20 Episode results for "Department Of Interior"

"I've always wanted to play it down" - 9/9/2020

Quick News Daily Podcast

19:15 min | 1 year ago

"I've always wanted to play it down" - 9/9/2020

"Hello and welcome to the Quick News daily podcast where I give you the facts I know click bait stories just real news that matters to real people. Today is Wednesday September ninth in the Lordy, there are tapes we'll get to that in just a second, but then it is the big breaking news of the day so far the rest of the show however will feel similar to yesterday show where we have a lot of smaller stories, but there was a trump rally yesterday. So you already know how much content that provided to me. It's good stuff in disgusting horrible way. So you won't want to miss a minute of it. Let's get caught up. Of course, we have to start with the big news of the day, and all I have to say is thank God for Bob. Woodward. Here's Donald Trump in his own words on February seventh and so what was President Xi saying yesterday we're talking mostly about the. Virus and. I think he's going to have a good shape but you know it's very tricky situation. It's It goes it goes through Air Bob that's always tougher than the touch touch. You don't have to touch things but the air you just breathe the air that's how it's passed. and. So that's a very tricky one. That's a very delicate one. it's also more deadly than your. You know your. Even your strenuous lose you know people don't realize we lose twenty, five, thousand, thirty, thousand people a year who who would ever think that. Right I know. That's pretty amazing. And then I say, well, it's the same thing for more deadly. This is five per you know this is five percents versus one percent less than one percent you know. So this is deadly. Yeah apparently Bob Woodward is writing a book on the trump presidency and. Donald Trump was moronic enough to say this on tape to the guy who brought down. Nixon. I mean, it's like a cop once said on the show cops, you don't catch the smart ones. By the way even his brain can comprehend at that point that corona virus has passed through the air, which we didn't know for quite a while after that. Already knew that back in February early February when we should have started wearing masks. Not only that you hear him say five percent is what the death rate probably about this. That means no I'm not exactly sure if he can multiply anymore or ever could but he says, twenty five thousand is the low number for flu deaths. Okay. So five times twenty, five, thousand, one, hundred, and twenty, five, thousand people dead now he's saying it's a hoax it's not real. So at that point, he has made the decision in his head that one hundred twenty, five, thousand, dead Americans is okay as long as he doesn't panic the stock market. That's literally literally what his mind went through in the decision making process on this, and if you don't think he was trying to hide it from us. Here's trump on March fourth on Sean Hannity today, the global death rate at three point, four percent and a report that the Olympics could be delayed your reaction to that. Well I think the three point four percent is really a false number now. This is just my hunch and but based on a lot of conversations with a lot of people that do this because a lot of people will have this and it's very mild. Less than one percent when he knows it's five percent. Now it's lowered a bit since then but it really depends we're not gonNA know until this is mostly behind us is never going to be gone at this point but whenever we get it to sort of like the flu levels. Now, remember when trump said that the kids are basically immune to this sort of thing. So that's why they should go back to school. He said that numerous times. Well, let's take a listen again. Just. Old People, Bob purchased today, and yesterday. Some startling facts came out of not just old older. Able to plenty of young people. So Paraguay's going on. That conversation was from March, Nineteenth March. Now. You might be saying, well, how do you know that he was intentionally trying to cover it up? You weren't there and he's not dumb enough to admit that on tape is he? A A moment of talking to somebody going through this without she or somebody who kind of. It caused a pivot in your mind because it's clear just from what's in on the public record that you went through a pivot on this too. Oh, my God gravity is almost. Inexplicable in unexplainable think Bob really to be honest with you, I want you I wanted to I to always play it down I still like playing it down. Because, I don't want to create a panic. He was downplaying it the entire time. So as not to cause a panic in the stock market. Now, he doesn't say that part but just spitballing here and thinking that maybe just maybe the man who will accept one hundred and twenty, five, thousand deaths just so the stock market will be fine. So he can get re elected might not care about panicked people. It's actually impossible for a narcissistic care about or even comprehend other feelings. This man does not care if you or anyone in your family lives or dies. So long as he gets reelected in doesn't have to face consequences judgment for his crimes. In the field of getting prominent endorsements, it's more of the same today for Joe Biden fee Republicans for Biden Group put out a video yesterday showing former Republican Attorney General for the State of Arizona Grant Woods Endorsing Joe Biden over Donald Trump. Again. This continues the trend of big names and big politicians including tons of Republicans who are endorsing Biden over trump I mean I suppose I shouldn't slight trump because again he has the Goya beans guy and the my pillow guy. So quite a formidable force there. In any case, let's listen to what the former attorney general had to say. A little bit about. Safety. Of, our crime. How He will state of Arizona versus interesting. Watch on trump. And I can say. He has no idea what he's talking. Are we safer right now in the United States, we feel better about ourselves than we did four years ago. And absolute. Donald Trump's presidency is failure when it house Jamaican people here in Arizona Ross. Be Better about their lives. And about their safety trying to put the adults acting. It's time to remember when the constitution is all about I asked you to join wording Joe Biden. President. Let Shift to another story I'm sure you've seen at least one headline about so far, and that's this covert vaccine trial being paused because volunteer has gotten sick. The trial that is put on by the partnership between Oxford University and AstraZeneca, they're trying to covert vaccine. Well, they had to put it on pause because one participant got a quote potentially unexplained illness. So they pose the trial to allow for an independent committee to do a safety review both Sinica in Dr Charlie Weller head vaccines at a UK company who was interviewed for this story and NBC News, which is where this is coming from. Both Dr Weller Industry Zenica say that this is normal part of vaccine trials but. The problem here today is that these trials are under such a fine microscope are such a strong microscope. What's the metaphor phrase there but it's definitely under intense scrutiny especially in our country since vaccines are like our only hope to get back to normal at this point like the trump administration just put everything on these vaccines. On top of all of that, there are these legitimate fears that trump is pressuring these drugmakers to release something quickly before the election so that he can say, Oh, look Rogan be fine. Now Biden's GonNa raise your taxes like that should matter to. So. Well, we have to be cautious about these fears in just acknowledged them know that they're here. For now we'll have to let this independent committee investigate and see if anyone else becomes sick or this is maybe just a one off thing maybe the onus becomes explained in just a bit. I want to highlight something for those of you who are like me who have a real stake in the climate climate change and our natural resources? Yesterday at that rally, we'll get to in a second trump announced an extension on the ban of drilling for oil offshore Florida's coasts this presidential order this executive order supposed to extend the ban by ten years. So now it goes all the way to twenty thirty two. But like I said it was done by presidential. So I'm not sure if this is really that binding, it could just be a show for the swing state in Florida where another big story from yesterday's Than Oo. There's this pull out there that shows Biden and trump tied in Florida. Maybe we'll get to that in a second but right away Biden hit back at the rest of trump's environmental record basically saying it's all talk and even that talk he still claims that climate change is a hoax by the Chinese or. Whatever so he doesn't really have a real record to stand on. This is probably just for show the part where it gets interesting is that there is actually some reporting that back up that claim back in June political had a report saying that the Department of Interior who's in charge of land natural resources essentially was actually preparing to allow oil and gas drilling near Florida but that they wouldn't say. So until after the election, these are coming from sources within the department. So. That's the thing about presidential or executive orders they're easy to change if they have any weight at all, they can be reversed by the president. So again, I just keep coming back to, we'll have to see how much weight this actually carries because some executive orders seem to hold up better than others, but they're designed to not be really important because of the whole premise of we don't WanNa King. I would say for right now it's pretty safe to assume this is mostly a stunt. Let's talk about that poll in Florida for just a second it's an NBC News Marist poll. It pulled likely voters in Florida and shows that Biden and trump are both tied forty eight percent to forty eight percent. Now I looked on fivethirtyeight dot com who has ratings of polls and marriage is actually in a plus pollster. But what I was surprised to find is that all of the ones still had a margin of error of about five percent and that's actually pretty close to what this poll ended up being. This poll has a margin of error of four point, five percent. So to me that sounds like pretty significant because that could mean binds up like fifty to forty eight or something like that or fifty to forty, seven something in that neighborhood. Or trump could be too. You know who who knows but this could be why trump thought was. So important to sign that executive order about drilling because maybe he knew this was coming out soon and that he would get a boost from this. The interesting thing though realclearpolitics which usually leans at least bit Republican. Still has. Biden up one point, two percent on average it take all the polls and average them. So in that one Biden is. Forty, eight to forty, seven in just Florida alone I'm talking. So I don't know. Is this one in outlier? Is it actually that close? What happened to the ones that we're showing biden up like six or whatever? I guess the thing to keep in mind is Florida's always gonNA come down to the wire. The famous saying after two thousand sixteen was you could give Florida voters the choice between a scoop of ice cream or a kick in the head. It'd be fifty, one, forty, nine. So. Yeah. Florida always kind of show. You know it's always Florida. quickly, and just another story that shows how trump is corrupting all facets of the US government. Actually, it's more William Bar Interior Minister William Barr yesterday in a quote highly unusual move nets the New York Times language meaning it's never been done before in it shouldn't. The Department of Justice moved to replace trump's private legal team with federal lawyers, and this is for the defamation lawsuit brought by e Jean. Carroll. Who is accusing trump raping her back in the Nineteen Ninety S in Manhattan. They're saying that since trump denied ever knowing carol or basically saying that she's not his type anyway. An actual thing he said. The Justice Department is arguing that since he was president when he said those things, he should be able to be represented by US lawyers like US attorneys, which is. Not, how it's supposed to work to say the least these are people we pay tax dollars for. It's just not how this stuff works. The Department of Justice isn't the president's Personal Legal Team The main consequence of this move is that basically overrules a state judge's ruling last month that made it possible for trump to be deposed before the election in November, which he obviously wouldn't want into knows huge show up for it anyway. But this is basically another stall tactic at best and a complete misuse of government resources at worst and most likely this sort of thing is the reason that a lot of people actually say that Bill Bar is the most dangerous person in government not Donald Trump because bill bars actually still with it and basically just willing to make the president and King and just steamroller everyone in the process. And finally, let's get to whatever happened in North Carolina last night the trump rally here. Let's take a listen to some of the highlights good. Now, these crowds tell you it's beyond what we had in terms of enthusiasm beyond what we had for years ago in twenty six. Breaking about crowd size during a pandemic when almost none of them are wearing masks bold move by the way you know who's further left than crazy Bernie. Kamala Kamala. Model Jeez on black. I can't imagine why trump would intentionally mispronounced her name in just make fun of it in general he respects both of those groups very much. Nobody has been through what I've been through as president of the United States nobody. Dum Dum hate done a four presidents have been assassinated. So but no, for sure. Yeah, you've been treated the worst. You know they used to say Abraham Lincoln got the worst press I said there's no way he got worse than, but Lincoln was very very badly treated by the is. Maybe. In his case, it was real I can tell you in my case it's fake. Totally fake love. The subtlety there just has to get one little shot in Lincoln about Oh maybe the press was right maybe he was the bad guy going against slavery. I mean what the interestingly enough some people have said, the Lincoln project has gotten under his skin so much that he subconsciously links them to Abraham Lincoln. So that's why he's always attacking him. It's sort of hard to tell any train of thought in that broken mind of trump's in by the way, don't take my word for it. Here's another clip from that same rally where are you going to be appointing very bro crime judges, but they wanted to destroy your suburbs he. You know the. You know the rule, the regulation that I just terminated they want to build low income projects in the suburbs been doing it. They've been destroying suburbs we're not doing it anymore. Pro Crime Judges they want just a ton of crime always love a judge who wants some crime. One. Last one here. Number one terrorist and the mass murder of American troops. Qassim Salamone we got. Him To salomone. The man just short circuits when he tries to say troops that's not just like a casual stumbled this man is slurring words. All right that'll do it for me here today there's really no special announcements today just the usual and a review. If you like what you hear, give me personal feedback through the Google form that sort of thing actually I lied I almost forgot it again I forgot it yesterday I think I think just starting Tuesday kind of threw me off but we have to give a very special. Thank you. Shout out to the people who helped make this show possible in those people are our producer Cathy and our executive producer. Gwen again, thank you so much supporting the show otherwise stay safe make your plan to vote fill out your census and I'll see you right back here tomorrow.

Donald Trump Joe Biden Florida Bob Woodward United States President Bob flu Arizona Justice Department executive President Xi Attorney Quick News Biden Group Abraham Lincoln Department of Interior Google
Episode 295 "Pressure. Direct And Steady."

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

2:49:54 hr | 7 months ago

Episode 295 "Pressure. Direct And Steady."

