16 Burst results for "Department Of Social Services"

"department social services" Discussed on Army Wife Talk Radio

Army Wife Talk Radio

06:46 min | 1 year ago

"department social services" Discussed on Army Wife Talk Radio

"The university of phoenix in seoul south korea yolanda is a proud activity. Army spouse humanitarian and mother. She currently serves to the service of armed forces international. Us programs division manager for the central atlantic division which covers delaware. Maryland washington dc. Virginia ohio west virginia and kentucky. She's always made volunteerism serving her community. A priority holding leadership and support roles in various military in community organizations. Yulon is also an active member of alpha kappa alpha sorority inc. Where she continues her. Altruistic service focusing on implementation of programs and services impacting critical issues quality of life for people of color. She's married to lieutenant. Colonel antero see gain. Well united states army and they have to amazing grown children. Aj and jasmine yolanda. I'm very much looking forward to our conversation. Thank you for joining us today. And welcome to army. Life talk radio. Thank you for having me. Cherie too i am excited looking forward to argus goshen undoubtedly and clearly you have a lot of experience empowering military spouses just based on that really impressive bio we just shared and now you continue your journey with the american red cross solicitor in a little bit more about what the red cross can do for military families. Tell us a little bit about how you got connected with the american red cross. Sure enough to so in twenty thirteen. We pcs to honolulu. Hawaii and i am sure you know. The challenges of military spouse is trying to maintain a career while always having to relocate every two to three years prior to relocating to hawaii. I was fortunate to be a part of another national nonprofit in various locations for abroad about eight years. But here i was in hawaii. Twenty thirteen Looking floor okay. What's next for me in my career. What am i gonna do of it in hang out on the beach. Every day and i was climbing. Dimon had one saturday morning. And as i got to the top of diamond head i looked across the ridge line and i saw the building across the street in the signed said american red cross. So is that four minute. And i pondered it just to to reflect on what has been my experience as a militarised spouse with the american red cross and i thought back. I had no personal family experiences. No we career My husband's grandmother passed away. But we didn't have to use ray across. I couldn't remember you know helping other military families utilize across programs in services especially on the multiple deployments that you know we've had over the years and so i got home that day. I google redcrossblood lulu. I saw that. They had a number of volunteer opportunities as well as career opportunities to support our military and veteran. Communities i apply for a paid position was afforded the opportunity to interview received the in actually got the position and here we are seven and a half years later another. Pcs move under our belt been able to stay connected with the red cross in both Paid and volunteer positions. What a fun on ramp. that started with. I guess i could hang out the beach and climbed this mountain. But i'll climb mountain and then it just kind of as they say escalated quickly with your connection with the american right across and just shy of a decade later. Here we are so congratulations on your success in a obviously you're doing a great work with this wonderful organization And so as a military family. I would say many of us. Don't wanna think that for emergencies will happen to us but unfortunately they can happen at any time so you would you share with us. How the american red cross comes alongside military families during those emergencies or the eucharist cross. Is there to support our military families. Three hundred sixty five days out of the year twenty four hours a day in the event of emergency. We have agents at our hero here center. Who are there to gather information about the emergency. We also verify that emergency by reaching out to medical authorities police department social services whatever agency or entity can verify that emergency for us and then of course we deliver that emergency communications Message to our servicemembers chain of command. Okay well let's talk a little bit more about the kinds of emergencies that people might face. What kind of emergencies would probably quote qualify as red cross message so those emergencies that will qualify as a red cross message would have to involve a death or illness or severe illness. Urgent time critical family emergency of course birth notifications because we do know. Babies are born while servicemembers are deployed yup emergency financial assistance in ne-. Okay well thank you clarify that. Because i know that sometimes as a military spouse and a former f. r. g. leader and all that kind of stuff people like this is going on and just having a general knowledge of what's the next step you know we just need to contact chain of command directly or is this kind of a bigger deal that needs to go through the official channels of american red cross. Should the service member have the option to be able to come home or come back from wherever they're at whether that's overseas deployment a major field exercises etcetera so We've talked about kind of the military family component there. But would you also give us a little bit more insight as to who's eligible to call the red cross to reach a servicemember if there's a crisis and walk us through those steps in what the specific procedure looks like. So anyone is eligible to call the american ray across initiator ray across message. But it's important for your listeners. To note that it order to initiate a message be emergency has to involve a core group what we call. Immediate family Anyone can call if if there was an emergency. That happened in. My neighbor was aware of that emergency. My neighbor could call the american hostile initiate that re- across message but we have to ensure that that message involve immediate family member and the american red cross in deal d. Identifies immediate family. Members adds a spouse children.

american red cross service of armed forces intern central atlantic division Yulon alpha kappa alpha sorority inc Colonel antero jasmine yolanda Army yolanda hawaii university of phoenix seoul united states army Cherie south korea Dimon Aj west virginia delaware kentucky
"department social services" Discussed on The Uncertain Hour

The Uncertain Hour

07:25 min | 1 year ago

"department social services" Discussed on The Uncertain Hour

"Part of what's so striking about these songs. Is there specificity. They were not afraid. Embrace the acronyms of bureaucracy like this one line deep e. s. s. stands for the department of public social services the welfare department but larry townsend ran and of course the lyrics could be that specific because it was the dp staff who composed produced and recorded most of these songs. What happened was he sent out a memo a paper memo paper memo. All staff members keith. Rogers was working in the mail room of. Gps s back then. His job was to send out the welfare checks that according to one of the songs he would later write welfare recipients should be envisioning in their past the memo from larry's said he was looking for volunteers to take some of the work ethic slogans. He'd collected and put them to music. Turn them into songs. Keith was a musician. The mail room thing was just as day job. And so you read this. What goes through your mind immediately. All got a chance to do my thing. Let me just go up and whip something up. And then submitted to larry townsend so after work keith sketched out a melody he still remembers it. Will i temporary nine away of live and he sent a demo larry. He loved it next dan on. I'm up in his office says the your boss's boss's boss all yea in look it's like the president you know and he gave me says. Now you're you're not doing male right now. You're you're going to be a producer you're going to produce my see the and i'm like how six months in the studio later with two thousand dollars of taxpayer money and musical contributions from the mail room on up through county social workers and they had their cd. It's worth pointing out that before he'd worked in the mailroom keith had actually been on government assistance himself back when he was struggling to make it as a and in between gigs. Yeah i mean i received food stamps. You know but that was just something that i needed until i became gainfully employed. That was not anything that i wanted depend upon. It was temporary not a way of life. I knew it wasn't way life tried to live off of food stamps and that was something i heard from a few of the people who worked under larry making the cd the message of the music that welfare should just temporary not a way of life that getting a job was important was kind of stating the obvious to them. But keith says the songs were fun to write. And he hoped they'd be fun for welfare. Recipients to listen to in the waiting room here at year end up being pumped all over in assistant near and then you might call at some of the welfare offices in you know they put you on whole welfare as a temporary way way of life and and i'm thinking you know you play certain things over and over again it does have a subliminal fec. Hey guess what. I want to find his job. And whether it was the songs themselves or the buttons the boards the bumper stickers. The job clubs. Or the job's first strategy altogether. Somehow larry's plan in riverside seemed to work. The results in riverside were the most impressive. We had ever seen in a welfare to work program up to that time. This is sociologist. james ricky again. He was actually hired by the government to study. Riverside's jobs first program. His team followed the families. Who participated tracked. What happened to them for five years and compare that to what happened to families who stayed on the plain old welfare program where they just got checks no job clubs or job. Pep talks turns out the ones who participated in the jobs first program. Five years later they were doing way better. On average had earnings that were forty two percent higher than those who were assigned to the control group. They were making forty-two percent more money than the families who hadn't gotten any of the jobs. I stuff james. Also compared the people who went through the jobs first program in riverside to people who lived in other parts of the state that emphasized education i and the riverside jobs i group came out on top. In that comparison to five years later they were employed more and had higher wages than the education i group and because of all of this larry towns and the director became a kind of star in this narrow world of welfare reform but this narrow world of welfare reform was about to widen and play a very big role on the national stage. And larry's get a job any job. Approach for welfare recipients became known as riverside miracle the riverside miracle. here's economist joe huts again. He also studied larry's program the riverside department. Social services received an award from the the harvard kennedy school for innovation government. It got a lot of attention on the national news and on just read a few quotes here from the new york times. No program has done as much to raise the earnings of people on welfare as one here in riverside county and from the l. a. times riverside is pursuing a notion. So obvious as to be stupefying if you want to get people off welfare. Stay on their backs until they get a job. We call them magic bureaucrat. Or something in it was an editorial page is my picture. I couldn't believe it was a little over the top. Larry has a framed copy of the editorial hanging in house. How many articles have been written over the eight hundred summit last count that i'd had but in all the news coverage larry's thoughts about the welfare system sometimes revealed a more aggressive tone than the one you hear in those songs and one article from nineteen ninety-three. He says that every time he sees a bag lady on the street he wonders. If it's a mother on welfare who quote hit. The menopause wall who can no longer reproduce and get money to support herself. I asked him about this quote. Please don't go there. Well it it is out in the public record. I just wanted to give you an opportunity to on the record eons ago now i don't know about the clarify it further. Well since we're going into history you know we the part. This whole story is about the history of the. You've done your job in that regard. So larry clearly did not want to talk about this but i still wanted to know whether he ever worried some of his welfare to work. Rhetoric might be hurtful to people there. Is this tricky territory. It seems like in discussions around this where there can be stereotypes that come up or feelings of judgment. The the examples that that talks about i. It was a A concept where. I was concerned about ladies getting into an unfortunate situation and nobody ever helped him to discover.

