17 Burst results for "Department Of Medicine"

"department medicine" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

09:30 min | 1 year ago

"department medicine" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Favorite artists. Welcome back to Minnesota Military radio. I'm your host. Timelines We've been talking to Dr Diana Bridges, who is with the university, Minnesota and the Minneapolis V, a health care, and she's working on a lamp study to test the effectiveness of non drug approaches to chronic pain management in military and veteran health. Here. Delivery systems and doctor, could you just, uh, tell us again? The lamp study stands for learning to apply mindfulness to pain. What is the study and in what are you trying to achieve? By studying chronic pain and our veterans in our in our military. Yes. Well, as you know, veterans are disproportionately affected by chronic pain up to 50% of male veterans and up to 78% of female veterans Report teen and we're trying to get away from solely drug approaches. We're testing three. We're testing two different interventions. Ah, mindfulness intervention that you couldn't do on an app over your phone supported by a trained facilitator. And an eight session group where you're learning mindfulness and you're discussing in, agreed your experiences with the trained facilitator and the mindfulness is delivered by an instructor via video. But the great part is it could be delivered by many different people. In BA, we can use people called whole health coaches. You don't have to be super trained on ninth illness, and they could teach these different skills to veterans to manage their pain and their conditions that can't go along with pain like Anxiety. Tucci against four Doctor. We discussed mindfulness in the first segment a little bit, but my understanding is that is about learning how to become more aware of your body thoughts and feelings and by learning that Is the premise that that can help you deal with chronic pain in a fashion that allows you to cut back on some of the opioids and drugs. Well, there's a lot of studies showing that mindfulness based interventions improved pain, A specially people functioning, their ability to function will attain because that teen interference And also a lot of those what we call it. Common disease existed. You know, conditions that go along with teen so it can really help and we're trying to figure out why it worked. There's not as much research about why we just know it works, and one thing we're looking at is this could help Candace help people engage and what we come or death behavior and less now that the behavior so instead of kind of catastrophe, izing and clenching and getting stressed And really tightening up and also maybe retreating and being more socially isolated. We want people to do what we call adaptive behavior, so exercising engaging with other people and having more positive self talk. We're trying to instill knowledge skills and also believed to make people feel like you can do things even with the pain. The doctor for purposes of this study. What type of entry veteran are you looking forward to enroll as a participant? Well, we're trying Tomo enroll veterans of the large scale. So what would you have me identify veterans from the left chronic health record based on whether they have a couple of crap, painful chronic pain conditions, I think, 18 months apart. And then, um, pretty and one of the sites and then we send people postcard in the mail, and then we let them know that we're going to be something of an email. So at this point, if you're especially if you're a woman at the Minneapolis seeing probably will get a postcard inviting you to go online and see if you qualify through some other questions, and if they're male veteran was sending it to a lot of people. Watch for the postcard. Right now. We're not recruiting people based on them coming to us, But we hope if this is successful, then we could roll it out to more people and anybody could participate. So, doctor. If if you're chosen to Tombo part of the survey, they start out by taking some surveys. How does this work? Yeah, you start out and you first do an online screener to make sure you have the phone. You'd be able to participate in eight months on this sessions and another session to help you get oriented toward zoom. And then if you call it then you take a baseline survey to measure your pain. And these other conditions that baseline Then we randomized you if you qualify, and then give you a call to see what we call you. We randomized you on the phone and You will be placed in one of three conditions either usual care, which means we'll get the interrogation into intervention in the end you your phone, but you'll just do care of usual. The mobile condition. Where do the whole intervention your phone and you have three calls with the facilitator and then the group condition where you participate in basically nine groups with other veterans. Yes, you were speaking with Diana Burgess, A Ph. D professor of department, Medicine University, Minnesota and With the Minneapolis V, a health care system on Minnesota military radio. The doctor wants their Children. They go through a study. You talked about those three groups and indicated they'd be placed in one of three groups. That first group once again was group mindfulness is that I understand that's a nine week nine weekly 90 minute interactive sessions. And is that online? What do you What do you talk about in those sessions? So this great was very structured. We have a facilitator to start that by welcoming somebody and welcoming everybody, and then they always start out with the loose. Um Discussion, and they do work The reflections. There's a lot of practice, so there's always a video about the topic of the week. It might be, um, I'm looking at our manual and it might be managing You go. Managing your pain through what? You save yourself. And then we have practice. We have group discussion and O s 01 week is the mind body connection, And then there's um Stinky back and also interaction. Sorry. I sorry, Dr Hwang. Thank you. And the second group is mobile Mindful Mission That's eight weekly 30 to 60 minute sessions. You tell us about that old man? Yes. So, So the mobile session, you do the same stuff, except you don't have to group experience. So you will watch educational videos on your phone. You will practice mindfulness using guided meditations, And then you will do something called mindful movement. This is the same stuff you do when you're in the group. Except you don't have that group and directed component. You also everybody gets a workbook where they do reflection exercises. And if you're in the act Group, the mobile group, you'll be talking to a trained facilitator in the beginning the middle of the end, just tow. Learn about the program and somebody answer your questions and kind of orient you When Dr the third group is normal activity of nine weeks, so they get some instructions on what to do and how to be aware of mindfulness. No, so that it's just usual. You got that your usual business and all brick. You fill out a survey in the beginning at 10 weeks, six months, 12 months And then after 12 months, the people in the usual care group can get access to the AP and the workbook so they will be able to have access to the program. After it's all over and that usual character This has died so we could systematically see whether the other programs our secure e er to doing nothing different than what you normally do. And doctor. What do you hope this project will lead to I would really like veterans to have an additional tool to manage your pain and another tool in their tool kit. And doctor. You told us earlier that that you're trying to connect with women Veterans men veterans. We should watch for a postcard in the mail. And if you're suffering from chronic pain Respond was put to the postcard and get into the study and let's see what we can learn. Yes, exactly. Doctor has been fascinating talking to today. I hope your opener study goes well and we'll look forward to a follow up to hear how the study is gone when you're on the other end of it and what you've learned on how to help our veterans and I'd like to thank you for joining us today. Thank you so much for inviting me. That was Diana Burgess, the doctor with the university, Minnesota in the Minneapolis V, a health care center on Minnesota. Military radio. Please stay with us. When we come back. We're going to meet one of our newest yellow ribbon networks..

Diana Burgess Diana Bridges 18 months Tucci 10 weeks 12 months three groups nine week 30 Minneapolis 90 minute nine weeks six months Hwang Minnesota Military eight months Medicine University 60 minute nine groups one
"department medicine" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"department medicine" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You could do it. No one gets a diploma alone. If you're thinking of finishing your high school diploma, you have help find free adult education classes near you at Finish your diploma dot or g'kar. That's finished your diploma dot org's brought to you another potential vaccines Success story today with enthusiasm. How does the modern a candidate compare with the Fizer vaccine? We got results on a week ago and what lies between successful tests on the one hand and distribution on the other? Welcome now in infectious disease expert she's Dr Celine Gounder, clinical assistant professor of N Y U Langone Department medicine and a member of the President elect's covert task force. So welcome, Doctor. It's great to have you back with us. So give us your read right now on this Madona candidate as opposed to the Fizer candidate. There are some key differences. Both the Visor and the Madonna vaccines rely on Marin a technology which is ah, previously unused. This is somewhat unchartered territory. These will be the very first vaccines that will be using that are based on this technology. Both of them appear to be highly effective, at least based on the data that's been shared with us so far. One key difference, though, between the visor and Madonna vaccines is the temperature at which the Moderna vaccine needs to be. Store advisor Vaccine We've heard needs to be deep freezed minus 70 degrees Celsius. That really is not something that the average doctor's office can accommodate. The Moderna vaccine, in contrast, can be frozen or refrigerated at more normal range of temperatures for up to 30 days..