"How would to this genocide to these things. You knew there was a deep quite well here. We go another week after A week off which which was not planned by the way but you have reached native opinion. We are an indigenous information and education radio show and podcast every week. We talk about current affairs related to and from our own native american perspectives. And again as we've done this now. Two hundred ninety five times. My name is michael kicking bear and he of course over there he is. David grill she. Oh everybody could morning and we're late twenty because of me. I had a technical problem with clean feed and we discovered that you can only have one tab open at a time so if you think about it uses that tool just know that i couldn't blame it on windows. This time i tried you. They give you a neighbor. Did trust him. After after after he was incredibly frustrated with the situation. I text him. I said by amac. And you know. God i even asked him. I just remembered. I asked david. Look how about a middle road. Get a tablet. no new refuse. They said that yup right here. we are. Nobody's as we're probably thoroughly angered you guys like okay. Are they doing saturday shows anymore. Not going to give me live anymore. They're going to be prerecorded. Ah what is going on. I don't blame you guys last week. We add unforeseen circumstances with prior commitments. That needed to be addressed service so and there was so. Oh there's hell mid-morning house so they went out. Okay just thing. If you guys listen live and you come into the chat and interact with us. It's one confirmation that we know actually stuff is working kind of sort of slightly. We appreciate a good see. How now today is what we call a thick show thick episode dave little bit because it was As as so many republicans pointed out our historic week during the confirmation hearing debra holland congresswoman deborah helen for the department of interior secretary. And we're going to get into that and that's that's going to take awhile. Yeah a little bit. I'll just say that historic event was overshadowed by her treatment. I'll i'll just meet now. You know no doubt absolutely so you know so. We'll definitely get to that so how you can reach us here on the show house done We have a chat room on the instructions. How to use that of course are on our homepage. At native opinion dot com can also email us. It's hosts with an ass hosts at native opinion dot com in quite a number of you did emails over the past week and a half Our time permitting today unfortunately We just not gonna be able to get to the feedback this week so We again policy is very much for that but Just so you know we did. Get your your messages and and we will. We will fit those in probably at the next saturday show So i just wanted to point out that little production snafu there another way you can reach us of course is also twitter at native opinion over there. We have a facebook page. It's facebook dot com forward slash native opinion podcast and our website again the aforementioned native opinion dot com. You can also subscribe to our podcast available after every live broadcast which saturdays and and the audio is Auto magically available directly after this broadcast. And so if you go to any of the major podcast directories And subscribe to show. You will get the audio delivered to you every single time. We do an episode which is wednesdays and saturdays. wednesdays are prerecorded and saturdays or live so please subscribe. It's probably the easiest way to listen to our show and you can listen to it at your own convenience so Last at least we also have a voicemail system you can Dial eight six zero eight hundred five nine five eight zero eight hundred five five nine five. Is that number so any of those will work. So thanks guys. Absolutely thank you mornings under. Well we want our listeners to know we appreciate the support that we receive from you. The financial support we receive goes directly to our costs and expenses associated with producing the show and some of those expenses are things like website and podcast hosting music licensing content development end curation our daily business operations marketing advertisement and more. So please join our the wonderful folks who have contributed to the show by becoming a patron and you can find those details. Honor website at native opinion dot com forward slash support and on our facebook page. Just click on the learn more button and another great way to help is by telling the people about the show and we again thank you for listening. It really does help us grow in leaps and bounds. Sometimes so that. That support is greatly appreciated. Definitely tell everybody yes. Please your friends tell your friends see social media or even burson absolute and you're listening to episode two nine five pressure directed steady. Yes yeah. That's a apropos title for sure. We also want to thank our sponsor. One only sponsor is mohegan trading post at mohegan trading post dot com. They make authentic mohegan handmade craft and beadwork ribbon shirts embroidered hats. Dream catchers other specialty items. They also create a cloth masks in this time of pandemic and kovin hope hopefully one day. Maybe they won't have to offer those anymore but But for now it is still recommended and so you can find out about all of those things at mohegan trading post dot com and again. We think very much for their support of our show. Absolutely thank you can treating post and another listener commander. Morning amanda amanda hey. How's it going. Amanda has a small bakery and the do great work for bakery for For pets for dogs come. We can vouch for for those. They're they're very tasty so our dog say marley loves his order. More matter of fact he he. He loved him so much he would beg for them. So that's how much he enjoyed the sweet. There you go with endorsement he would come up to me and sit and look at me with pitiful is and i would have to figure out okay. He's been fed he's had his morning treaties had his button. His button is his nutritional supplement. So i said okay. What's left. And then i go towards the bag. And he's like yup that's it his tail wagging it's like. Yeah some so. Thank you amanda for those streets. Want put the link to your website in in the chat that would help to. Everybody can sure check it out and experienced. Our dogs did awesome awesome. Alright so i guess we should transition into native news because again we have. We have a lot to talk about. Yeah we'll springboard right into that this. This particular article made me smile. And i'm hoping other states will Jump on board as well but more. So i'm hoping the federal government will get on board with it. And the title of this article lists oregon law to decriminalize all drugs goes into effect offering addicts rehab instead of prison and this was written by lindsay sh-sh-she schnell for news dot yahoo dot com so for jamie benn rock-bottom came slowly and all at once a longtime drug and alcohol addict. Gawky some lucking son. I hope i pronounced that right pushes back on the idea that one terrible day on the street leads to an epiphany and i climbed back to normalcy. That's what happens in movies. Not in real life quote. I've lived in the bottom for years for me. And people like me. I laid there and wallowed in it for a long time. She says but if she has to pick the lowest point one that lasted years not days. She said it came shortly after she hit thirty in nine hundred ninety eight at that time gullickson there we go had five kids ages five to eleven four different men. She came home from work one day at a locksmith to find that her ex husband had taken her two youngest and left the state horrified and convinced that this was the beginning of the end. Her life spiraled. She dropped her other son off with his dad and left her two daughters with their mom and soon became an ivy meth user in prison. Six years later well. Gullikson was contemplating joining intensive recovery program. When a striking mag- magnetic gorgeous black woman walked into the room held up a mug shot and started talking about being in the very chairs we were sitting and that was a quote gullickson remembers. There was life on the other side of addiction in prison. The woman said but you have to fight for it. Gullikson believed her quote. I remember thinking. I may not be able to do all that but she was but maybe i could do something different than this quote call. Gullikson said that day. I felt the door open to change in healing now. Executive director of the mental health and addiction. Association of oregon. She's determined to give other addicts that same opportunity. That's why she pushed for the passage of measure. One one zero i. It's kind legislation that decriminalized possession of all illegal drugs in oregon including heroin. Cocaine meth and oxycodone. Instead of a criminal justice based approach the state will pivot to a healthcare based approach offering addicts the same treatment. I'm sorry offering addicts treatment instead of prison. Time those in possession will be fined. One hundred dollars a citation. That will be dropped if they agree to a health assessment. The law goes into effect monday. And this article was written on the first of february this year Staining yep so the laws are really in effect and will be implemented over the next decade by by state officials at the oregon health authority. So i think this is a great program. will discourage drug-use. I'm not sure but it's a step in the right direction. In my opinion because loading up the prison system with people that need treatment instead of incarceration is not the answer. either. And i say that because there's just a big drug problem in the prison system as they raised outside the prison system People are still getting drugs in the prison. So like i said. I'm not sure that this this law that's going to curb illegal drug use or a curb drug use. It's no longer illegal. But i don't. I don't know that it's going to curb drug use it but at least it's a step in the right direction. It's you know you have to lay foundation and you build up on a foundation. So let's hope let's hope other states will kind of adopt some of the same policies offering treatment instead of incarceration will help people stop drug use. I guess that that's curbing drug use to some degree. So let's let's see. I'm gonna keep my eye on this one and see how it develops Through time and the rest of this article will be in the show notes. Do you have anything. Wanna add brother. Thank you brother. No actually when you're talking about. I was thinking about my son and who Who has the prison ministry indigenous prison ministry here in connecticut So he tours the different Different state presence in don was curious. What his what. His position on that might be Common 'cause he may he may come across folks that are there because of that Am not not entirely sure. But you know. But i'd have to. I'd have to ask them if the lady that was featuring. The article is from an indigenous community. He didn't really identify but it did. Not but yeah. But the reason. I a gravitated towards this one because it you know there are lots of native people cauti- rated for substance abuse so that that would apply to them as well This new law that oregon has instituted But i'm sorry to interrupt your train of thought. No no. that's okay. So i you know i. I'll have to talk with them about that. Probably see him this weekend. So i'll try. We'll try to run it by and see what he says. So all right This next article title reads federal judge. React excuse me rejects apache strongholds request to halt transfer sacred oak flat because they are not ready sovereign. They're not a sovereign nation. We there is a line between education and ignorance and another line between education ignorance and willful. Ignorance So it doesn't matter if you're a united states federal judge or local judge or someone in even even an attorney in general your biases can still play a role in decision making. So i'll throw that out there before. I even read any of this. Yeah i've been trying to get a hold of wins lert noise. He's headed this. This fight for a long time. I know of windsor through another friend. And they had mentioned the podcast to wins a time to. So i'm going to keep trying to get a hold of him call. Let's see if we can get him on the show like a plan on so out of washington and this is brought to through native news. Online dot net for the source. Excuse me. I'm having a problem with my throat today. Washington goes on to say the united states district judge on friday denied apache strongholds request for an injunction to prevent the gateway. Excuse me to prevent the giveaway and destruction of sacred oak flat to rio. Tinto resolution copper to a mining company. If i remember practically be The district court judge steven logan A stephen logan up Having a problem reading today district court judge steven logan apache stronghold has no right to ask the court for help because they are not officially designated quote a sovereign nation in his ruling. Logan said the united states government has no trust responsibility to the apache. Even though their treaty of eighteen fifty two says quote the government of the united states shall so legislate and act as to secure the permanent pro prosperity and happiness of said indians sounds pretty straightforward to me. Why a federal district court judges having and difficulty reading federal law and policy must be that thing you mentioned. is questionable. So you know. I'll be bold and say i if the judge is having difficulty interpreting federal law and policy than said judge should not have a judgeship. Perhaps because it's not about. Oh michael kicking bears mad because a judge didn't rule in a positive way for an indian tribe. No read again. The government of the united states shall so legislate and so as to secure the permanent prosperity and happiness of said indians and said indians is identified in the treaty of eighteen. Fifty two for the patchy nation doesn't about michael kicking bears. Bias is about doing his job. The judge that is correct going on says in reaching this conclusion the judge quoted a case saying quote the exclusive right of the united states to establish indian title has never been doubted. And whether it'd be done by treaty by the sword or by purchase by the exercise of complete domination adverse to the right of occupancy or otherwise it's justness is not open to inquiry in the courts close quote. Are you kidding me. That wasn't ballsy quote. We are disappointed but we are not giving up an are excited to appeal to a higher court to prove our points where we disagree close quote apache stronghold leader informal san carlos. Apache tribal chairman. Dr wins ler noise senior. Said quote quoting him again to say that we are not being. Coerced is not accurate. As i am living there. We are praying there yet. If rio tinto gets i'm sorry i won't be able to pronounce this kilkeel O. teal and the land becomes private property on march eleventh. We will be arrested for criminal trespass on our own. Sacred land insane Why do i feel like A bunch of people are going to be converging on rio tinto in the next lynx. The it should happen. I am. Here's the sad thing. The appeals process. Slow the mind will be open and operating before an appeals court. Here's this case. Damage will be done. People will become sick. Land will be desecrated before this gets to a high court and the high according to this this point will be probably the supreme court. I believe so so. The federal court of appeals as a stepping-stone before before the supreme court. Here's decide whether you'll hear the case or not and of course that's that's that's their prerogative over there. The they have the ability to deny cases as well as accept them. So i'm i'm hoping deb. Helen's confirmation will carry a lot of weight and stopping this process. You know here's the thing. I'm sure there are other lands that are not native lands although all turtle island native land. But i'm speaking of land that has been designated public land that doesn't involve native religious sites burial ground reservation property etc etc. Where they can do this mining. I see this as a concerted effort to target native people's as often as they possibly can and stealing. That's what it's about I don't think it's about well we can't we can't get it anywhere else bul hockey. Here's another problem statement. I'm sorry i'm scanning ahead here in the article. But it says judge. Logan also concluded that the complete destruction of oak flat turning into a two mile wide crater over a thousand feet gps and eliminating the apache ability to practice. Their religion is not a substantial burden on the apache because they are being coerced to act contrary to their religious beliefs by the threat of civil criminal sanctions close coat. Even after oak flat became private property on march even out even though after oak flat became private property on march. Eleventh apaches praying there would be subject to arrest and prosecution by criminal trespass so there is a provision in federal law. You know it's it's it's known as The native american religious freedom act which does apply if they are on tribal land and so for as david pointed out an appeals process. That's that's takes time to you know. Get squared up In since this judge did not see fit to Put a clause in that. Says you should upon repeal appeal if it's a sale transfer whatever whatever the status of oak flat currently is he saw fit not to do that and add additional protections at least for the for the tribe in this particular case. Now another thing. I wanna point out is this is this is this is a district federal judge and on this show i have. I kept trying to bring awareness to people That the bigger damage being done to Indigenous people in this country is at the district court level not the supreme court level and the and the amount of district court judges that were seated by donald trump administration is higher than any other pass administration of record and so these are conservative judges in many cases and so this is the kind of rationale and misapplication of federal law that we can expect until its address now that aspect of process deb. Helen is not going to have an effect over. So i just want to point that out that this is this is going to be a continuous problem. anytime an area like this. That is sacred to us or a tribe. If i wanted to be a little more. Balanced comes under scrutiny Well here's the thing this isn't new and it's something you know the apache people in other other tribes there have been fighting for a long time and i am glad they mentioned it in this articles. I did some research on this Icenhower had been protecting that that area since fifty five nine hundred fifty five four. it's cultural environmental value and it was two republican senators and it will republican senator during a democratic senator That gave it away. Gave it to resolution copper in twenty twenty fifteen through legislative process. That's bs that's like reaching into somebody's pocket. Bringing out a handful of dad presidents looking at the person standing next to them and saying here. You can have this. That's what it amounts to. What is the matter with people. What is the matter with people do you want do you answer that. It'll take another hour. No that was that was that was a little hyperbole hypothetical in it's just come on people where lawmakers. Oh when is enough going to be enough. When when are they going to have enough money to say okay. We don't have to steal from people or or desecrate sacred lands. When is enough enough. Well i can answer that in sort of a tease for the deb jalan segment. You have senator barosso on the energy and environment committee senate committee. Who's been in office. I think i still have the slide up me. Let me double check Second guy sorry. He's been in office since june twenty-fifth of two thousand seven yet to get rid of the old guard is my point. I and hopefully bring in people that that are a hell of a lot more open minded and have a desire to you know to follow policy and law that has been long established and then on top of that make improvements to those policies and laws because nothing is perfect right so no. It's not. Nothing is perfect but it's a good reason to go to why this matters dot org because it talks about doing some of the same things my brother just mentioned we have to get rid of the old guard and it's not that the you know. Some of the old guard didn't have good ideas they did. But some of those old ideas got lost in the shuffle. no republicans. No some of that old guards idea got lost in the shuffle when groups like the tea party came along and they ran roughshod over the party. Totally totally so. We have to put people in the position to run for office who are wanting to buy demonstration. Listen to those people who are going to vote to put them there who see some of the same problems that their future constituency and know that. Something's gotta be done to stop the greed stop the hatred stop the destruction if not you know. The last flush is going to happen because we are already circling the drain. The last flush is going to happen. And there's no way back just to round out this article. Okay flack excuse. me oak. Flat is located about seventy miles east of phoenix on the tanto national forest on lands historically by multiple tribes including the apache the of apply the law and the Oldham we've talked about before their their their border reser. Their reservation straddles The arizona and new mexico border giving me mexican border. Excuse me and and Trump ran his. Dan wall through the middle of the res- prior to the writer. Oak flat has been protected from mining since nineteen fifty when they mentioned president. Eisenhower protected the area for its cultural and environmental value rio. Tinto admits that they're oak flat. Mining will create a crater almost two miles across in more than one thousand feet deep middle finger. Fu to them. The can't like you can't find another place to do you're damn mining. Yeah like i said a moment ago. I know the representatives that pushed this this legislative rider onto the fifteen defense department funding bill. Yep that's where it was. That's where it was stuck in. it's called pork. John john mccain along with an kirk kirkpatrick and paul gosar push this bill through course to republicans and a damn of course into the defense department funding bill. So you know come up people. This has to stop. It has to stop so all right all right brother europe so it's next segment. It's going to take awhile morning. Everyone in jack is dave likes to say a. Grab your favorite beverage. Have a seat because This is probably a not necessarily looking to myself or looking for accolades. But this is probably the most amount of writing i've ever done to to date for the show because it required an An unusually an unusual additional amount of research and deconstruction to counter are lot of bs from Republicans and. i'm trying very very hard to be good today with my language And dave heard your mic. Click off. But i hope i hope you're going to jump in here. Different points Because there's going to be a lot of things that need to be responded to. I feel By both of us but anyway this congressman woman have howland with from the blow of laguna and has been representing new. Mexico's i can gush congressional district. Since twenty nine thousand nine hundred. She was also one of the first. Two native american woman elected to congress here so before we move on with this segment here is congresswoman deb. Hounds opening remarks in her confirmation hearing on her way to becoming the nation's first indigenous cabinet secretary for the united states. This is going to take about six and a half minutes But i but you know. I think it's obviously fair that you know we play Her statement Because it's oh sure absolutely that's absolutely critical this is. This is the person that joe biden his pick to become the next interior secretary. So here was opening statement. Thanks guys guazzini. Hopefu- do it's arteaga schumi hano chairman mansion ranking member barosso members of the committee. Thank you so much for having me here today. I wouldn't be here without the love and support of my child. soma my partner skip. Who is with me this morning sitting behind me. My mom eri toyota who's watching from pueblo. My extended family in generations of ancestors who is sacrificed so much. So i could be here today. Acknowledged that we are on the ancestral homelands of the koch tank anacostia in piscataway. People as many of you know my story is unique. Although today i serve as a member of congress and was vice chair of the house natural resources committee. If confirmed i would be the first native american to serve as cabinet secretary this historic nature of my confirmation is not lost on me but i will say it's not about me rather i hope nomination would be an inspiration for americans moving forward together as one nation and creating opportunities for all of us as the daughter of a pueblo woman. I was taught to value hard work. My mother is a navy. Veteran was a civil servant at the bureau of indian education for twenty five years and she raised four kids as a military wife. My dad the grandson of immigrants was a thirty year career marine. Who served in vietnam. He received the silver star in his buried in arlington national cemetery. I spent summers in. Minnesota are small village on laguna pueblo. The location of my grandparents traditional home. It was there that i learned about my culture from my grandmother by watching her cook. And by participating in traditional feast days and ceremonies it was in the cornfields with my grandfather. Where i learned the importance of water and protecting our resources where i gained a deep respect for the earth as a military family. We moved every few years when i was a kid but no matter where we lived. My dad taught me and my siblings to appreciate nature whether on a mountain trail or walking along the beach. i'm not a stranger stranger to the struggles. Many families across america face. Today i've lived most of my adult life paycheck to paycheck and piece together. Healthcare for me and my child as a single mom and at times relied on food stamps to put food on the table. It's because of these struggles that i fully understand the role. Interior must play in the president's plan to build back better to responsibly. Manage our natural resources to protect them for future generations so that we can continue to work. Live hunt fish in prayer among them. I understand how important the department is for all the stakeholders rely on it in the communities whose economies are connected to it. I know the bipartisan accomplishments of this committee. Stand out in congress. Your work led to interior. Having significant resources and authorities especially with the great american outdoors act and the public land's package will work collaborative collaboratively with all members of this committee to ensure these are implemented. Well as chair of the subcommittee on national parks forests and public lands. I also worked on these issues in congress and listen to all of my colleagues and constituents about ways to improve management of the department. I am proud of the bipartisan manner. In which we move these bills through my subcommittee and to the house floor as i've learned in this role. There's no question that fossil energy does and will continue to play a major role in america for years to come. I know how important oil and gas revenues are too critical services but we must also recognize that the energy industry is innovating in our climate challenge. Must be addressed together. We can work to position our nation and all of its people for success in the future. And i'm committed to working cooperatively with all stakeholders and all of congress to strike the right balance going forward as part of this balance the department has a role in harnessing the clean energy potential of our public lands and create jobs in a new economic opportunities. The president's agenda demonstrates that america's public lands can and should be engines for clean energy production. President biden also knows that restoring and conserving our lands through a civilian climate core. The potential to spur job creation the families of fossil fuel workers. Who helped build our country ranchers and farmers who care deeply for their lands communities with legacies of toxic pollution. People of color who stories deserve to be heard in those who want jobs of the future. I vowed to lead the interior department. Ethically in with honor and integrity. I will listen to and work with members of congress on both sides of the aisle. I will support interiors servants. And be careful steward of taxpayer dollars. I will ensure that the interior department's decisions are based on science will honor the sovereignty of tribal nations. Recognize their part in america's story and i'll be a fierce advocate for our public lands. I believe we all have a stake. In the future of our country. And i believe that every one of us republicans democrats and independents shares a common bond our love for the outdoors in desire and obligation to keep our nation livable for future generations. I carry my life experiences with me. Everywhere i go. It's those experiences that give me hope for the future. If an indigenous woman from hong humble beginnings can be confirmed as secretary of the interior our country holds promise for everyone. finally. I want to give special. Thanks to you chairman mansion for calling this hearing today and for sharing with me the issues and needs of the people that you represent in west. Virginia if confirmed. I will listen to all of the people represented by members of this committee and this congress. I'm grateful for your time today. And i'm ready to serve. And thank you senator heinrich for kind introduction and i look forward to your questions so there you go congresswoman deb. Helen president biden nominated deb holland as his pick for secretary which would make her the country's first indigenous person to hold a cabinet secretary position and only the second indigenous person to hold an administration cabinet position overall. Most people do not know that a native american once was vice president of the united states. unfortunately american public schools failed to educate its citizens of this fact. His name was charles. Curtis what is known about. Hurt us is that he was born in eighteen. Sixty two a white father and konso or cau- indigenous