology of cure. It comes from the word care. And a darkness was just something that was used throughout history for as long as I could find moments where people are talking about depression or melancholia. Darkness was one that popped up time and time again. So that wasn't really a personal element of the book, the title. And why did you want to take this approach? Because obviously there's been through a few different approaches on books about depression. So why did you particularly want to look at the history and also different cultures rather than say just a personal kind of memoir? Well, like you say it was there are books that have done that already in very good books that have done that and I don't think I could add anything with my story..

depression
"depression" Discussed on Mentally Yours

Mentally Yours

05:34 min | 5 months ago

"depression" Discussed on Mentally Yours

"Coding case weekly podcast about all things mental health. I'm Ellen and I'm evette. And this week we're chatting to science writer and author Alex Riley. We're going to be chatting to him about his first book, a cure for darkness and depression..

Ellen Alex Riley depression
"depression" Discussed on Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

04:49 min | 10 months ago

"depression" Discussed on Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

"Associated with reduced odds of depression but of the twenty one st they could find in the medical literature. They were only able to find one. Randomized controlled trial considered the study design that provides the highest level of evidence and it was the study i profiled in improving mood through died which removing meat fish poultry and eggs improved several mood scores in just two weeks. We've known that those eating plant based and to have healthier mood states less tension anxiety depression anger hostility fatigue. But you couldn't tell if it was caused in fact until you put it to the test which they finally did but what could account for such rapid results. Well eating vegetarian does give you a better antioxidant status which may help with depression. Also cy previously addressed our consumption even a single carbohydrate rich meal can improve depression tension anger confusion sadness fatigue alert and calmness scores among patients. Pms put about long-term overweight men and women randomized into a low carb high fat diet or hike car blow fat for year but the end of the year who had less depression anxiety anger and i still feelings of dejection tension fatigue better vigor. Less confusion mood disturbances. These sustained improvements in mood in the low fat group compared with low carb group or consistent with results from epidemiological studies showing the diets. High in carbohydrates low in fat and protein are associated with lower levels of anxiety and depression have beneficial effects on psychological wellbeing. Being the overall amount of fat in their diet didn't change in the study though but the type of fat did their iraqi tonic. Acid intake fell to zero racket on a gas isn't inflammatory mega. Six fatty acids that can adversely impact mental health via cascade of neuro inflammation. It may enflame our brain. High blood levels in the bloodstream have been associated with a greater likelihood of suicide risk for example and major depressive episodes. How can we stay away from the stuff. Oh americans are exposed to record on a gas primarily through chicken and eggs but when you remove chicken eggs and other me. We can eliminate preformed or.

depression anxiety depression anger hosti fatigue alert depression anxiety anger confusion anxiety
"depression" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

04:11 min | 11 months ago

"depression" Discussed on Throughline

"But the last i got explained to you during the depression there's three walks of life. Daytime there's the business throughout grant avenue you see people moving around with their products and open up for business after dinner. There's another walk of life and that's our kind bums around the street doing nothing just to pass the time away because there's no work nowhere. The students don't got no work because they don't know how to do dishes or hard work or anything. They rather hire are kind for that but even us we don't get no work. Everything was so dead. There's hardly anything going on. So in the evening we come out and walk around the street and pass. It was nice.