larry townsend keith larry department of public social se riverside james ricky dp Rogers Keith joe huts fec riverside department harvard kennedy school for inn dan Riverside riverside county james
"department social services" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"department social services" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"My career was progressing. The way that will always was going to even before you know I met alison. So i was like no i pretty much wanna make this a fundamental event in my life One that initially can be terribly depressing of that eventually could have some form of meaning and purpose and in the more i thought about that the more i thought that public service might actually be something that i wanted to do and then donald trump got elected in two thousand sixteen and i said well that jerk can get elected than anybody can get elected and i thought well why the hell not and and i reached out. I reached out to the to the party. i didn't know anybody in the democratic party. I didn't vote in a lot of local elections. Because that's kind of how. I was instructed at journalism school at emerson to try. And take out any opportunity for you to have subconscious bias by voting for somebody that you'd have to directly cover a lot. You know. I remember when my campaign did research on. They saw my irregular voting history and thought that it could be used against me. And i explained to him and they they thought that it made sense but i reached out to them and then eventually we put a hell of a campaign together and we were able to to flip a seat and then two years later we're able to take a majority and i i'm really sensitive to still wanted to be independent and not wanting to be seen as a political hack or just some part of a party machine but i. I think it's pretty incredible. What we've done in the last two years to help people in not necessarily to try to accomplish a particular. Party's agenda but we're really tangibly helping people in meaningful ways that has been delayed and delayed and delayed for years part of what. I campaigned on and twenty. Seventeen was i was getting really tired of covering the same crap all the time about our schools fallen down because they're underfunded about people not being paid a reasonable wage not being able to afford their bills but people who get trapped in the criminal justice system and can never get out. And we've taken a lot of meaningful action on that and so I really do think that was the right choice. It's great to have both of you in the general assembly. I think he has bring so much to the table and one of the things that you guys bring to the table. I've watched you in committee. And i've watched you on the floor. You're both great. And i think this comes from being journalists. You're both great at sniffing out when something somebody says doesn't quite sound right and you dig in and you ask the follow up questions and i've seen you trip up not not because you want trip them up but just because you want to again to the meat of issues. I've watched you both do that. And i think that definitely comes from having been a journalist. Why i remember. It happened few weeks ago when we had that bill abound vida right away and retrieving dogs and we were misled. Assembly on what. The intention in origin of the bill was and And so i needed to draw attention to the heck remember in. There are lots of us that have group tax everything in votes for saying that you know there's the investigative reporter you know a rare in his ugly head again though. Yeah i think for me i i. I don't know. I really wanna be a workhorse. Not a show horse and danika is exactly the same way. I think a lot of times. We can't get out of a spotlight even if sometimes were trying to maybe pass it to somebody else. But i think like danika also showed a tennessee like israel great reporters tenacity and i have. I have some fun stories to share of. When i did that sometimes too ill effect but you know when she was trying to get a notification for people who receive in public assistance for those folks to get additional notification on other benefits They may be entitled to. I mean she was running back and forth on the floor. Going passing the bill by temporarily working at out and then she she worked it out. And if there's one thing that virginia general assembly is that's totally different from dc. It's that if it's a bill with your name on it. You are the one who has to get that damn thing past because no one else is gonna do it for you and danika you know is just so tenacious and so fierce. What what was that bill. It was on had to do with the s s. One thank you doug at her so it's very kind of you in second on yet. That was the bill where been working with the department of taxation department social services it was basically designed to combat child welfare fraud which i think everyone else agree on and nothing came up on second reading like which is when you're supposed to debate. And so instead they tell me that the morning of third reading i was like no no keeping. My mother is from the bronx in the race in italian sicilian household away. You're not telling my bill now. So i had to take on delegate lee ware. Who's an absolute gentleman. By the way you know a negative thing about ways. He he really is a statesman. I telling telling me that he. He was not to induced about having to kill that bell on so stood on the house floor made mccain for. He withdrew his motion. Just senate back I made the best case. Could for the bill based on my word and my work ethic and yeah Actually ended up winning kind of a gag gift award out from the caucus afterwards for of the never say die award which is named after black sabbath Vita wanted stories. I was again tell. Last year i was in the house transportation subcommittee and One of the members from the other side who had like me been critical of the tolls on i sixty six was introducing a bill to add reverse toll to sixty six. Because for some reason this makes sense in the republican caucus that they're opposed to toll so they want to add more tolls in so. I told some the member sitting next to me. I was like let me handle this. One in is started asking question after question after question in got to a point of saying like so. I would ask the delegate here would she say to you're constituents ever go into dc during the evening or come home in the morning and he's like yes. Okay so you're saying that your constituents some of them will end up paying more tolls because of this bill. But you're against tolling right. And the only time i motioned to. Pb ability entire year because pb is like the harshest death. You can give a bell and typically we just gently lay a table but that one had to die violently for a reason and it was just like i wanted to make a case on this. Do not show up confirmed transportation committee telling us one thing publicly and then trying to act another way once you get here. That's just not how things are going to be an. Yes so i've also seen delegate hearst really really go into account and one of the things i really like with him as on the house floor. Very rarely. Dc our former news anchor ever stutter or triple. For his words he's eight. He always has since speeches while put together. Even if he's doing it on the fly he always had such a good argument for when he makes them but when the republicans try to gang up on him or try to surprise them she calls them on their crap every single time he so good on a speeding so good on the floor. It's just really something to watch. Won't i sometimes need to filter myself and have more that attitude. I had when i was on the tv station to make sure it in curse on air but no calling everybody jumps.

donald trump alison danika Last year department of taxation departm third reading emerson twenty second reading both one republicans second two years later Seventeen eight few weeks ago virginia general assembly democratic party two thousand sixteen
"department social services" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

Five four two and the Blue

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"department social services" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

"Was simply a a group home in could be left by simply walking away walking out the door secure facilities for juveniles at that time and still today are for juveniles that may be a danger to themselves or others in the community or cases where juveniles are awaiting trial on serious felonies and they might not be able to be relocated before the trial now in an unsecured facility. Juveniles can be kept for about ten days as approved by a judicial official magistrate or judge open court records show braun had left similar homes on three other occasions since nineteen ninety-three the mother and her interview with the press declined to say while miranda had been placed into custody in nineteen ninety-three she would only provide the information that her daughter was was a good student who ran away from the group home because she was being mistreated there last time. Miranda ran away from a group shelter. The shelter itself contacted department of social services which they were required to do as department. Social services had legal custody of miranda. The officials with department of social services filed a petition which is a document requesting the court to take action in case involving a juvenile in. This situation was a runaway petition. This was filed with the county magistrate's office in bunkum. County on november six. The petition would was standard procedure when a child run away gives police officers and sheriff's deputies the authority to take the child into custody if they locate the child the newspaper that asheville citizen times conducted their own investigation of dss is handling of the brown case and they found that the social workers had failed to file a missing persons report on brown after she had run away from the group home. In if that is the case then law enforcement did not actively investigate the missing person case of miranda and if she was taken into custody by law enforcement would adjust been by chance when they had come across her and taking her into custody for whatever reason the investigation by the newspaper also showed that the social worker should failed. Contact lester family. With whom verandah had stayed in the past with their knowledge and brown had been at that location at some point and they had the information on where she would have been this time apparently now on the night in question in november nineteen ninety four in a small rental house behind it old grocery store on boulevard road in asheville a life of miranda brown of woodford ansi county into tragically brown had attended small party. This location with cheryl other young people. Six people had gathered at the home most had been drinking before the incident brown went into the bedroom with the other along with a young man. Twenty two years of age. A mark anderson along with the others that were at the home. A shotgun was removed from a wall rack. Witnesses told police. Bureau was placed into brown's mouth possibly by the victim herself. The police report said anderson. Tell the stock of the gun. He told police it discharged accident. Only the police report. Data has not been redacted indicated though several of the witnesses stated that the gun had discharged by accident that hit it off while the end of the barrel was in the teenagers mouth killing her instantly. Police documented that brown died at twelve forty one. Am on a saturday during the party after the barrel twelve gauge shotgun was placed mouth. Either by her or by another person of the five male individuals that the party only mark anderson was identified admitted he was the one holding the stock of the shotgun when it went off witnesses in assisted that miranda had placed a gun in her mouth. Were self anderson. Called police about twenty minutes. After the incident occurred after the investigation. In the gathering of evidence anderson was charged with second degree murder. He was placed originally on no bond that after his first appearance in court was to a hundred thousand dollars secure bond juanita around as always disputed the account of the accident or the incident. She said her daughter had been assaulted by the men at the party. The senior detective for the investigation. The police department has said it was all senseless. There were no harsh words no arguments. They were all pretty happy and having a good time before the shotgun went off. Now the victim's mother was later charged with making harassing calls in relationship to her daughter's death to a family in west asheville. Miss brown was also very outspoken. On the issue of her daughter steph which is understandable. Those charges for.