mother. His mother died when he was three and he was left in the care of his concert. Grandmother according to the official website or the combination of oklahoma the nation during this is a quote the nation derived its name from the co on aca or south wind a reference to the tribes role in sarah in war ceremonies using power of the wind. When recognizing warriors among the many variations of the name given by french traders and other europeans were conza or kanza. It's important to keep in mind that. When europeans heard indigenous languages spoken in north america they attempted to translate those names into english and other languages phonetically the condemnation the original people of the mid western territory where they originally lived was renamed by europeans. Later to be called. You guessed it. Kansas curtis later became a successful lawyer and was elected to the. Us house of representatives. He was then elected to the senate serving as majority leader. Curtis was a republican and is documented as being an advocate for women's rights. He has proposed or excuse me he had. He proposed the very first version of the equal rights amendment so if an indigenous republican can introduce positive legislation in the early nineteen hundreds. What the hell's wrong with these modern day. Republicans tea party because their behavior towards indigenous who is the current nominee to lead the department of the interior was anything but positive in this segment. We will look at statements made by some republican members of the senate committee on energy and natural resources and we will also deconstruct the lies that they perpetuated during their testimonies a congresswoman halland it was pretty shameful but sadly also expected before you continue broad. Let me let me interject something. Good thank you some of the statements that you're about to hear coming from or actually let me backup some of the attacks that you're about to hear throughout the segment are coming from republicans. I'm gonna say this much. i'm not. I'm not using behavior by some democrats as well. No no no. I understand but in this segment we're only dealing with republicans. Want to be clear about that. Thank you and the reason. I mentioned this is because some of those very same republicans are on. Guess what the indian affairs committee. The indian affairs committee absolutely are how oxymoronic is that. And those republicans are senator lisa. Murkowski for alaska senator. Job hoven from north dakota senator james langford from oklahoma senator. Steve daines montana. Sure i don't remember rounds or moran testifying there if they did it must have been remote missed it but some of her worst attacks are coming from three of the four people that i mentioned early. there's one individual that very unkind towards her and he's not on the indian affairs committee. But you'll you'll hear his comments the upcoming but how oxymoron issues the fact that you have people that are supposed to be on the indian affairs committee working on the behest of native peoples ripping this candidate part for no other reason than you know doing the bidding of their their corporate masters yup absolutely so think about that as you listen to the comments from these individuals in. You'll you'll wonder why in the heck are they even on the committee. There uber. Okay no problem. Thank you brother you all right so to kick this off. Here is the committee's new chairman. Joe manchin with the democrat of west. Virginia who explains the responsibilities of the secretary interior. And i thought this was important so that anybody. That really isn't familiar with what. The responsibilities of the interior secretary are felt that that playing his setup is very very important grilled about three and a half minutes. So here we go. Committee meets today to consider nomination representative deborah holland to secretary of the interior. So good to see her here and she has honorable young with your friend of all of us for many many years. We want to welcome her to the committee. Thank you for being here this morning. And for your willingness to serve in this important position the role the secretary nearly one hundred and thirty years ago. The supreme court described the secretary of interior as the guardian of the people of the united states over the public lands but the court's description barely scratches the surface of the broad scope of the secretary's responsibilities. The secretary responsible for managing more than four hundred eighty million surface acres nearly one fifth the land area of the united states. Seven hundred million acres of subs- subsurface minerals and two point five million acres the outer continental shelf. These lands include over four hundred national parks over one hundred national monuments and over five hundred national wildlife refuge along with nearly five hundred dams and over three hundred reservoirs that supply water to thirty one million people in era gate. Ten million acres of farmland in addition the land managed by the secretary produce nearly twenty percent of the nation's energy that is critical for energy independence including twelve percent of our natural gas. Twenty four percent of our oil forty three percent of our coal half of our geothermal energy and much of our wind solar and hydropower. Those public lands also generate twelve billion dollars for the federal treasury. Now i don't know if you guys that in the background i'm trying so hard to fool at my language because we've already gotten feedback about my my mouth. Somebody in the background said you sure you want this job. Yeah i heard that okay. it's it's little. There's there's a ton of What's the word. i'm looking for. Micro aggression yes. Thank you perfect. That are going to play out in this. That was one of them now cliff. i don't know who that was but you know and they try to flay as jokes. I'm just joking just joking but yet you heard it yourself. They support one point eight million jobs and contribute an estimated three hundred fifteen billion dollars to the us economy. The secretary also maintains government to government relations with five hundred seventy four indian tribes holds in trust fifty six million acres of indian trust lands provides educational services to tens of thousands of native american students in twenty three states. In addition the secretary is responsible for reclaiming thousands of abandoned coal mine sites paying health benefits to minors overseeing one of our nation's premier scientific agencies the geological survey and protecting thousands of endangered and threatened species from extinction. Finally the secretary oversee seventy thousand employees in the department of interior and the annual budget of over twenty one billion dollars it truly is an enormous and important job and it is critical that the secretary be ready to take on the management of the department and have a deep understanding of the many issues under purview president biden nominating representative holland for this critical role expressed his confidence that she is up to the task and that she will be. A true story of our national parks are natural resources and all of our lands. Representative hauling currently represents the first congressional district of new mexico in the house of representative. She served as vice chairman of the house committee on natural resources. And as the chair of its subcommittee on national parks in public lands during the last congress as a former governor. I've always believed that. The president should be given wide latitude in the selection of his or her cabinet. But i also take the senate's constitutional obligation to advise and consent to the president's nomination seriously like many of my colleagues. I look forward to hearing from representative holland today and getting to know more about her views and the policies and programmes she will pursue if confirmed to this important position. Okay now for the benefit of some of our listeners. Outside of the united states the process of many senate and house committees is to alternate testimonials in questions between generally the two main political party representatives that of democrat and republicans. Right for the most part our country gets done because representatives are more interested in toeing the party line and arguing amongst themselves rather than truly representing the people in their interests here. This process means that. For every positive statement and support deb jalan receives. There was an equal and negative reaction from the other side. This was on full display in this confirmation hearing now again. i'm not really focused at all on democrats. The democrats have pretty much lined up in are supporting the which is appreciated so You can disagree with somebody but you don't have to be. I'm so used to used to just saying what's on my mind the way i want to say it but you don't you don't have to you. Don't have to be mean spirited about it. i'll put it that way. Okay all right so to begin. We're going to start by deconstructing. The opening statements of the committee's ranking member. Which is sort of like A second in command position and this is going to. This is republican. John baracoa at the moment who represents the state of wyoming. So here's our first clip of mr barroso. I would now recognize my colleague. Senator brosseau to make this opening statement brosseau. Thank you very much. Mr chairman today. Our committee is considering the nomination of representative dave holland to Services secretary of interior since two thousand and nineteen congresswoman holland has represented new. Mexico's first congressional district. Which includes most of albuquerque and several surrounding pueblos suburbs. If confirmed she would be the first native american cabinet secretary for that reason. Her nomination is historic and deserves to be recognized. Bad right acknowledged deb. Howland stated that her appointment would be historic. but then here's his very next sentence. Same time i am troubled by many of representative holland views views. That many in my home state of wyoming would consider as radical radical views. Okay sure he's entitled to his point of view. But just because you disagree with someone's point of view doesn't necessarily mean that they are radical the word radical is defined as number one very new and different from the unusual ordinary now we purposely played congresswoman deb holland's opening statement and actually that was out of order the way the hearing actually when but i did that deliberately because i didn't hear anything radical in there i heard somebody that's willing to work with both sides as willing to take a balanced approach to policy and work with everyone the second part of the definition radical is or of relating to people who favor rapid and weeping changes in laws and governments so in the context of the department of the interior brosseau to define what he means by radical so moving on with broncos opening remarks. Here's the next part secretary of interior's critically important job in my home state of wyoming and to the entire west if confirmed as secretary of interior representative holland would lead an agency with more than seventy thousand employees. These employees manage twenty percent of the nation's lands including our national parks. Our national monuments are wildlife. Refuges are multiple use lands and other end the entire outer continental shelf. The also serves managed the also serve as managers of the largest water supply in the west the secretary's responsibility that includes upholding our nation's trust responsibilities to five hundred and seventy four federally recognized american indian tribes and alaskan natives. So here we're also kept using the word our in the context of responsibilities of the secretary of the interior our nation's lands our wildlife refuges. Our multiple use lands our national monuments. Let's define the word. Our in the context of indigenous in american history. No senator. it's not our anything. The lanza deb howland would have oversight was never hours in the context of the country now known as the united states of america they are original indigenous occupied lands that we're in some cases forcibly taken after wars displacing hundreds of thousands of indigenous peoples then later noncompliant treaties were written by early united states union leaders and not every tribe agreed or sign them then later still through theft in bogus. Land deals and policy changes such as the united states relocation. Act that senator. Barosso is how you must define the word. Our in the context of terrestrial and submerged lambasts in north america. Anything else denies proper. Historical context so if senator barrasso is going to open his testimony by stating how deb jalen's appointment would be historic who better to begin to correct the egregious crimes of the united states which has committed against its indigenous peoples since its inception now. Are you saying those are pretty strong words. You damn right well. In my opinion brussels words were especially his use of the word our it was used to imply other to cast her in the light of otherness. Absolutely absolutely now there was something in mnuchin or munchkin or whatever his name is his openness damages in his opening statement and most people missed it. And it had to do with you. Do you mind playing that again brother. There's a reason why i'm asking you to do this. Only what three minutes. Yeah three and a half minutes. Yeah please indulge us for a little bit if you would please folks. There's a reason why. I'm asking my brother to play that. And listen really. Close to what he says about mine. Reclamation and who's responsible many meets today to consider nomination of representative deborah holland to be the secretary of the interior so good to see her here and she has honorable don young with her a dear friend of all of us for many many years. We want welcome to the committee to thank her for being here this morning. And for your willingness to serve in this important position the role of the secretary nearly one hundred and thirty years ago. The supreme court described The secretary of interior as the guardian of the people of the united states over the public lands but the course description barely scratches the surface of the broad scope of the secretary's responsibilities. The secretary responsible for managing more than four hundred and eighty million surface acres nearly one fifth the land area of the united states seven hundred million acres of subsurface minerals and two point five billion acres of the outer continental shelf. These lands include over four hundred national parks over one hundred national monuments over five hundred national wildlife refuge along with nearly five hundred dams over three hundred reservoirs that supply water to thirty one million people in era gate. Ten million acres of farmland. In addition the lands managed by the secretary produce nearly twenty percent of the nation's energy that is critical for energy independence including twelve percent of our natural gas twenty four percent of our oil forty three percent of our coal half of our geothermal energy and much of our wind solar and hydropower those public lands also generate twelve billion dollars for the federal treasury. They support one point. Eight million jobs and contribute an estimated three hundred and fifteen billion dollars to the us economy. The secretary also maintains government to government relations with five hundred seventy four indian tribes holds entrusts. Fifty six million acres of indian trust lands provides educational services to tens of thousands of native american students in twenty three states. In addition the secretary is responsible for reclaiming thousands of abandoned coal mine sites paying health benefits to minors overseeing one of our nation's premier scientific agencies the geological survey and protecting thousands of endangered and threatened species from extinction. Finally the secretary oversee seventy thousand boys in the department of the interior the annual budget of over twenty one billion dollars it truly is an enormous and important job and it is critical that the secretary ready to take on the management of the department have a deep understanding of the many issues under purview. President biden nominating representative holland for this critical expressed his confidence that she is up to the task and that she will be a true story of our national parks are natural resources and all of our lands. Representative hauling currently represents the first congressional district of new mexico in the house of representative. She served as vice chairman of the house committee on natural resources. And as the chair of its subcommittee on national parks forced public lands during the last congress as a former governor. I've always believed that the president should be given wide latitude in the selection of his or her captain. But i also take the sense. Constitutional obligation to advise and consent to the president's nomination seriously like many my colleagues. I look forward to hearing from representative holland today and getting to know more about her views and the policies and programmes she will pursue if confirmed to this important position. There you go okay. He specifically mentioned abandoned coal mines and that was something that his state is particularly interested in because a lot of cold comes out of west. Virginia a lot of coal correct. But what's more important is. And what's more important to know. Is who manages the payment programs or the benefit programs for the miners who worked in those coal mine. The federal government manages the benefit programs for those miners. Most people don't know that everybody's heard of black long everybody's heard of that and that's something that minors acquire who work in the coal mines but what people don't know is how many billions of dollars sometimes millions and the millions of dollars with benefits that are paid and i'm not saying that those miners aren't eligible for that. Of course they are but a lot of these programs that we are paying tax payers are self inflicted our governmental self-inflicted entities that cost people their lives. Eventually black lung is horrible disease horrible and my other point to this is the government is paying literally millions of dollars into these programs. They didn't have to be but they short the indian welfare system the indian health system. Excuse me by millions of dollars so when these senators are beating holland over the head. They're not thinking about you. Know the indian health care system and how they voted a lot of them to not fund the indian health care system adequately but they want to throw billions and millions and millions of dollars and two programs. They didn't have to be because of greed. That's my whole point about you. Know asking you to play that again brother in mansions or whatever. His name is mentioned of the coal coal fund. This links here that i'm gonna put in a chat and they're pretty eye opening so you know it just. It just galls me that you know. The interior department is managing all of these different fund. And they're not managing indian health service as adequately as as. It should be no argument there. And i'm not saying like i said i'm not saying that. These other funds aren't aren't aren't people. Aren't you know qualified or shouldn't receive them by all means they should but you know the same breath under a under a tree. Viant trust obligation fund indian. Health service in abundance. There should be no debate. Absolutely no debate. And what year was it twenty. Nineteen the government bailed out coal miner. Pensions ten mill ten billion dollars. That's what was sold out to save coal mine coal mine. Pensions ten billion dollars but the indian health service get shorted and they they they they quibbling in in quail over how much indian health services should be given exactly. There's there's no even application whatsoever again. We we'd speak about two sets of rules in this country constantly and improve it with verifiably with with examples like that and it still doesn't seem to change the behavior right now not at all. I'm like i'll share these these links and the show or show chat because it's important and it it all plays into you know why these people are beating up and demanding that she do this and do that. I'm gonna circle back to mention. Actually even though. I didn't really have him originally scheduled Not in the rundown. But i just quickly edited a piece because There's a price to pay for votes in like. I said i'll come back to that in a moment so back to barosso's opening remarks and again For those that just joined us and everything barosso is the ranking member or the second in command of this particular committee that's overseeing the confirmation hearings of deb holland and so senator barrosso who was from wyoming then transitioned into the first aspect of what republicans are truly so bent out of shape about energy and who will control the future of its production. Here we go. This is short. I'm sorry why did i lose. I've lost my audio for some reason on guys. It's probably has something to do with the cut just made Let's see let's see. Yes sorry guys. All right we get back. We did what is going on. I guess that's my brother. It's my turn to have some weird stuff happen. Hang on audio. Pack over wow. I mean to stop the whole show like this Pity okay so that was there now. Let me flip it back back to the board all right now. We're having all kinds of technical problems. Guys i'm so sorry. I'm not sure what's happening here. All right you. What brother are you there. Dave muscle unless oh okay here we go okay. I'm having a having a problem with my Outs my turn having a problem. Because i i edit it something which was stupid in the middle of the show. Also i to have to restart. I think on the system. So why don't if you don't mind. Why don't you jump ahead to other news for us if now sure and i'll get this. Thanks guys. sorry. All righty so in other news before i do that. Those those links that i shared in the chat room will. They'll they'll pr on the show notes as well but go take a look. There's there's so much that you know voters are left in the dark about. And i'm sure you know if they were given the straight scoop. They could find out about a lot of these things but a lot of times. Voters have no idea how many how many of you knew that. The black lung was a fund paid by the The interior department or partially funded by the interior department. So you know. There's just so so many things that voters left in the dark about the voters should know about so there. You go something to research but ahead jumping into in other news. It's seems that like say if if we needed to get results from something we have to apply pressure and that should never have to be the case and this article is is an example of some of that directive steady pressure diplomatically. Mind you but the nc response to hollan helen holland opposition urging her immediate confirmation as interior secretary and this was written by gina coons. Gm pronounced that right for native news online on wednesday the national congress of american indians and this was written february the eleventh convened an emergency meeting resulting in its public urging for the immediate confirmation of congresswoman deb holland to secondary of the department of the interior amid a growing chorus of pushback from republican senators. And a lot of and again. A lot of that. Pushback came from senators on the senate. the cynic committee the committee. Excuse me for indian affairs. Go figure that out. That's where a lot of the pushback came from senators who sit on the committee for indian affairs quoting department. The us department of the interior carries a broad range of responsibilities including the management of public lands water resources minerals wildlife management and cultural heritage preservation. And that last phrase cultural heritage preservation is important additionally it is charged and entrusted with upholding. The federal trust entreaty responsibilities. Of the five hundred. Seventy four tribal nations and more than five point. Two million american indians and alaskan natives. So that whole thing was important and if you think back about The article that we read on oak flat. It falls within that purview. As well as a result of these unique few dishes area entrust obligation to tribal nations. It is time that the ranks of the interiors leaders finally include a voice from the community. Who's day to day. Lives it impacts the most in quote holland congresswoman from new mexico and a citizen of laguna pueblo was nominated by president biden to leave the interior department in december but a growing number of republican house members have joined in opposition to the nomination citing concerns that holland. It's too radical which we heard before and some of the comments made by some of the panel members but in its emergency meeting with tribal nations on the eleventh. Ncaa president fun. Sharp cornell indian nation said that organization is aiming to educate lawmakers in and the general public. About holland's bipartisan record quoting. I'm very confident that deb holland would look to the best possible public policies in a way to manage our resources that honor public trust. That will heed the advice and recommendations of subject matter experts and make decisions that are objective fair and ultimately designed with an eye to preserving our natural landscape for many generations to come in quote. Sharp told native news online. So you see. Ncaa i has has had has found itself having to apply some of that steady direct pressure on congress and the panel that would service the confirmation or non confirmation of Senator holland so. Let's hope that she gets nominated. Let's hope that she gets the support that she needs from a majority of congress and like like we've said you know sometimes you have to apply pressure to get where you need to be and get results on things that you need results on. And it's sad. When pressure is the only thing that will solicit a response and if that be the case then directing stated pressure is called for absolutely indeed each and every time. and if that's the has to be the case then so be it all right. You're back for yes. Sorry guys it was like yeah and the rest of the article will be in the show notes software. Faux pas usual brother. Even max canal problems. That's true but that's true. It's tech but not anywhere near as many as windows. So i was i was. I was waiting for the rest of that. And thank you for that. Actually it was great reinforcement off of Pretty much where we were at so absolutely r right so That's hey it's why that's that's what we do. So all right. So as a as i originally was trying to let you guys know that again barossa transitioned into an aspect of really honestly what republicans are all pissed off about right. It has to do with the future of energy production from their their point of view. And so here was. Here was barosso's starting point on that discussion. The secretaries most critical functions is to oversee the development of traditional renewable energy supplies on public lands. And waters in wyoming. We're proud to be america's leading producer of coal uranium trona bent night wyoming ranks number one in federal production of natural gas and number two in the federal oil production. Almost fifty percent of wyoming surface area and sixty nine percent of wyoming's minerals are owned by the federal government. The collective size of the surface area owned by the federal government in wyoming is mr chairman larger than the entire state of west virginia. That was that was for information. Alaskan here in a moment. I'm in trouble right now. All right now that laugh you just heard our white male senators who are really heavily subsidized by oil and gas lobbyists money. Only they laugh at stupid jokes like that. Yeah that's very true. okay. I'm going to have to do a little research. I'd mentioned something about the The the the indian affairs committee indian affairs committee. I don't know how many natives are actually on that committee. I don't that's up my head either. But that's something. I will find out about but you know listening to them. That cackle about brussels joke you made me think that there's there's no natives that i know of on the committee and some of those committee members are sitting there cackling at brussels joke that are on the indian affairs committee. But i digress So okay so you heard barosso mentioned Some of the industry's you supposedly concerned about. He mentioned the production of for example trona. What is brother. It's used for a lot of stuff like glass and nanking agent in baking soda. I'm impressed yes but for everybody else. Here's what toronto is. Join me on a journey as we discover soda ash from the ground up. My name is selena downs in this series all the exploring white granular substance. That's been with us for more than five thousand years yet. Most of us very little about its use to clean. Our air even helps to sweden. It's used to manufacture the gloss in our buildings and the bottles we drink from as well as keeping our houses clean and this chemical is also playing a key role in the new wave of mobility. It's used in the batteries that power today. Symmetric vehicles like this one. It's also being used to minimize air pollution from our local shipping industry by drastically reducing sulphur. Emissions this is a story of manufacturing prowess on a global scale. This is the story of sodium carbonate known as soda ash. But what exactly is it. And where does it come from to find more come to the british geological survey based in nottingham here in the heart of the uk. I'm surrounded by some two hundred thousand rock specimens and four and a half million fossils and off to meet andrew blood worth the science director. Sarah andrew what is soda ash soda. Russian chemically in sodium carbonate is derived from mineral. Trona used in all sorts of things that we use every day everything from glass detergent pharmaceuticals to food. It depends on the economy. The ancient egyptians were the first people to use soda ash. They found deposits of trona out in the desert and they use that for making gloss like we do but we also used it for preserving mummies summation civilization made it from plum osh so certain plants that grow particularly in salty areas like marshes if you burn them the ashes quite sodium richard hence the term soda rush produced today in two ways. One is to a chemical process