depression
"depression" Discussed on The Hilarious World of Depression

The Hilarious World of Depression

04:14 min | 11 months ago

"depression" Discussed on The Hilarious World of Depression

"I remain a fan of joel. Kim boosters comedy. I have become a fan of joel. Kim booster the human being as a result of this conversation. He says he's not creative. But i think he created something amazing just now. Depression as we know is a hard thing to describe. It's difficult to articulate. Just what it is to be a deep depressive episode. I've never heard or read. Or i think written anything that really covers the expansive exhausting swamp of depression. I think the best anyone can do is talk about what life is under the weight of this illness. And i think joel did that beautifully and now when someone asks me what depression is like i can say. Well i can't quite describe it to you in words. But i did this one interview. You might find helpful. I'll send them a link to this episode. There's another thing on my mind. That i wanted to just take a minute to recognize at some point in the interview. I stepped away from the idea of gathering information. I wouldn't more into the territory of trying to help joel of expressing concern. I wasn't really following the rules of interviewing in the classical sense. I was breaking them and i felt kind of weird about it afterwards. Because it's like. I wasn't doing my job and if you thought that too believe me i get it. I try to be as much in the moment as possible during the interviews. I try to have very few plans or expectations. As to where the conversation will go. I try to just be there. And i think that's why i dropped. The idea of an objective disengaged interviewer and in this one especially i just became a human listening to another human who's suffering and the urge to help overwhelmed me and i tried to help even though i know you can't reason someone out of depression. You can't point to reasons to feel better because depression is not based on reason. It's not a response to a single thing. It doesn't respond to logic. It's an all encompassing mood disorder. I know that about depression. I've been doing this for years. I literally wrote the book on depression while i wrote a book on depression. Look i'm not trying to make this all about me. I'm really not and i'm not trying to beat myself up either. I'm just saying all this. Because i believe there is hope in the compulsion to try to help someone that urge that basic route benevolence and. I think you would have done the same. In my position that is more than politeness. It's an instinct. Want to lift each other up when we fallen and if that instinct to help is there i have faith. Faith being belief without proof. I have faith that there's an instinct also to seek help and receive help and take it in my friend. Ana marie cox says that. Hope isn't always something you can wait to have delivered to you. Sometimes you gotta go out and find it. And sometimes it's hard to find and you gotta go look for it anyway next time under pressure mode. We all have brains. We would all like to be as healthy as possible so why is talking about mental health. So dan difficult when you just name a thing and say like depression is an experience that i know intimately like how about you this. It's like oh we're allowed to talk about that. We don't have to hide and pretend like it's not happening when you acknowledge invite in that kind of questions about the. That's part of the plot of all of our lives. You can sort of be like oh okay. We're gonna actually admit that that's happening. Okay pleasant talk about difficult things with anna sale host of death sex and money. We love it when you recommend depressed mode to friends. It might help them. Also something that matters a lot hits subscribe give us five stars rate reviews that helps more people find out about the show which helps our mission of getting those conversations happening..

depression joel Kim Depression Ana marie cox dan anna
"depression" Discussed on The Hilarious World of Depression

The Hilarious World of Depression

07:11 min | 11 months ago

"depression" Discussed on The Hilarious World of Depression

"Done but you've been you've been in the pandemic since they're like if you haven't been in the world what's there to observe about the world. I mean you know it's been a couple of months. I've been vaccinated and out in the world and it's not coming back. My thing is is like things. Don't remind me of other things anymore. And that's the bedrock of my comedy you know like i. You know You feel like. I'm in love. And i have nothing interesting to say about it. Nothing funny no observations about it at all and that's wild to me like this new experience in my life and i have nothing to say about it. That's scary. that sucks and and the depression is new. this this didn't exist pre pandemic. no okay not to this magnitude. I mean i get sad sometimes but you know it was nothing nothing that would keep me from writing. What are you doing to address it. You know therapy medication. That the whole that whole shit sounds like it's not going great on that front. No nothing works. This is who i am now. Yeah yeah what do you. What's your plan. I have no plan right out. You know until people start to catch on. And then i can still act. you know. that's easy acting as easy thing in the world. And hopefully i'll be able to continue to get work that way but beyond that i don't know are you. Are you working on like writing projects but are just stalled on them or you just not working on the mall You know. I have a movie that i'm shooting that i wrote I'm taking out a show. I wrote one of the best scripts i've ever written at the very beginning of the pandemic i think during a manic episode Trying to sell that. But if they asked me to write an episode to i couldn't do it Have you talked with other people who've been in this situation similar situations. Yeah everybody says oh. Yeah my creative. Creativity is shot but yet they're still turning out new jokes. They're still turning out new videos. There's still tweeting through it. It's not the same. I'm blank. Do you think it's permanent. Yeah because i have no reason to believe it's not k. but if it came on during the pandemic in the pandemic has over yes for all intents and purposes. The pandemic has been over for me since february and it's june now and nothing's changed. How much of your dad do you think is in this. It's it's hard to suss that out. You know it's another situation where i can't believe i have nothing to say it's just grief is just. It's just grief and used to be when i would experience something like that. I could write a joke about it. I could write something about it. I could process it through writing. And i have not been able to process anything. He's just gone. Were you close. No we got closer in the final years. We were sort of at an impasse. I mean he's very conservative man. You know it's our relationship was probably as good as it has ever been right before he passed you know and it just There's a lot of big things coming for me. And i just sucks. That he won't be able to see them and you know he never approved of what i did for a living. I don't think he he never saw sunnyside. He never seat. He's never seen any of my stand up but like you know. I might buy a house this year. And that's something that like. He would've been really really excited about and he won't get to experience that now and you know we were finding little ways to connect. I was starting to guard in. He's a farmer and has a huge garden and now it's something we were connecting about. And now he's just gone. What about the things that that you think he might have been really excited about like. You're in a position where you can recognize those things as exciting Are they exciting to you. Yeah sure i mean it just I've never felt so blank in my entire life. I don't understand what yeah sure means. Are you is that. You're you are excited about those things i can. I can recognize things on paper as like being exciting. I understand that is the human emotion that coincides with this event x. event but in terms of really feeling it. I feel nothing I i. I'm looking for for for ways to make this interview not dark in case that's what you wanted to be but i also feel like i need to kind of honor the reality of the situation. You're in like if i'm talking to joel on this day. This is who this is. Who joel was on this day. Yeah i'm really sorry for being such a fucking down on the depression podcasts. I mean i'm the one running depression podcast. So it's fine with me. One more with joel kim booster including where he goes from here. That's coming up in just a moment. do. How is it for you to watch funny things now to watch funny shows or stand up or like that nothing but jealousy really nothing but just the and just not not in terms of the successive which is like god..