miranda department of social services brown asheville citizen times miranda brown ansi county braun mark anderson Miranda dss verandah anderson lester woodford asheville cheryl juanita police department Miss brown steph
"department social services" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:27 min | 2 years ago

"department social services" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Just an ongoing list of reasons that things are becoming more challenging You the Rosalynn Carter instituted called us an emergency room moment for caregiving. What did you mean by that? I'm a public health person and in public health, we constantly try to keep people out of the emergency room, whether through prevention or education and awareness campaigns. Or mild treatment options. Unfortunately, caregivers tend tio reach out for help or get support when they're at their stress point when they're experiencing physical or mental health elements themselves. I think this is the point for the country to see the caregivers. If supported, won't get to those stress points won't show up in that emergency room of their caregiver journey. What can be done about it? I mean these air It's not as simple as the government passing one law mean these air people again. It's in. It's in the family. It's Children. It's the elderly. It's it's so many different kinds of circumstances. What are the kinds of things that would help them? I work for caregivers will require an engagement on thinking at the population level about policies and programs as well as listening Teo and learning from individual caregiver stories, but your aunt Judy, this is going to take an effort amongst different sectors. Employers engaging directly legislator than lawmakers, Health Department, social service departments and community organizations. Working to see caregivers. How often are kangaroos thought of not nearly enough. We don't engage in caregiver conversations at many board rooms and companies across this country. Nor in the hallways of governments at the federal and state level, and that's the change that we're calling for. Across this country. There have been caregivers who have immune compromised loved ones that they've figured out innovative solutions for whether that's drive through services or drop offs. So would it be amazing if we started to look to caregivers as the problem solvers that they are? And to learn from them. Well, there's no question they're doing extraordinary work as you say for millions and millions of Americans, Jennifer Olsen with the Rosalynn Carter care giving Institute. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you, Judy. If you found that this election is increasing your anxiety that maybe more than a sign of the times, it could be the result of a conscious political strategy to scare you into a point of view. Our Lisa Desjardin reports on the use of fear in the 2020 campaign. Beneath the 2020 fight and aggressive undercurrent. No one will be safe in Biden's America Fear used especially by President Donald Trump, making alarmist extreme claims. No city town or a suburb will be safe. This tremendous violence if you want to save democracy from the mob. Then you must vote. But the president is not alone. Remember seeing those neo Nazis and clansmen and white supremacist coming out of field with lighted torches? Veins bulging. There is near pervasive talk of threats to your community. Your race to you. What does all this use of fear? Do? What does it mean to voters? We asked on social media and thousands of people responded. They surprise us with the intensity of their fears related to this election. You know, I'm concerned that My name's Homer. He's part of it in my town. I'm a breast cancer survivor. So preexisting condition coverage is a huge deal for me, no matter who wins between you know whoever. Gets the election gets the nomination. The other side, just going to be mad and no express that anger in very violent ways. We might get a point where they just can't function at all you know, and it just the whole system comes crashing down. I fear a lot of fear for the future of my kids. These fears are not being expressed in a vacuum life. It is happening amid fear based campaigning. Including ads like this one supporting President Trump tells voters they will not be safe. I think it is fair to say that this election it's truly spectacularly extent to which politicians are making Ah, fear based messages. And when I say politicians, I, of course mean Donald Trump. Dan Gardner is the author of risk The Science and Politics of Fear, He says both presidential campaigns are using fear. Former vice president Joe Biden, focusing on fear off Mr Trump. But Gardner says it is the president who is using the tactic the most, including implied fears of other races and people, not like you like in July, when he spoke of low income housing. Your home will go down in value and crime rates will rapidly rise. Suburbia. I'll be no longer as we know it in truth times are good in most US suburbs with years of income growth and safety. But Gardner says fear can override the reality because it works on a primal level. We're hardwired to give priority to information about threat. We will always prioritize negative information, so will notice. At first we'll remember it longer and it will be more influential in her subsequent decision making, then will other information Gardener says Scary ads or speeches are affecting you. Even if you think they are, so when you see a political ad, they show you images of a stranger at the door going to knock it in and do God knows what to the innocent person inside. It's going to convince a part of your brain that there is a really threat, but they tend to think that they're thinking uniquely among all human beings. Isn't influenced by those biases. So in other words, People believe that everyone else is at risk for being manipulated by fear, but they don't believe that they are exactly the fear based ads are many like this one from Biden's campaign. Donald.

President Donald Trump Joe Biden Dan Gardner Rosalynn Carter president Judy Rosalynn Carter care giving In cancer US Lisa Desjardin Health Department vice president Teo Jennifer Olsen America
"department social services" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"department social services" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"ABC Mike yeah hi I have I have a small solution here one eight zero go for it might yep okay first of all every crap gets three chances but really investigated when he does something wrong after three chances he's out of the gate best western wall thank you for all the pension you start to get the offense after ten years of this shop NBA gets upset because I felt as if the percentage on this fence and so you look to think twice before you toss something bad because you got to worry about dispensing down the line all right well remember with New York City unlike a lot of other departments which twenty five years or more it's twenty years and you can opt out you get half his salary unless it's disability that it's like a three quarters and you get a full load a full load of pension and welfare benefits till the day you die for yourself and your entire family so if you go down to let's see port Saint Lucie on the east coast of Florida get a little ice cream shop you now have two incomes coming in where you're able to make in the ice cream shop to probably will not have been looted by then and obviously your pension so you also have the strong unions the unions defend that their membership there men and women the PBA the sergeant enabling association lieutenant benevolent association captain benevolent association so it's like you jostle with elected officials and I notice a lot of those elected officials they don't mind coming by to the PBA offices when it's time for re election in getting a campaign contribution because they know the check will clear and by the way speaking of officials James Comey the former FBI director wrote a really good piece I have to say in the Washington post about on basically a message to law enforcement about why they need to listen and it's a very very good thing but one of the things he says is look he has no problem people want to pay someone else to handle truancy mental health homelessness and substance abuse and what the police actually do their jobs the job of law enforcement he says that would be a blessing and that's what I've been trying to say is that the police on that I've spoken with a lot of police you know when you see interviews they say we're just we have so much pressure on us and there's so much there's so much I'm the onus is on us to try to be the psychologists and sociologists and therapists and this is not what we're trained for and it distracts us from doing our job that's one of the things that's the that's the that's included in this whole sort of reinvention of the police get let them do their jobs and let the you know the L. the experts in mental health deal with the truth you don't believe like that where you gonna get the money to do it now we had a pandemic financially it is ruined us follow looking only so that's not my job to figure out where the money I don't know that's not my job you know you gotta figure would call me to say but he had to handle a budget when he was FBI director he knows in good times what you can do it in bad times what you can do and all these officials I love how they talk about how things are going to go back to normal then this was one part of this no no I want peace I mean I I I thought it was very good and he was saying look there right now I meet the officer said they're in there they're like why are we being bashed we're doing the right thing most of us are doing the right thing you know we there is this instinct to get upset and slammed the window as he says when you're hearing yourself you know your your line of business your profession constantly being attacked but Comey was say you open open up the window a little bit because there are some things that we need to hear it it's about constructive criticism well I wanna call me I want trump I want all the officials to tell us whatever their idea is waiting on to get the money from because I insist we have to keep telling all of our citizens we're going to have to do more with less everyone schools fire department social services cops there's no money one eight hundred eight four A. W. A. B. C. but first let's get the news headlines and updates you can see it.

ABC Mike
"department social services" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:53 min | 2 years ago