and the product that comes out of that as like synthetics direction and the other is by mining trona. Let's explore further the story of natural soda ash to find out more about how it is produced on crossing the atlantic to the big planes wyoming in the us because as well as its famed yellowstone national park by naming has a hidden secret underneath these planes. It is head deep within the green river. Basin with crystal structure of trona can be found in the lead evaporate deposits underground some eight hundred feet beneath me. Ladies boss natural deposits that were formed some sixty six million years ago. It's the reason why yeoman is called the soda ash capital of the world. I want to get a closer look. So i'm meeting with my manager. Wendy strobe to find out about conventional mining in wyoming where we just descended down our service voice about eight hundred and fifty feet. This area is the oldest area in the mine was constructed. Nineteen sixty two with conventional drill blast so the miners would have rolled out around. They would have used a cutting machine around the perimeter and loaded it with explosives and then blasted it out. And how does it stretch so innocent tired if you were to go east and west. Approximately five miles and north and south. It's proximate ten miles. And why do you find so interesting. It takes a lot of different people to do the planning and execution to actually produce the trona and get onto the surface. So i think that it's it's really good to see from front to back the entire process. Assassinates me for the past. Four years this mine has been run by jenner. It produces two and a half million tons of soda ash each year. I'm off to meet with. Ceo president ozark him to find out more. They're not many natural soda ash resources around the world this location. We're sitting on actually the ninety percent of the world resources located here. This is a two point. Five million metric tonne production facility with great ambition with growth. Also two thousand twenty five. We are adding five million tons of soda ash production about forty miles south of where we located today with two new facilities. So how long will the to. Last there is over one hundred years of resources available on that new project without considering any expansion around i think responsible mining and you utilizing the resources effectively is a key. Tell me about your workforce people you employ. We have the most productive workforce over in the green river. We have four hundred and forty four employees located right here in this location and we have forty four additional over at the headquarters. We just become a huge family or continues to grow. So that's toronto. And the king barosso sitting on top of the largest deposit in the world. So i'll give them that. A lot of things are made. Our that is dave said as you just heard in the piece which was produced by the way by bloomberg news and the host there was selena downs The other thing you mentioned was bent night ben tonight. His brother one for to now been tonight is actually a clay. That's where it is due purdue. Ding ding ding. Good thank you ooh. What is the purpose of drilling. Fluid claim the bottom of the whole to coal clean and lubricate the drill bit to maintain the walls of the whole transport cuttings to the surface and to prevent entry of formation fluids into the well bore water based mud consists of three parts or phases as mud. Engineers like to say. I is the water. Phase second is the active solid and third is the inactive or inert solid. What do we mean by active and inert while active. We mean that the solids respond or react when they contact chemicals here for example ben tonight. Clay and active solid has been put in a bigger of water which is a chemical by the way so dave get surprise. It's used for a lot of lot of different things matt. It has a medical benefit as well. S- correct. I saw that as well. Yeah okay so yeah. It's it's it's been around a long long time. And you know here's my thing on mining i'm not opposed to mining but do it responsibly. Clean up after yourself. If you abandon a mind. Fill the mine in with materials that you were going to discard and in the ocean. Put it in these minds you know like slag from you know smelt smelting process. Put it in the mine. Fill up the hole that you left in the earth. Just don't leave a gaping cavity. That does it. it's not going to benefit. It's only gonna cost problems. Do something about it but mine responsibly responsibly. You don't have to tear up sacred sites people's homes or you don't have to do anything like that you don't have to kill countless number of animals and restrict gracious all of. That's not necessary. It's not necessary mine responsibly. But in the case of ben tonight senator brosseau is worried that somehow the appointment of dab howland will magically make the production of ben tonight clay. Which as you heard is used to cool off. Drill bit heads will disappear drill. Bit heads are the key pieces of equipment used in oil and gas extraction production ding ding dang so to complete deconstruction of committee minority leaders opening remarks. We're not gonna turn to republicans next key argument against the appointment talent or her nomination and that is jobs and the economy. This'll be a little bit longer. So the about five and a half minutes. Let's see or dude. I have the wrong. Oh i am. i'm sorry. I have to add a clip guys. I'm blowing it today. God i got to tell you no problem relying it. It's it's been a a non tech day just not working like it should and also rust or something man all right so actually this not five minutes three minutes so higa. Energy production on public land creates good paying jobs. It provides tremendous revenue for state in wyoming energy and mineral activity on department of interior land. Had a seventeen point. Three billion dollar economic impact for fiscal year two thousand and nineteen and supported over fifty seven thousand jobs for years. The state of wyoming has collected over a billion dollars annually in royalties and taxes from oil. Gas and coal produced on federal lands within our within our borders and wyoming isn't the only state that benefits from energy production on public lands in representative holland's home state of new mexico. Energy and mineral activity on department of interior lands contributed twenty one billion dollars in fiscal year two thousand nineteen new mexico's collected on an annual basis over a billion dollars in royalties and taxes from oil and gas produced on federal lands. Within its border. We shouldn't undermine america's energy production and we should not hurt our own economy yet that's precisely what the biden administration is doing by signing an executive order to ban all new oil coal gas leases on federal lands. The president is taking a sledgehammer to western states. Economies aban on federal leasing could result in thirty three thousand workers. Losing their jobs in wyoming in representative holland's home state of wyoming sixty two thousand workers stand to lose their jobs are states will also hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue that is used for essential services including hundreds of millions of dollars in funding of k. To twelve public education the biden administration's moratorium robs our children of their vital education funding and the senate agrees on february fourth. The senate voted ninety. Eight to two for my amendment in an effort to restore the hundreds of millions of education dollars that will be lost to biden administration policies in his first month in office. President biden has declared war on american energy. He's crushed jobs and threatened vital education funds for our children representative hollins past statements. So she agrees with this strategy in may of twenty nineteen representative holland said unequivocally in an interview with the guardian newspaper she quote. I am wholeheartedly against fracking drilling on public lands on her campaign website representative and said we need to quote keep fossil fuels in the ground and then went on to say. I pledge to vote. Against all new fossil fuel infrastructure close quote representative holland's positions are squarely at odds with the mission of the department of interior. That mission includes managing our nation's oil gas and coal resources in a responsible manner not eliminating access to them. I'm willing to work with representative holland. And the biden administration to conserve our national parks and monuments to uphold our nation's trust responsibilities and to protect multiple use of our public lands representative holland in tennessee. Us the department of interior to crush the economy of wyoming and other western states than i'm going to oppose the nomination. Today's hearings gives us an opportunity to hear directly from congresswoman holland and to get more clarity regarding her views and vision for the department of interior. Thank you mr chairman. I look forward to her testimony. Thanks in abruzzo all right. So here's where the fun begins so let's breakdown some of those statements and also as nine twenty nine nineteen member of the indian affairs committee. Okay i senator. Brosseau stated that wyoming has a positive seventeen billion dollar economic impact on what he called quote department of the interior lands. Close quote those lands. He didn't really define beyond simply being in the state of wyoming. He stated that the biden administration and deb jalan are seeking to quote hurt energy production close quote and also quote undermine our economy close quote so we focused on his state of wyoming. Took a look at one of the largest revenue producers their oil and gas jobs and the economic impacts. Okay so in two thousand eighteen. The oil and gas industry in the state of wyoming employed eighteen. Thousand two hundred seventy three people with an average annual wage of fifty six thousand nine hundred and sixty two years paying total into it just over one billion dollars in twenty nineteen. It went up number of people employed nineteen thousand. Four hundred and sixteen average annual. Wage was fifty seven thousand. Nearly fifty eight thousand dollars and total wages was paid about one point one billion dollars now. Those figures from the petroleum association of wyoming. Okay when we look at historic revenues in senator brazos state during the obama biden administration in two thousand fourteen to twenty fifteen the revenues from oil and gas production. Were ready two billion dollars in two thousand sixteen to twenty one thousand nine hundred. During the republican republic can trump administration wyoming revenues from oil and gas. Were down as of twenty nineteen reported revenue. Would one point six seven billion dollars. So despite trump and republicans claiming a strong economy prior to the pandemic oil and gas production in the state was down under republican control. But we didn't stop there. In our last example we used pro appro industry source. So what if we look at a source that looked at the impact of alternative energy on the state of wyoming in an article by high country. News jane hugh took a look at the wind energy sector in that state. The tight over article is new. Wind projects power budgets in wyoming as the pandemic hit the fossil fuel industry renewable energy projects filled community coffers. Those the title. So here's what she said. When covid nineteen pandemic hit robin lachmann feared the worst for her. Town of cheyenne wyoming. As the city's treasurer she estimated that it might lose up to twenty five percent of its budget in tax revenues stalled and Stalled than the prices of oil and gas and coal tanked eliminating money. The city typically received from the state as royalties from the extractive energy industry. So the city did hardwork laying off eighteen employees and cutting funds for travel in training and then surprising thing happened. The huge deficit never arrived in fact over the summer. The city brought in more tax revenue than the year before so again twenty eighteen to twenty nineteen july and september. Shy cheyenne wyoming. Saw a twenty point five percent increase in tax revenue compared to twenty nineteen in. I'm sorry that so. That's twenty twenty in september alone. The increase was staggering three percent or one point four million dollars quote. I was shocked when i saw it said lachmann. She feared the good news was a mistake. So she called the wyoming department of revenue to confirm the numbers quote. The tax reported was legitimate and was due to the roundhouse wind project said lachmann referring to an energy development project. West of the city throughout wyoming county typically depend on industries like coal oil and gas drilling mining tourism and recreation to bring in the taxes necessary to pay for education community programs and infrastructures. That sound familiar. Oh yeah that was barroso right. Overall economic activity is down. Statewide sales and use taxes shrunk six six percent over the last year but revenues from mining quarrying and oil and gas extraction are down nearly twice that okay so hold. Let's read that part again. Revenues from mining quarrying and oil and gas extraction are down nearly twice that again all of twenty nineteen through and into the pandemic of twenty twenty. The economy was all on. Trump's republican. watch wasn't it. But what the wyoming petroleum association reported revenues were strong and up from twenty eighteen to that timeframe. Someone is lying. Your i would think so. But i trust numbers and i and reported wyoming state. Revenue should be reliable revenue coming from alternative energy saving wyoming economy but barosso said deb and under president biden's direction we'll destroy the wyoming economy. Right so barossa lied during his opening statements. Yip not only that he set the stage for what can only be described as a huge hit. Job orchestrated against congressman. Deb howland by some of the biggest political a holes. The american system has to offer. You wanna know some more hypocrisy about that whole thing brother. I don't i don't remember hearing one thing about what the interior can do to help native tribes coming out of any of those republican mouths. Not one thing. I in fact i in fact it's the complete author so let me move on in it is you'll you guys will understand very very quickly so again brosseau. But let's move onto other people for this. We're going to start with senator lankford from oklahoma who question congresswoman helen on oil and gas leasing programs on tribal lands versus federal lands. Here's what he had to say. Central langford ex-chairman reserve Thanks for being here and for the dialogue. i'm sure you're very aware last week Across much of the mid west we had very extreme cold temperatures that We had a test in the southwest power pool while there was a lot of national attention on texas in the long shutdowns. There we had issues as well Are wind towers froze up In fact for several days in the southwest powerful we were actually running more diesel power than we were wind power which is not uncommon frustration. Forty percent of our power by wind. Power we had a A real pool on oliver solar panels. Obviously there were covered in snow at the time or very cloudy days. And so we had. We had quite a challenge on just being able to maintain power when we were negative fourteen degrees so the issues about power and reliability and resilience matter to us because we wanna make sure that we don't lose access so while jobs matter and those are extremely important it matters every single consumer the cost of energy the availability of energy in the diversity of energy So we are truly all the above state as you. And i've talked about before we haven't we have more renewables in oklahoma that we use in our power than new mexico's We are significant and our use of renewables and an appreciate those But we have some real challenges that we wanna make sure that we pay attention to so. Let me real down a few issues because some of your past statements and and want to get a few things just in conversation. The osage nation in the on stage mineral council They they have a lot of oil and gas development in their trouble. Areas had a challenge in fact we asked him about it. They said they've had seven years of devastation. Brought on by onerous regulations restricting access on their oil and gas while records and then the fish and wildlife coming in and adding environmental impact statements. That were entirely new to them. It's a significant portion of the income for the tribe and it's significant to the state as. Well what would be your standards on oil and gas development mineral development and tribal areas. Thank you for that question. Senator and i Your comment about oklahoma. Having more renewal was in new mexico. I don't know about senator heinrich but that sounds like a challenge to me. So perhaps we can work on that. Senator with respect to the pause on leases. I know that it's it's just on public. Lands not on tribal lands and so tribes should continue to move forward with with their operations. Do you assume that the rules would be different for tribal lands as they would be on federal lands in the days ahead because as you make recommendations. You've made some pretty bold statements in the past. Say no fracking no pipelines. I mean some the statement you made in the past and make recommendations to the biden team. And you've said several times you'll follow prison biden's direction but obviously the secretary of interior making recommendations them sitting at the table as well. Would you recommendations be different for tribal land development and they would be for federal land development. Senator i want to. I assure you that. If i'm confirmed secretary that is a far different role than It is for a congresswoman representing one small district in my state. So i understand that role. It's to serve all americans not just my one district in new mexico. I i. Of course. I can't answer fully those questions at the moment i am. I am not there yet. If i am confirmed to secretary i will absolutely take all these issues into consideration and and of course look forward to consulting with you but would your recommendations be that there would be unique. Difference between tribal management of their mineral rights and oil and gas development fracking. all of those things pipelines than there would be on federal land on senator. I would be happy to to look at the issue to to study it. Then if i'm confirmed and and and speak with you. This is a map of one of the units rolling gas area and it doesn't matter the state but it shows the puzzle here for a second every one of the republicans brought easels maps charts. You name it. Every one of them have their staff running in through doors behind them bringing in their lovely little foam core pieces to supposedly illustrate their points. Just wanted to point that out because you can't see it on audio podcast. The the complexity of this for many of these leases that come up a portion of the land would be in this case. it's Area that is tribal land is what you see in the tan here. And then in the salmon color it's recording engineers managed But that's still has be olym- oil and gas leases on it so the challenge becomes there's different sets of rules When they go through this process What i'm trying to get at is this is a common look As you go through the different pieces are there that anytime they start to do. Any kind of unit a development they could complexity on what the rules are going to be. The rules are different in each of these areas. If you change that air from travel lane to private land that even changes in more so means ask a question permeating wise. Would you look at this type of map into say permits. Not just the least but the permits would be different if the federal lands had a moratorium on them could they still develop the private lands. Could they still develop the tribal lands. That are literally right next to the federal land. I understand i. it's a. It's a concert of a complicated issue. So but that's what the real world looks like. Yeah yes. I understand what you're saying and i would be happy to take a look at those be briefed understand the issue far better and work with you. If if there's issues in your state thank you look forward to a second round all right so here. I'm going to insert a couple of points in and then Completely disrupt what he just said. Langford is one of the republicans that continued to advocate that the election was stolen from donald trump while the capitol was still under attack very clear he was still before they evacuated everyone from the chambers. He was still party to and with one of the signatories of that resistance. Just wanted to point that out. Now analysis of langford exchange with deb here is very easy. It's obvious he attempted to use the plight of another indian tribe against deb as an indigenous woman herself. But this is what these modern republican pukes he tried. He tried to tie a restriction. The biden administration put on the bulk of the oil and gas industry to try to show how that hurt an indian tribe in this case the osage nation. We're who are located in langford state of oklahoma. He's originally from dallas by the way. And i always chuckling at cliffs remark and chatty said well oklahoma and texas. Can you spell winter maintenance. But here's what osage minerals council stated in their press release quote in the first two weeks of the new biden harris administration. Federal officials issued several executive actions and statements related to tribal sovereignty tribal consultation and climate change in light of these actions and statements the osage minerals council calls upon the biden administration to continue to listen to the voices of tribal officials from tribes that rely upon conventional energy production like the osage nation to develop their tribal economies on january twentieth. Two thousand twenty one acting secretary of the interior scottdale vega issued secretarial number. Thirty three ninety five which suspended the delegated authority of regional and local interior officials from making certain decisions related to fossil fuels for sixty days under the secretarial order. Interior officials are prohibited from issuing any fossil fuel authorization including approval of leases and permits to drill. Now jalan explain this to langford reading head on january twenty fifth after hearing from many tribal leaders including the osage minerals council. The department clarified that. The secretarial order does not apply to tribal and individual indian lands quote. We are thankful that the federal officials listen to us and quickly clarified. This order said osage minerals council chairman andrew gates quote and while we are encouraged by the administration's quick response to remedy the concerns of tribal leaders about fossil fuel. Authorizations the osage minerals councils committed to developing a strong relationship with secretary nominee deb halland and other interior officials to ensure the interior fulfils its obligations under the nineteen o. Six was sage allotment act when other mineral development issues arise link for. Didn't say that when he pulls the questions. That congressman helen diddy. Nope lankford also tried to position his questioning about different rules around drilling right implying that it's unfair that tribes get to drill while others don't and the quote others close quote that he was referring to is of course largely white owned oil and gas corporations. The truth is yes. Because of this country's history of abuse and human rights violations against indigenous peoples a series of federal laws which indigenous people have fought for and are designed to tribes and our governments. Are they perfect. No but they cannot be ignored or destroyed not by langford or the white supremacy republican elite. The federal government. I would suggest that senator lankford review the following federal law enforcement through the bureau of indian affairs and the bureau of land management. Because they worked together on these issues so that statement you just made just seconds ago shows. How much of shows how much hypocrisy there is in that panel because langford barosso and makovsky are on the indian affairs committee. They know this stuff already. They already know this absolutely now. I mentioned a moment ago. And i did this deliberately. That they bring in charts which means they've got staff doing supposedly all the research. But you didn't hear link for quote this. The following some of the laws and regulations for the oil and gas leasing and development on tribal lands. This comes directly from the bureau of land management. Mineral leasing on tribal lands is governed by indian mineral leasing act of nineteen thirty eight And the indian mineral development act of nineteen eighty two indian tribal energy development and self determination act of two thousand and five as amended. And then there's links era says regulations for indian energy and minerals can be found here but he didn't mention any of those in his statements. Now did he know so to end this segment on the republican hit. Job on congressman. Deb howland here's a montage of additional questions posed by her by by senate republicans. Okay i tried to keep this short but it's not so short. It's about thirteen minutes. It's letting you guys know. This is who she was before science Do you know what the recovery criteria are for the grizzly bear in the greater yellowstone ecosystem specifically. No sir so the the the answer is five hundred bears and would you know how many bears we currently have in the nickel system. I do not so the most conservative estimate is seven hundred twenty well above the recovery. Target many estimate it's closer to a thousand bears well above the recovery criteria well above carrying capacity yet on may seventh two thousand nineteen you cosponsored legislation that provided federal protections for the grizzly bear in perpetuity forever. Why would you sponsor a bill like that when the science tells us the bear. Numbers are well above the recovery targets. I imagine at the time i was. I was carrying about the bears. And why don't you believe. The grizzly management should return back to the states. Wants to recovery. Targets are met well i. I'm not saying that it shouldn't be returned back to the states. But that's what you your legislation. Cosponsored said is he would keep it in federal protections forever in perpetuity. Well i i would be happy to take a look at the issue senator if if if i can help with that issue of course i love to speak with you more about it as secretary you will get to have it your way. Will you recommend extending the leasing moratorium. And how do you justify this. Moratorium with the requirements of the federal law under the men releasing act senator. It's my understanding that it is a pause on just new leases not existing of valid leases. And if i'm confirmed as secretary it is president biden's agenda not my own agenda that i would be moving forward and appreciate your advice on this issue congresswoman holland. Thank you enjoyed visit. Your personal story is compelling and one thing we spoke of or those families such as yours and frankly such as mayan growing up whose parents were able to have a better living because of some in louisiana on many of those better livings are related to oil and gas industry pipelines etc. And we understand that if if there's kind of a campaign against them there's many families which will have a less bright future so that said let me first ask. Do you agree. With president biden's executive order to stop the keystone xl pipeline knowing that eleven thousand current or future jobs are eliminated because of so in the case of the jakoda access pipeline. Which would say he has more than you were. There and protested the pipeline. Are you still opposed to that senator. I yes i did go to Stand with the water protectors during that several years back. I'm the reason i did. That is because i agreed with the tribe that They felt they weren't consulted. In in the best way. I know that tribal consultation is important and and that was the reason i was there. What is your position. The bible in today well senator. I know it's an important issue for you. And i understand that i also Agree that whenever these projects come up that we absolutely should make sure that we are consulting with tribes if in fact these projects do affect their their lands their sacred sites and the like so. I understand i'm sorry. Did you know. Sir i mean i. I am happy to get briefed on on any of these issues. If i'm confirmed. And of course senator i would listen to you and consult with you and and work with you to the best of my ability at my time has expired and i will go to senator brosseau. Thank you very much. Mr chairman representative yesterday when discussing the effects that president biden's ban on oil and gas leasing have had on workers. You stated quote. You said i feel like in the short term. Hopefully their jobs have not been affected. Made that statement. Yesterday their jobs are being affected. Now i have a letter from the northern arapaho business council in wyoming if you're familiar with members of the northern arapaho tribe in wyoming and they are opposing the president's ban on leasing the northern arapaho business council letter states delays in leasing have already already negatively impacted small to mid sized operators the longer the orders remain in place. The more revenue will decline in result in additional blows to our economy. The oil and gas workforce and wyoming's education system. So mr chairman. I ask unanimous consent to enter this letter into the record of the hearing today. Thank you next. I'd asked that my Chart be put up on the screen so you have a chance to see it. I have a copy of it of behind me. You have stated that you are quote wholeheartedly against fracking and drilling on public lands. You have said that quote. We need to keep fossil fuels in the ground. You have also stated that you oppose all fossil fuel infrastructure if confirmed president biden is likely to ask you specifically whether we should extend the ban on oil and gas and coal leasing on federal lands and waters. Now you've said repeatedly the president biden's agenda is your agenda but what this committee wants to know is how will you advise him that. How will you act because you're the principal role of secretary of interior. So so how will you advise him. You encourage the president to extend the sixty day ban on leasing or not thank you ranking