depression joel joel kim
"depression" Discussed on The Hilarious World of Depression

The Hilarious World of Depression

07:25 min | 11 months ago

"depression" Discussed on The Hilarious World of Depression

"Did the comedy interest the inkling the the displays of talent. Like when did that start showing up in your life. When did you kind of latch onto to comedy. You know growing up as a gay coded kid you learn to either hide or you learn to become the class clown and i chose that route and so that was when i started to try and make people laugh and it works was effective. I wanted to be an actor After college a writer in an actor and i moved to chicago to do that and it just sort of fell into my lap. I didn't i didn't like the parts. I was being called in for as an asian person. And i tell the story often. Is you know. I just started doing. Stand up as not thinking that it would. It would ever be something that i could do on a large scale but just as like an outlet to finally feel like i was being represented my offend like an authentic version of myself as being represented by the part by by art. You know like it was so frustrating to get called in to be chinese delivery boy over and over and over again. So i turned to stand up and your standup i. I've seen it described as a as a character that you're playing. It seems to be more like just a part of who you are as sort of the. It's a heightened version of myself for sure right the the kind of confident hot guy. Yeah yeah how did that. How did that come to be the voice that you did comedy in. I think you know early in my career. And i think this was just like what everybody was doing. It's it's comedy is about self-deprecation. My comedy was about self-deprecation. Oh i'm so ugly. I can't get a day you know. I'm so sick and stupid and blah blah blah blah blah and It really had an effect on my self esteem in a big way. And also i realized ice especially as they started to gain a little bit more notoriety and success like you know i'm an asian person i'm an asian man and i think so often we are put in this position to be the clown to supplement ourselves to white audiences and play that part of like the pathetic clown and that works for some people and that makes feel authentic to some people but to me. I was like it's been done and that's not really how i wanna feel about myself and It felt like a different sort of route to go. It felt like a challenge. It's way harder to go out on stage and say i'm hot and awesome now. Laugh at my jokes going out on stage and saying oh. Aren't i so pathetic. Please laugh at my jokes. You know it's like going out there and demanding people laugh at. You is way harder to get them on your side And so it was an interesting challenge for me to try in an attempt. it's kind of a. it's a character it's a. It's an approach. That does have some precedent to it though. Like i think of steve martin going out. There is as the kind of hit kind of arrogance about him but he invited you to laugh at his arrogance at the same time. Yeah i mean y was did do audiences or audiences seen through it and kind of get. Get the wink if there is a wink. That you're doing -solutely and i think You know it wouldn't work. I don't think to the extent that i do it if people believed it. You know. i'm still in asian man. I'm still on a feminine asian man. And so i think people laugh because they don't believe it when i say i'm hot powerful. They say no you're not And so they're able to laugh at it because there is a difference there And i'm okay with that. Because i believe it so. Yeah that's that's surprising to me because it. It's i mean it's a character but it's a convincing per trail i mean maybe i'm maybe i'm underestimating anti-asian bigotry but it seems plausible to me like you know good looking confident guy. I've seen those before. Do you think it's it's the asian quality that makes audiences in general like. I don't know how how. How does the anti-ageing discrimination factor into that idea of that audiences. Don't believe that your powerful i think it knocks them off balance a little bit. They don't expect it from me. And they they i think because they're used to seeing people apologize onstage for it and inox amounts and whether or not they believe it or not. I don't know the jokes work. But i think I think when what also helps us. That i play being an idiot too. You know and that i think is as helpful. 'cause they're like this guy's just an idiot and so it's okay to laugh. He's not he doesn't. He thinks he's better than us. But that's because he's an idiot is is comedy. A refuge as acting refuge are are any of these things a break from the struggle that you have. Yeah i would say stand up when i'm on stage feels great. I mean it it definitely is the most self realized it's the best thing. I'm what i'm best at out of acting writing all of it. Stand up being on stage. It's what i'm best at and why it hurts so bad to not be good at it anymore. Are you doing shows again are you. Doing live shows worrying. Right now. touring on the hour. That will eventually be a special and that. I is all material that i wrote pre pandemic and it feels great because it all works. It's all good material but you know i'm looking ahead and i don't have anything beyond that. Okay i i. I'm staying with you here. Because even though i think there's a there's a lens of the the depression that you're looking at this through but i don't i don't get the connection between you knowing that it. It feels great to be out there. You're doing this material and thinking that you're not good at it anymore. Like if you're out there and it's going great. How can you not be good at it. Because i'm not generating new material you know. I'm i'm i'm basically being an actor right now. I'm i'm performing old material. That i wrote when i was good at writing. Stand up and and that feels good but in the back of my mind. I know like you can't riff you. Can't you know you're not. You're not trying new jokes. You're not you have no observations left about the world.