"department medicine" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

05:59 min | 2 years ago

"department medicine" Discussed on WJR 760

"You know you spend a lot of time trying to figure it out? That's better. You're Veronica. Veronica. Okay, Thank you. All right on a more serious note. While the election has certainly dominated everybody's focus and concentration, Colbert 19 continues to surge in ways unseen. Here to 400,000 cases in a day. Nationally Now Michigan Seeing some ridiculously high numbers, we go to Dr Daniel Havlicek, Michigan State University Department Medicine Division of Infectious diseases. He's been great with us in previous shows answering some questions, Dr Havlicek great to have you back. Thank you. Thank you. I promise. I won't ask any election questions, No bad song. Prison questions. No bad some prison questions, either. Although thank you for remembering and referencing Friday, there's a door. Sorry. So here's my question. We are now I looked at the rates in March. When things were rampant, and we were not wearing masks and now We look at November. Things are rampant again, and despite the fact that there's still plenty of people who don't like to wear a mask, by and large, we are wearing masks everywhere. We were not wearing masks before. So how is it that with all these masks on Our numbers were like doubling now. When it was bad back in the spring. Can you explain that? You know, I wish I could, and I'm sure the state And national health departments. Where stake it to, um There is more testing number one, You know, then that's going to find more positives, of course. I do think, um, distancing, you know, still needs to be on the issue, and I think that the issue of school's going back and some people being Kind of sick but yet not really feeling sick and then spreading Cove. It has been an issue to college campuses of as you know is, you know they've been problems and and we've got to get out of that mindset. It's okay to be a little sick because it's just not. You know, people that are a little sick with this until somebody else and that's You know, that's just what we have to go with our mindset, I think right, But how do we know the difference that we're in November when sniffles or common and nobody wants to panic over everything? How do we know the difference when we're a little sick with Cove in or just when we're a little sick, which didn't go away? It's not like every form of sickness now is covert. So where's the line between those two? Yeah, That's a great question, I think depends a little bit on what our ultimate goal is. If our ultimate goal is to try to get rid of Cove it we would have to assume everybody who has a little sick is covert until proven otherwise. And that would be the only waited to really do it. In answer to the other question that one of things that I was thinking you were going to bring up and then you did. Um, I'm not sure that we are fully in control of asymptomatic carriers who spread the disease. And you know, that's something that is still going around with. Ah, positions and epidemiologists. You know how common is the person who is carrying the virus doesn't know they have it. And then they're spreading disease, either family members or, you know people in restaurants her whatever so that, But that theory Wipes out even your suggestion about being overly cautious when a little sick must we have to assume that when you can't even tell that anybody is sick, what are they supposed to go on? If they're if they are, you know if you're in your own home and you you're seemingly healthy and you feel fine and you have no symptoms. What are you supposed to do? Socially distant from your wife's social distance from your kids? Because there's still a possibility that you might have it. Even if you if you have no symptoms. How are people supposed to even get through regular life orbit? Forget about opening and closing the economy Just just using the bathroom? You know anything like that. We can't all live Permanently. 10 FT. Apart from one another Yeah, and I I don't know. I Read that Slovakia is actually implemented a program where they're going to test everybody in the country now, and I saw it every day. Period. They Yeah, they came back. Forget what it was. It was about. Was about. Ah, I want to say a 4% contagion rate or something like that. But, yeah, they tested 2 2.5 million people on one day and and some more on another day. But what does that prove? That just gives you a snapshot of that day, right? It changed that three days later, right? Well, it may or may not. I mean, if you have isolated if you've identified everybody that's carrying the virus. On that day, and those people have to quarantine for X number of days. And then maybe that number is 21 or 28, not 14. But if you do that Perhaps. The virus will burn out in that population. It will continue to transmit. It has to continue to transmit, of course to obviously continue. Um so You know, that is one approach and I think in the next month or so That, um, outcome is going to be known and will have Teo say, Well, gosh, maybe we should do that in the United States. Well, it's a lot easier to do. I've got the story in front of me. A lot of you should do in Slovakia, where they have 5.4 million total people. Then in the United States, we have 330 plus million people. They gave tests Auntie gin tests to 3.6.

Slovakia Dr Daniel Havlicek United States Veronica Colbert Michigan State University Depa Michigan asymptomatic Teo
"department medicine" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"department medicine" Discussed on KGO 810

"Epidemiologist. More information they got. If you have to look at something right now that you think that we still might be getting wrong. What would it be? Something that is important, Maybe we that we might steer another direction in the near future. You know, people sometimes think. Well, I think that we might get wrong is the thing we got wrong in May, Which is? You know, Marjan, April Terrible. May was pretty good. We say we're out of the woods were doing okay? And then June and July were pretty bad. And so, September is is the analog of May. The country has come down the really bad hot spots over the summer, mostly in the south, but a little bit of California for Southern California. Have gotten better. And so what? We get wrong now, as we let our guards down again and say, Oh, it's not so bad. Even still pretty bad. I mean, we're still 35,000 cases the day and we still have around 1000 deaths today, but we've sort of become Innards. Those numbers. Those numbers would have been shocking and flabbergasting six months ago, and now it's like, okay, it's another day of cove it so what we could get wrong is saying, you know, not so bad. It's so much better than it was over the summer. It's so much better than it was in March in April, and then we'll get slammed again because the virus couldn't care less that you had a good month last month. It's the same virus mutations are pretty trivial. It's just this contagious. It's just a deadly And and and for the vast majority of us, particularly in a place like San Francisco. That's gotten off pretty, You know, we've done very well. Very, very, very few of us have antibodies, so We're completely set up for precisely the same thing to happen again. If we let our guard down, it's looking like that. Maybe starting to happen in the Midwest, San Francisco and the Bay Area has done miraculously. Well, sort this whole thing. In part because we did the right things early, our politicians to the right thing, and the people are doing the right thing. The total number of deaths in San Francisco since this thing began is 92 in the city of San Francisco in Los Angeles. It's up to 6300 in New York City. It's it's 25,000. So we have done really, really well, but we can't You know, I may sound like I'm contradicting myself Having gone to Florida. You have to be thoughtful about the risk that you take. But don't don't take risks with the jettisoning the mask. Or going to parties with large numbers of people you saw there was a big outbreak at a wedding in Maine. You know if if that's that's where we will get it wrong, we'll let our guard down. We'll forget will say, Oh, you know, we got through the bad part of the summer. We're okay and we'll have another think, Serge. Great stuff, Doc. I really appreciate your time. You get your looks from your mom. I was looking at this picture. You guys took a lot of like, I think you probably saw Twitter. I said, you know my dad who's 90? He says I know I'm going to die. But the one thing I want to stay alive for us to vote. And I was very proud of him for that. Now you know my best to them and you stay safe as well. Please come back to you as well Soon. Okay. Thank you. Dr Much. Take care Doctor. Bob Walker Again. Chair UCSF Department Medicine, MD. Author of a book the digital doctor. Ah, and just you know to me what he just said. And the way he approached this Just Can you imagine if we had AH, leader who embraced that? To get through this. Anyway. All right. We're going to talk about that coming up on a little bit about Ah, a super spreader event that happened And the weird part about it was is that the people that got sick and died weren't even at the event. We'll tell you about that and your phone calls. 80 88 10 got a lot more to go..

San Francisco Epidemiologist. More informati California Marjan Twitter New York City Bob Walker Midwest UCSF Department Medicine Bay Area Serge Dr Much Maine Florida MD Los Angeles
"department medicine" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

08:26 min | 2 years ago

"department medicine" Discussed on KTRH

"Go to Dr Joe Gulati dot com for More information about what we have, and we will be talking about. I hope you enjoyed Michael Garfield. The last segment. He is always full of energy and never know what he's going to say. All righty. Well, as I had said earlier. The next person, Dr. Ayman Quigley has been on the programme and he is one of the few people that was patient enough to die Elin during the years he lived in Ireland in the middle of the night, calling into Your health first, But let me just give you a little background on Dr quickly before we get him on. He isn't currently The David M. Underwood, chair of medicine and Digestive Disorders Department medicine professor of medicine. At Houston Methodist Hospital. He is the past president of the American College of Guest or no guest room, neurology and the world gastroenterology. Organization former editor of the American Journal of Gastroenterology. Former Dean Medical School in Cork, Ireland. Author researcher. And All around. Awesome physician. Dr Quigley, Welcome again to your health first. How are you? Very well. Thank you. Great to be with you again, Joe. Maybe a year or two since we were together, But we've we've done this many times before. In a ball. George? Yes, yes. And I and I, and I believe that the one thing you and I both share outside of patient care is education. And this is this is the crux of the programme here now. In all of the Possible topics that I could ask you to talk about constipation. Is the one tonight so Well, This is a no bars topic for this program, so I guess before we really dive into it. A lot of people say I'm constipated, but there may not be constipated. So really, what would you say is your definition of what constipation is for everybody listening tonight? First of all. I applaud you, Joe for breaking this topic up because I think it's one that's unfortunate he gets doesn't get the other time it showed because it really is very distressing from for many, many people. I think you bring up a very important point in that's the definition of constipation. Constipation means many different things to many people, and more things we have positions fails to appreciate is that it does mean different things. For many years. We were fixed to this kind of Victorian concept. The constipation men's That you didn't have a bomb would want every day or every second day way. No, no, that that's actually on the minority of the problem of constipation. For many people, constipation symptom means that they had difficulty having abound open tonight. In the essence of the problem. They have to strain They feel it's not complete. They have to try and try again or some people very distressed. They get the arch to go on. They just can't do anything and that's very distressing for people and can lead to a lot of problems. So I think would be I'm a lot more flexible in understanding of constipation, and even the guidelines on the base. Bodies that come up with these technicians know, acknowledge that we have to be a lot more. Broad, if you like, in our concept of constipation and brought in a way that truly understands, or patients herself in problem. Well, you know that approach, which I fully endorse, requires two things. One is listening on the part of the physician or having a A set of probing questions to clarify it and many times the patients when when we do ask them about how often or how much straining or what symptoms. They almost seem a little caught off guard to say, Well, you know, if I had known this question ahead of time, I would have prepared for you a little bit better. What do you think of that? That on the physician side, we're not asking the right questions or spending the time and patients aren't quite Able to describe what really is happening, Probably because they're embarrassed. What were you actually hit on two of the most important issues in this whole area on the first, Unfortunately, where we've let people down on that is not listening. And I wanted things I tell our students and our training is all the time. They say. Also source constipated assaults of diarrhea, I think. Well, what exactly does that mean? And they look at me that I got two heads because that actually is the essence of the problem. Right. And I think when you have a patient sitting with you whether your primary care, doctor or specialist and this guy got constipation, you must fully understand exactly what the patient means by that before they leave the the consulting room. If you haven't done that it actually failed a patient because you're likely To make decisions on their behalf, which may actually take them and completely the wrong direction. And you also like to prescribe things for them, which may be totally useless. So I think that's the first part of your quest. The other part actually is very important. I think we should be more proactive in terms of top looking after patients and that another was teeing up some of these issues, perhaps by questionnaires ahead of time drops by, you know, today's pieces of a patient education before had to So that they can think about things about what exactly happens when I try to have about books, Right? Right. Do I have to strain? How long? How long am I sitting there kind of a bomb movement is painful. Do I feel that it's completely have to try again. Those are questions which you know, because the that I private interest in. We asked routinely, but I think it doesn't take very long. Actually, I think you can make fatal errors on the pavement on work, but I think you make serious errors. In terms of assessment without me, if you don't have those questions. Well, you know, the one the sort of that the sister set the questions here. Which is, I think part of this whole discussion here. Is for patients to describe for me or for you what their stool looks like. And there again, there are some patients that literally will come with a sketchbook. Of the stool and others are flabbergasted that we're asking, And they will say will excuse me. I just am not a looker. And I have to say Look, start looking, because that may help out what do you say to the people that are not Looking But we actually know in our my consulting rooms when we were seeing patients who have a little chart in each of the rooms is called the Crystals to scale. Yes, on bits, of course, is a city in England and the reason for the true scale of many years ago. I'm connection off standing condition, gastroenterologist and chemical researcher had developed the Bristol stool scale whereby they have little pictures. You know, cause only diarrhea to the hardest of hearts Tool and Dick. Score them and you can look at it. And in fact, one of the things I found Amazing, Recep. You know this charges up in in our examination rooms before it went through the patient's A well I'm a 35. And you're already you're off to a great start. Yes, because 11 thing that has been discovered is that that crystals to game Actually, Carl. It's very well with the function of the column that I think that's been a major, very simple, very completely Patients orientated device, but it's actually very helpful, and I think it's it's the ultimate ice breaker in a sense to say OK, instead of getting graphic with everything, just 0.1 through five. Tell me where you're at here. And it gets down now, when? When you look at the statistics, you know everybody from the beach to the various medical societies say about 2.5 million people suffer constipation. I would almost think that you could almost double that number..