member. I appreciate the question. And yes. I will reiterate again. President biden's agenda would be my agenda. If i am confirmed i recognize that roles are different the role of a congresswoman and one district in the country is much different than the role of a secretary who is fighting and working for every single american and all of our public lands across the country. Those are those are those are two different things. I recognize that. I want to make sure that that. If i'm confirmed that we're looking at things and working to strike the right balance. We need to care as much about the environment as we do about the fossil fuel infrastructure in your state and other states. We need to balance those priorities. And i feel that that yes sometimes it might seem like a tricky sort of balancing act. But i think i feel very strongly if we have a mind to protect our public lands for future generations of that will also be able to protect jobs for future generations as well. I very much excited about the opportunities that lie ahead and chairman mansion and i have spoken about this technology opportunities innovative opportunities for workers across this country and i think there are a lot of workers who want to have jobs of the future. And so what i would like to do is just make sure that i am doing everything i can to help. President biden in his bill back better plan to create millions of jobs across. But we'll talk about those workers in their jobs for the future because in two thousand eighteen you campaign on eliminating oil and gas production in new mexico and you were specifically asked how you would make up for the loss of oil and gas royalties which the state uses to fund public schools. And your answer. Was you would vote to legalise cannabis. That was your answer. And that you said if we legalize cannabis and we have a new funding stream for our education system. That will help tremendously. That was your that was your statement. Do you still believe that states should replace oil and gas royalties used for public education with taxes on the sale of of marijuana. Is that your position. Well i think the point of that ranking member was to say that we should diversify our funding streams for education not just rely on one so is selling marijuana. Among what the biden administration calls better choices that the biden administration has promised to give displaced oil and gas workers. Is that the better choice. Marijuana ranking member. i honestly don't know what president biden stances on cannabis but we know what your stances on replacing the revenue from the energy jobs. Jobs that power our economy and the energy that powers our country and your preferences to turn to drugs is what you've recommended to the voters at a time when we know when there's high unemployment and energy workers lose their jobs we've seen it in west. Virginia we've seen it around the country. There's been an opioid crisis in this nation. And yet what i hear from. You is the answer in a better choice. World is marijuana. Thank you mr chairman. I guarantee you guys right after that. The very first thing i did was light went up. Probably there wasn't anything i have to say. Let these fools stand on their own. They're of course was a lot more testimony but by now. I'm sure you can see what deb jalan had to contend with one dimensional single focus questioning by largely corrupt individuals who sought to discredit her in any way possible. Say i'm sorry go ahead. Senator barreau said in that last clip. He sounded completely desperate. We hope deb holland is confirmed. We believe she has a good understanding of the issues and the interior department. She will do her best to bring a balanced approach to policy. You just heard her mention it there regarding the environment. It's something that's been lacking for several years across both political parties and administration's she will provide open and honest advice to the president and consult with all parties. She said that in her responses we also think and hope ending country will be better served with her in that position. So go ahead. Those individuals on the indian affairs committee should not be there between them and non native department heads. A the department of the interior have jointly been running roughshod over tribes for decades. And it's a threat to them to have a native person in there who's going to look out for natives for once so i'm hoping she gets a confirmed. Well it chance go ahead. I was gonna say it's more it's more than just for tribes. Though i know i i understand that. A she very much That was very honest about a balanced approach to the position so incorrect. I heard that and i understand that but if if you will if listeners will think about what the interior department has been doing over the decades like i said the head of the interior department in the fairs committees have not been working on the stuff all individuals. Sorry about that. I don't know what that was neither. They haven't been working at the behest of all individuals they've been running roughshod over indian tribes. Absolutely so that's why. That's why i made the point that deb holland's going to look out for the benefit of indian tribes. Of course she's going to look out for the benefit of everybody else but this time she's going to include indian people are in that mix instead of being excluded in allowing to look in from the outside. And that's what they're afraid of. No question desperate. I called it so you not that we have to but if we look at it from their perspective they're guy trump lost trounced their their beloved capital was stormed by a bunch of white people not people of color white people and now they lost their presidency and now they're about to have a person of color and an indigenous person at that head up one of the most important departments in the in the cabinet quite frankly in my opinion absolutely. Yep go ahead. That department is the gatekeeper for old an untold number of wealth resources. Yep that's why they don't want to relinquish that that position exactly yep so all right so one last thing that you have to mention now like i said we focused squarely on on the republicans in this equation right and they spoke for themselves quite well. You know who they are now for. Sure all right but there was one problem child at least leading up to the hearings and some might even go as far as saying even in today one of the of the of the testimonies because it was over the course of two days and that individual or the democrat. His name is joe mansion. Joe mansion is the chairman of this particular committee that we've been hearing from. He finally made a statement and said that he did intend to vote for deb. Haaland joe mansion is from west. Virginia joe manchin has taken an enormous amount of oil and gas and mining lobbyists money enormous. And so i pulled this this. This clip wasn't originally going to play it but But i decided to do so. And i apologize that this has been so long today. You guys but obviously you can hear. There's there was quite a an credible amount a bs the other. I wanted to play at least for our audience and you know. Feel free to share this episode. If anything is because you're mainstream news media did not cover any of the hearing at all. They covered more merrick. Garland and a couple of others is important as interior secretary cabinet. Post is your corporate in mainstream news. Media couldn't be bothered to cover this and that infuriated me now. Joe mansion as i said takes lobbyists money so on day two. He decided to open up a line of questioning of his own. Deb jalan and it went a little something like this. Thank you senator constantly holland. Yesterday you come into center keen to review the methane waste prevention rule. The methane waste prevention rule. The majority that rule was fired by district court judge last summer and the fact of the matter is far too much methane. That's being emitted. We all know that. In two thousand nineteen oil and gas operations onshore federal lands vented or flared almost seventy five billion cubic feet of methane. That was eighty three percent increase from twenty fifteen levels. This is especially troubling because venting and flaring of methane can be prevented. No that that doesn't happen on private land. So i start asking questions. Why are we wasting this product. Why would any accompany in conscience let that much value. Go up in the air when they could be selling it and putting it in a product line. Their problem was this. We cannot get permits to put in the pipelines to take the methane off property. Because they couldn't get the permits and only thing. I'm saying we've got this resource. We're using this resource. We're going to need an ability to have a permitting. Process is going allow us to take the methane off rather than polluting it because they they've got legal leases. They're working on so anything. I would ask you if you will work with us on finding a pathway forward to make this a reality and not vent seventy five billion. Cubic feet of methane senator. I would be happy to work with you on this issue. I i know that millions of dollars go up every year that could be spent on our public schools. Certainly in new mexico. That's been the case we do need to reduce methane pollution and of course that can create jobs absolutely and and also care for our climate. So i i appreciate that. I think benefiting the tax payers is always a good idea and i would be happy to help find solutions. The main thing is is the permitting process. We're going to need help on. I'm gonna ask you to work with us. On that to make sure that we can get this and not flare not vetted or flair and i think it would be tremendous for the for the environment tremendously helpful I wanna get facts on the record that make sure that we're working from the same page. It is my understanding that the orange gas industry continues to hold twenty six million acres under lease onshore twelve million acres offshore of the nearly fifty three percent of those acres onshore and over seventy seven percent of those offshore are unused and non-producing so they have the leases in hand. They just have never produced him. So i have defended president by saying i want to take a pause. I think we need to look at his inventory and finding out why or what. Their intentions are the leases. They're holding over. Approximately seven thousand seven hundred oil and gas permits are approved but currently unused with these apd's in hand companies have obtained the necessary authorisations. They need and beginning operations at their choosing. We haven't showed anybody down. We're not stopping anybody. And i want people to know that it's also understand that executive action taken by the president. Put the pause the pause on gasoline to allow the new administration to review the leasing program. Which i have asked for also i wanna know. Hot with determination are what determine these leases are how much they're paying for these leases. Why they're holding so many with non productive status and i believe it's prudent conduct a review releasing these products processing and want to work with you. So my question would be well. Any company with existing leases as you understand if they have those existing leases. Were they still be able to apply for the permits or begin operations based on the existing permits have abc's on those existing leases including those that are currently non-producing two thousand as producing thousand. Could i move to my next leases without running into impending in impeding my Process on that from the government agency or department of interior chairman. Thank you so much for the question. It is my now. I'm not at the department yet. So i don't know every single issue however it's my understanding that yes permits are still through. I know that each permit might require something different with respect to how they're reviewing it but it's it is my understanding that they are moving. Those through and and i agree with you that a review is is a good idea and we're going to bring the companies in find out the basically if there's going to be a reach back to where this putting additional regulations that they won't be able to use the leases. They've already obtained legally and gone through the permitting process. We wanna make sure there's a fairness to it. And if we have better ways to basically improve environment in doing that such as pipelines taking methane off no methane flaring things of this sort. But give them a you know some kind of reprieve That there's a possible way of doing everything that we need to do. A may be much healthier for the environment and our climate so with that my time has expired. And i will go to senator brosseau. Thank you very much mr chairman. Okay so the press release that came out about joe manchin saying he was going to nominate or he was going to support the nomination of pailin came remarkably short right after that exchange which means to me. This is just me alone. i don't. I don't know how you feel brother but to me. That was a great example of you. Want my vote. You got to pay for it because notice. How super hyper focused. He was on permitting. I'm going to need your help with this many times. Did he say Okay how's that because permitting lesson. No go ahead. I'm sorry two points on permitting. He was talking about uncommitted leases that were out on the Out to sea as well as dry land now out to sea means two things to me one loyal and gas production in the gulf of mexico and that apparently there are lease areas Which means the ocean floor bottom where they haven't put a rig up yet uncommitted but okay by the federal government for oil and gas production. So i'm reading that correctly joe. Manchin is concerned that they have untapped potential resource yet to be exploited. Second to that is an area. I'm very familiar with and working on a daily basis on as a matter of fact offshore wind energy because you can call projects that haven't been built yet as uncommitted and again he said i'm going to need your help on this okay by my vote and i'll help you out. That's how these people work. Oh of course she should yes them to death and then get in there and go psych. But but you see this is this is where the limitation is in what she can do and the amount of pressure she's going to be under and as some other folks within indian country have stated there like i have said things like will we don't. We don't know what everybody is so excited about deb jalan being in that position in not being a congresswoman anymore. Because she's going to have to Cow tail to these interests. And so when you hear when you hear an exchange like the one that just happened between her and joe manchin you very quickly conceive how easy it is to form that opinion so time will tell It will take time willto. And i want you know one thing i will. I'm sorry go ahead. I'm pretty much on her. Said but you guys know who. I am I put skepticism ahead of of Of even optimal. That's just the way i am. That doesn't mean everyone else's so what mentioned did munching. Whatever his name is. The chairman brought up a good point about methane. And you know. I have to agree with him there. I have to agree with him about the methane. Well that's also. I want you to watch. And this is a recommendation to you guys as well But i i sent sent of the name of a documentary out. There called kiss the ground and deals with methane production and why it's needed for plant growth primarily talks about regenerative agriculture. That's that's really the focus of the film so Look for it on netflixif again. It's called kiss. The ground is narrated by woody. Harrelson the actor but yeah. I think there's a balance that has to be struck between methane release in methane recapturing There's a balance that has to be struck. Me exactly yes. Plants do need methane to some degree as an energy source but we as a nation have just poured literally trillions of gallons. I'm sorry trillions of cubic feet of methane into the atmosphere decade upon decade upon decade. And that is in fact contributing to the greenhouse effect. I mean that's that's been proven you don't time and time and time again. That's a no brainer. Good portion of that at least from the united states perspective is is big agriculture. Big egg get a good portion. Now if the if the the interior department as it's been operating years pass with really concerned about the environment they would have done something about capturing a portion of that. nothing they would have so i. I'm i'm curious to see if the chairman. I can't can't remember the guy's name i just call. Call him. munchkin. I'm i getting away because it's very close to mnuchin right. Was the treasury secretary under. So i'm curious to see if he's going to put his money whereas mouth is in relation to methane and whether or not he will serious when he spoke he has concerns to deb howland about methane. Because that's an un unused energy source period. It can be used to fuel. Plants were energy power. Plants for energy can be used but it's poured into the atmosphere and in in in turn it's caused catastrophic damage to the to the environment doing catastrophic damage capturing methane and reusing it and some of the regenerative ways but especially that's depicted in the film will in fact help reverse climate change. It most certainly will. It will correct it entirely on its own but But that's that's the case they're making their but Right it can be reused in other ways most. Certainly so you know. There's there's no reason why it should not have been looked at as a viable source for energy methane. Coming from a a well is in fact. A natural gas yes yup. It's just another form of a natural gas. They it's it's over the years they used to call it dirty gas and nobody wanted to deal with it. That's why you see the little flames burning on oil wells out in the gulf or little flames burning with. They're not little but looking at a photo. It looks like a little tiny candle flame. The i should say this. Because i'm going to be like everybody's going to think. I'm such an immature something or other but it made me think of it when i saw when i saw house Response and chat he goes. I know where a lot of methane it's coming from and whatever referring to is as children Some of us. I'm saying that generically Used to farts on fire. Some adults still do and some folks used to call it. The internal blue flame. True very true in the name of science me right. Sorry which could lead to internal combustion so we close this out entirely hear the segment for sure this long segment long segment we've ever done. I think Giving any partying words for the republican elite brother. I put myself on the back done pretty good today. You've done exceptionally well. I'm proud of you. Have a special word for bourassa. It'd be a sort of rhymes on a leave it at that rhymes with poll known. So yeah my parting. Words to the republican party is get rid of those elements that are dragging you down to. Hell no doubt and get back in the game of doing. What's right for for people. That's that's my parting words for the republican party. Talking to you as a republican. So you know. Get your head out of your Dark nether world where the eternal flame generates the eternal blue flame. Generates you get your head out of that. Neither nether region. Because you're going to become extinct. Stand with us or step aside That's my message. Beth says and chatted. Have you seen the golden trump statuette cpac. Yes it's been called the golden calf. No i i care not to have no interest in but all right well well. It's time for our old standby segment. Yes it is yes it is. Take them in america I'm trying to remember. Did you have story as well No al safin next saturday. Okay all right. I think this episode will have been quite long enough. yes it is So this'll wrap is up for today but But i i wanted to play. Because i thought it was thought it was rather interesting so during this month of february it's of course black history month right. Cbs news produced a piece that Caught our eye that we feel worthy of this segment It pertains to american history and One serviceman regarded by many As a hero. But because this is america There's a right that needs to be corrected. So here was the piece that cbs produced. As we celebrate black history month we're highlighting one of the first black officers in the army special forces the fame and the courage and valour of retired colonel. Peres davis earned him the respect of his fellow soldiers in vietnam and a nomination for the nation's military combat award. He never received the medal of honor. His file vanished at the height of the civil rights movement. Now nearly fifty six years later senior. Investigative correspondent catherine herridge shows how davis is heroism may finally be recognized nineteen sixty five washington. Antiwar protests raged bloody. Sunday in selma alabama galvanized the civil rights movement and in vietnam. Then army captain peres. Davis broke barriers on the battlefield. Or you one of the first black officers in the green berets. Yes i would. How did that work. Well because you can call me. Captain davis but you can call me and it and it did happen northeast of saigon near bunk song. June nine hundred and sixty five davis lead and nearly nineteen our rate were stacking bodies the way you do kangaroos in a grocery store hit by a grenade and gunfire davis would not leave behind americans. Billy want and robert brown. Both gravely injured brown had been shot. I could actually see his His brain pulsating. It was that big and he said. Am i gonna die and i said not before me. Were you ever told to leave. Well twice as davis first revealed in nineteen. Sixty-nine to an up and coming local tv host phil donahue or told him sarah. I'm just not gonna leave. I still have an american out there. And what did he say. He told me to to move out and just disobeyed the orders thereby davis aside ron dice now. The team's youngest survivor. Kevin davis refused and said no. I'm not leaving while. I'm not leaving out off the field. General westmoreland who led. us forces in vietnam visited davis outpost and his commander. Billy cole recommended davis for the medal of honor. And then somehow the paperwork vanished in vietnam. A nineteen sixty nine military review did not reveal any file on davis. What makes the pierce davis case. Stand out that it was lost. Everybody i've talked to that served under him. Says he's the best officer they've ever served under. What really stands out to me. Neil thorne volunteers time to recover. Metals for overlook saturn's. How common is it for medal of honor paperwork to be lost or destroyed very uncommon. There would have been multiple copies in nineteen sixty nine. The army was ordered to submit new paperwork. Asep for davis. In for a second time there is no evidence. A medal of honor file was created in one. Thousand nine hundred. Eighty one statement. billy walk. Whom davis carried on his shoulders to safety wrote. I only have to close my eyes to vividly recall the gallantry of this individual over the years davis teammates also lobby congress but each time. The process stalled. Do you think race was a factor. I don't think i know race. Was a factor of questions. Says he experienced. During his twenty three years in the army he recalls an encounter with another pilot he rescued will on a different mission. I saw him. At ford greg. With his wife and his skid. They saw me. He went on the other side of the street so to speak if that had been white guy going over and hugged him. That's racism eight percent of medal of honor recipients for vietnam. Were black now is he. Approaches his eighty second birthday. There is new momentum to recognize davis. Were all trying to right or wrong. The army isn't commenting an expedited. Review of davis's lost nomination is due next week. The final call rest with the defense secretary and president biden. Mo- would it mean to you. It would mean all the things that i haven't been able to dream about for cbs. This morning catherine herridge strasburg. Virginia catherine herridge. i'm speechless. thank you so much for bringing us that story. Talk about writing a wrong. Well how about riding a wrong and where you have people in his own commandment said i wouldn't be here if it not for him. Yes and actually brought to tears recalling the the the episode of make that right you're watching. Cbs this morning. We'll be right back. Yeah i agree. You know i it's yet again. Another example we have we have we have example example after example like this ending country to where you know country puts blinders on when it comes to people of color in their contributions being in war or whatever right very true i hope he i hope he gets his mantle of honor that he so justly as as earned this government. I tell you this. Government has has crapped on almost said it. This government has crapped on so many of its service members. That i can't i can't i can't give us your your give us your body to abuse as we as we see fit and don't complain you know it's only part of the game we'll take care of you after we've we've used due to the extent that we can even that's a lie. Well you know relevant to the military okay in for our indigenous communities as well We looked at Joining the military as a means to support our families despite the cost that could very well take on us. Meaning the call the ultimate sacrifice right. And i'm not trying to diminish that but that's what we're talking about we're talking about someone interests a service to feed their families and Someone may not never see their mother or father again. Depending on who by and large and at that time of but at that time it was mostly men enlisted but you know women in less to and now go to combat and so you know that's a risk we have this for indian country. We have this Documentation of you know of are people going you know into the military to quote unquote defend the country that crops on them as you said In this for us this goes back into other industries as well. Such as whaling might people were you know To provide for families got wailing vessel. And sometimes they don't come back so this is what we refer to and we're talking about. The country owes a lot to absolutely absolutely but in the case of the military a lot of military people period. Forget you know regardless of their their white or any other color but by in large people of color in those positions or forgotten about has that story points out. So i hope like dave said i hope i hope he does get the recognition that that he deserves. Now there's another recognition. I want to talk about because it's bothering me. And it shouldn't and there's other indigenous people that don't hold this point of view either. And i respect them for their position. How is it that corporate mainstream news media can dedicate A segment almost every day for a whole month to celebrate black history month. But they won't do that in november for native american heritage month. I don't know if you guys noticed that if you've ever seen programming on television during a month dedicated to you know recognize something accomplishment or or people in history. You don't say anything about native people. I saw something in it. Shocked crap out of me on the history channel remember when it was not during november. But they actually did a focus piece on a novel woman It wasn't a part of show it was it was an actual spot. Somebody bought so. Why can't these news outlets. Do this do the same thing for for other groups. Same thing with asian americans by the way. Asian are are starting to get some notice because they're being attacked now because white america thinks it's it's their heritage fault that were in corona virus in fact this morning. Cbs did they did a follow up on a story. They did a gentleman who had been able to keep his restaurant going in new york city. But the guy actually wrote back to the network and said hey just wanna let you guys nose sort of as a follow up you know. I have to close the restaurant early because my staff is being attacked. The i remember that that was this morning. There was another story that i remember where that same exact thing happened. They had to close early for that. Very same. reason is being attacked by tree. You guys live in some of you. That listen to this show so called americans that claim. They're all excited about the melting pot. They call it. We want people to come here but then we want to be able to discern who. We really like a who really don't. That's the truth of america. People can denied all they want and they can call me whatever but it's as plain as the nose on everyone's face so i don't know i just i would just like to see some things change and you know change from the heart where people really truly mean it. Not not just some something. That's that sounds good. I get a pipe. I got support. Black lives matter. you know. because it's they look at it more as a trend as opposed to you know. Look we really need to make change. Police departments are a problem in this country. Oh yes you know what i mean. It's not a mean. It's an identified problem that needs to be solved tons of them. Are people willing to do it. And that's you know. That's what i'm particularly sensitive to. So what right i'll end on that but Sorry fort it being somewhat of a downer episode but the same time it's reality guys it is reality so You know now like like my father always tells me okay. You've you've you've identified the problem you've complained about the problem now. What he doing about the problem. So that's incumbent upon all of us so all right so as i play us out. Thank you guys again for hanging with us for another saturday. If you want to comment on anything you've heard in this past episodes you can email us hosts with an s. hosts that native opinion dot com. We will we will share the feedback that we've received over the last couple of weeks of sorry we weren't able to get to it today but obviously as you can see we had a long segment so my name is michael. Kicking baron from the mashantucket pequot tribal nation here in the state of connecticut. And the guy with air force. He is david gray. Al citizen of the cherokee tribe of alabama. Thank you for being with us and be safe out there. Where your mask. Yes shots or not. Wear your masks exactly. I do too maderno shots. And i'm still scared. I'm just being real just being honest. I'm i'm still scared. So all right you guys have a great one. Thanks again and say because all you'll hear from dave on wednesday absolutely. Don't go i guess be well take care gear bye-bye.