steve martin chicago depression
"depression" Discussed on The Hilarious World of Depression

The Hilarious World of Depression

06:34 min | 11 months ago

"depression" Discussed on The Hilarious World of Depression

"Covered. No since cova. Yeah yeah. Let's go back a little bit. Let's do a quick arc of life. Let's figure out your life in just a few minutes joel. You are not originally from la or from the midwest cracked. Yes that's where in the mid west right outside chicago. What was mental health growing up. Like what were your experiences with it. What was your understanding of it. I grew up in a really religious household and so we weren't really somebody. We weren't people who talked about mental health in terms of sort of psychological mental health. It was all about spiritual health. So if you're feeling down it was about. You know the spirit and you know where your relationship with god You know i'm bipolar. And in looking back at a lot of my experiences growing up that was that manifested a ton and my parents didn't know how to handle it and they certainly didn't wanna medicate me. They certainly didn't send me to any reputable therapists or psychologists who was all christian therapy and it was all prayer and None of that worked and was extremely damaging. Bipolar one bipolar to bipolar one. Okay did you share your family's belief in religion but just founded at odds with your brain. You know up until a point up until a basically i came out and then you know that was completely at odds fundamentally with everything top to bottom that. I was raised to believe so. That's really when i started to sort of full tilt left the church and left the religion. It took a while for me to not believe that i was going to hell. When was the bipolar diagnosis. Not until two thousand nineteen okay so fairly recent. When did you realize when did you realize you were gay for four k so when you came out was it a. Was it a surprise breaking news or did everybody already know. I mean listen. I am i. Don't you know i was. I was called faggot like from a very young age and to me that means like you just can't hide it. You know people knew that about me before. I knew that about me and so i don't know if people were surprised But it was definitely a it's definitely tumultuous experience for my family. I ended up moving out when i was seventeen I didn't talk to my family for a year And you know it was. It was a bad situation before we get to the bipolar guests. What when did what you now know as a depressive disorder as a as a clinical depression start factoring into your life. Oh you know it's funny. Is that my manifestos mania. More so than oh. I rarely felt depressed. Depression is a relatively new addition to my life a new development. Okay y when did the mania start then. Pretty young like when i was a teenager it would manifest in get. I would stay up all night doing homework. And i would you know and then i would just like a hair trigger like be. Just have these meltdowns that were unexplainable and and my parents called them tantrums. But at seventeen sixteen like it's not just tantrum. It was something uncontrollable in me That was really Hard to articulate. Anybody you know girl really hard to talk about by the way and Yeah okay if. I cross the line if i go somewhere. You don't wanna go. Just let me know and i'll back away from ant. Yeah i just thought this would be funnier. Well i'm trying to get the trying to get the story When you were in a mania did you recognize it as you know. Because i've heard some people say they thought this was just living their best life. They were getting all this stuff done they were you know. They were entertaining and amusing. They're talking a mile a minute so everybody must love that. They thought it was really great. Was that what it was for you. Yeah absolutely it's it's that until it until it becomes uncontrollable rage and tears and destroying hotel room. And you know not being able to control your emotions in screaming at at anybody who is around to withstand the wrath of it. I've written some of my best jokes. During main manic episodes and i miss the manic episodes. I i often wonder. If that's why i can't write anymore is because i am cut off from that. Are you cut off from it through through medication through counseling medication. Okay i mean it is. It's funny i we. We've never met i. I know your work your standup. I really liked sunnyside a lot. And i was a big fan of the other two as well and Quit sunnyside a week before. We started shooting because of a manic episode really. Yeah what happened with that. It just it is it's unexplainable Something happened a scheduling conflict came up. And i couldn't handle it. And i have complete mental breakdown and said if i can't make this work then i will quit and nobody understood. Nobody it was just like. I had to leave a vacation day early to get back for a table read and i said i can't fathom doing that. No i quit this this huge opportunity. And of course like you know my manager intervened and you know. Talk me down. And i got stabilized but it was one of the bigger breaking points of my life where i was like okay. This is a big.