constipation Dr Joe Gulati Dr. Ayman Quigley Ireland researcher American Journal of Gastroente Patients orientated Michael Garfield Houston Methodist Hospital American College of Guest David M. Underwood professor of medicine president Digestive Disorders Department Elin Cork Dean Medical School editor George Carl
"department medicine" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"department medicine" Discussed on KTRH

"Cut You grandma killer Michael Very live at 8 A.m. and 5 P.m.. Weekdays on news radio 7 40. Welcome back everybody. Dr Joe Galotti. Every Sunday. We're here to raise your health. One listener at a time. That is our Amato. Go to Dr Joe Gilady dot com for more information about what we have, and we'll be talking about I hope you enjoyed Michael Garfield. The last segment. He is always full of energy and never know what he's going to say. All righty. Well, as I had said earlier. The next person, Dr. Ayman Quigley has been on the programme and he is one of the few people that was patient enough to die Elin during the years he lived in Ireland in the middle of the night, calling into Your health first, But let me just give you a little background on Dr quickly before we get him on. He isn't currently The David M. Underwood, chair of medicine and Digestive Disorders Department medicine professor of medicine. At Houston Methodist Hospital. He is the past president of the American College of Guest or no guest room, neurology and the world gastroenterology. Organization former editor of the American Journal of Gastroenterology. Former Dean Medical School in Cork, Ireland. Author researcher..

"department medicine" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

07:09 min | 2 years ago

"department medicine" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Just randomly stamp or blood test and then throw everybody on the same starting dose. And, you know, watch to see them get a bad reaction or a big, you know, Welt on their arm when they get an allergy shots, so yeah, What we do is a great deal More specific and You know, we're on the same page with the lack of stress is hit specificity with some of the testing, that's you know, covered, or that has been done. And unfortunately, health insurance companies are covering the most of this, right. Well, health insurance companies will cover the intradermal test. Absolutely. We've seen that all the time because that's the gold standard. So I remember. Health insurance companies were not there to cover everything that you want to do. They're there to take a lot of money and figure out how not to pay out. So even though there are tests that are great for you, and there are procedures that are great for you. Insurance companies don't want TTO lose. You know what would be some of their profit so That's typically what happens. In some other time when we can touch up some other things. Thanks. Absolutely. Thank you for your call. Great information, So, Yeah, I've been saying this for such a long time. It's nice to hear that people that are searching for something beyond the basic type of testing. That really doesn't give us enough information. Another interesting corollary. Many years ago. A company that Came to my office wanted me to do or by their machine to do allergy testing. And I said, Okay, let me see how your machine works. So we had a couple of patients. A couple of staff. And we did the blood. And as the blood respond in the centrifuge, they put little drops of the blood into these different chambers. And then in those chambers had, you know allergens. And so your antibodies in your blood were meant to bind to the allergy. And then they put this device is trey into a machine and it would read. You know how many antibodies are bound? Roughly. So if the liquid look very cloudy and clumpy obviously it looked like there are a great tomb or allergens and more of an allergy response. And as we did that I also had allergy testing done intradermal on the same people for those same substances. So in doing that, that machine would have a lot of zeros, which means they didn't pick up any allergy in those individuals. There were very few people that were class one on that machine or class, too. But the people who are zeros on the blood test machine were either twos or threes on skin test. And if there were once there were two threes or fours on skin tests, which again goes to prove my point. And we did this as a little. In office study to show that the blood can tell you what the skin test can, and that's because you don't have every allergen in your blood and antibody. Rather binding and showing up right near the needle when that small amount of blood is strong. So important to think about 70% of your immune system's response is in your gut and ability to find reaction. So there are so many people that have delayed food allergies that I'll realize it when we Discover that when we start to correct things, people remains that just changing their diet can change. They're pictures significantly. Okay, Forlines room. But if you'd like to call and ask a question you could do so now 108 for eight W A. B C 108 for 89222 And we'll get you up on the air. So again, a variety of great studies out there and we take a look at this. You know all the time. Make it three fatty acids. Yet another study about omega three fatty acids, fish and taken decreased risk of heart failure. This comes from the American Journal Clinical Nutrition Research done a department medicine. Brigham and Women's Hospital at have ID. Medical school for all of my boss, tonight's sending you out a little fellow in a case control study in 1572 subjects. In a large cohort study involving 19,000 and 97 stuff subjects. An inverse relationship was found between A good foster lipids, the D A with a decreased risk of heart failure. And fish consumption more than once per month was associated with the reduced risk of heart failure. As well. So important to hear these things so that you can adjust check the fatty acids in your blood looked to see which are out of range. Correct that with nutrients. The EPA Of course. Olive oil is a great oil for you. So if they're only two hours you could ever have the rest of your life You'd want have olive oil. And the because they have so much, you know, benefits. Another great study, which we have to post in the office. Exposure to mercury increases the risk of heart attack and because I've been talking about heavy metals for literally 32 years Because in Practice when I first started to go to every nutrition course I could find and I got certified in HK elation therapy. Um Every time I would go to some of these really good cutting edge courses. Which, of course over the years have been proven to be. A brilliant information. You know, years ago, people say, oh, heavy metals. Don't worry about it all that it would believe it. And then year after year after year after year, the studies have mounted into such an amazing body of literature. That we have talked about heavy metals with everybody that comes in and we test him through blood and urine. So this is a great study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, talking about heavy metals and specifically mercury. With myocardial infarction. Now medals bind to LDL, the bad cholesterol and become a phone cell that foam cell gets stuck to the lining of the blood vessel wool and increases. The plaque buildup. Significantly. So Any of the medals that do this. Will increase the risk of plaque and I'm not even talking about 50 other risk factors like bacteria viruses, high cholesterol triglycerides, high LDL low HDL. Higher amounts of the small LDL column microns all of these things So we look at all of those toe. You know what we have to change? So this study showed that the people that Were exposed to the medals and had the largest amount of the medals in the Mercury on board had the highest risk of heart attack. Even a small change in exposure to the mercury. Produced a significant decrease in the inflammatory mechanism that can lead to The plaque in the heart attack, so Important, understand? There are things that are in your body that were exposed to all the time. Not knowingly. Of course that can create damage, and that's why people come into the office and they're shocked. I can't believe I had AH heart attack a mini stroke stroke. You know, these things are evolving without you realizing it, so you won't understand what your body's doing and create..

American Journal of Clinical N myocardial infarction American Journal Clinical Nutr HK Forlines room Brigham TTO EPA W A. B C Women's Hospital
"department medicine" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:33 min | 2 years ago