"department social services" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Nursing homes you're talking about a system living facilities and retirement senior communities we're also talking about long term rehab facilities all of these percent of similar problem that we're talking about with their C. homes they do they do and in fact I actually want to mention that because I and I think my come up earlier on our call but the information that we received on Friday night specific to nursing I'll be roughly twelve hundred nursing homes skilled nursing facilities or snaps at the record and all of those were talking specifically about one thousand two hundred ninety employees and one thousand seven hundred and forty residents who have tested positive now that's the only nursing homes we know that there are thousands of assisted living facilities other types of long term care facilities that are regulated licensed by the department of social services and if if logic tracks you're going to see thousands of employees thousands of residents of these facilities also has positive new governess indicated on Saturday that he was anticipating and working toward releasing a similar batch of data about those types of facilities as the state released about nursing homes that's another one that's going to happen I know myself and the much everybody else are eagerly waiting for that to happen because as you've indicated these the solution might be slightly less prone to having used types of outbreaks some experts will say that because assisted living facilities can range from you sort of apartment style dwellings where you have you know maybe a hundred unit set up an older folks can basically live there and it's a retirement community that's a very different risk of disease transmission and a nursing home that might be tightly packed local people per room multiple staff working with groups of patients that sort of thing so I think the concern is just as prominent but maybe what data that will see hopefully in the next short amount of time well helps understand better want to read a comment from Ron rice my mother was in a very good senior living facility until the end of last month when she died of a non call the disease this is a very very good facility to facility includes independent living assisted living and memory care unit so far they've done okay I think but the independent living residents still want to come and go and due to some degree this is a cause for concern and the state should look at this immediately and get another caller on here how rude joins us next welcome you're on the air yes ma'am I agree I want a small residential care facility for the elderly so we take care six elderly people together and home like a house like setting and we're regulated by the department of health services like you're talking about and we're having trouble securing you know he either we might hold if if we do have a positive care having trouble getting testing if you know I have had to spend my characterization project baseline which is you know basically all jumping into the fray and helping out with testing because they can't get a test from their doctor from a clinic the test will still not there and even if they are able to be heard has to teach you weeks before the test comes back I wish we left with nothing shortages eight you know where we are regulated by the department social services which is very tempting to help us but you know they are not apartment of health and they're having difficulty also and I mean we have dementia patients who you know would not be able to be told to stay in the Iran more isolated if they were positive I just got an email saying that we aren't really able to sort of like walking person into their room you know to discourage them from coming out if they were positive yeah that would be a violation of resident right you know we have a really high staff ratio usually we have about we what we have Texas resident you know the staff ratios always never gonna be more than one effects usually have two people working during the day to take care of that but even still you know somebody has wondering you know and they can't remember they don't have a long memory and it will not be possible to keep that you know probably wondering about the facility yeah the possibility but basically coming out of the room so we're struggling with hand you know we're doing the best we can but yeah we held well I hear I hear it's difficult I understand I empathize and the difficulties you express or even a small ways with the small facility like yours can be microcosmic of the bigger picture is that we're getting here from our experts I want to read a comment from Lynn who writes my ninety five year old father in law is in an assisted living facility in the vital there have been two deaths and six people tested positive for covert nineteen the staff says they won't test residents unless they have symptoms since twenty five to thirty percent of people don't have symptoms there's no way to know if residents have the virus or not are there any public officials in Marin county who could require teaching all staff and residents this is me testing all staff and residents in the facility you know the answer to that Molly Peterson I don't know the answer to that I think I think the answer is very very valuable depending on county that's right yeah what about you Jason can you shed some light here a simple I think that that's right I think this very ability is really concerning thing for a lot of people when it comes to testing and how it's going to be rolled out especially as this goes on for the next several months right I mean nursing homes and assisted living facilities all types how's the population that is disproportionately dying because of this of this disease and so when we think about what the next several months are going to look like for how we respond to this is going to be very much based in the facilities are having to rely on having reliable past readily available and I don't think we've seen on a grand scale quite yet let me bring another color and that's kind of color thank you for waiting join us you're on the air Kyla are you there no doubt I'm sorry hi my parents and I'm a Jerry yeah I'm I'm engaged in a part of Medicaid that you yes I've been actually working closely with several nursing homes in San Francisco a couple points that I wanted to bring up that have not been raised and that is the issue of patient privacy and discrimination and while we absolutely have to balance the public health good we also have to be very careful and put ourselves in the in the shoes of someone that has Kobe and doesn't have anywhere to go into the importance here is working closely with the PH which has to approve every discharge from the hospital in San Francisco so there are safety measures in place and as a geriatrician I am very acutely aware of the of the needs of our of our older adults in nursing homes but it is not OK to uniformly tell everyone about your status as Kobe and without protecting your privacy the second thing I'll just lastly say in terms of testing there's a lot of concerns about downstream effects of testing in terms of do we understand the downstream effects and will be be falsely reassured with negative cats so while we are likely heading in the direction of universal testing we have to make sure we have clear policies and procedures to about what to do with those tasks before we start knocking them Carl I thank you for that call and let me go back if I may to you professor Harrington you want to address the two points that you brought up the issue talking not only about privacy but she's talking about testing and downstream effect well I think those are two points that that we need to protect the privacy of president we also have to be aware where be able to protect the staff and other residents in the community so it's a complex issue but until we get the more universal testing I don't see how we're going to be able to really stop the spread within the sky bell okay so what about what we heard earlier about people with moving freely through some of these facilities and also in some of the long term care places actually going out in public and that sort of thing I mean we have any controls in place or any thing that you can suggest along those lines to make things more control what if we had the testing with an assay if markets are looking and meet new people work did not help the buyer I don't see any reason why people can't move around frequently within the so many race symptomatic that's that's the concern here is not well but that's why you need help Peter but so if if people don't help the buyer and they can move around I thank we don't want to be too overly sweet a strictly within a small facility we read a comment from Alyssa rice I work for the department of social services as a licensing program analyst I inspect state licensed facilities and conduct investigations of these facilities and we have been asked to assist the Oakland regional office for adults and seniors with the call the task force the department's handling of covert has been absolutely a mess me bring another caller on Sophia thanks for waiting you're on welcome a licensing program analyst thanks bye okay so we have Sophia we want to get you on here but your radios on you always have to turn to you later all right got it yeah so it really is a zero sum game between PP and universal testing and unless we really can't control staff even if we do try to coal for coal that positive within the facility there's no way like the other previous caller said about the Jewish call them back geriatrician at her mom that you cannot control the death because there's not enough staff and they're just really as many support of living the spread of exposure because most.

"department social services" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"department social services" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"From Olympia to Tacoma twenty nine minutes in a twenty nine minute drive from Tacoma to Olympia traffic brought to you by indeed dot com that your in charge of hiring let indeed customized screening tools help fine tune your short list so you can get moving to your other to do list post your next job and indeed dot com slash higher Kyra radio real time traffic and Tracy Taylor now from the Cairo radio news center my northwest dot com our hearts go out to the patient's family friends and many people in the community who knew her if you're skinny today reporting its first death from the corona virus bringing the total death in our state to sixty seven this afternoon Dr Anthony chan the woman who passed away was in her fifties and had underlying health conditions governor Inslee's urging people with compromised immune systems as well as older adults to stay home and care about you who love you we want you to be around for your grandkids for more years or seven TV's Gerry Corker reports the seniors who heard the governor's firm request for people sixty and over to shelter in place I'm certainly over sixty years Warner glass who's close to celebrating his ninety third birthday Warner who we spotted running errands has a PhD in science but he understands the risk of infection for older adults I'm not worried about not you know when you're there going on ninety three every day is bonus day were put his own risk into perspective the governor so far has not ordered everyone in our state to shelter at home although gatherings of fifty or more people have been banned in numerous businesses have been ordered shot to slow the spread of the virus today he offered help for those affected under my direction the department social services will expand eligibility for the family emergency assistance program to include families without children he's temporarily halted evictions and speeding up the process for.

"department social services" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

08:19 min | 2 years ago

"department social services" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Family friends and the many people in the community who knew her here's county today reporting its first death from the corona virus bringing the total deaths in our state to sixty six this afternoon Dr Anthony chan the woman who passed away was in her fifties and had underlying health conditions seven or Inslee has been urging people with compromised immune systems as well as older adults to stay home to care about you who love you we want you to be around for your grandkids for more years after seven TV's Gary Walker reports among the seniors who heard the governor's firm request for people sixty and over to shelter in place I'm certainly over sixty years Warner glass who's close to celebrating his ninety third birthday Warner who we spotted running errands has a PhD in science but he understands the risk of infection for older adults I'm not worried about not you know when you're there going on ninety three every day is soon bonus day were put his own risk into perspective the governors of all I believe we're going to governor Insley right now yes and that's what we're talking about today joining us remotely is Seattle mayor Jenny Durkan intercom America Victoria Watters they'll see a few things after my remarks both of them have been really a strong leaders for their communities at this time also during this remote Lee is our history commissioner Susan Levine should be available to answer questions should there be any after my comments so today we're going to continue to take actions dealing with the health and today the economic security of Washingtonians I'm pleased to say we've already distributed over seventy five million dollars of the legislature's two hundred million dollar allocation for our code outbreak response and that's for state agents agencies and institutions to use for our statewide response well I don't know acutely that the folks who have been involved in the sit down service in our restaurants and our bars and those who missed large gatherings because of this this is because some real economic hardship for our families and our small businesses and large businesses so we want to do what we can do to help them and to that end I am announcing today several measures to help relief for workers for renters and for our small business people a first announcing a statewide moratorium on evictions for failure to pay rent for residential tenants for the next thirty days this is how this order will work residential landlords will be prohibited from serving a notice for default payment of rent residential landlords my would be prohibited under this order from issuing a twenty day notice unless the landlord can show that action would be necessary for the health and safety of the tenant or other individuals the residential landlords will be prohibited from initiating judicial action I wanna thank you twenty general Bob Ferguson and his team helping to craft a disorder I appreciate their partnership we've got some good news for the federal government today related to housing the federal housing finance agency directed Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to suspend foreclosures and evictions for at least sixty days do the covert nineteen outbreak as you know we're experiencing a rapidly growing number of workers who are off the job for leaks of time that exceed many workers leave benefits is the same for workers who are not covered by our current social safety net therefore in addition of it Nelson adicional help in regard to our unemployment benefits instead Washington first we are waving the one week time period before you can get access to unemployment insurance this will help when you get into the unemployed Washingtonians pocket as soon as possible when they urgently need a second disorders retroactive to claims filed March eighth the day of my first emergency rule expanding unemployment insurance two more workers I'm also continuing to work with the White House and our congressional delegation to establish disaster unemployment assistance this would give us the authority to serve impacted Washingtonians were not otherwise eligible through the unemployment insurance program we sent a letter to the to the trump administration today asking for the president to make a national disaster declaration and the importance for several reasons but one of the foremost is that today Washingtonians who not accumulated I believe it's six hundred eighty hours would not have access to unemployment insurance if in fact this is accomplished in the president issues this decoration we believe this will open unemployment insurance to people just like we have been in for disasters and tornadoes and floods if the president is unable to do that for some reason then we are calling upon Congress in in the next round to take that statutory actions will people get access to unemployment insurance I think this is very important for families they're obviously going to be so stressed but it's also important for the economy to make sure that money gets distributed so that those families can can be good consumers and and keep dollars flowing through our economy that's helpful for everyone in addition to these hard pressed families so we're very hopeful that the administration will take this step and that Congress can be assisting that review in that regard we also do more to help families under my direction the department social services will expand eligibility for the family emergency assistance program to include families without children we think this can be very helpful to quite a number of families I'm also calling on all public utilities to offer repair assistance I'm asking the public utilities waive late fees for concerts kannst customers who are out of work for offering customer customers payment plans and expanding bill assistance programs for customers who are economically impacted by this emergency many abilities have already taken this step we appreciate their leadership that includes Seattle city light sound energy to calm a public utilities and public utility district who acted early to address the needs of their customers soon after the outbreak and I just want to note that we see so many acts of civic responsibility and compassion they're going on like this that the utilities took it upon themselves to do we're seeing this from big businesses small businesses medium businesses social clubs neighbors I gotta tell you it's just heart and when I see people stepping up the plate like these utilities have done I'm also suspending certain restrictions on utilities and transportation commission to enable them to use funds to provide economic aid to customers affected by covert nineteen this will provide utilities and transportation commission authority to expand the use of the energy bill assistance funds to customers who are out of work or working significantly reduced hours as a result of the pandemic we realize it's not just employees who are hard pressed small businesses are as well earlier this week the federal small business administration approved my request for a disaster declaration it is anticipated that all counties in Washington state.