clinical depression cova midwest joel bipolar la chicago Depression
"depression" Discussed on The Hilarious World of Depression

The Hilarious World of Depression

01:47 min | 11 months ago

"depression" Discussed on The Hilarious World of Depression

"John. The host of the hilarious world depression. You might be confused. Maybe delighted to find a new episode in the feed here because it has been awhile right. Yeah hey how have you been as you may know. The show known as the hilarious world of depression ended over a year ago. But the work of that show the reason it existed that continues under a different name. The effort to normalized conversations about mental health continues the task of telling anyone living with a mental illness that they are not alone and telling a few jokes and even having a bit of fun. Along the way yeah. I have not stopped doing that. I'm just doing it somewhere else. I am the creator of a new weekly show called depression mode with john. Mo- it's part of the maximum fund network. Depression mode is not the exact same show as hilarious world. It's about more than just depression for one thing. It's about all kinds of mental obstacles anxiety. Ocd traumatic stress eating disorders. And it's a new show every week. We don't really have seasons. There's just a new episode for you every monday but you will recognize the tone and the warmth and the humor from hilarious world and we have some familiar names on depression mode people that you first heard on hilarious world folks. Peter segal jenny lawson open. Mike eagle plus new voices like patent. Oswald the try guys even ira glass. We also bring in some top mental health experts doctors therapists researchers to explain some of the mental health issues in clear plain language that we can.

depression John Depression Peter segal jenny lawson Mike eagle john Oswald
"depression" Discussed on I'm Not In An Abusive Relationship

I'm Not In An Abusive Relationship

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"depression" Discussed on I'm Not In An Abusive Relationship