Gullikson us gullickson steven logan department of interior indian affairs committee congress David grill amac debra holland deborah helen congresswoman deb supreme court amanda amanda oregon lindsay sh facebook Association of oregon oregon health authority cabinet
Bidens Infrastructure Plan and the Department of Interiors Forum on Oil and Gas Leasing | Petronerds Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

50:54 min | 6 months ago

Bidens Infrastructure Plan and the Department of Interiors Forum on Oil and Gas Leasing | Petronerds Podcast

"Welcome to the pet nerds. Podcast with your host. Tricia curtis ceo. Petro nerds and even bellamy. This show combines upstream and midstream expertise in rocky mountain showdown brought to you by digital wildcatters. Welcome back to the podcast. This is episode. Ten of the petronas podcasts. So easily pretty excited about this. I'm your host tricia. Curtis i'm the ceo of patrons and this is my co-host ethan. Bellamy the low tricia good to see you again. See you to. It's nice to actually be back in person together. I don't have the technical as may technical difficulties ahead last time. I don't have to argue with my father about our inability to get good video like we did last time. Yeah so it wasn't that bad. I mean we got shot on twitter. We got lots of shadows on twitter. Let's good it's because of the Mostly because of the audio let's dive in oil macro oil and gas on federal lands. Us exports the made in america tax plan infrastructure. It's april seventh. Twenty twenty one. This is episode ten. And we're going to dive right in. Let's start tricia with the us. Cutting its supply outlook well opec expense awesome great quite a great topic. So yeah we will start with. Us and we'll kind of dive into all this stuff. 'cause we do have. We have a lot of ground to cover. So the us actually a reduced the reduced outlook for for production. And i think it was vicky hall of the ceo of pioneer. I'm sorry we'll get to learn a second it was vicky hall. Who made some comments with regards to opec's what opec is doing and with what with Shale eloquent flat and she actually said so this is the hall of is the ceo of occidental petroleum and she actually was basically saying packet opec bosses done a great job and she was saying that the us were does not gonna see thirteen million barrels a day again I think she's said there the Too much investment in says would be required for the us to return to its peak of around thirteen million barrels per day so that that's her standpoint. She said this in this is a bloomberg article but she said this in riyadh in february's wall so she's echoed this a few times and then i think she also quoted saying they're trying to get back to a supply demand situation and she's talking about opec plus quote many of the countries worldwide needs sixty or seventy or eighty dollars to break even and so ultimately i think in two thousand twenty two will get to seventy dollars or better and the reason i want to bring this up because we thought we could circle around to this whole where prices are i right now where the industry seems to think prices are going. Seventy dollars is not unrealistic but also where we talked to opec plus last week in depth and those numbers and everything. And the one thing i just want to correct on here is that were were stuck right now at word range-bound at sixty dollars crude oil prices and Those fiscal break evens. Yes they technically need that to fiscal break. Even have achieved does do that when they want. Just because it's the fiscal break. Even they've got those prices in a few years so it it's not as relevant anymore. I don't think so to just say that. I mean seventy dollars more realistic than some of the prices. We were talking about last week but do agree with that. The big question is why anybody would be bullish over. Any extended period of time given up expert capacity. And that's the seventy price target is not that. That's not unrealistic right. We we were pushing. We're getting close those levels and it came back down. But i think that opec expert capacity and then what we're seeing now with the us as we talked about last week. Us sort of driving the growth engine for demand. All these concerns now. Obviously brazil's not doing well with the virus india's not doing what was the virus. The raw in europe is ben atrocious. So we're sort of that. Bright spot for demand. So let's say everything gets things. Start getting a little better. You still have all this burke fasi and just to the numbers because i don't know if we stated them correctly Clearly enough in the last podcast but it's opec plus said we're gonna do two million barrels a day. The math doesn't quite work. If you run these numbers they said in its may. It's apron june so remember. That bus meets every month so they can easily. They're not gonna probably change anything this next meeting. But you know in a couple of months. They could probably change course if they want to. They're gonna add three hundred fifty thousand barrels Dave ac one month's another three hundred fifty thousand barrels day back another month and then four hundred fifty thousand barrels a day if you do those numbers. That's not quite a million barrels a day and then during that time period also saudi arabia's gonna bring their million barrel they cut back so you're looking at a million or two million barrels a day plus for that for treating before sheeting exactly surgery. I think prices cooling-off do sorta disincentivize cheating a little bit right. This is the way and the saudi oil minister is on the record for his metaphors. Her husband we're testing the waters. You know this is. You know we're adding this. He's to They're sorta testing the waters. But i think the reason he keeps emphasizing that this because he wants to have the play. If things are going south really quickly he wants everybody to cut again so just everybody needs to keep that in mind that they have brought the barrels back yet. You know they're slowly bringing the back and we're range-bound at sixty so to think that you're for sure gonna see you know these very high oil prices. I just think we have to be a little bit cautious and the more and more you hear from the industry doesn't matter who you're talking to people with annoying. Gas industry are very very confident. The prices are going up. You know the the trajectory and that's just It's not if we didn't have all those barrels back. You know those were already on the market and these were the prices. I would say you could believe that. But i just think there's more production out there and there's a lot of production that wants to be produced at sixty plus then i think it's because most of the pundits were talking about are people who are long. Us and looking at the lack of us cashback in the low us recount and the bigger picture is well. The saudis have tap and. That's that's the point. I think was vicky hall of saying she using her position and where her vantage point of looking at the macro. And you can. We've seen people get in trouble without. we've seen. Mark papa from centennial resources. Get wrong because of his vantage point hussein harold hamm do the same thing with resources and they literally you know change course of their companies by getting the macro wrong so it's pretty important to get the macaroni right and i think if you're young if if you're thinking we're not gonna go above eleven million barrels per day were stock. That's we were thirteen million barrels per day. That's technically i think eastern. I both agree that technically we could easily go back to thirteen million barrels per day from a technical standpoint whether or not we will actually do that as another question but the other piece of this is that these i pulled up the recount again and last week you know we lost we were saying that the us recount at least for permian was on a steady trajectory to keep moving up right and it's honestly trajectory to basically two three hundred rigs work two hundred twenty rigs right now according to embarrass and as we must before they include lots of other. They include workover rigs and like all rigs. But i think it's important to look at the entire. Us because inverse data. So keep that in mind. You're talking about workover rigs you're talking to or disposal rigs everything that's being drilled. But we have five hundred one rigs running. So it's quite. I mean from where we were. We've recovered significantly now. We have over thousand rigs that are stacked so. That's another whole thing. So a lot of rigs are stacked but the permian and they are so many of these small operators. I mean painters your biggest company drilling twenty-one rigs we'll get to their purchasing just a minute. dissected fourteen Thirteen rigs and you've got two hundred twenty rigs running. You still have four hundred eleven rig stacked in the permian but the point is that you're growing up and then when you break down who these companies are there just so so many tiny companies when you bring that list down. You're not even looking at the top ten operators in you're starting to get to tap Chevron only has six running gb k. has four rigs running you just have a lot of tiny operators and those tiny operators are going to bring production on. Whether i mean it's not like they're not gonna just do dachshund. Just sit there. whatever i think. They're going to bring production line so the big boys may be a little more cautious in their approach they may be spending but these cumulative these tiny guys and you know we used to be able to when the permian was producing two million barrels per it was like half small guys half the guys switched. Now i just think the activity in the role of small players so important on the absolutely is remember that the majors left the permian. It was the independence the on unconventional there. Yeah so maybe we're seeing a little bit of a repeat their just one we've talked about the we've talked about the eagle before and i i. I are both pretty confident in texas production. Everything eagle ford's at forty one rigs and i just think it's important to watch and if somebody had asked us in on twitter to talk more about natural gas and we won't in this podcast but we certainly will because i think natural gas is gonna do great in effort and i think number eleven. Let in our next episode right. Yes we will talk about. We'll we'll we'll try and get sometimes truce's bring it goes even faster than her mouth which is hard to believe so so natural gas will get to you. I'm pretty bullish on eagle for oil and natural gas. I'm really bullish on the hanes. Ville i think the hanes just an absolute kill it so we will get to that and and if you're if you're following natural gas production it's recovered nearly to what we were pre covid levels and that's just the tendency of Need to find more things to argue about. Because i agree on hands with electric. Primetime villes. back baby yeah. I think he's and i think. Actually i think is underestimated. I think people are going to see these like we're we're gonna we're gonna start see people really crushing it and we haven't seen that many big players. I'm sure we'll find something to argue okay. Pioneer purchase purchased doubled plant right. Yes yes and the absolutely crushed production in two thousand twenty. When everybody else was laying rigs down they went aggressive and and group production massively. The consensus of energy finance twitter is that Let's just say they got a great deal for themselves. Six point for. I mean six point. Four billion is not a small number especially now may just as yet the snow small number will and if you look at their web so i mean this is slightly dated and i am working on updating this production data but i'm looking at all their wells for or dogging it's were were shy of at least in in in late fall of like october data. This was a have wells. I mean we're talking two hundred wells so it fits really nicely. So i think from each standpoint and whether at everything if it's nicely in really already Pioneer was the number one. They had ousted oxy. So they're the number one producer. They're definitely the biggest player in the permian basin by far now wish will. Maybe we will get tom law-free on to talk about his his analysis of the deal once the the market players have been positioned correctly. Because i i think. Definitely the contiguity of the acreage was was pretty solid. Some question about the evaluation bomber posted something about that and he was a little bit skeptical. Shall we say We'll see i mean. Certainly you know building. A big permian acreage position. I think tom would probably argue that. They pioneer really needed to do that for him. Tori purposes. I mean that's the thing is so. I don't be acre sized but we're talking like fifty thousand barrels a day production roughly in some sub three hundred wells so it's not production but it just seems the sticker price seems like a lot for that but they're big. I mean i think the other thing. I think people aren't realizing is that some companies have been able to go to the market Do okay i think. Pioneer has is doing the favored by the market. They're doing okay. They're in the same boat. I think chevron so i mean end though the biggest player in this play is going to be around forever and they are exclusively texas. So they're not in a bad position but they have made a lot of acquisitions lately. Who will there on the right side of the border and that may be a good segue into the next topic and yes well. Let's talk about federal lands. There was a there was a four hours. Zoom call held by the secretary of interior entitled interior public forum on the federal oil and gas program. And i started watching this This morning there were eighteen. Likes and i think thousand views on youtube suggesting that for something that is so impactful to so many people in the industry that hasn't really been socialized yet. And i think it's important for anybody who's operating on federal lands whether it's service companies or anybody who's got permits. I think it's important for you to watch. Maybe at least two or three hours of this but what did you think about the well. There's a lot to unpack. There was a whole lot on. Api earthjustice tribes were oil and gas tribes against oil and gas. It was it was quite the menagerie. I mean i was. I was actually so. I was watching last night. And i'm i'm texting ethan. Sending a voice clips. I'm texting texting chuck aids as well end. I i mean i was very i was kinda lit by because i think that the So the agenda just so to clarify from eaton's perspective. It's over three hours. I have not finished. I will because i i'm i'm diving into on a very deep level but it sort of it starts out with you know deb hall and gives these opening remarks and she does remark surgery. Two guests Acting secretary of interior. She gives opening remarks then. She's not present for the rest of it and she is pretty. I mean it's it's not very bias is is for relatively open to talk about you. Know oil and gas is gonna be with us for a long time and this is this. Is the public form. Federal oil and gas. I'm for on federal Program just kind of weird title but anyway so you have the though three women that are within the department of interior and important important to state for context that holland that we are operating under executive order. One four zero zero eight. Which was biden's tackling the climate crisis at home and abroad that so we've referenced that executive order and this kind of gets back to you when people talking about where prices and when i'm talking with clients aren't talking to lots of folks in the industry. I asked a lot about the regulatory perspective. In why i feel as probably as negative as i feel about this The this administration's stance on oil and gas. And how it just. I don't think it bodes well for the industry and we hadn't heard much right. We nothing had really happened in the last several months end. Supposedly the bureau of land management is now allowed to actually do so they can permit a because a sixty day moratorium from order number three nine five from acting secretary of interior at the time that That is now over with and they re this was that or was a few times as well. So that's over with boat if you talk to operators it seems like he'll technically permits. But they're not actually doing that in any aggressive fashion so it just seemed things like your stock so this happened on march twenty fifth and they basically said. There's a comment period. So they do this big form and then they say there's a public hurried so you have until april fifteen to get your comments. And that's that they not be long. They want them to be briefing. They want any in all comments a bibliography. It's april fifteenth so two weeks. They've given yeah through federal guests. It was it was pretty short. So the people in this forum. I mean this is. It's really important to listen to think about and you can just call me. You know if you really wanna know the lowdown how this actually went down but it's you have The person representant giving the presentation. that's nevada culver with be a limb and then you have amanda lesson and she's that's the bureau of ocean energy management. And so you get these two presentations which actually excellent. They were great overviews. They gave you the facts. I mean a couple of big highlights from i think from federal federal in guest leasing is just understanding of how producing end where end in the amount and some of the big takeaways are because api had come back in and made a comment that 'cause Somebody within the form had said that did kind of accused. The industry of stockpiling permits on the industry had a ton of permit so that we didn't need to worry about that regardless and they show a permit the permit slowly going up but they do show that twenty nineteen and twenty twenty had slowed down a little bit. The royalty the minimum royalty. There was set forever ago to a point. Four percents. which is. That's not yeah. It's not egregious but it's not unfair either. I mean that's it's not a. It's not horrible rotary. But i think they were laying out a lot of these things that were set in the past and should be revised upwards so assuming they would like much higher royalties if they. I'm that'll be interesting. In the context of that discussion is the one stop. Oil and gas leasing are would be surprised if royalty rates aren't higher. Yeah i would be surprise. Well i think it's a guarantee that cause the incentive you know. I'm not certainly these all these women on this thing. I don't think they're nestle. Their personal agenda is to to end this but the mountains they referenced. The executive order on climate change. Because this is why they're doing it. I mean this executive order on climate change literally within it which we talked about before was suspending your suspending all leasing on federal land for for this evaluation period. So all this stuff. That's happening right now. In this form is part of this evaluation period and so they start with the facts and explaining all day so even if you listen to the first thirty minutes you would get a lot of information on just how the programs work but the really good thing was the data the numbers which even though we're talking about flying he was basically saying it's sort of irrelevant from a dollar perspective or before you get into that. The other thing is bonding which they would suggest to low. So when i read out of the gate the two variables the if you're looking to lease on federal land will probably go up. We'll be the royalty rate and the bonding requirements. Right and that's part. I mean as part of the infrastructure plan which. Don't worry we were definitely gonna talk about the Plan as part of that you know in the in the two weeks was last week. When by naturally i talked about it. He talked about the abandoning. You know giving money for the abandoned while program in an plugging those wells. So this is all sorta ties together and gets a little complex and confusing because they did actually within this farm as well when they kept talking about federal and they were like. Hey we are talking about federal land. But we're not precluding they literally said we're not precluding what we could do with private land. And i was like okay. Well that's not your jurisdiction are might be overreach but it sounds to me like they are going to use the studies in everything from this to maybe influence stuff. That's going to happen on private land so big takeaways. This is a really great slide in charge That the one of the first woman gave and this is the woman on from the blm and it was. It was that the statistics for twenty twenty Was that over three point. Four six billion in revenues came in just from federal and this doesn't include offshore and this is two point three billion in royalties so again if rates to go up. That's increase ninety two point nine million in bonus bids and twenty three million in rentals. And i do believe. There's other additional money that i know that bonus bid their reference that there were outside money or additional money could get so. I don't think that's a cap infra. Sure if that was twenty twenty. I think we could historically see more in two thousand nineteen. Their estimates were That it contributed that federal land for oil and gas contributed seventy one point five billion in estimated economic activity. So that's not a small number. It's a decent amount and supported Three eighteen thousand jobs also not a small number so that's pretty big from just a federal lands perspective the bureau of ocean energy management. And they don't put up particularly on the slide but they noted. They say that they do explain that. Bureau senator management. It's basically gulf of mexico production. That's the majority of production that we're talking about. It's about a million barrels. Today they say that fifteen percent of production. That's the numbers they were using at the time. for twenty twenty and that so for. Oc s for office of getting this road Yes thank you outta continental shelf. That's over three billion revenue just from those leases alone so they didn't break the numbers down but it's a lot of money i mean and they produce a lot of gas so the point is and this does this. Money goes to a lot of different entities so they will have to either increase the If they're gonna stop leasing Generating new business than this is going to be existing leases existing permits which no matter how they slice a is going to is gonna probably slow down but the the great thing was the first trump people that came on the first group of people was actually from was from the tribal lands. So you had three different tribal entities. Speaking and i will not boxes but that one was from was from alaska. one was from colorado and new mexico and the other one was. She was on the east coast right. She was on choosing the potomac. I believe she was in. Dc so you have three tribal land folks. They didn't agree. They obviously had they had one guy who was very anti oil and gas in explaining all the spills and everything was taking place in. I'm not discrediting that. I'm sure they're out concerns there. The woman alaska. She gave a lot of numbers and stats. That were pretty damning She was very bullish on oil. And gas and Defended the industry and cited that twenty. Five percent of the activity in alaska is based on oil and gas. And so she was. Definitely a proponent. And i think she also said that the native population there has been dealing with climate change for one hundred years and doesn't see a problem doing that. It was even saying problem. Promised that they. She was saying that they've been dealing with climate change for decades and they've adapted to it and they understand it well because they live there she also pointed out that the just some of the things that they were concerned about was that their rural population all these people literally use generator diesel generators. And she invited them to come out there. And we're just like you better be prepared to come to pass anchorage and you better be prepared to stay week here. 