"department social services" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

13:13 min | 2 years ago

"department social services" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"To find out you know isn't there any way that he could come in and given this blind I understand about the chemo treatment but at least to get them as blood and platelets too full to this is he is proctor's cancer long and hard and we had to talk and at the end we had decided that he was going to have hospice come in and god forbid he contracts the virus are they going to make him go into the hospital or will you be able to have hospice come here and take care of them who would like to answer that question a lot wrapped up in that question you know I'm sorry that for the first part if you haven't already you should have a discussion with his oncologist as to what alternatives may be possible because of the question because from my mind R. is it doesn't probably thinking for some reason the hospital is the best place for him to be receiving care which he every hospital in the state should already be enacting their infection control plan so although you will let me know the possible to have a potential of for more germs there they should be taking extra extra precautions in the circumstance in generally is when I was still in full time practice I was across the hall from our local oncologist in the middle of the precautions they would take that the second question is is there an outpatient infusion center that the oncologist potentially could use and if the oncologist thinks that home therapy would be appropriate is there an insurance hold up and so that would be needed to clarify the oncologist what is the best setting in his or her medical opinion and then address why if it if it can be done elsewhere in the hospital we just simply how can that be accomplished the second question about hospice there should not be any reason why he could not get hospice rows which corona virus or any other infection it's just a question of having the hospice staff take appropriate precautions so that their health is protected as well but I don't see that as a as a barrier for hospice care thank you doctor next question next question is from Anita in Hyatt well I need a year on the congressman where thank you hi my name is Anita and my question hi my question is in reference to governor Hogan's announcement today that all public schools in the state of Maryland will be temporary would temporarily closed from March the sixteenth through March the twenty seventh and there's quite a few children that that receive free lunches is there a program or is that something that's going to be developed to make sure that those children for the next couple of weeks have some sort of access some of them depend on the school lunch as having one good meal or so a day the second part of my question is the homeless population is there an effort to address the corona virus within the homeless population there are homeless that are on the streets and homeless that actually go to shelter but because I live in the city of Hyatt still look pretty densely populated there's a lot of communities that kind of run right next to a different world and mount Ranier so is there an effort in Maryland or nationally to kind of get the word out to the homeless and also testing and giving them pointers on you know what to do they can do to protect themselves let me chime in on the first question you asked about the school lunches we are considering either tonight and we're trying to get agreement between the administration ourselves the house the Senate to make sure that school lunches are available to children whose schools are closed but usually get school breakfast or or or lunch we think that's critically important we don't think the administration and Republicans Democrats agree on that so that certainly will be part of any bill and so we will help the states incur the cost the meals of course are already been provided for in the budget because they did not disclose when it gets closed so that that that is being addressed let me let me go ahead and run the guilt of prince George's counties emergency management office he's the director and well he wanted to speak to the homeless challenge sure our current regiment yeah I I I wanted to go back to the first one real quick we've been planning within the county public schools along with our department social services and our transportation system will begin in the plan of what that would look like if we win we would have to provide these meals so these systems of what you're doing and what the county is doing our goal is to make sure no child is that rich people real your second question with regard to homeless population again the department of social services has been and will continue to address along with the health department our lives population to be able to identify where there are we for the most part we know where most of our almost population are reside with the county and that information is being pushed out to them and proactive or prepare this information such as if you're the same if you are a joke if you haven't the call up just different things too that they would know and his seat belt the most do not have or you know a primary care physician whether they go to the client instead of staying on the streets were push that out to the homeless population a telephone town hall organized by U. S. house Majority Leader Steny Hoyer Democrat from Maryland on Thursday night what is it that is a real challenge I'm glad you asked that question in Asia and we're very focused on that as well an office so thank you Ronnie next question our next question is from Barbara in Mount Airy alright you're on with congressman earlier hi I just wanted to tell you I've been very pleased with our respond to the situation I want to thank everyone for that secondarily I was wondering if somebody the fact that they have because it's nineteen really not much that can be done in the medical field so I used that weren't unit and caring for them it would be the first line of defense if that's the case what supplied with it be necessary to have it like a decongestant or what would you recommend over the counter to care for these patients so we don't over an inmate medical system I can take that to mean a Brewster from St Mary's county thank you I and at a hundred minutes okay I'll I'll restore you go at dot org I mean Dr Brigitte thank you very much I'm I think you are you are asking an excellent question and I'm so glad you brought that up because I think it's important for people to know that while the vast majority of individuals that are infected with the virus that causes because that nineteen have mild symptoms like the common cold or moderate symptoms like the flu there is a portion of individuals who really struggle mainly as congressman had mentioned earlier people over the age of sixty or people with chronic medical conditions and so you're the care that if somebody is having significant trouble breathing or is does not seem to be doing well enough to be comfortable recuperating at home it is advised that they seek medical care because well we don't we don't have much information about this virus in terms of what works for treatment we are learning a lot from what we've seen already over the past few months and so there may be supportive care that can help the person to help a person breathe more comfortably or you know address other parts of their symptoms are happening and there could be some medications that can be helpful for you than breeding support that could be helpful if they truly need it the second part of the question lies if they are stable enough really to be at home and not need treatment or support that they can get into more and a hospital setting what kind of you know what what do they need to do to make sure they have around them because that is that correct I think I'd be the type of supplies that I that are important for somebody who is recuperating at home to have around them is just basically if you're stable enough to be home it's just like when you have a common cold or the flu so you want to make sure you are drinking plenty of fluids and you're arresting if you feel like you're having fever sometimes medications for fever can be helpful if you're feeling from that and another kind of over the counter medicines that may be helpful for people with the flu or the common cold it's just really important that people pay attention to their symptoms are worsening and if they seem to really be struggling with breathing or having other chest pain or anything like that while there are recuperating at home but they didn't call ahead to a medical provider and discuss it with them and potentially seek out more care thank you very much Dr Brewster in the I think that's good advice in the store was good advice first of all to to the fluids we haven't mentioned it but or node over everybody I talk to says wash your hands wash your hands frequently take twenty seconds with a good soap washing your hands obviously there is this concern as well that's been expressed on Capitol Hill the concerns about the disinfectants being available and in short supply and in some areas and we're working on trying to make sure that there is a spry and be that the price is not hi and that people are doubting that that's that's a great concern about medical supplies generally that are in high demand at this point in time that we don't have the public acknowledged at the same time if manufacturers are switching from one product to do the product it's immediately available now there may be some extra cost but it should not be an extraordinarily high extra costs and we're we're we're we're paying attention to that thank you very much for that question and doctors thanks for your reply next question all right we have time for just one more question this evening our last question is from a lot all in billion level you're on with congressman where she's been radio programming from Friday yes all my question is that out thank you for taking my call my question is at running folks that get infected and yeah and they get over first of all how long does it take for the average person to get over it and then the second part of that is once a person is over how do we know that them getting past it does not still carries a gun a pathogen that can affect others even though they've already gotten past it good question that Dr Carter you want take a crack at that sure so just like any other viral infection once you'll get it and typically like with this one you'll it'll last you look just about fourteen days once you get it and you get over it then you're you're in you build up the antibodies your body gets rid of it so you're no longer getting it like you did when you first got it when you first got it you've got it in now and then Dr Paul Kate explained you start making a lot of copies of that Barriss and you.