"Common in the world to say that just because Part of my mental health work is to not cause shame and guilt in people about their mental health condition or on what they're going through because you're clearly dealing with enough. You don't need shame and guilt about. I'm depressed to top of my domestic rounds relationship. You may beat and that's okay. That's where you currently are but to know that you're not alone in that other people are experiencing depression as well. It's not just you in the world and so well from my point of view. I would assume that every client would be Depressed you know they come to you. And they're beginning to to reach out to to heal from from all of the abuse or to to end it for themselves and their children and how that works But but i would assume that would not be the case that you can't just say well they must also be depressed. So how how does that. How would you go about treating or talking with people differently. Obviously there are going to be some signs that go beyond just you know a normal reaction to the trauma. Yeah so we look at depression. Were looking for significant changes in the way that you used to go through life. You know so that your behaviors. Your thoughts have have significantly changed because again. It's not about it being today. i'm depressed. it's daily weekly monthly. i've been. I've been dealing with this and so we look at a loss of energy. You know i'm tired and fatigued all day long. Even though he didn't do anything right. I i don't wanna get out of bed. I can't get off the couch. i just In severe depression There's a symptom called catatonic and so that's the inability to move and still. My depression is so deep that i've seen clients in my pro might persistent and severe mental health. Work that i used to do Who would sit on the couch and like defecate and wet on themselves because no energy to get off the couch and go to the bathroom even though the bathroom was five feet away. So there's a gun there's a range of all these things. I could not leave my bed for three days. But i could still get up to go pee get some head depression and then there's depression and there's always a different scale of severity and all the different symptoms of it so it could. It could be you know all those different ranges. well if you are in a domestic abuse situation. I'd what do you do with i. I mean what the depression or will. I have to take off. Because i have to. You know not triggered the abuse or Wow that's a.

depression
"depression" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

Dateable Podcast

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"depression" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

"They not saying that you would but as you didn't guilt him into going. It's always difficult part with people with you know going through depression is they can't on something and then they're just going to be like well. He'll always cancel That's not going to be helpful. So i've probably done that before. But not in this instance. No but honestly i feel like and not saying that. This has been in relationships. That i will say what has helped with friendships. Is the friends that i've been able to vocalise. Might depression with and they know that. I'm currently going through the though just usually just either come over. And say hey. We don't have to go out. 'cause like i don't wanna go anywhere public but you come to my apartment will like watch tv ice cream ice cream. What flavor. Who can resist ice crave. How dare you. How dare you laura me with ice cream. So i don't just honestly sometimes the best thing for in for me. When i'm going through depression. That would be perfect for any partners. Just sort of just hanging out together but honestly not talking about it. Because i feel like most time. That person isn't gonna want to hang out to talk about the brushing. They just need sometimes. They just need like an escape then. Just someone to be there that. I think that goes a long way like i know. Like sometimes My friend when she knows that. I'm going through depression. She's a k- you know. How's everything going. It's okay. I guess in. They're like oh all right. Well you know. I'm always here to listen or if you wanna come over rican. Just do something. Sometimes it's like small acts like that held more than trying not try to get to the bottom of it. Because i feel like most people on. They're going through depression. The last thing that they're gonna wanna do is to talk about it. I think honestly talking about depression. Wind people aren't in the middle of is usually a lot easier for me to talk about. Depression is a lot. It's it's easy when i'm not in it. 'cause right to call are able to recap all of this but like all right but during yeah i think. Yeah i definitely notice. When i said things like i'm here if you wanna talk or like more putting it more passive than active right like if you wanna do this. I'm here for you nothing..

depression laura
"depression" Discussed on The Finding My Psych Podcast

The Finding My Psych Podcast

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"depression" Discussed on The Finding My Psych Podcast

"Able to do that. So yeah. So how I managed you know depression now is is probably pretty important because this is just kind of had its etiology, you know, you know, this is kind of had its Journey, you know, I'm just fumbling my words. This has had a had a life of its own and I have kind of been on a journey round major depression and I think that where I'm at now with it, you know, I've used different tools over the years, but what I found now, you know by the age of Forty-Eight, there are some things that really do help me and medication certainly is one. I'm not taking any medication right now and wage haven't been on a new medication for depression for about six years. As a matter of fact, that doesn't mean it's cured. It just simply means I don't feel like it's gotten I've had dipped so severe that I've needed a job. And my dips now is tend to be much more mild than not and who really knows but no doubt. I've kind of walked to that edge. So if I was to go back on medication, you know, I would certainly go back on Prozac just works really really well. One of the other things that works for me. Of course, you've heard me talk about lots and all part of her life psychology and mental health is Fitness and I had this complicated challenging relationship with running as in particular and running is one of these activities that I do that really improves my mood in in probably the most dramatic way. It's both I would say I get I get a sense of well-being after a super long run and I and I also find that it's a bit preventative that my anxiety is a whole lot better for days to come as a dog. We have to really long runs. So keeping my fitness at such a level to where I can do long runs is very very important. And I know that we're my depression has kind of started to show off my head again is where my fitness my VO2 max or whatever tends to fall enough to where I can't do those long efforts and logging efforts are really defined as 10K or more on that sweet spot for me is around twenty two k that is just like oh that is an ideal distance where I noticed the impact of the run on my mood and anxiety just it's so directed so black-and-white. So anyway, I don't want to go on and on about that. But let anyone who denies the power of you know, Fitness can't help you man. It is it is, you know being looking physically fit is not the point, you know, being fit enough to be able to go for an activity for a period of time to gain the emotional mental health benefits of it. That's really the point. I'm a big guy. I'm not I'm fat boy running guys. I am not summer. Wiring thing that runs 22k every time they go out I've battled with us but I've battled with it. That's the point as I keep going back to it. Cuz I know what it does for me. So it's not about being a professional athlete. It's I consider myself an athlete but if you look to me, you wouldn't think that I keep at it. That's the whole point and I think everyone should it needs to be part of every treatment plan off some kind of physical activity routine diet is one of these other things very controversial. I don't subscribe to the idea that there is a diet for depression..