"department medicine" Discussed on KGO 810

"Than a woman that you have to smooth morning. Meet Nikki looking. My name is Nikki. And the Good morning. It is Wednesday, July 1st 20. I can't believe it. Brad Burkhardt, We have made it to another month. Wow, It's just what I feel like. I'm stuck in at the end of February and March. You know what's interesting is, you know right around this time. I just think about because you know in this business, it could become ground Hog's Day with stories that we do So we're coming up on a holiday weekend. So normally be planning for fourth of July barbecue parties or you know where you're going to be travelling to will be talking to Triple a about how many people will be hitting the roads and flying during the holiday. I know, right? That's not happening this year 2020 is not going to be a year of these types of stories. Instead, we're kind of stuck in this ground Hog's day of Oh, no, We're seeing more cases, and it's like we've gone all the way back to February and March. You know, in numbers wise and part of the problem with what you're describing is that Talking about and planning a vacation or planning things with friends and family for upcoming holidays is almost as if you're experiencing holiday. It's therapeutic to just think about in plan and talk about with friends and family about getting together and so having that absent in your life, it just slows everything down even more. I know, even though some people like my daughter things this year's gone by so quickly. I d'oh now that I've said the words July 1st 2020. I do feel like this year's kind of going quickly. I can't wait to get to November. Just, you know, I really want to just I want that election to come and go and just know what's goingto happen. Just let you know. Coming up at seven o'clock. I will be speaking with Westwood ones. Bob Costantini. Joe Biden is ah! Coming out swinging at President Trump saying, You know he's not fit to be president really questioning the president's fitness? Of course, President Trump is still getting heat over the Russia bounty story. Now that he's officially been breathed also coming out swinging. I'm sure Is Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf. President Trump said listed Oakland amongst the list of cities that was like living in hell right, Oakland, Chicago and others. And so I'll be talking to the mayor about that. I'm sure she's not happy. But of course, it's not surprising that President Trump looks at Liberal California cities that way also The mayor shaft is for the guaranteed income an idea. Another presidential candidate, Andrew Yang, had offered up and was called crazy. And now when people are looking at their paychecks and their bank accounts right now in the midst of a pandemic. You know how good does a guaranteed income sound right about now? So we'll be talking at a 30 with the Oakland mayor. Then at nine o'clock, I'll be speaking with Dr Bob Walker. He's the chairman of the department medicine at UCSF and the doctor had this great Twitter thread about what was, you know, early on in this pandemic. Called California's Miracle How a State of our size was really able to keep our numbers lower when you compared to something like New York, which was just catastrophic early on in this pandemic Well, The doctor says the miracle is over. So what kind of talk about what exactly happened in the Golden State and why we're seeing the numbers that we're seeing. But my husband I was saying yesterday he was going to need to get tested. And he did. So the testing site was a couple like I don't know. A mile away from my house. So is writer on the corner. It started testing at 10 he said. He got there on 9 15 There were already he estimates 150 people in front of him. Wow, 45 minutes before they even started. And so apparently this location was extremely popular from for some reason, and it has to be one of those things. It's difficult to plan. Because when my husband finally got you To the front of line and it was a medical professional that had a slob him by the way that it wasn't that bad. It wasn't that bad. He said. He didn't They didn't touch his brain went up his nose. No, and so, But he said that they did not think they were going to have enough. Swabs to do everyone in line didn't have. I mean, not that Santa Clara County or whatever didn't physically have enough. They just didn't send enough to this location, which seemed to be really popular. Also, I believe some of these pop up spots. Will be ending on Thursday, so and they'll be moving maybe a different locations. And so obviously, if you're watching the news, and you're saying this rising cases you're probably rightly so. Thank you to yourself. Maybe I should go get tested and see if I have it. So how did you know? I think they should. How did he feel about it? He was fine. He sent me this video when he was leaving of the long line. I mean, it was at Silver Creek High School in San Jose, and it was on the campus. Unease, and when he left, the line was through the parking lot onto the fields of the high school, And so that's a really long line of evil. Of course, they're distanced right, So there's six feet in between the lines definitely longer because of that reason as well. But ah lot of people want to get tested, and I think you should if there's free tests, no appointment, drop in or set up an appointment. Go get tested. I just think we need more data, but unfortunately more people get tested, But we're seeing more positivity. I was mentioning former vice President Joe Biden he was talking about, you know, just how we have handled this crisis in this country, especially when you look at it. The number is coming out of other countries. And, yes, I know they're smaller, You know, places like New Zealand. They were really able Teo get ahold of this pandemic and basically crush it. But Vice President Joe Biden says Trump has failed. Month after month as other leaders and other countries took the necessary steps to get the virus under control. Donald Trump failed this month after month. As many of us urged him to step up and do his job. He failed us. Just look at the record. Just look at the record, you know, and President Trump still refuses to wear the mask, which you know, A lot of Republicans now are coming out. Tucker Carlson are non Tucker Carlson. Sean Hannity was out saying, You know, all our mascot opens up baseball and everything and I wonder if now that Sean Hannity is saying it if certain people will now start listening. It's sad to say that people like Dr Anthony found she and other aren't expert enough that it has to take. Sean Hannity to say it, But hey, if that's what it takes to get through to some of these conservatives find was Sean Hannity and Mitch McConnell coming up Finally, at the end of June. Totally gosh, after so many months, and now we have this divide in this country. And I don't know if you're gonna repair that divide, even with these high profile Republican commentators and leaders, saying that they're going to wear a mask and that it's it's a good thing to not only keep you safe, but keep others safe. Don't you think it's just such human nature, though you speak against something for so long that when you finally get it You just can't do it because it would. It would make you wrong. All those times. It's just suck it up. Whatever you need to say. All right, I'll wear a mask. I don't want to, but I'll wear the mask right. Just say whatever you have to say in your mind to make you feel better for being wrong this whole time and put the darn mascot thing. All of us have a hard time admitting they were wrong. Sometimes it's right. Eso eso to hear him talk about going to his local grocery stores so he can wear his, you know. Where his mask you know where he was wearing his mass safely so he could go to his local particular go grocery store. Yeah, it's refreshing to hear again A little. Ah, a little late on the game, and now we have had this divide, but hopefully hopefully that'll pull people together and get people to where their mass because now we're talking about enforcement in the state of California. Will you hear those announcements today from Governor Gavin Newsome, that dimmer switch that he talked about early on, He's going to utilize it. I was speaking to my producer John Daly before the show he was talking about. You could hear it. You can hear the frustration in Governor Newsome's voice..

President Trump president Joe Biden Oakland Sean Hannity California Nikki vice President Governor Newsome Brad Burkhardt Dr Bob Walker Libby Schaaf Tucker Carlson Santa Clara County Bob Costantini Twitter Westwood Andrew Yang UCSF
"department medicine" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"department medicine" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"We're seeing this organ we just mentioned organ they're crushing their economy and they've had it for thirty people put in ICU they said we didn't shut down the economy their own models in that state tell them they have ninety people in the ICU crestor comment why why are we doing here in Arizona and it's true what Alex Berenson said we dry places we don't have subways maybe the festival of books canceling was a good thing because it seems like large events as word spreads made the big the store a couple weeks ago but the bingo tournament what are the bridge tournament is the bridge tournament electric the bridge right I'm that's where it is this this guy that is the chair of the university of California at San Francisco department medicine is tweeting he was winning a medicine a tree on sorry information last night scratching our heads regarding where did the non covert patients go we've dialed down surgeries and transfers most of our usual Haitians are really sick folks coming to the emergency department hearing this mother hospitals to why we have enough tests at UCSF for clinical needs get a lot of talk regarding major test shortage seems confusing so he's saying we have tested it who's coming in they're not seeing the people crossing the patience Doug Ducey's gonna do is big town hall tonight six o'clock it's going to be everywhere you can hear here on campus to game seven ninety and I mean I'm sure he's not going to talk about anything about the turnaround and and maybe just maybe as a country aside from New York and maybe New Jersey maybe Nolan's this is we're past we're past the peak the fact that again V. the the model the company doing the modeling used by birds and voucher thing twenty forty thousand may die next couple weeks this again same company said New York was projected to have fifty thousand people hospitalized as of Tuesday as as of yesterday really did that a week ago there was twelve thousand hospitalized what the heck is going on here so I think we're getting hood wink I think it's about time people say enough is enough we got to open up this economy got to make it work we got to get back to school we got to get back to all this stuff eight eight zero can S. T. eight eight zero five six seven eight are you want to comment you can and you can disagree to non I think we need to.

Arizona Alex Berenson UCSF Doug Ducey New York New Jersey Nolan ICU university of California San Francisco
"department medicine" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