proctor
"department social services" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:54 min | 2 years ago

"department social services" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR news I'm no well king and I'm David green Jane Whaley was not satisfied with being a pastor's wife she believed god had bigger plans for her so she pushed against all the norms that kept her from the pulpit and found the church and spend their North Carolina called the word of faith fellowship the church's website shows people singing and smiling Jane Whaley at center stage from the outside it looks like a community of pious believers but some former members say the dangerous cult these people believe that Jane Whaley was their path to salvation and that if they did anything that went against her wishes they would get cancer and die or they would become drug addicts these are things that Jane way we would tell them it was Holbrook more he and Mitch Weiss a fellow AP reporter have been looking into abuse allegations within the church for years our colleague Rachel Martin spoke with them about their new book broken faith and just a note here the story does include descriptions of that alleged abuse there is two sides Jayme wellies yours that's sweet southern grandmotherly type and then there's the Jane that nobody sees except church members the one who screaming at the top of a longs congregants warning them that the devils have to come out it's like the Jekyll and Hyde right Holbrooke can you describe what people saw in her what was bringing them to this church I think that in the beginning when people would go to the church they were selling a lot of love yeah the members of this church they live in nice homes they drive nice cars the children are well mannered they have a Christian school so I think when a lot of families first go there everything seems great but over time Janeway Lee and her other ministers they take more and more control of your lives in fact a lot of times they'll remove children from their families home it and place them with ministers to be raised and what that does is over time sometimes those kids care more about the minister's than their own parents so it makes it difficult for families to leave so it's not a quick thing where you just walk in the door and they say Hey come on in you can come in you can never leave we're gonna take your television magazines radio all that away from you an institute all these rules it's a slow progressive thing and Mitch she when the other church leadership they would use family members against one another I mean hobar talked about how they would separate children sometimes as leverage but they got family members to serve as informants almost absolutely you have to realize they believe that Jane well it was a profit that god spoke to her and everything she said was the gospel and one of the techniques that she used what she had everybody informed on each other it was in a way she would have them tell her their deepest darkest secrets and then she kept the file of those secrets and if they threatened to leave or did something wrong she had all the evidence she needed there to keep them in line so it it was a range of emotional and psychological abuse but from interviews you did with a hundred or so former members you were able to reconstruct a pattern of a violent physical abuse can you just a lay out for us some of those more extreme examples of that yes it was something that that really got worse over time and you have to understand what her philosophy is the doctrine is is really pretty simple doubles a real and if you're a drug addict it's because you have this drug gavel if you know your alcoholic the same if you're having an affair it's the same thing there are there lawful devils and so what she would do is it was called devils and deliverance where they would have people surround you and scream at you at to get the devils out get out double yeah and and it will go on and on and on perfect example is with the baby if babies cry it wasn't because they were hungry or they had a dirty diaper it was because it was a devil inside them that was making them cry so you would have groups of people surrounding a you know in a fan and screaming until that baby would just get tired and finally you know go to sleep and not to scream it just it just to be specific this method call blasting they are they're right in front of the subject's face right there screaming into the baby's ears enter a like inches from her face exactly and that's how she started at the beginning with her congregants over time it became more and more violent it wasn't enough just to screen to scare the devils out of people now you had to punch people you had to hold them down to restrain them you had to choke them you had to do everything possible to get rid of that devil and that's when it became extremely violent that's where the people who who recounted their stories would break down to us they would tell us about their injuries and they couldn't go to doctors they couldn't be treated because they knew what would happen so they had to keep it secret but it's those beatings that that really it's still seared into their planes now they can't get rid of those images those nightmares there is a lot of suspense in this tale but it's it's not fiction I mean this is this is a real life accounting of how the church destroyed these lives but you're you're so specific I mean it reads like fiction though you could you've you're recreating dialogue how did you do that we tried to talk to as many people as we could about any particular incident that we wanted to write about let's not often interviewed him together multiple times over a period of five years really we look for please reports department social services child welfare investigation documents we have recordings from inside the church videos so we just tried to to use all the resources that we could find to tell this story in the most compelling way that we could several lawsuits have been brought against the church and its members over the years has anyone been held accountable for the abuse there are five people currently charged with assaulting a former member of the church Matthew Fenner he says that he was beaten to expel his homosexual demons back in two thousand thirteen but so far nobody's been convicted in that case and Matthew fenders waiting for justice the fact that you have the sheriff you have the district attorney all these people who have looked the.

Jane Whaley David green
Word Of Faith's Pattern Of Abuse 'Got Worse Over Time,' Says 'Broken Faith' Author

Morning Edition

06:52 min | 2 years ago

Word Of Faith's Pattern Of Abuse 'Got Worse Over Time,' Says 'Broken Faith' Author

"Jane Whaley was not satisfied with being a pastor's wife she believed god had bigger plans for her so she pushed against all the norms that kept her from the pulpit and found the church and spend their North Carolina called the word of faith fellowship the church's website shows people singing and smiling Jane Whaley at center stage from the outside it looks like a community of pious believers but some former members say the dangerous cult these people believe that Jane Whaley was their path to salvation and that if they did anything that went against her wishes they would get cancer and die or they would become drug addicts these are things that Jane way we would tell them it was Holbrook more he and Mitch Weiss a fellow AP reporter have been looking into abuse allegations within the church for years our colleague Rachel Martin spoke with them about their new book broken faith and just a note here the story does include descriptions of that alleged abuse there is two sides Jayme wellies yours that's sweet southern grandmotherly type and then there's the Jane that nobody sees except church members the one who screaming at the top of a longs congregants warning them that the devils have to come out it's like the Jekyll and Hyde right Holbrooke can you describe what people saw in her what was bringing them to this church I think that in the beginning when people would go to the church they were selling a lot of love yeah the members of this church they live in nice homes they drive nice cars the children are well mannered they have a Christian school so I think when a lot of families first go there everything seems great but over time Janeway Lee and her other ministers they take more and more control of your lives in fact a lot of times they'll remove children from their families home it and place them with ministers to be raised and what that does is over time sometimes those kids care more about the minister's than their own parents so it makes it difficult for families to leave so it's not a quick thing where you just walk in the door and they say Hey come on in you can come in you can never leave we're gonna take your television magazines radio all that away from you an institute all these rules it's a slow progressive thing and Mitch she when the other church leadership they would use family members against one another I mean hobar talked about how they would separate children sometimes as leverage but they got family members to serve as informants almost absolutely you have to realize they believe that Jane well it was a profit that god spoke to her and everything she said was the gospel and one of the techniques that she used what she had everybody informed on each other it was in a way she would have them tell her their deepest darkest secrets and then she kept the file of those secrets and if they threatened to leave or did something wrong she had all the evidence she needed there to keep them in line so it it was a range of emotional and psychological abuse but from interviews you did with a hundred or so former members you were able to reconstruct a pattern of a violent physical abuse can you just a lay out for us some of those more extreme examples of that yes it was something that that really got worse over time and you have to understand what her philosophy is the doctrine is is really pretty simple doubles a real and if you're a drug addict it's because you have this drug gavel if you know your alcoholic the same if you're having an affair it's the same thing there are there lawful devils and so what she would do is it was called devils and deliverance where they would have people surround you and scream at you at to get the devils out get out double yeah and and it will go on and on and on perfect example is with the baby if babies cry it wasn't because they were hungry or they had a dirty diaper it was because it was a devil inside them that was making them cry so you would have groups of people surrounding a you know in a fan and screaming until that baby would just get tired and finally you know go to sleep and not to scream it just it just to be specific this method call blasting they are they're right in front of the subject's face right there screaming into the baby's ears enter a like inches from her face exactly and that's how she started at the beginning with her congregants over time it became more and more violent it wasn't enough just to screen to scare the devils out of people now you had to punch people you had to hold them down to restrain them you had to choke them you had to do everything possible to get rid of that devil and that's when it became extremely violent that's where the people who who recounted their stories would break down to us they would tell us about their injuries and they couldn't go to doctors they couldn't be treated because they knew what would happen so they had to keep it secret but it's those beatings that that really it's still seared into their planes now they can't get rid of those images those nightmares there is a lot of suspense in this tale but it's it's not fiction I mean this is this is a real life accounting of how the church destroyed these lives but you're you're so specific I mean it reads like fiction though you could you've you're recreating dialogue how did you do that we tried to talk to as many people as we could about any particular incident that we wanted to write about let's not often interviewed him together multiple times over a period of five years really we look for please reports department social services child welfare investigation documents we have recordings from inside the church videos so we just tried to to use all the resources that we could find to tell this story in the most compelling way that we could several lawsuits have been brought against the church and its members over the years has anyone been held accountable for the abuse there are five people currently charged with assaulting a former member of the church Matthew Fenner he says that he was beaten to expel his homosexual demons back in two thousand thirteen but so far nobody's been convicted in that case and Matthew fenders waiting for justice the fact that you have the sheriff you have the district attorney all these people who have looked the