depression
"depression" Discussed on The Journey

The Journey

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"depression" Discussed on The Journey

"Listen it's okay to feel. It's okay to cry. It's okay to take a moment and just crumble. But I. Want you to this very carefully. It is not okay to stay there. You. have got to dust yourself off and move forward. You've got to do this for your child for your family for yourself. Who knows how many other people you are about to impact? The world is waiting on you. So take your time and cry. Take your time in crumble, but do not make your home. That is not your home. and. I know that's hard to do when your brain is Numb, I know that's hard to do when you can't think. Would you not motivated to do anything when nothing brings you pleasure? Will you just want to withdraw in Hyde? So when you get in a Rut and nothing inside, you compels you to move. I want to give you some strategies, and if you could just follow them if you could just follow them, not think. Just Act who. K. These are some of the things that I've done to keep moving forward. I stay busy, okay, mindless work, so depression could like quicksand, and it can just start sinking you deeper and deeper slowly until just drowns out. So what you gotTa do is you've got to keep moving? Otherwise? You are going to sink letting depression swallow. You is dangerous. It can result in extreme harm to yourself and others. Don't over think it just keep moving. Just stay busy. I'll give you an example. One time I was feeding Katie at the High Chair, she was not responsive. She was acting Aloof gone absent as she just sat there and. I remember just feeling like I had poured myself so much into getting a reaction. I conduct and I remember that I felt depressed. She just wanted to sit there and stare at nothingness. Not Move, not do anything. So I remember that I allowed myself to just sit in sync down to the floor and sit in the corner in cry..

Katie depression Hyde High Chair
"depression" Discussed on The Journey

The Journey

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"depression" Discussed on The Journey

"Doctor's advice, but there is power in relating and connecting with others walking through a similar path. I want to be very real and vulnerable with you because there is power in telling the story. Now listen. Our children are important. This is obvious. That's why you're here. That's why we're talking, but there's another person that auction gets looked. It's you. You're a theory, important person and you are not forgotten. Today. Let's talk about you and let's not be little your process. Let's put a name on some of the feelings and experiences that you are having. You know by naming emotion. It helps you deal with it better, so let's get real. Let's talk about the ugly hard truth that we face in private. Let's talk about three very difficult. Mental states that many special needs parents find themselves experiencing in walking out. oftentimes alone. I'm talking about depression. Grief and even post traumatic stress disorder. Now it is not my intention here to minimize heroes who fought in battle, INEXPERIENCED PTSD or post traumatic stress disorder. I JUST WANNA explore how there's also affect special needs. Parents I also don't want to minimize those people who have actually grieved a death of a loved one, but I do WanNa some light on some of the experiences that we tend to overlook because truthfully we're so caught up raising our own special needs child that we don't stop and think about ourselves. I don't WanNa. Be Little the process that we are going through on a daily basis. We are in the battle every day. We questioned a choices every day. We're scared to make a mistake or to run out of strength all the time. So I wanNA, talk to you about some of the medical definition of these diagnoses. Let's look at depression. Depression is defined as a psychiatric disorder, and it is characterized by an inability to concentrate. There's insomnia loss of appetite. And Adonia which is a lack of ability to feel pleasure feelings of extreme sadness, guilt, helplessness and hopelessness..

Depression WanNa PTSD