'cause you need to take a day to fly here you need to take a day to adjust and then you need to actually see you need to see the stuff that no one goes to seize worthies people in rural alaska actually For our audience out there anyone would like to sponsor the petra nerds team to go out to alaska for a week. I would be very happy to take you up on that. So i would. I would kill to do a to do podcasts. And people absolutely. I'll go to the roughest place a breast a there. Hundreds of us tribes. And i had the pleasure of more marketing into some of those tribes financial management in the past and I was taught that there is no such thing as a unified opinion on anything among those tribes of all the hundreds of tribes. You get hundreds of opinions. So don't make the mistake of thinking that there's a monolithic view. And i just thought it was good so fond. Sharp was the she was the president of the national. Congress of american indians mario Nco was a board of directors for its dna. Care c. a. r. e. and then nicole guerrino or romeo. She was the one who referencing from alaska. And she's executive vice president and general counsel for the last good federation made us and i just heard discussion was interesting because he also pointed out to the corporation so within alaska because they do have so many travel entities within alaska and they also have native corporations that they legally according to all the rulemaking subs. We've done they legally have to have a seat at the table. And those are oil companies. So these are alaskan native oil companies to have a seat at the table. And i thought it was interesting when they were asking so when the department of interior was asking them you know what are some best practices and not just best practices. What does some things we can do to to help with this. And they all of them said the dialogue all of them were saying they wanted better dialogue and communication and that they didn't give enough advanced combs through the messy system the web system to be notified and these people are nodding their heads like that. I thought well crap that sucks you have to be on it to be seeing me stuff posting and then they have to comment back so and the stuff that we had referenced before an order number three nine five that was mentioned because department of interior at the time had listed indian tribal lands in indian lands on that suspension of delegated authority which they had no legal claim to actually do that which was a joy. Screw yeah sounds like it was a scope and they referenced. This these folks were saying. Hey you put us on that. And they didn't say hey that's was not like they just said there was a lot of confusion because confusion about trying to do something illegal and they also referenced the same thing we did which was the consultation that other basically it. It went against their sovereignty and it violated a previous agreement. That was just how they because they basically did not consult tribal leaders lands when they issued that order and that was something all these tribal groups were saying within this meeting. Was you have to consult us. If you're going to do something to consult us. I again think this is very interesting this conversation. That's taking place and some of the things that the the woman from alaska was coming because she said look were in support of of initiatives on climate change. We are not in support of getting of transitioning tomorrow and of doing this in a rapid fashion because we use we produce and we use oil and gas and we don't see a the ability to switch off of it tomorrow and that was just their her statement on this this just to underline. It leaves us in an interesting position. Which is that on the one hand. They want to have a rapid transition away from fossil fuels but on the other hand. They want to make sure that they incorporate travel consultation and You can't have it both ways. Yeah i think it's i think it's a little hard when you You know you have to respect if these tribal lands are these tribal leaders want to want to rapidly transition and they want to put solar and wind in green tekken geothermal. What if they want to do all that. There may be options for geothermal such but they wanna do that. That's up to them those great but that's their economic revenue drivers and i'm and they i think it was pointed out and there's a lot of mineral rights in a lot of money from oil and gas that goes to tribal lands and that's why all of them I don't know if that that that gentleman had mentioned but the other two women basically commented that guess industry is very important for their as a revenue stream. So they can i to me i some is they made it pretty clear that they're not getting rid of oil and gas anytime soon. If you came this out far into the future and you assume that there are some owners restrictions on private lands you can see a future for oil and gas where you have an extraordinary concentration of production on travel lands yen. It could make it to where you could make it to where they're more open to doing business with opera for operators that bringing operators incentivizing them to come in because they have an opening. It's no different than than the us being downward eleven million barrels per day in opec being able seed market share. I mean if you're seeing everybody hurting if you're have the i mean if you're in the us to basin are you have your the fort berthold reservation. This could be an opportunity for you to say. Hey we're open for business come to us. And that may or may not were and best practices and everything certainly has to be done but it just something you think about. This could be a actually a positive from an guest point on native lands. Should they want it so nothing that i welcome. I don't know who listens. I don't know exactly who listens. I know we're getting gaining an emt community base of of listeners But folks disagree or want to jump on talk about stuff. I am more than willing to have folks on podcasts Especially on issues like this. So they deform continues and i finished. The season has finished but formed us continue with the industry experts on you have somebody from. Api talking that individual did explain that he. He seemed a little defensive The was not stockpiling permits. And that's not quite how it works. I would actually say that. Some players industry have stockpiled permits because they intelligent players because they knew that biden. Mike clamp down on them. Efg is one of those companies. But the industry's a whole. I don't think. I personally do not think did a good job at all stockpiling permits which they actually should have done. And that's legal. There's no. I don't see how that could be an issue. But they do point that so it's interesting that they say we are not impacting existing permits yet they reference but the industry has stockpiled the bunch so wouldn't matter anyways That that type of talking and everything does make me a little bit nervous. And then so you had the The industry panel. Which i didn't think was very good. I wish they would have had an operator. I wish they would've had somebody outside of api. I didn't think it was a. I did not think it was a very good representation of the industry as a whole and then the second or the foam that we both watch Earthjustice came out swinging. Pretty hard All of the environmental folks from the environmental group was earthjustice and The arctic ocean conservatory and the nrdc. They were all anti surprised inland. They're all anti only gas and they were all for no more drilling at all ever again on federal land immediately putting a stop to all new leasing everything i i don't know if they went as far as saying you know taking away the permits but they urge of justice called the new mexico permian basin a climate bomb So you know there's that and that was very clear where they stood on this issue here. Putin clapping in the background. You know it was just so so we'll see was a it was an interesting There's a lot of passion in that one. Yeah right so let's get onto the case of what actually is infrastructure and talk about the make america great again tax plan. No it's not called that. It's called the made in america tax plan. That came out today. That would cut thirty five billion dollars of oil and gas Let's call them. Tax preferences include intangible drilling costs Depletion expense The publicly traded partnership tax code. Which would have some interesting implications for enterprise magellan etc transfer. So what's your grand- take on the the tax plan in what it would mean for the only guests sector okay. So that's the big question. Is this more of question of this more drilling question of what is what is infrastructure. Which i think we can probably the. There's too broad. I think two things that are going on with us and we're actually touch on some of the power stuff as well. I think china was referenced. Lot so biden gave another speech today if you saw it and he was talking about the you know he's basically trying to sell this infrastructure plan so there's two things happening. This is both in infrastructure. Plan that is going to spend a lot of additional tax dollars so this is an a two trillion dollar infrastructure plan apparently spread over ten years. Which personally for all the stuff that they want to include especially the decarbonising of the grid. I don't think that's enough money because most of the math on the decarbonation for the grid just for transmission alone is in the trillions itself. So i don't think that's gonna work but so it's to to do this. And then the problem is now. It's it's a it's called the infrastructure plan but there's a whole tax changes with it so now there's tax plan and so that's what actually some of the questions on from from twitter were the made in america tax plan And this is an as you know making It is interesting. The is making america better. Not making america great is making america. Better which is just like just took a pivot on on trump's talking points juice marketing. So biden talk today. And i do think it's really important to clarify this stuff on china because this is driving me a little bit bananas and i had a book upstairs which meant to bring down search on china but so this this is bloomberg in. They're saying you know biden pitches infrastructure plan as vital keep china and he referenced china avant so he's basically saying look china's eating our lunch their head of us on infrastructure the head of us on five g they build all these airports in the cnbc. Put the numbers for look at all the airports they build and look building more coal plants than we are so they don't put that up there. How many new coal plants. You gotta realize that china. It's it's different. It's not if you're not comparing apples to apples when you're comparing the us and china and certainly they have robust infrastructure that they have Built out they had built out a lot of stuff. But the primary impetus for building out. A lot of this stuff is to have jobs right. It is literally. Let's go build a we have to hit a gdp growth targets. So they have their five year plan. They set their gpo target. And then they have to hit it and the way in which they do that is. Let's go build roads. Let's go build coal plants. Let's let's build infrastructure. Let's build electric vehicle charging stations and really do your research and watch some of the shows seriously everybody in a couple of the grand tour where they do this and top gear as well and they go to china and it's empty. I mean they're gas stations. That have never been used and charging stations that have been used because nobody's driving on these roads and there are even in the i referenced this before but the energy transition podcast which does a really great job on their china episode Worth buying just the episode because it really talks about how so much of the service empty. We talked about this with coal with all coal fired. Power plants and power generation. Is that so much of them are built and not fully used. But they're built to hit. Mexico's pats peak capacity right. So a lot of that's built on the job creation so comparing china in terms of hey they do all this stuff and this is and we need to compete with that. It's not fair is not the same at all and all of the stuff that they build is sixty five. Their power generation is sixty five percent coal. So don't pat them on the back too much because it's built on the back of coal and apparently that's not what the administration is trying to do. So that's what is built on. It's not built on. They don't have a superior grid that's that's built on all this this green tech and we pointed out in the previous podcast. I mean the reason in which they do is because they have all this coal. The other problem i have with this comparing it to china is that he biden talks a lot about the the different. The democracy is a you know we're history is going to judge whether democracy wins and that you know that criticizes us as a democracy because we cannot We can't get it together. We can't just build this stuff. Well you know there's a reason that we have You know we have institutions and we do have checks and balances and you know. He's he's the problem that's happening with this infrastructure. Bill these tax right now is it. Doesn't they're getting pushback from the other side right. The republicans the democrats are not disagreeing on this and this is not rocket science. Okay this is. I think this honestly is basic economics and basic politics. This isn't like crazy left or crazy right in the infrastructure plan. And this is where we're going to get to defending infrastructure. And i would love your thoughts on this but typically infrastructure. We do think of roads and bridges and highways. that's not. I'm not being really bias in that in this infrastructure bill. This is broadened getting high speed internet to rural america. I'm from rural america. That's awesome bring high speed internet role. Trust me my nieces and nephews would love it but then it goes further and it gets into healthcare for at home care for the elderly and things and actually care for a What schools and care for all kinds of different at homecare. Sorry i'm screwing up on. That point is that's not that's not infrastructure that is A social welfare social services and so putting the infrastructure bill is. That's bullshit so take it out and put it in a separate bill and call it what it is. And that's really what i think. The republicans are honestly saying that's not infrastructure most of it is infrastructure but it's putting the social stuff and so they are trying to be more broad and inclusive and saying they want to. You know there's tons of stuff in your list. Let's let's be fair and say that every time there's a massive bill and everybody puts their entire wishlist in it. Republicans democrats everything and it would be by some out or what but the point is is that you're calling for they're calling for a whole new tax system or tax plan this infrastructure bill. This is going to cause problems. I don't care who would be in office in which parties they're gonna fight on it but the point is that when you're putting in social costs like the these healthcare things or just don't care that's not a typical thing we think of infrastructure and that you're asking taxpayers in a form whether you're changing the tax codes and everything you're asking them to pay for it and i think that is That's complicated so that is also something that we typically see in in more european and more I'm not criticizing this either but it is. It tends to be slightly more socialist or more democratic. When you're you're spending money on those things and everyone's paying for it A according to the new oxford american dictionary infrastructure the basic physical and organizational structures and facilities needed for the operation of a society or enterprise. Physical physical yes sir structure and i think i mean he talked about it and he ten soup biden tends to be talking more about the infrastructure. Stuff changing outlet pipes. You know actually. My pipes were changed in denver already. But you know changing everybody's lead pipe so lots of stuff in there is definitely one hundred percent infrastructure that i think a lot of people are in support of it. Just some of these other points. And i have not i. It is on my jets. Get deeper into it. But the point is like the. I'm really having trouble selling this. So the democratic thing is saying well china you know china can do things they can just pass the infrastructure that can just go build it and they're building all these batteries. I am going to clarify again that their batteries are not the best in the business. There's a reason why tesla is in china. And that's because they're the batteries that china makes are not the best. They are not the most efficient battery so not the cleanest and they process. And i think the washington post said had commented on this. Some folks on twitter had to that you know the process the majority of the bolt and a lot of the process a massive amount of the lithium and all these components both in in the chip sector Really in the battery sector and the processing of these medals and these minerals is environmentally intensive it typically has radioactive material with it and they have to take that off of it. We don't do a lot of that in the western world. They tend to do it there because they don't have the environmental standards and so when we are putting themselves on what we're really giving it to. It's a compliment to them. When biden saying the stuff to them one year. Doing all this stuff. And you're eating our lunch you doings. They're doing it with no environmental standards and they're doing it with sixty five percent coal so i just don't think it's fair to to liken is it's not the same thing and we do have rules instructors and we do have ruled law which they don't That we don't just shove things through and so saying we should shove this through That's not how democracy works in the us in this debate that we're having in this back and forth that that's what's going to happen and that's not necessarily a bad thing okay. It's april seventh. Russian troops are massing on the ukrainian. Border wait we don't wanna get into the taxes. Hold on we have to. We have to go back one second and get into this Okay so there wasn't a question on replacing of the taxing so within the tax bill. We are talking about replacing the subsidies for fossil fuels with incentives for clean energy production. And i'm just gonna read this. It's important but so they talk about. Climate change is already impacting. Homes were having devastating storms wildfires et cetera. But they say today. The tax code contribute to climate change. So they're saying the tax code today is contributing to climate change by providing significant tax preferences and subsidies for the for the oil and gas industry. And i'm reading this from. This is the made in america tax plans so this is the tax plan on the back of this infrastructure plan. The president's tax plan would remove subsidies for fossil fuel companies while providing incentives to reposition the united states as the global leader in clean energy into ensure that our infrastructure is resilient to storms floods fires and rising sea levels targeted investments. In clean resilient energy future would also shops for american workers and address our industries. How exactly interesting. How exactly they're gonna do all that. And and the types of spending. I mean there's a lot of things you could do with that or could be included. They also say this is where i do. Have to pick a bone as being. I have a background in economics. And i've spent a lot of time studying. Various things including china estimates quote estimates from the treasury department department's office of tax analysis Okay estimates from the treasury department's office of tax analysis suggests that eliminating the subsidies for fossil fuel companies would increase government tax receipts by over thirty five billion in the coming decade. With a lot of money. I get that. And here's the kicker the main impact would be on oil and gas company profits right. That makes sense. If you're going to take away all the subsidy so we get that. Research suggests little impact on gasoline or energy prices for us companies little impact on our energy. Security i just don't know how you can. Impact company profits but not impact at all energy security or production in the us. I just. it's amazing how that goes. They do cite study. I will be chasing up that study. You can bet your ass It's a twenty eighteen study. And i just find that ridiculous so you obviously cannot change a company's profitability without changing its wack and without changing available capital to reinvest in the marketplace at cetera. So we know that is full mardi seeing it. So you're seeing that we've seen changing in profitability. I mean prices going negative and the actions of the industry. And you've seen the property and folk spending less than the fact that they have to spend more on she and they have to spend more on all these things. They're not putting it in. So milwaukee milwaukee but one thing we should say about that though ten billion dollars excuse me ten years thirty five billion dollars three and a half billion dollars a year. That's not a lot of money in the grand scheme of things. And i do think the way. They wrote that emphasized the big number of course of ten years. And when you plough that through the amount of You know consumption that we have in the us every day. It probably doesn't amount to a huge number But it's still economically matters and of course if your business your anytime the market interferes and you distort the market and let's say a company either exists or doesn't exist on the back of intangible drilling costs or depletion and if all of a sudden you become profitable have to pay tax. That could shift a bunch of marginal producers out out of profitability of out of existence. Yeah and i think it's i just think it's important to kinda circle this back. Because the actual the alumna bureau of ocean energy management if you're producing you know we're we're talking on bass numbers about seven billion a year you know. That's that's more than this right. So you're gonna trim you're basically saying hey we're gonna we're gonna stop the oil and gas leasing and we're gonna trim that now. They said they're going definitely stop. But either it's going there curtailing it to some degree. I have a very strong opinion on that. So that's over seven billion. That's a lot of money and then you're saying okay. We'll get thirty five billion over ten years in the subsidies and to your point that you just made on your shifting this. I not impact the energy security. It's absolutely ridiculous. We you know so much of the gulf of mexico. Loan is producing a million barrels today. And that and an alaskan all this contributes massively to domestic energy supply and intern in many ways in energy. Security i mean we just we have it here. We have the benefit of producing. Have creating those jobs where it's been every finding it here in creating those jobs was Of keeping the money here not saying elsewhere. And i think it was noted actually within one of those department here presentations that there was a great and we will all be showing this and some of my work in putting it lincoln twitter. Those was a really good chart that did show. The i think it was ano- national industry association and they represent both offshore wind an officer oil and they were talking about the emissions. Or maybe this was api. I might be getting this wrong but the juicy emissions on a scale and the gulf of mexico was actually really low on ghg emissions and part of domestic production tends to be lower because they do include the full cycle eventually importing. It and i thought that was important. Also was making me think about you know. They industry keeps getting this pressure for full cycle emissions. And i'm just wondering when we're going to start talking about full cycle missions on that lithium cobalt and everything that we're getting from china. 'cause i'm pretty damn sure that when sixty five percents scolded the life cycle of that you know. That battery just doesn't seem as clean so we will have to make those batteries here if it's if it's going to be about emissions but that is my opinion and the other thing is on these companies so we're gonna if we're going to put these companies out of business in the us. And i made this comment abroad. But this is no different than bp selling their assets to another company a chinese russian company. That's gonna go do it. This is not. I mean so you were basically saying hey. Tribal lands are probably do are in a good position to increase production. But so we're we're going to reduce it in the us your incentive to produce in the us we are going to have to. That kudo is going to be produced somewhere else. And so we are going to produce an abroad. And i think the narrative gets a little stock because we talked about when people define the energy transition and increasingly i think it's the accelerated energy transition and in that in view of the vantage point of this accelerate energy transition that demand is just continually declining oil and gas so we don't need it and therefore prices are low demand is the cleaning prices are low and there's lots of this crew on it it functions very well in this theory of this accelerate energy transition. And so it's not a problem but the reality is is that you know prices may be relatively stable. They may be ran fifty to sixty bucks other companies and other industry or other players around the world are probably going to produce it so we're literally just not producing in the. Us is going to be produced elsewhere. And then we're gonna probably imported. And particularly i think in the next few years the given our demand trajectory in post covid. It's it's teeing up to be a robust demand. Growth at least for the us is true. So it's april seventh. We're gonna close soon. But i wanna i wanna note for episode eleven. We'll circle back and see if anything came from the ukrainian russian tensions building and whether that has Any implications globally for Other actors testing the united states resolve for example chinese and the tea in taiwan the iranians there was a a mine of iranian tanker by probably the israelis so lots of tensions building up that could have impacts on oil. And that's not. I think obviously it's not currently be Being reflected in prices so we'll see if traders when add this sort of risk premium to it. I don't think you know when we look back and see when the last time the russians did this and you know when they were kind of pushing the stuff in two thousand fourteen with crimea The truly didn't do much to push back so and you. We saw all the stuff that china did over during covid we saw how aggressive this wolf warrior. Diplomacy became an how aggressive you know. Literally what they're telling us even after the overtaking hong kong and baseless saying don't criticize us. I mean some very very serious off. From from overtaking hong kong from pushing into the east china sea from pushing into you know the the spat with india in the in the himalayan mountains through treatment of which might threaten the us olympic participation. Yeah i mean this is a serious like the self that china has done even just during covid. Because everybody's been very busy and you tend to do. I mean this is what autocratic authoritarian dictators do earn folks like putin and so it makes sense to me that i. I've been kinda waiting for russia to do something because you know you do it when everybody's busy in their focused on what they're doing so they should have honestly done it six months ago but it makes sense now that hey everybody's busy and the just recovering from covid. So why don't we just stepping 'cause honestly who's gonna push back everybody's they're gonna eventually have to do something to stop them. I don't really think it's that negative. You know we tend always think wars bad for earth him unless it's going to impact production. I don't at least right now. I don't think it's a production. Actually risks Uptick really didn't do much than you know. Yeah so i mean to read it. I think it's something really really important to watch. It's also really important for this administration because foreign policy at. We've i've noted this before policy just one of those things that it looks easier on paper. When you're coming into office you thank. You can be different than your predecessors but on honestly if you look at like you can look at very left presidents for right presidents. They tend to congealed when it comes into foreign policy. They don't necessarily make bass lee different decisions and and by next hasn't he is a huge pickle with iran and china. Though i mean it's not it's not looking good And just it is important for listeners. For people to be aware of what china's doing of how their energy is produced an end. Really aware of. I don't think it's fair to to use china as an example when you want to and then reform them when you don't and i certainly don't think it's fair to be saying that there is better than our democracy over here will next week. We'll come back to a global geopolitics and possibly will address one of my friends. Hr hunts wives on on. Twitter will address the question about rennes correct spreads. Potentially if we can get up to speed on that yet. Thank you for joining us again. I'm ethan bellamy. Co host of the petra nerds. Podcast this is my lovely host. Tricia curtis the ceo of patrons will see next time.