Jane Whaley
"department social services" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:27 min | 2 years ago

"department social services" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Show after four clock manly stored in fun all the representing many victims of sex abuse particular childhoods and today they have a client cold Jon LA one done and he was sexually abused by a former priest named Michael Baker and anybody that knows the history of this knows that name he was serial petal file in the Catholic Church in the archdiocese of Los Angeles any confided in carnal Mahony that yes I have abused boys and Mahoney sent them to one of those camps and when he came back put him back in a Paris and it was after he came back that he abused mainly students in all these client we'll be talking about it to John Manley because it's a suit against the archdiocese end against Molly personally any chance of course to the creek Baker come up at the news at four o'clock rinse the vagrants oh by the way I got this email which I thought I'd pass along to you from a listener they came in this afternoon hi you were discussing the homeless who poop on people's property and how upset people are about it when we had those listers on I think one guy was in Venice he couldn't get the sanitation Ellie sanitation clean up the the vagrant Lupin is alleyway right never took nine days yeah this must been talking about that think about that my sister lives in an apartment in a very nice area of Santa Monica the laundry room is downstairs next to the underground parking there is no security gate she was walking down the concrete scare stairs carrying her laundry basket when she slipped and slid down the stairs she realized the vagrant had put on the stairs the poop was all of our backside under her shirt and in her hair she was screaming and crying that's life today yeah gonna carry a laundry basket down the stairs he can't see that well right so that he carried a big basket you can't always see where your Steptoe and son open garage yeah she said this game well so they can get into the living area outside Iraq pretty the common error in well you're asking for that that's where the guys go for shelter nine out and to pass out after they inject their heroin fentanyl they gotta go they gotta go I could've been dog poop a day that all of your sacred to promise there yeah I now meanwhile the nonpartisan legislative analyst's office we don't talk about a much it allegedly what they do is they took a lead they take a look at things dealing with budget and finances and they pass judgment on it which is supposed to be not Democrats not liberal not Republican or conservative and they came out with the opinion that they don't like Gavin Newsom's budget proposal for ending or to do something about homelessness which is all just spending money I knew since proposal falls short of articulating a clear strategy for curbing homelessness in California and basically typical for Gavin Newsom and this year he wants to spend another seven hundred and fifty million dollars now you listen to the show the first part of this with a like either instead of giving it to local governments the money's gonna go to regional administrators will decide how to spend it administrators will be chosen by the state department of social services you've heard us talk about many times on the show the homeless industrial complex the idea that all this money is being shifted around and it ends up in the hands of middle man it's handed out to nonprofit groups and of course he's not going to have to pay these administrators who will be chosen by the department social services to dole out the money recently wanted straighter day they work for the government they work for the private sector they're now going to be employed by the government I don't know who what's a regional administrator administrator walked up the money what what what are they doing to decide who gets by seven hundred and fifty million dollars what are their job what's their job right now how did they end up getting a hold of these millions a tank of wild gas what their job is right now these are people already involved in the homeless industrial complex they'll be called in as experts maybe they work for a nonprofit maybe they work for some other social services agency they'll be tapped because they have the expertise to know how many can be bestsellers to help the homeless community they're all failing course they're all doing their way that's the point of this idea is not working because they will do the one thing that must be done it will always be a failure unless you force people into mental health and drug treatment if you don't so that nothing will ever succeed but this is typical Newsome is spokes all from press secretary name Jess milker says basically if you keep doing what you've done to get the same result meaning they don't want to just hand this money over to local governments like our city etcetera because they believe it's being wasted instead they want regional administrators to dole out but I think we're going to a different answer it's a different guy blown right either either got it's another middle man think about it sure takes a cut sure do you know that his salary is offices salary anybody else connected to me these are big six figure salaries that these are these homeless executives make this is a very lucrative industry to work in a homeless industry and you don't have to show any success every CEO of any company has to make money asked to sell stuff as they have a profit not not these homeless executives thank you just blow the money we could end up with way more homeless and Pat themselves on the back for all the hard work they put it well this is just this is the same my car sitting there simply wasted a billion dollars right nothing changed now to some dancer I'll just I'll just line up more bureaucrats to distribute the money that they in rich the theory is that he thinks the regional administrators will do better returning the money there's no theory they know nothing works they know their ideas don't work they don't have the guts to say we've got to force people into where into drug treatment they have the guts to say that that violates their strange ideology the government can't force people there's no incarceration anymore there's no forced drug treatment no force mental health treatment everyone is free to do whatever they want if they don't volunteer to get help then that we have to live with it that that's their version of of a free society all right when we come this doesn't work we actually have an eighty one year old vagrant who is suing the city of LA and he's upset because of what people are posting on Facebook about him yeah he's been around that long it is that well known to police so there are police officers are going on their own Facebook accounts they deal with residents in their community about the vagrant problem and I guess this guy's been discussed and he doesn't like it he feels harassed that more coming up John can't can't find several markets news Saksi drivers who say their livelihood has taken a hit because of a shift in passenger pick up policies at LA acts are taking their fight to city hall drivers a rattling downtown demanding that they again be allowed to pick up passengers curbside at the airport's terminals a lab in San Diego is trying to get a covert nineteen corona virus.

Michael Baker Jon LA
"department social services" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

07:28 min | 2 years ago

"department social services" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"So if our interpreters do not know what the difference between asylum between refugee they will not be able to convey conveyed the message so we have to So we have to train them. What are these words because while out of these Pro Prophet Prophet Language Agency? They all dying shepherds that they have they bar. All Spanish orangish not Wa- CEELO dish novel or refer. Hugh Hugh said anything to that individual or to the detainee as opposed to you. The chip will. So yes Julie. Soon they which is very different thing than just is not what CEELO. That's at the level gun in our language program to talk about. How do we think about these words? How do we think from the immigration language to court language to the medical language? How do we put it into our words? How do we describe it right because it this is a silo asylum? It's very easy to just translate. Sounds like from Spanish interpret from Spanish to English however for is is very descriptive so we have to train our interpreters but the pro bra for profit Language agencies agencies is not about the human rights of the of of the detainees double making money who gets the bid. I've gotten calls from these companies. Can you just take the calls I can. Because I don't know what's very sample ticket is just take the call supple tick tick so what we're doing is training from a very different point. As as the standard model said that exist in the Spanish language Spanish interpreting schools. We had I to develop our own curricula. We had to develop our own goals Sherri we had to develop everything for ourselves as indigenous people. So it's a lot of work but I think it's so important that were trained because the life of a person depends on us as interpreters if I go to a hospital and I'm not instructed how to give my child medicine in my language I might put them at risk if I go to the court and I don't know how to say asylum. I don't understand the court system. I could be D- be the tool to deport. The person so you have to understand is much western culture and what's happening here in the United States as you do indigenous culture yes you have to understand the western culture very very well and then be able to convert it to an indigenous world and same way in indigent is world worldview to the Western world. I we'll tell you about a case. Amanda his child was taken away and he told me in supple take when they took my children away. The the tears just fell out of my eyes in my face like the rain in August in the region if I interpret that literally it doesn't make any sense to us all right but these are the way the the in the case of suppled fickle. It's how he told me. And when I got when I finally was on the bus the cheers just popped out like the the hale after a huge After the the the rain in in that doesn't make any sense because the sentences offenses are not very clear so I need to be able to convert that into the Western world. So it's In these men when he fell was taken away I mean. He didn't know He. He agreed to meet these. These These what's that the Department Department of Social Services. He went there because they called the police on him. Because the show wasn't growing And when they got there they just like okay. Sign these papers. The kids were taken away and he didn't know what happened. So and and so we need to know both worlds. What department social services to what did the immigration language is what is double Cavalieri otherwise? We're not being useful to indigenous people as interpreters so we really have to be ethical about it and be honest fight. Oh no the lynn the word but then there's The issue that we have is our biggest ally or our biggest enemy will be the Spanish English interpreter. If they notice that we're not making coherent sentences they should stop us and ask. Are you understanding what asylum is. Can I explain it to you. As opposed to just continuing and I mentioned the Spanish English interpreters because there are very few trae lingo interpreters In the US most of them are bilingual so they have to work with Relate interpreter which is a Spanish English interpreter reporter and that makes it much more difficult any that Spanish and English interpreter just continues to interpret it without questioning. If we're if they're seeing that we're borrowing allowed a Spanish word they should stop and this is who you have to work with so instead of saying this interpreters joined they're interpreting adequately stop and say how can I help you like. How can I explain asylum for you are you? Do you know where You know the calendar is in Immigration Court so so we have a lot of challenges. So we're going to solve them little by little as you stand there in Guatemala City. Rachel Nolan if you can talk about what most surprised prized you as you did this piece. For the New Yorkers you did your research translation crisis at the border and what you feel. What are people saying needs is to happen now? I was shocked at the extent of the problem. Frankly when I called legal of the ACLU and asked him you know. To what extent are the issues that are affecting all all asylum a Central American asylum speakers in the United States affecting indigenous language speakers. He said it's enormous their disproportionately affected all of the problems. That spanish-language asylum secret face are exacerbated. If they speak my language is so just to get one example when we were speaking on the phone Legal of the Aclu told me that of the kind of worst most cases of families that were separated at the border under trump's zero tolerance policy. And I will remind everyone that that policy is officially over but the separations are ongoing at least nine hundred families have been separated since the official end of that policy over a year ago told me that of those over four thousand families Emily's that were separated and one parent at least was deported. Back to Wadham all of their country of origin without tiles of those four thousand cases legal learned of the ACLU estimated that ten twenty percent affected Mayan language speaking watermelons that's more. That's not just the Guatemalan asylum-seekers. That's all of the families separated so the kind of scale of the problem was what most surprise me. When I began reporting this Rachel Nolan's piece in the New Yorker is a translation crisis? The border will link to it at Tomography. Now Dot Org O.. Delia Ramirez is up tech interpreter with the by National Front of indigenous organizations for the full conversation go to Democracy Dot Org Monday Dr Martin Luther King Special..