10:34 min | 2 years ago

"department medicine" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Four five and six sports all right fun stuff ahead with the vintage game rewatch or cut the budget sound from that get you go and go set a fun show going to the fictional coaches in there's actually NFL news the playoff fell just steamrolling like event is going ahead and keep you know nothing going on right now the draft is still long I believe right yeah we got played beginning with these guys I don't even know what they're gonna do it before you take up just real seriously for a moment and I followed yeah I'm trying to get money for it much information as possible there's a lot of grim information yet nationally yesterday in terms of you know the the the shelter in place is being extended in and you know thing spreading especially talk Louisiana and in Michigan it etcetera and in the fact that I think even here in the bay area they they extended the clamp down as of midnight last night it's it's it's gotten much more extensive in terms of like you know no dog parks no basketball courts they really really really want to get people serious and I want to say this is why because I follow this guy on Twitter name Bob Wachter is his name W. A. C. H. T. E. R. yeah he's the chair of the U. UCSF department medicine so you got UCSF the guy and he's he's the thing is there's actually like decent news in San Francisco I'm not trying to minimize anything I'm just saying I think San Francisco even though we see those selfish peas as we know give me the bouncy see bump bump bump bump bump bump stay the blanket home every right right right you don't need your gym you don't need your beaches stay the black at home right but it those of us like a poly mac like a bunny jail like a coach who are bay in this whole thing he says we're still stable at UCSF no news equals terrific news he said the covert patients remain at fifteen at UCSF yep the other night in the I see you but no change in the past few days and few new patients are coming in the I. S. U. and several floor patients have been discharged the point being is that you know listen like we're miles from being out of this thing to San Francisco's early aggressive action and everybody for the most part X. F. U. piano playing selfish peas you are going out thank you thank you thank you yeah if you follow the effects of the the bouncy see on the piano we can get there we can get there but anyway so there's a little bit of good news there I mean that is it did it again you gotta it's measured it's measured but again it's it's something that we can at least you know rally around for the moment but other parts of the country had rough days yesterday man like the you know New York had another really can only take care of our own you know I mean and and if you could just take care of your own here in the city yeah and here in the bay we can get this tweet from this guy Bob Wachter no news equals terrific news so there you go copes by man that I was going to looking actually tracks down I'm sorry I I know I pulled up a day to think it was something I was gonna I was gonna follow up with you about what you just said I'd seen an article last night it was from ABC seven where they said that their cell phone data vides indicating which counties in the bay area are sheltering in place the best which based on cell phone towers also because also expected to contract with the yeah we're going to get this in San Francisco video by county in San Francisco on the day that the the shelter in place was issued San Franciscans were traveling about an average of one point seven miles from their home a week later on what would be the twenty third I guess right yeah they were moving average of one mile from their home and then just this week San Franciscans were down to moving a few feet on average from their home which means at San Francisco at ninety eight percent rate is sheltering in place better than just about any county in the bay area before so no my napa county's actually instituted their shelter in place movements they were only like seventy two and seventy percent but Santa Clara Contra Costa and Alameda San Mateo San Francisco are all from ninety two to ninety percent shift in no movement so that's why it's pretty positive for the north the northern California counties what a brilliant staff yes fracking cellphone movement that's awesome yeah I love it so I mean I don't know how accurate oldies was article from yesterday A. B. C. seven dot com if you wanna check it out but it was an interesting piece of the how San Franciscans and most bay area counties are abiding by the children because your neighborhood look pretty good I mean dude it's it's people are still out walking around so I wanted to quit our yesterday just have a in exercise on a walk in but for the most part people are saying it's it's it's bicyclist and and a few people outside what's funny is I stepped outside to for some recreational partaking activity in the afternoon and do no joke the city will do it has been across the street from one to four different times in the last week like we walked out we can wave to each other for stoops like Taylor and then yeah look each other through a cloud of smoke yeah that's it right met you guys you guys are bonding over the over the afternoon session a full block away house courts are looking as dated fearful that people aren't nobody's really out in about of their it's popped a hamstring walking up to quite terrible damage Smith with that little cell phone straps that's what you're going to do is tell your cell phones what is that thing we ever get tired of the ninety four visits game rewatch Emmitt Smith is out there with the with the injured hammy and eventually had to leave the game add to that ten minutes ago on the fortieth the new year he looked like an absolute he's battling it out okay and it jumped out of the huddle nobody it when people say greatest running backs of all time even though he's the all time leading rusher I don't know anybody who ever says Emmett Smith probably has to right he might like him and Peyton you know it's funny Tom Brady said it when the patriots but the cowboys this year and he said man I hated the cowboys so much because Emmitt Smith got at least five yards every time he touched the ball yeah yep we're their shoulders find a little gap in bowl met he gave did like clip off another eight yards like he he just had a knack for finding the smallest crease and it's getting through and he was north south man he was gonna like Shuki them too many moves we just take credit card ice line in front of him falling up to it I mean maybe the greatest offensive line I've seen seriously right yeah there's a might be and I hate to say that because the Niners have had some great ones we guys we love Steve Wallace airport and Jesse shut up that is a poll where C. but that Dallas thank you those early nineties lines or if you're hard pressed to find a better align the are you when you heard Pat Summerall said he just slides behind to an AA two and AA innate I gotta say there was something about summer all yesterday that just got a I was like aw this guy if you know anybody who's ever going to get yeah that was the greatest broadcast team there was like that I like out like a feeling of importance when those guys were in the building you know it's funny has is over engine and our discussion this morning to his body was talking about that pass interference play that was not a pass or fail yeah it's the beginning of the game they were talking about how you would expect Dion Sanders to be Michael Irvin but he wasn't they put him on the number two and they put it who would that would be put on the on air Davis Davis Bates treatment on that first throwing around what the whole time HM stays on as many jobs that route in addition to the house but but over a day was saying this is a tactic to bill Belichick is used for years to where you put your best defensive back your best corner on the number two and you double team the number one the switch it up later in the game you're giving us different looks yeah it was great that that really could argue that you could argue that that opening game strategy may be one of the game because yeah it gave on that touchdown that wind up being curtailed that has nothing to gain yeah and it it it still it slowed the cowboys in the first quarter net account was one of the jesting and then they want to move in Dion on the Irvine later in the game right right when they're like Hey S. it's getting real now we need to go on on her friend didn't it win it did have a couple of firstly I get a pick late in the third quarter and Michael cried about that one too it wasn't I just don't I mean there's a lot of stuff to get done we will but just you know so but just want to say right now Michael Irvin as a poly about is unstoppable receivers you're gonna get used to drive me insane dude he used to drive me crazy and I also do could we get a shout out a guy we never really talk about but man was he brilliant as a rookie and we did have them in Miami but shout out to bar non William Floyd area just barreling his way into the end zone after one of those turnovers in the first quarter just give it to bar non just slams his way I think that I think we have an injured shoulder after early came back he came back later in the game and you got a hard run to set me up well there's a lot of sound to get into it all that so what what is it about left handers and sportsman what is it about like you're talking about the throw Steve young made the touch on the jury rise other one he made earlier than that I mean that's one of the in the first half he made one of the three touch on the end of the first quarter you talk about the lofted pass to handle review water like it was when he's overthrown in ranches total runs right under it right now and just goes right with me to the to the video we saw yesterday will Clark all stroking his garage like to learn everything very excellent call just great you're absolutely right that is look veterans yesterday we were treated to left handed artistry performances Steve young's attached at the jury as such under Ricky Watters and will Clark hitting balls is garage codes I I show that to my kids and I was like I can't even explain to you why this swing is so perfect that I did to get from god yeah well I will go into the leading up to the two thousand disorderly calls I've ever seen it's it's a gift that there's there's you could sit there and go to a lab and break down the bio mechanically ME get chi Karan is tunnels and the and whoever the guy who is the the guy with the hair and the eyes that we talked to that down there and and then they the Chippendales hitting all shoot member called yeah yes yeah I mean those guys can hit you with their tunnels in there now exists and then you can just watch will hit the garage right I just feel like sixteen years old instead of a T. mobile will have a little unhappy about will port wing courage will find a lower total Todd we're not happy with the the trajectory on the somebody needs to put that will Clark hitting thing to some sort of opera like pick like a pet pick like a Mozart opera a paparazzi area yeah that'll work as you know what he stay in the black at home is it is garage dude you can still do that I could still have all no doubt still here question did affected the giants in the field if indeed one day they'll hit the field this year and if they had Clark and bonds in the.

NFL
"department medicine" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"department medicine" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"One is number read Dr Robert Wachter professor and chair of the department medicine at the university of California San Francisco who is president of the society of hospital medicine chair of the American board of internal medicine and author of about three hundred articles and six books in two thousand fifteen modern healthcare ranked him as the most influential position executive in the United states Dr Walker thank you so much your time really appreciate it it's a great pleasure thank you for having me so yesterday you were tweeting about the flattening of the curve in San Francisco what do you see in San Francisco obviously it was a place where there is a lot of wide scale worry about significant outbreaks that would that would overwhelm the health care system you're tweeting some optimistic numbers from San Francisco what's it look like up there yeah the numbers we're seeing here are remarkable critically when compared with New York and some of the other parts of the country were things are breaking out we have had a total of just under four hundred cases in San Francisco by contrast New York is now over forty thousand and we had a total of six deaths and San Francisco from cove it and New York is in the high nine hundred maybe over a thousand today and what's amazing about that is a two two and a half weeks ago we had exactly the same number of cases New York police this it had a very different trajectory out here and we're incredibly sad about New York and some of the other parts of the country but very thankful for what we see here wonder why do you think it is the San Francisco seen such a different trajectory because they started taking social distancing measures about the same time as New York week down here in Los Angeles started to take those social distancing measures pretty quickly bye right after the announcement from San Francisco yet we're seeing a pretty significant uptick in the number of cases what do you think the differential rates are coming from yeah it's hard to know exactly but we were early in and not only serve general instructions for people to do social distancing but a policy pronouncements so err city in the six bay area cities and counties I went to essentially full stay at home orders on March sixteenth in the state of California went on March nineteenth which was several days before most of the rest of the country it may turn out to be just as importantly but if you think about the big industry in San Francisco the biggest one is the tech industry and the leaders of the tech businesses Google Facebook and others basically told older employees to stay home as early as March fifth and so there's like I said here was one in which the the the it was both orders from the government as well as the major corporations telling people to stay home about a week before many of the other parts of the country and so dad and I'm I think some of it is just luck but it turns out that days make a difference and you know this this thing grows can grow exponentially so quickly if you get moving on keeping your distance and staying at home even as as much as three or as little as three to five days earlier it may make a huge difference in the overall trajectory and I think that's what we're seeing little more than a moment but first let's talk about the fact that your business actually needs the only state I mean have you ever had a situation where business needs data more than like right.

professor and chair Dr Robert Wachter
"department medicine" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

07:19 min | 2 years ago

"department medicine" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Chair of the department medicine at the university of California San Francisco said I've walked around if you had a chance to them in any of the various models are being bandied about as to the death rate of crime virus and the possibility of of what the sort of exponential growth curve looks like the flattening of the curve is an imperial college study there's that study at the university of Washington is now being cited by folks from the White House that suggests going Dr Fauci in October it's that even if we engage in social distancing and this sort of locked down for a for a prolonged period of time we may see a hundred thousand two hundred thousand deaths what do you make of of the models and how effective do you think for how long can this can social distancing B. because well one of the questions here's what happens when people start to gradually be released into the economy it doesn't seem like we have sort of a a date certain as to when the medical resource are going to be available such that a surgeon cases is not an old woman system yeah I mean the the the models are as good as we can do now but they all have substantial uncertainty associated with them that the evidence is pretty clear though that that that social distancing and shelter home orders really work quite effectively there's there was a study out of Italy where to regions next to each other in the Monterey one went early social distancing in the other later and the cubs are just night and day one has a very big peak and the other is is much flatter so it's pretty clear that the recommendations of the infection experts are all right the problem with social distancing and with a shelter in place orders is is the outcome of what happened before them are kind of baked in so would happen in a week or two before people started separate themselves that's going to play itself out no matter what you do now now doesn't mean you shouldn't be incredibly aggressive now because he because it it keeps going unless you you separate people but it's not like it's magic in the day you do it you stop seeing new cases you will see the cases that got infected from from a week or two before I think what the models that seem like they're accurate that to me and to my colleagues that study this for a living it looks like we're on a trajectory for for as many tens of thousands of not hundred thousand or two hundred thousand deaths and whether that number gets any higher really depends on whether we can do the social distancing and stick with it for a for a period of time now what happens when we start coming out of it that's going to be a very tricky phase and Scott Gottlieb the former FDA secretary is put out a policy set of policy recommendations that I think are quite smart because it's going to it's going to die down it's probably gonna happen in different communities sooner and later but it seems like many of them it will peak in the middle of April and maybe begin dying down in may it's not going to be gone and so I liken this to a to a fire that you may have extinguished the main fire but they're still embers around and then we have to engage in really aggressive testing and and public health strategies to be sure that we catch any new cases early isolate them and keep this thing tamp down but it's not until we reach that point and that's likely to be in may that we can begin thinking about relaxing the kind of restrictions without using Robert Walker professor and chair of the department medicine at the university of California San Francisco speaking of those measures that are gonna have to be taken in South Korea had built up for these measures in the aftermath of the sars epidemic in two thousand three it took them literally years to build those sorts of resources so they can do what they've been doing in South Korea now we're talking about having to build not only testing resources but surveillance resources that can be activated in a matter of a couple months I'm not supremely optimistic that we're gonna have those measures in place given how long it's taken just to get basic testing approved via the via the FDA even now we're struggling to get those tests out so with that with that said it realistically speaking how long you think it'll be before most Americans can go back to work not just a few waves in people who've already maybe been tested for antibodies but but like actually most Americans able to go back to their offices you know Bennett so it's so hard to know but some of that depends on the adequacy of the public health response and that's everything from testing to other public health maneuvers it probably isn't a very by community so you know places that were hard hit may see a very early peak in search and then they may come down fairly quickly that's what we saw in China for example and some of it depends on something we don't quite know yet whether that whether this thing is seasonal so it may be that it's dying out on its own in in in mayor and or or thereabouts and that may change the tempo at which we can allow people to go back to to go back to work we go back to what resembles a normal life the problem of course is it seasonal there's a good part of and the bad part of that which means it might come roaring back in the fall as happened the Spanish flu epidemic but that will at least give us a little bit of time and bandwidth to continue to work on therapies to build the testing capacity to work on the other things we need to do to keep this thing tamp down and prepare ourselves for the possibility that we're gonna do do act two of this sometime in the fall that's what it isn't pretty wide consensus across the political spectrum this needs to happen there needs to be is tremendous lockdowns obviously the trump administration is on the same page as everybody else when it comes to that there are some critics who suggest that we should have been implementing measures like the Swedes or like another ones that are up a fair bit more loose why do you think that those wouldn't have worked in the United States and what it how do we sort of developed but I know hypothesis here given the fact that everyone is basically engaging in the same measures and so if we succeed in the deaths are down and that is accredited to the to the staying inside there will be some people say what we did too much and and actually we should have done any of this at all well I think it's very hard to see what's going on in New York and and and say that that we've done too much and and even in the places that have put out statewide or regional proclamations that people should stay inside the degree of adherence to that and it forced me to that there is a lot it's not just that you have to have the order it has to be everybody's gotta understand and it's gonna be message constantly that this is the right thing to do it's brutally hard I mean no that is the the impact on the economy is real and is devastating in its own way but to my mind this thing is that it is and it will never see anything quite like it in our lifetime and certainly my medical life time of thirty five years and we can't do anything including get the economy back on track in till we get this thing tamp down to a manageable level so I I have very little sympathy to to the argument that we should be doing doing less I think if you look at San Francisco versus New York you I think it really supports the hypothesis that being aggressive about this early not just from the public sector in the government sector but from the corporate sector pays a massive dividends and I suspect that we'll have a big impact on on the economy ultimately if we manage to keep this to a more manageable level so I think we got to be super aggressive about it we can't let our guard down anytime soon until the public health experts say that it's safe for us to do so and I think that's not only.

San Francisco university of California
"department medicine" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

07:19 min | 2 years ago

"department medicine" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Of the department medicine at the university of California San Francisco said I've walked around if you had a chance to them in any of the various models are being bandied about as to the death rate of corona virus and the possibility of of what the sort of exponential growth curve looks like the flattening of the curve is an imperial college study there's that study at the university of Washington is now being cited by folks from the White House that suggests going doctor found G. and after birth that even if we engage in social distancing and this sort of lockdowns for a for a prolonged period of time we may see a hundred thousand two hundred thousand deaths what do you make of of the models and how effective do you think but for how long can that can social distancing B. because well one of the questions here's what happens when people start to gradually be released into the economy it doesn't seem like we have sort of a a date certain as to when the medical resources are going to be available such that a surgeon cases is not an old woman system I mean the the the models are as good as we can do now but they all have substantial uncertainty associated with them that the evidence is pretty clear though that that that social distancing and shelter home orders really work quite effectively there's there was a study out of Italy where to regions next to each other in Amman everyone went early social distancing in the other later and the cubs are just night and day one has a very big peak and the other is is much flatter so it's pretty clear that the recommendations of the infection experts are all right the problem with social distancing and with a shelter in place orders is is the outcome of what happened before them are kind of baked in so would happen in a week or two before people started separate themselves that's going to play itself out no matter what you do now now doesn't mean you shouldn't be is incredibly aggressive now because because it keeps going unless you you separate people but it's not like it's magic in the day you do it you stop seeing new cases you will see the cases that got infected from from a week or two before I think what the models seem like they're accurate that to me and to my colleague that study this for a living it looks like we're on a trajectory for many tens of thousands of not hundred thousand or two hundred thousand debts and whether that number gets any higher really depends on whether we can do these social distancing and stick with it for a for a period of time now what happens when we start coming out of it that's going to be a very tricky stains and Scott Gottlieb the former FDA secretary is put out a policy set of policy recommendations that I think are quite smart because it's going to it's going to die down it's probably gonna happen in different communities sooner and later but it seems like many of them it will peak in the middle of April and maybe begin dying down in may it's not going to be gone and so I liken this to a to a fire that you may have extinguished the main fire but they're still embers around and then we have to engage in really aggressive testing and and public health strategies to be sure that we catch any new cases early isolate them and keep this thing tamp down but it's not until we reach that point and that's likely to be in may that we can begin thinking about relaxing the kind of restrictions without using Robert Walker professor and chair of the department medicine at the university of California San Francisco speaking of those measures that are gonna have to be taken in South Korea had built up for these measures in the aftermath of the sars epidemic in two thousand three it took them literally years to build those sorts of resources so they can do what they've been doing in South Korea now we're talking about having to build not only testing resources but surveillance resources that can be activated in a matter of a couple months I I'm not supremely optimistic that we're gonna have those measures in place given how long it's taken just to get basic testing approved via the via the FDA even now we're struggling to get those tests out so with that with that said it realistically speaking how long you think it'll be before most Americans can go back to work not just a few waves in people who've already maybe been tested for antibodies but but like actually most Americans able to go back to their offices you know Bennett so it's so hard to know but some of that depends on the adequacy of the public health response and that's everything from testing to other public health maneuvers it probably isn't a very by community so you know places that were hard hit may see a very early peak in search and then they may come down fairly quickly that's what we saw in China for example and some of it depends on something we don't quite know yet whether that whether this thing is seasonal so it may be that it's dying out on its own in in in may or or or thereabouts and that may change the tempo at which we can not allow people to go back to to go back to work you go back to what resembles a normal life the problem of course is it seasonal there's a good part of and the bad part of that which means that my come roaring back in the fall as happened in the Spanish flu epidemic but that will at least give us a little bit of time and bandwidth to continue to work on therapies to build the testing capacity to work on the other things we need to do to keep this thing tamp down and prepare ourselves for the possibility that we're gonna do do act two of this sometime in the fall that's what it isn't pretty wide consensus across the political spectrum this needs to happen there needs to be is tremendous lockdowns obviously the trump administration is on the same page as everybody else when it comes to that there are some critics who suggest that we should have been implementing measures like the Swedes or like another ones that are up a fair bit more loose why do you think that those wouldn't have worked in the United States and what is it how do we sort of developed but I know hypothesis here given the fact that everyone is basically engaging in the same measures and so if we succeed in the deaths are down and that is accredited to the to the staying inside there will be some people say what we did too much and and actually we should have done any of this at all well I think it's very hard to see what's going on in New York and and and say that that we've done too much and and even in the places that have put out statewide or regional proclamations that people should stay inside the degree of adherence to that and it forced me to that there is a lot it's not just that you have to have the order it has to be everybody's gotta understand and it's gonna be message constantly that this is the right thing to do it's brutally hard I mean that it it being the impact on the economy is real and is devastating in its own way but to my mind this thing is that it is and it would never say anything quite like it in our lifetime and certainly my medical life time of thirty five years and we can't do anything including get the economy back on track in till we get this thing tamp down to a manageable level so I have very little sympathy to to the argument that we should be doing doing less I think if you look at San Francisco versus New York you I think it really supports the hypothesis that being aggressive about this early not just from the public sector in the government sector but from the corporate sector pays massive dividends and I suspect that we'll have a big impact on on the economy ultimately if we manage to keep this to a more manageable level so I think we got to be super aggressive about it we can't let our guard down anytime soon until the public health experts say that it's safe for us to do so and I think that's not only.