United States Rachel Nolan ACLU Hugh Hugh Wa- CEELO Immigration Court Julie Department Department of Socia Sherri Dr Martin Luther Guatemala City Aclu Delia Ramirez Wadham Amanda official
"department social services" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:44 min | 3 years ago

"department social services" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Their lives we help DSS of the department social services make decisions to help bring the soldiers home she's reunited seven hundred families still forty five percent of the time mom and dad don't work out even as a non profit family recovery program of Baltimore faces the same challenges as any other small business and she says she doesn't have a product to sell except the opportunity to strengthen families and make people productive members of society and that's the Bloomberg small business report on the the storm just hit and we went from donating to the food bank hunger is a story we can and ended at feeding America dot org brought to you by feeding America and the ad council from the Bloomberg interactive brokers studio this is Bloomberg best its forty seven minutes past the hour now it's time for Bloomberg opinion informed perspectives and expert data driven commentary on breaking news editor Taraz Rafael joined Bloomberg's Nathan Hager to talk politics as voters head to the polls tomorrow for the UK's general election she covers European politics and economics for Bloomberg the head of election day Taraz opinion polls are getting interesting yeah they've tightened to somewhat toward the final days of the campaign and I think that's to be expected it certainly what happened in twenty seventeen the YouGov poll that was of very much awaited and came out late last night showed the Tories still with the probable majority of about twenty eight seats but down from the not quite land slide but let's say you know far more robust majority that it showed a couple of weeks back so you know that might be a little worrying for the conservatives on the other hand they didn't want to go in to vote day with you know hands down lead that was so enormous that some of their voters might think well why bother I'll just stay home so I think from Conservative Party headquarters they won't be too discouraged by that so is there still a concern for conservatives that some labor voters who perhaps might have been sitting on their hands during opinion polling might surprise everyone come out tomorrow I think ill labor voters are likely to come out it's such an important election I think turnout was up in twenty seventeen I would expect it to be up again tomorrow and either there is signs of their signs that there that there's been a shift in these final days they've been a few events that I think have registered a lot with people both again score but on the anti semitism issue but against Johnson after the London Bridge attack when he seemed to show you show up a sort of callousness toward toward one of the victims the father of the of the victim claimed that Johnson had used the attack for political ends there was another case of a couple of days back where either Johnson seem to refuse to look at a picture of a four year old boy lying on a bed of coats on the hospital floor because there was no bed available so those are the sorts of things and in the final days might it might cut through of for at least those voters that had not yet made up their mind because they're about the character and the trustworthiness of the potential candidates from leader rather than sort of the big issues themselves when you talk about that four year old boy getting treated on the Florida National Health Service has been tied into brags it to some extent in in terms of the debate in the U. K. but our domestic issues driving voters more than the question of which party can deliver right exit okay so I think that's the question that we can only really answer after we get a result is this a box election or is this an election about the National Health Service which has been I'd say the second most discussed issue over the course of the six week campaign that's the issue that the labor party wants voters to have for most of mine and they are promising a swathe of new spending plans although the conservatives are also promising new spending for the NHS it is I'd say far more modest increases in some pending than what we're hearing from labor so either the flavor gets its way people go to the polls and they think about the health care system and about education about domestic issues if Boris Johnson gets his way of we're going to the polls sinking let's get brexit done first and then we can have a debate on these other issues and I think that's the the the that's the question that will only really be resolved once we have tallied the votes and seeing how things break especially in the north of the country the Midlands the say fifty or so labor marginals those areas that the labor party held but thirty nine of those voted leave in twenty sixteen so those are the areas that they're really fighting for in the conservative camp that was Bloomberg opinion editor Taraz Rafael you can read more on this and other stories from Bloomberg opinion at Bloomberg dot com slash opinion and on the terminal by typing OPI and go now let's check in with the Bloomberg affiliates to find out what's happening on the nation's most influential radio stations I'm Lisa Parenti on WCCO in Minneapolis I'm reporting a locally based General Mills changing the shape of its Cheerios into hearts to prop talks about heart health I'm Tom Busby NO WTIC in Hartford all be reporting on Connecticut based health insurance giant cigna putting one of its units up for sale I'm corny Donahoe on whoa whoa in fort Wayne General Motors redesign Chevy Tahoe to be about six inches longer I'm Jeff Ballenger and on cocoa in San Diego I'm reporting Padres uniforms will display the Nike logo next season thanks Jeff game stop the ailing video game retailer plunged as much as nineteen percent after posting a third quarter loss that was larger than even the most dire Wall Street estimate it CEO George Sherman blamed the results on an unprecedented decline in gaming hardware sales Bloomberg equities reporter Ryan vest delica discussed gamestop earlier with Bloomberg's Tom Kean and Paul Sweeney so right what happened at gamestop well there is very weak results last night like you mentioned they cut their outlook really again massive declines in same store sales and overall growth this is really a story that's being hit by all sides here so not only is this a brick and mortar store at a time when people are increasingly buying online but is the brick and mortar store that's dedicated to video games at a time when most of the real action in video gaming is you know.

"department social services" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

04:08 min | 3 years ago

"department social services" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"One oh four seven FM fifteen past seven o'clock Tuesday morning November the nineteen that I think it looks like it's Startin to let up a little bit out there but don't expect to see any sunshine today maybe a little bit every now and then but a mostly cloudy day to day once we get these showers out here by about nine to nine or ten o'clock this morning today's high only forty seven degrees more holding steady at just forty status out the code is being subjected to some online roasting after unveiling their latest anti math campaign that's okay they say because they say it's working the campaign was launched by the state department social services and it's simply titled meth we're on it that's the name of the campaign math we're on it features a new website billboards and ads with people frankly saying that their meth users now the effort which has cost almost half a million Bucks so far was widely mocked on social media following its release many slammed the simplicity of the messaging criticize spending so much taxpayer money on the campaign built around three what words math we're on it that's actually for words South Dakota governor Christie no one shot back on Twitter with the perfect response the point of the campaign was to raise awareness so you know what it's working so I guess we really can't argue with that but what a campaign title math we're on it I mean who came up with this the same people who gave us cooler and warmer you know sounds like in Congress looks to avoid another government shut down here we go again fox's Sean Lynch L. the latest from DC the house is expected to vote today on a deal that would extend government funding for another four weeks and avoid another shutdown house and Senate leaders have struck a deal on a continuing resolution that keeps the government open until December twentieth and is not put any restrictions on border wall funding something president trump demanded in exchange for his signature the house is expected to pass the measure and send it to the Senate just ahead of Thursday night's funding deadline but Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer has suggested president trump could refused to sign it over his frustrations with the Democrats impeachment inquiry in Washington Sean Lancel fox news thinking after seven o'clock now Noah says last month was the second hottest October on record agency says the average temperature across global land and ocean services was nearly two degrees above the twentieth century average it was also just a fraction shy of tying the warmest October from two thousand fifteen notices the five worst October's of all taken place since two thousand and fifteen the report notes two thousand nineteen is on track to become the second hottest year to date with average global temperatures making this the second warmest January through October period in one hundred and forty years while California is suing E. cigarette maker jul over its advertising claiming that the company intentionally targeted teens in this marketing campaigns the AG there says pool also failed to properly disclose warnings about its products risk for cancer birth defects and reproductive harm according to the U. S. centers for disease control and prevention Jules sales now make up more than sixty four percent of the E. cigarette market here in the United States in two thousand nineteen the CDC identify more than two thousand cases of long illnesses linked to vaping forty two deaths associated so far with the cigarettes or vaping products use of California is now suing the E. cigarette maker jul apparently Louisiana was targeted in a ransomware cyber attack yesterday that led many of the state's government websites in email systems to be shut down and that of course disrupted business operations and online services across the entire state agencies some services started returning by the afternoon but the governor there John bell and which are just won reelection his office said that it could take days to restore all websites and online operations Edwards is office said the systems were taken off line as a precaution when a cyber threat was detected state police there and federal agencies are investigating the attempted attacks a Louisiana targeted in a ransom where attacks so I guess governor John bill and would celebration of reelection was short lived twenty minutes after seven o'clock which is the roadways.

forty seven degrees sixty four percent twenty minutes forty years two degrees four weeks