San Francisco university of California
"department medicine" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

10:30 min | 2 years ago

"department medicine" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Updates and that's basically what we become our son coronavirus watch good times good times well the president of the United States has now extended the social distancing guidelines the end of April originally remember the president suggested that he was hoping we'd all be back in business by the middle of April April twelfth Easter that of course is not going to happen it's pretty much not gonna come close to happening because we are not expecting peak until at least mid April maybe all the way at the end of April so we'll see well what's that there is some good news I mean I do wanna get some good news and a little bit here about the flattening of the curve because it is happening in some areas of the United States particularly in Seattle and San Francisco that's a that news in a moment but president trump did announce yesterday that the social distancing guidelines would in fact be extended to the end of April have to follow the guidelines that are great vice president holds up a lot he's holding that up a lot he believes it is so strongly the better you do the faster this whole nightmare will end therefore we will be extending our guidelines to April thirtieth to slow the spread on Tuesday will be finalizing these plans and providing a summary of our findings supporting data and strategies to the American people well president trump also explained extending the guidelines on fox and friends this morning why exactly these guidelines were being extended and I listen to express we have doctor found too we have as you know we have Deborah Berke suse fantastic also doctor Deborah Brooks and did two of them plus many people behind them send the worst ticket happen as you do it too early and all of a sudden it comes back it makes it more difficult that of course is true one of the great fears here is that if you allow people to go back back to what you really see a massive increase in cases it overwhelms the system and then you started seeing mass death out there in a sort of second wave the as as I said there is some good news from other countries you're seeing day on day in Italy an increase in the number of test but a decrease in the number of positives which suggests that maybe finally Italy's meaning to flatten the curve you're also seeing that her being flattened in Seattle which is good news according to The New York Times officials in Washington state I believe the Danes maybe precarious they see evidence of containment strategies have lowered the rate of virus transmission again the goal here is two fold one well this thing off until summer when hopefully the summer kills it and to we increase the number of resources can be brought to bear in these various cities in fact the the USS comfort which the navy ship that is designed for hospital beds as thousand hospital beds just docked in New York the pictures are just astonishing on this giant hospital bed with the the big red cross on it that are that are passing the statue of liberty and docking in New York harbor it's it's pretty amazing amazing stuff meanwhile in San Francisco apparently the curves being bent down as well because the social isolation measures have been put in place by Walker is one of the doctors over at the university of California San Francisco and and he has tweeted out is the UCSF department medicine he says that as of day twelve there is no change in status at the hospitals he says our command center briefings it now less newsy seems like work over preference search that may not be coming which will be great he says the overall San Francisco cases were still seeing mild growth over the last seven days in San Francisco I'm really struggling with the curve is flat versus calm before the storm narratives true generally across the country even pessimists are tilting toward the former we have to what leading up there could easily flip the other other way he says well San Francisco's okay nightmarish reports from New York he got a a report from an old pal now to major teaching hospital saying in your things are incredibly dire as of today we filled all expanded beds are fully utilizing all available ventilators we deputize the full work force to serves adult hospitalist including ophthalmologist radiologists and pediatricians it's truly terrifying so obviously people are freaking out in New York and there isn't decent evidence for that obviously are starting to see a lot of anecdotal evidence on the ground that things are getting ugly in New York they are building a hospital in Central Park they made the Javits center into a hospital but so where exactly is this thing going at this point after Anthony felt yesterday was on national TV out with Jake tapper and he suggested that we may see a hundred thousand two hundred thousand people die in this epidemic even if we adhere to all of the social distancing when you use numbers like a million a million and a half to million that almost certainly is off the charts now it's not impossible but very very unlikely so it's difficult to present I mean looking at what we're seeing now you know I would say between one hundred and two hundred thousand cases but I don't want to be held to that because it's it's it's I I skews me deaths I mean we're gonna have millions of cases but I I just don't think that we really need to make a projection when it's such a moving target that you can so easily be wrong well this is one of the concerns that all of the modeling smiling it's not real on the ground we don't we don't know exactly what this looks like according to the Wall Street journal the confirmed case in common nineteen imprisoned more than two hundred forty thousand globally more than thirty five thousand deaths were up to over twenty seven hundred deaths in the United States alone the Wall Street journal says hard hit states aim to increase hospital capacity this week to accommodate the influx of patients the federal government and US navy hospital ships to New York and California as well China where the virus was first identified in December said nearly all of its major industrial companies resumed production even so here's the second operator causing authorities to backtrack on some measures to get the economy up and running gets trying a little bit later because it's pretty obvious that they have been lying at this whole time meanwhile the virus continues to spread across the globe total confirmed cases passes under forty thousand led by the U. S. Italy and Spain now again confirmed cases is also good indicator of increased testing which is actually not a terrible thing you want to increase testing at this point increase testing means increased positive that's not only not the end of the world is actually what you see right you want increased it increase asking because they Chris positives we need increased testing therefore will get increased positive however around the world you're starting to see people like Benjamin Netanyahu the prime minister is now not self isolation after one of his advisers his seven year old woman tested positive for the virus also we're seeing anecdotal evidence for disaster areas in New York governor Andrew Cuomo's aim to increase hospital capacity with makeshift medical treatment centers according to the Wall Street journal the US army corps of engineers was slated to open a temporary medical facility at Javits center in Manhattan on Monday and if the hospital ship arrived in your cover on Monday a second navy ship docked in Los Angeles on Friday Cuomo has called on the federal government to provide more ventilators president trump said on Sunday that FEMA brought eighty tons of personal protective equipment to the state including face masks hospitals gallons and gloves among other supplies other governments state governments offering people to stay home at Maryland governor Larry Hogan said we're no longer asking or suggesting suggesting that Marylanders stay at home or directing them to do so also the CDC issued a travel advisory for New York New Jersey and Connecticut directing residents not to travel domestically for fourteen days basically stayed home for fourteen days don't go to other states already states like Florida had basically been requiring that everyone who enters the state from places like Georgia or New York be self isolating Macy's on Monday said will furlough the majority of its employees a hundred and thirty thousand employees so the the economic fallout is also incredibly dire all of this is is worrisome and even more worrisome when you consider that we just aren't getting data from a lot of places on earth rather than getting no data from India were getting no data from Russia the data we're getting from China is probably bull crap minister Pedro Sanchez of Spain said at the weekend the tighter lock down that they they're gonna lock and again was needed to avoid the collapse of saturate hospitals in the dread Spain reported more than eight hundred twelve new deaths on Monday bringing the country's death toll to nearly seventy four hundred Italy and Spain remains the hardest hit their disproportionately elderly and their systems have been overburdened in some good news a clinical knowledge is the jubilee hospital in Rome so the number of deaths is dropping every day over the weekend the number of new patients needing critical care had gone down as well none the less Italy had extended national locked down for April third that probably will continue even further in Britain Dr Jenny Harries deputy chief medical officer said it could be six months or more according to The New York Times before return to total normal with lockdowns being reassessed every three weeks she said of the strategy was successful the country can effectively limit the peak of cases in the short term measures would have to continue she can't say we just go back to what we were doing also I mean shout out to the respiratory therapists shout out to the registered nurse a shout out to the doctors shouts all the medical workers who are doing unbelievable work trying to help people trying to keep people safe medical students having graduated early in New York so they can be activated and put on the front lines which is just unbelievable retirees are being called back into action Andrew Cuomo said if you're a healthcare worker and you are basically at home doing nothing please come in and help out please volunteer so this is an all hands on deck situation it's really scary you know as a person with a wife in the medical profession who is on maternity leave right now we are maybe like two and a half weeks ago you know it's the the prospect of having her house would freak the hell out of me I and I can't imagine what all the other medical workers are going through so thank you all for doing what you're doing you are truly unbelievably heroic according The New York Times emergency rooms in ice use throughout our city typically just passion that'll professionals are feeling panicked as an increasing number of their colleagues get sick that is because a lot of people showing up day to day facing overflowing emergency rooms and apparently some of them are are still lacking personal protective equipment because well those it will be put in does exist people are not getting it in time in China more than three thousand doctors were infected nearly half of them in will hand in Italy the total number of healthcare workers were infected is now twice the Chinese total nearly fourteen percent of Spain's confirm confirm coronavirus cases are medical professionals so all of this is obviously a devastating and we all owe our thanks to all the medical professionals who are on the front lines will get you more of this in just one second first let's talk about the fact that this is tough times for businesses that means you have to be as efficient as possible because at some point we're gonna come out of this and you're gonna need to explode out of gay this is why you need to be on top of your data I'm talking about next week successful companies know that if you want to.

president United States
"department medicine" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"department medicine" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"America is watching we W. Y. P. C. mobile news all the level on the go the governor's emergency declaration means partly cloudy breezy and chilly overnight mostly sunny Saturday I'm Stan Lee here's what's trending this hour Indiana's first coronavirus case a man from Marion County who attended an event in Boston he is not in the highest risk age category and not sick enough to require a hospital stay but he's in isolation and governor Holcomb has declared a public health emergency to ensure that the state of Indiana is in the absolute best position to get the federal funding necessary to respond step by step the state health department received testing equipment last weekend twelve people have been tested so far thirty five others being monitored an angry mobs in south bend of the special prosecutor's decision not to charge the white police officer who shot and killed a black man how do you work you for the war well that is charging landing Neil is charged with misconduct in more internet related case and a new officer is reporting for duty with the fishers police department medicine McGill reports his name is Rico and he's a fourteen month old Belgian Malinois wall he'll be a dual purpose narcotics canine and has three more weeks of training with his partner officer Jarod Koopman said the department in a Facebook post Rego is joining the force after the department lost canine Harley and November Madison gill ninety three W. I. B. C. mobile news on the level on the go on Twitter at ninety three W. I. B. C. and W. I. B. C..

Jarod Koopman Madison gill Facebook partner governor Holcomb W. Y. P. C. W. I. B. C. Twitter Rego America Rico McGill Neil officer prosecutor Boston Marion County Indiana Stan Lee
"department medicine" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:22 min | 2 years ago

"department medicine" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"We return now to the core of our story at least eight people are dead and tens of millions are on lockdown in China as authorities they're trying to get their arms around a rapidly growing epidemic welcome now doctor Salim calendar she is clinical assistant professor in the department medicine at NYU Dr grounder produces and hosts American diagnoses that's a podcast on health and social justice so welcome doctors good to have you here thank you we got a lot of course with the Chinese authorities are doing really locking down tens of millions of people over there check the area airports are they doing enough to their two key developments from over the weekend that I think will help us answer that question so one of which it would appear that the dot the virus was already spreading even as early as October at least in November so that means the virus is spreading undetected and so we're really only detecting it now because we're looking for we have tests for it that didn't really emerge until the end of December so that's one key issue the other key development is that it would seem that sometimes the virus may be transmitting by people who do not have symptoms at all and that has yet to be confirmed by the CDC but if you can't figure out who's infected and who might be transmitting it's very difficult to contain this at the same time there seems to be I won't call panic but a lot of concern in China areas got masks on is there a risk here of actually making people and being counterproductive every flocking into healthcare centers immediately well the history has shown that travel bans and quarantines don't usually work with never done anything on this scale before quarantines in the case of the bowl or very specific actually to this specific patient who had symptoms who is being diagnosed and manage but when you're doing this kind of population level quarantine it has not been shown to work it basically tries as you said mass panic and also as a a consequence of all of this you're already seeing shortages of food and medical supplies we've seen videos of Chinese women in grocery stores you know if you can get out literally to buy produce and some of that may actually be even more dangerous have we learned from earlier epidemics I guess sars is the one we automatically think of because it was a corona virus right was another do we learn some in there about what does work and what doesn't work in trying to contain this or does it just have to burn its way out so if this is not transmitted by people without symptoms then the same strategies we used for prior coronaviruses like sars as well as free polo which is basically what are the symptoms getting tested if you're contagious you know having them be hospitalized until they're outside of that window that works anyone in your also tracing contacts of people who've been in contact with them but if people who don't have symptoms are transmitting that's a game changer the general doctor Salim the Gondor she's from NYU what treatments are like effective limited exceeded everyone on the new talks about exceed as I said we still have one for sars we still don't have one for sars the hope is that we might have using sort of the basis of of sars vaccine candidates using those as candidates for a corona virus vaccine that would work here maybe we could have those in clinical trials by June but you're still looking at some time after that and as others are predicting right now that based on modeling of the disease transmission we may be looking at this disease peaking in April or may so we know well before you would have a vaccine candidates you know a lot of people could die in that time other other treatments that stop short of a vaccine to cure some of it is please come miglior a sort of the symptoms for example Tama flew we hear a lot about I mean there's no there's no particular reason to think Tama flew at work here it's an entirely different kind of virus in general when you have somebody who is a viral pneumonia and a lot of things can cause that including the flu actually a lot of what you do is actually supported measures that might be having somebody on a ventilator for example to help them support their breathing until they get better but to do that with millions of people across China that's not going to be feasible is the international medical community doing enough WHO's walked up to the question whether is a global health crisis said no it's a Chinese health crisis not yet globally as a more the WHL could be doing CC other authorities around the world so the declaration of a public health emergency is both a medical technical decision as well as an economic and political decision we've already seen the stock market take a hit you know even here as a result of this and you know the Chinese economy takes a real hit that's gonna cause tremendous harm as well especially to the poor in the countryside not to mention the rest of us so I you know I think part of the reason you're seeing such draconian measures and in China is one that that's just how their government tends to function that tends to be their instincts but also it may be to head off a public health emergency being declared and will even more restrictive measures being taken by other countries on the outside two critical questions I think that most lay people have which is how communicable is it how is it is a catch it and numbers without it what's the chance if I get it that I will die so the current estimates are that for every person who has the disease they will transmit to about two other people a bad number a good number I can on the same level as the flu in in terms of legality we're seeing probably about three percent of people who are infected dying from this to give that some context it's about ten times higher than the flu but sars was ten percent of people who got the infection died so it's not as lethal as sars per person infected but if you have many people infected many more than have the sars then you could actually see total more deaths as a result of sort of you know the percentage times the total number so it really you know we we want to focus also on containment and making sure not to be too many people are affected so finally Dr as we go forward there's a lot of things we don't know a lot of questions open as you look at things what we'd be looking at what the factors are saying I'm really good paying attention that or those two things to figure out whether this really expensive very dramatic way or can be contained I think this question of can a symptomatic people transmit the virus I think that's going to be key because the things that we normally do to contain an outbreak like this may not be so effective if people without symptoms can transmit as a thank you so much for being with us doctor really helpful the sector Salim Gounder she's NYU clinical assistant professor in the department of medicine coming up with.

China doctor Salim
"department medicine" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:37 min | 3 years ago

"department medicine" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Over one year had reductions in significant decreases in blood flow and improvement in the lining of the blood vessels now you might think well that's not a lot of garlic extract is really not a lot of co Q. ten so we typically try to get the co Q. ten levels in your blood up nice and high in some towns that requires three or four capsules a day so even with patients that have Parkinson's studies have shown that gone up about three thousand milligrams a cookie today but certainly blood test see where you are raise the levels recheck so you can make sure that you're the right range so pretty significant improvement in the endothelial function the vascular elasticity with the H. Karluk the CO two ten some people like to use the supplement garlic some people like to like to use the fresh garlic which I certainly love for those that the first call because it'll be too strong for then we tell people by elephant garlic every store is going to have a set of very large garlic but it's a a lot less strong it's a lot less biting in terms of its its effect so you can easily put that on your salary your food have that they wouldn't give you that you know uncomfortable sensation back in because it's it's just less harsh so still will give you the benefit once again phone lines are open it's like Colin asked question do so now one eight hundred eight four eight W. ABC one eight hundred eight four eight nine two two two for like to call and do so now we try to make sure everybody gets the call in before the end of the program and would love to chat with you okay let's go to Ted in Forest Hills hi how are you how can I help you what can you hear me how are you Ted are you there okay we'll try to get Ted up as soon as we can hello there was so for a moment and we'll get back to you so as I say you want to have a lot of the best nutrients in your food all of will certainly great for you I think if you only had two types of oils in your diet for the rest of your life really should be olive oil and fish oil because they have more benefits than really anything else and there are a lot of people that like coconut oil let's find some people type like to take a tablespoon of olive oil first thing in the morning or some people take at night that's fine I will have been known to help to kill germs you got so I think there are lots of benefits to all these foods that have been around for hundreds and literally thousands of years in populations in studies have been done with Mediterranean diets with olive oil and all the great vegetables you know this is not something that is new or unknown I think every population and certainly in the in Europe Middle East and across the Far East have used olive oil has one of the major components and now you can get a wonderful all for oil in any of the good stores this organic all of world makes all the sense to buy organic okay phone lines are open one eight hundred eight four eight W. A. B. C. one eight hundred eight four eight nine two two two and we'll get you up on the air the vitamin D. at once again important you know many many I think millions at this point studies on vitamin D. and benefits of vitamin B. and this is a study that looked at the non traditional risk factors for heart disease of course research will talk about cholesterol triglycerides LDL but homocysteine fibrinogen C. reactive protein low vitamins arrest low hormones or risk so we want the vitamin D. really to be in a nice range close to a hundred because that's where all the research worldwide says the vitamin D. race results not at ten twenty thirty forty fifty it's got to be a higher so this is a great study was published in the archives of medical science he talks about how people in the study large group Huntington subjects had vitamin D. levels or super low eleven twelve fifteen and they looked at the low levels of vitamin B. and found that was associated with higher triglycerides and a higher small LDL cholesterol the bad cholesterol so they're independent things that could influence your cholesterol it's not this cholesterol number that has to be what it is that you have to take medication for it so cutting carbs exercise for two hormones vitamins make all the difference in the world and this is what I've done for my the entirety of my career evaluate your body learn about your first see what trump against and then start correcting things so I say say we see a lot of people that are hypoglycemic but don't know the irritable anxious tired even panicky depressed Hey maybe I maybe have a less humid but they also may be at the age of a decline in their hormones so things overlap each other in their mobile contributors to symptoms so we have to as I say go back the layers of the onion to be able to get to all of the underlying causes not just look for one or two but vitamin deficiency is extremely common we see it and typically everybody that I see on their first visit long term selenium and co Q. ten usage may reduce mortality this is a big study and it was published throughout the division of Korea vast amount of some department medicine health sciences and it was a five year study randomized double blind placebo controlled study among four hundred forty three Swedish citizens age seventy to eighty eight long term supplementation with selenium and cookie ten reduced cardiovascular mortality people are evaluated twice a year over the course of study with blood **** Carty grams sonograms looking for plaque in the neck the heart the legs and multiple follow throughout that period of time and those that have the nutrients on board had a significant reduction in cardiac mortality reduce bi N. P. which is a peptide that your heart can muscle can leak out as that muscle is damaged or dying SO three B. M. P. is high we know that you're having some damage the heart muscle these individuals had body but a cardiac function better cardiac output so yet again nutrients helping to maximize your building your health so I think the blood test for vitamins is one of the.

one eight hundred eight four e five year one year