opec vicky hall alaska department of interior us tricia china biden twitter Tricia curtis america burke fasi
09-02-21 Proposed NAGPRA rules to strengthen repatriation

Native America Calling

56:44 min | 3 weeks ago

09-02-21 Proposed NAGPRA rules to strengthen repatriation

"Support for this program by the alaska native heritage centre experience more than ten thousand years of history and culture through art dance film and more exploring your home. State is the co vid safe way to enjoy the summer. Welcome to native america calling. I'm melissa yucky. London department of interior just wrapped up a series of consultations tribes there outlining ways tribes can have more say in repatriating ancestral remains funerary objects and other items held an institutions across the country. There are a number of exemptions and loopholes preventing tribes for repatriating the tens of thousands of items held in museum collections. We hear about changes in the works right after national native here This is national native news. I'm antonio gonzalez. The all public council of governors is calling on the new mexico legislature and staff to make meaningful improvements and rebuild trust with tribes because calls followed the resignation of legislative staff member. Rachel guzzle director of the legislative education study committee. She was reprimanded last year. Accused of making disparaging remarks about native americans. For months public governors and leaders of the navajo anti patchy tribes had saw her resignation. They believe their legislative priorities on education. Were stifled bubble leaders. Say the new person to lead. The role should have knowledge of cultural diversity and respond to the needs of native children in a statement academic pueblo governor. Brian via says it's time for a fresh start. Adding the process to find a replacement should include consultation with tribes. A group of high school students from the lack of flambeau bound of lake superior to wa has been staying busy this summer. They're part of a second cohort of students to participate in a summer. Work program that employ students to engage in their culture w x. pr's aaron got soccer went to work with some of these students to learn more about the program. It's pouring down rain in lactose flambeau. But the rain doesn't stop a group of about six high school students from gathering carb traditional wooden foods sheaves strips of cedar wood into wild rice now. The teens are part of a summer work. Program called lactose flambeau. Youth cultural experience funded by the economic support office. They spend about twenty hours four days a week working on cultural projects. Greg johnson. is the program supervisor. This program is to educate and you are kids here. An opportunity to work laker was good end. That's exactly what these students are doing. We've collected cedar bark. We've made a couple of wigwams. We learned how to make traditional foods. We learned how to gather traditional medicines. Lacy value is one of the programs participants before the summer. She says she couldn't have imagined herself spending her school. Break learning about this culture now. She can't imagine being anywhere else. It's just being able to bring the culture back after so long because the wigwam that we built the type the type that it was wasn't made for over one hundred years as school gears up for the fall. The summer program is winding down but the lessons learned this. Summer will last much longer than a season. I've picked up a lot of skills. That i can use a lifetime and i feel that that will serve me well and others to. I'm aaron got soccer. He lo- river indian community governor steven rayle lewis and to native students joined arizona governor doug ducey wednesday for the signing ceremony of a bill which ensures students have the right to wear traditional dress to graduation to represent their culture. Hp twenty seven. Oh five prohibits school dress codes which prevent students from wearing traditional clothing or cultural items to graduation ceremonies native american state. Lawmakers introduced the bill and helped get it through the legislature. The federal communications commission is extending the deadline to september twenty seventh to submit applications for four seats on the native nations. Communications task force. Applicants must be elected leaders from a federally recognized tribe or employee authorized to act on the leaders behalf. The task force makes recommendations to the commission about tribal related issues. I'm antonio gonzales. National native news is produced by chronic broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting support by the center for indigenous cancer research at roswell park comprehensive cancer center dedicated to cancer research medicine and cancer care for indigenous population. The no charge online risk assessment tool is available at roswell park dot org slash. Assess me support by aarp. The native urban elder needs assessment survey will provide data to improve urban indian elder health equity elders are underrepresented in data and you can help info and survey at you. I a coalition dot org native voice. One the native american radio network. This is native. America calling from anchorage. alaska. I'm melissa london for more than thirty years. After the native american graves protection and repatriation act was enacted the remains of more than one hundred thousand people remain in collections in american institutions. The department of interior is proposing some changes designed to give more tribes more power to repatriate those ancestral remains in this hour. We're going to learn more about those proposals. What they do and what they don't do we're also going to get a better idea of the limitations of the current law and some of the ideas to improve it and hold museums and other institutions accountable. We also want to hear from you. How has negra helped. Tribes regain their incest remains. What more can the law due to keep the pressure on through patriot. Items in a more timely way. If you like to join our conversation give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. That's one eight hundred nine nine native joining us now is shannon laughlin. She is chief executive and attorney for the association on american indian affairs and she's also citizen of the choctaw nation of oklahoma shannon. Thank you so much being with us today. How are you think well elissa. Thanks thank you. Can you tell us a bit. More about the association on american indian affairs. I know it's the oldest organization indian country you were saying. Yes the longest serving indian country nonprofit. We've been around since nineteen twenty two. We were formed During a time of assimilation and an an allotment when our lands were being taken away when our cultures and practices were being outlawed and there were some progressive thinkers in the southwest and in the northeast came together To want to change those types of federal genocidal policies away from assimilation and allotment toward self determination and sovereignty and One of the first big things that our organization worked on was to protect a pueblo lands in new mexico and we worked with the all Pueblo governors council to do that and to get the state of new mexico off of pueblo. Lands so we've kind of continued a trajectory Along those lines working on national legislation. That really changed. How the federal government dealt with native american issues and the native american graves protection and repatriation act was one of those huge pieces of legislation that we worked with tribal partners and other native org us To change how our bodies and items have been treated and how that legislation progressed over the time can you give us some update surrounding it. Wow over thirty years Let me talk about the positive. I over thirty years museums and agencies have been mandated to consult with tribes to achieve repatriation of our ancestors variable longings and other cultural items and what museums have learned is that they didn't know anything about what was in their collections. What they had was limited knowledge That was based on theft and oftentimes The doctoring of what that provenance information was so by working with tribes and consulting with tribes across the country museums. Have been able to Better understand and better educate the public about who particular tribes are and to do it in an appropriate way that's acceptable to the tribes that they're working with so it's really helped to progress Public education as well as progress. How museums treat the things that are really not were never there to begin with with tribes It has been a really hard and emotional process. Having to create ceremony that was never needed before in order to bring ancestors back home and put them into the ground so it has been a difficult process. I think for four tribes positives right trying tries to be a part of the education process. Helping people realize that it's a living history and not something that could be relegated to history. Museums like dinosaurs is. That's been part of the re education it has and also really brought You know we're considered we have been considered a vanishing people and And it seems like museums and others think it's okay to Study our ancestors remains and to showcase our cultural and religious belongings and even our burial belongings behind class with little simple tags on them and and what the act has done is Reminded people who were still here. And we're still alive and that It's important for us to have these things back to put them into use. And what are some of those conversations like when you're trying to explain whether to a a legislator or saudi museum that we're still here what were those conversations end up taking you Most of those Well we hope that Museums have gotten a little bit further along in their education than than than basic Indian one one. We're still here type of of of communication I think what is is mostly scary for museums and federal agencies is They lack cultural competency. And sometimes even common sense on how best to work with tribes who they should be reaching out to And so sometimes it's it's simply educating Museums and institutions. How to start the conversations with with tribes and and then getting to know Those people who are in charge of taking care of a cultural cultural belongings of of the tribe and and and following their lead. Could you explain. What's the different. What is different about the federal government's role in negra. What's different about it than in the past or how it's progress their role it comes to enforcing it right so Nag is a really special piece of legislation. it is considered Probably the only piece of human rights legislation that that comes out of our our national government and be The federal government role is based on the government to government relationship that it has with tribes and through the congressional history of the act Senator and congressman after congressman are are saying that what has happened to tribes has been genocide and the theft of their ancestors. Human remains and other belongings was wrong was genocide and that these in order to correct that Problem that passed federal policy created. No was solution was the remedy. What are some of the new proposals than for nate pride. And how are they going to help with all of this. Well so there's already has been an active nagpur regulations They have been confusing. Complicated and Loaded with loopholes that museums have been able to exploit what the proposed draft regulations Have shown us is that the department of interior is absolutely willing to scrap those old complicated unsuccessful regulations and of start over again and basically re-look at what the act which is a wonderful well written piece of legislation. What it said and what it was trying to do and actually create a simple process that repatriation can occur. So i think in the current draft that they've provided to tribes for consultation purposes. So this is not part of a proposed rulemaking. it's it's it's a draft has only been provided to tribes to allow Further trouble consultation There is a deadline of september thirtieth where tribes need to Provide their their final comments on this draft And there's a few things that that still don't work but we're working The association is working with tribes to Understand what tribes need and make sure that We can have some strong comprehensive comments to go back to The department of interior with them with secretary halls appointment. How will this affect negra in these new developments. Well we think i. It's it has been her leadership that has pushed this forward these regulations. It's my understanding that they have been drafted they began drafting back in the obama. era and have languished over the trump administration and We're happy that Secretary holland has moved these forward and and and they're out in the public. Now we can. We can look at them and we can. We can move forward towards something better. Thank you shannon. We're going to continue more after the break. But for now and this is a native america calling and we'd love to hear from you today so call in at one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. You can also reach out on facebook. Native america calling or on twitter at one eight zero zero nine nine native. And we'll get your comments on air post on instagram at native america. Calling and take me elissa k. London we have short break. But we'll be right back Adding ancestral remains for more than one hundred thousand people remain in the hands of museums and other institutions. Us department of interior just held consultations with tribes on ways to speed up repatriation. Efforts will hear about the latest proposals. And what else needs to be done. That's on the next native american coin. If you're hurting in your relationship or have been affected by sexual violence. Strong hearts native. Helpline is a no charge. Twenty four seven confidential and anonymous domestic dating and sexual violence helpline for native americans. Help is available by calling one eight. Four four seven six to eighty four eighty three or by clicking on the chat now icon on strong hearts helpline dot org. This program is supported by the national indigenous. Women's resource center is native america calling. I'm melissa london in anchorage and we're talking about repatriating. Ancestral remains to tribes and how the federal law designed to facilitate that process. Works and ways. It can be improved. How does the law inform the upcoming investigation by the us department of the interior into former boarding schools. Join the discussion. The number is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. That's one eight hundred nine nine native on the line with us. We have shannon o. Lachlan she is chief executive and attorney for the association on american indian affairs. We also have dr april counselor. She is executive director. The olympic museum kodiak and she is a member of the sooner tribe shannon and april. Thank you so much for being on the line. Good to be here. Thank you thank you. april tolls about your role at the olympic museum. Sure i'm the executive director. Here at the newseum archaeological repository in kodiak where tribally governed museum With the board of directors made up of native representation from around the archipelago we serve ten tribes in our region which is about the size of connecticut. So it's a pretty large island. And i myself and Member of this unit tribe of kodiak. So are working. Repatriation has been incredibly meaningful to me. Personally my home village of arsim bay was the recipient of One of the first major repatriations done in our country in nineteen ninety one which was actually outside of neg pro because it came from this sonian institution the smithsonian is exempt from nagpur on But since then our community has led Quite a few repatriation efforts and the olympic museum has been designated by the tribes to assist them in the process because very few individuals in our tribal organizations have You know a lot of expertise in neck press so it helps a lot when we worked together and have designated organizations that can help guide the process for people who may need it. I imagine so. Can you tell me more about your involvement and getting repatriation repatriation of remains to alaska. Sure well by our count which is an estimate. We believe that our region has Received about twelve hundred and fifty five ancestors back in the past thirty years And it's sometimes it's a relatively easy process. It really depends on the museum or institution or university that were working with and We've had a few that have taken fifteen years or more to accomplish a couple of years ago We completed repatriation from Cheer cough island which is Individuals who are part of our culture area but from a community that is now abandoned and there was about one hundred and twenty five individuals there And after many many years we were successful in getting them home and our lunatic museums or visit temporary repository until the human remains could be reburied and reinterred so we had You know a ceremony to have them reburied We incorporated cultural Aspects of ceremony and tick dance and we also incorporated russian orthodox funeral rites because with that particular repatriation they did come from a russian orthodox graveyard from the early eighteen hundreds. So there's a lot of research involved trying to figure out You know who actually has legal control over the remains that were trying to repatriate and then You know just keeping at it for for many years and sometimes over a decade until we're actually successful in getting those ancestors returned home and sounds like a lot of persistence and then a a big deal when it actually happens. So what would make repatriations easier. Well i think some of the new proposed rules will help. I think As shannon said there's probably still quite a lot of loopholes in the the act but One of the new proposed rules relates to requiring museums to submit information to federal agencies. If they have a federal holding and this is something that was a problem for our Tribes in the past where a university had human remains but they did not inform anybody. They did not inform the department of interior which actually had the legal control of the remains under the act. And so that's one of the reasons. It took so long because there they were not forthcoming with information. And even after the repatriation occurred This university declined to hand over any information about what research was done to the individuals They said we could go ahead and look up the journal articles on academic Journal article website if we wanted to find out And so you know. We still even in this day and age based that kind of treatment sometimes by organizations and other times. It's not that way other times. They're very eager To try to do what is right under the law But we still face some holdouts. That never wanted an egg print in the first place and they still want to have the right to do research on native american remains without informing the community and ny where does that mindset. You think come from and why do you think that is well. You know. I think it does go back to that era where people believed that native americans are a dying race and that urge to collect all sorts of material including ancestral remains so that For some reason in the future it might be useful to mankind when really it was a form of You know racial prejudice where people did not consider native americans to be fully human and they did not consider our ancestors To be even connected to us today whereas from the native perspective in my community. Those ancestors are part of our family and even if we can't Directly connect to them through genealogy. We feel that that they deserve to have an honorable final resting place and slow. Our museum has made efforts to try to make sure that our broader community understands that this this is a basic human rights issue that people once they are buried. They deserve to not be disturbed and they deserve to not be shipped thousands of miles away to sit on shelves and be studied for reasons that are not even known to the community right. They need to come home. So shannon what do you think is needed to get. This mindset changed well i said We're waiting for a generation of anthropologists and archaeologists to pass on Part of the problem is that many people who are in leadership in decision making positions and in museums and other institutions were raised with this idea that that they could simply hoard our people's bodies and and cultural items as part of their academic career in which they've benefited from the generations behind them have been growing up with nagpur have been growing up with productive relationships based on free prior and informed consent with a tribal nations and native hawaiian organization so A part of this is just a matter of time. I think This huge change in the regulatory structure for nag pro will help force those Those individuals who are still not Complying with the law. They they'll just have to. They'll have to but what the association is trying to do. We're trying to do our best to make sure that people are aware of the institutions. Who aren't acting well And where their numbers are and where their money is coming from and and trying to create strong advocacy for students and others to join in So we can Bring some attention to these problematic institutions shannon. How will these regulatory changes work. How will they work well So right now. We're just in a process where this draft regulation has been shared with with tribes. It's not open for public comment only for tribal consultation so what the association and and other tribes are going to be asking department of interior for is further consultation so Tribes will be providing Their comments on this draft and will likely be asking for further consultation after the department of interior reviews so comments because the last time interior consulted with tribes on. This was was ten years ago so we need further consultation and then once once that process has been finalized and a good set of regulations drafted Then there will be a proposed rulemaking where the process is hopefully near final and is open for public comment before publishing his final regularly and see is the language for nagpur can improve things. What are you hoping to since there hasn't been changes in a decade. There's a lot there. There's a lot there and let me share some good things that we're seeing In the current regulations for one they've added a term called not just adjudicated Aboriginal land but acknowledged aboriginal land and our our partners in department of interior Believe that there's not a square inch of of the united states that hasn't been acknowledged aboriginal land and so this will open up the rags appropriately so that institutions will be consulting with somebody they won't be able to use an excuse that there's you know there's no tribes there based on the previous definitions in the rags So that's one good Thing it's a good thing. Is that the current draft has eliminated this idea of culturally unidentifiable human remains. This is what has caused probably the biggest damage In nag is that many institutions have simply either out of laziness or because of other Nefarious reasons have failed to consult with tribes an affiliate ancestors two tribes or or multiple tribes and Has instead just put them on the culturally and identifiable list and that has created problems. April now the question to you. What would you like to see. Change negra well You know one of the draft changes that caught. My attention was that there are requirements under these new proposed changes so that if a tribe where to request a repatriation that the organization institution or museum is actually required to respond. That was apparently not part of the previous regulations. And so this will hopefully compel Some of those holdout organizations to actually work with the tribes that are knowledgeable that they have human remains from their region in their holdings So that will hopefully be An improvement and there's also More clarity about some of the penalties In these draft regulations so that those organizations that are not in compliance and refused to comply that there actually are dollar amounts of penalties that are identified and that those penalties can be increased if necessary. So we do hope that Based on this our museum will be helping our regions tribes with More repatriations coming into the next few years because it's a project that is so important to our tribes that all of our ancestral remains that are sitting on shelves around the country that they come home since museums and academic institutions or critical to the return of a critical to repatriation efforts. What would you like to see museums at academic institutions do differently. You given some some ideas but just unpack it for us. Well i would to see Full disclosure of the type of research. That was done On any human remains that are being repatriated There has historically not been a lot of sharing about what was actually done with the remains Although you know upon receiving human remains we can sometimes tell that that certain types of research has been done to them But it should not be on the side of the tribe to have to track all of that information down. I believe it should be required part of the process during repatriation to turn over all inventories all notes all research materials. All files related to the human remains. That are coming home. In currently that's not mandated in negra to my understanding. I believe that is correct shannon's at your understanding as well. Well it's actually in the ac so in the act that A museum or institution. It's supposed to turn over all documentation. That's relevant To the repatriation so The problem is is from what i understand. it's the fact that use zia gms are left with the decision making and the way that the civil penalties are structured into regulations has not allowed tribes an opportunity to dispute When the museum will not give up information and it's difficult for tribes to take a case like that to federal courts. Too expensive so museums have had a lot of leeway to kind of do whatever they want make the determinations. They want even in violation of mac pro. Will it take to give tribes more power in the process To open up the civil penalty process. So it's not more. It's not so restricted to open up review committee. Finding so that the secretary can enforce those through the civil penalty process and make sure The regulations are clear and specific And then then it's up to the rest of us if an institution is not doing what it's supposed to do. We need to hold them accountable. And i think that's been difficult for tribes to do because It brings controversy to something that is highly sensitive. And and many tribes. Choose not to do that. And just their best to try to work and push an institution to make the right decisions so You know we do have to hold them accountable if they're going to act How they should under the law in shannon is their repatriation effort. That you've been a part of that has been particularly meaningful lots Ice started as a young attorney working on repatriation matters with the honi standing committee on burial rules and regulations with the six nations up there and You know i was told by One of their teeth that my job was to bring their ancestors home and that That's what would make them whole and to have that when we go to break but this is native america calling. We'd love to hear from you today. Call in at one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. You can also reach out on facebook at native america calling on twitter at one. Eight hundred nine native. We'll get your comments on the air post pick on instagram at native america calling and take me a list of london. You have to take a short break. Right back this program is made available in part by the colorado plateau foundation of place based foundation providing grant. Supporting native led initiatives protecting the lands waters and cultures colorado plateau for generations to come the colorado plateau foundation helps to build networks community and organizational capacity information and apllications available at colorado plateau foundation dot org deadline for grant proposal. Submissions is september. Third merica calling. I'm melissa london and there's still time to join our discussion about giving tribes added muscle patriot and cecil remains. The number is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. That's one eight hundred nine nine native on the line. We have shannon a lachlan. A chief executive and attorney for the association on american indian affairs and we also have desert martinez. The president of the cobblestone resource management and a tongue tribal archaeologist. Who is also gabriela. No tonga. i'm shannon you were sharing with us Before the break About something that you were really proud of in terms of repatriation efforts. That you've been a part of you. Finish that thought for us sure I had wonderful opportunity to work with the schone on repatriation efforts in new york We even brought a dispute Against the new york state museum and they're culturally an identifiable list To the the review committee. I think back in two thousand eight or two thousand nine and and were successful and and having about one hundred eighty ancestors repatriated From a site and in southern new york That's been one thing but This work is so important. And i'm just an attorney The people who are actually Digging the graves for our ancestors and doing the ceremony are the ones that that I i would love to to hear more from Their stories everyone plays a vital in one of those people also desert martinez does. Can you introduce yourself to our audience. Yes i am a member of the community. And i've been working on getting our ancestors home vienac pro and other laws So that they can be reburied for almost all my life but Yeah that's just a little short snippet. Yeah it was very important work and can you tell us about how nagpur differs in california. Well i actually wanted to talk a little bit about kind of the issues with nagpur As it stands now and particularly for my community. The the gabriella no In that the currently as shannon has stated is that there is this category that's called culturally unidentifiable. And if you're not a federally recognized tribe such as the of tonga We do not have the ability to make claims or when it first i pass wasn't didn't have the ability to make to our ancestors and so with the new regulations there is now a process where We can do that in the past. We've teamed with other federal recognized tribes in our area in which we have relationships with through marriage and other cultural traditions to make claims on our behalf and so With the new regulations world the able to actually say our ancestors and we want them back or items that are being repatriated Relatively being returned with easing and prior years or your experience in that realm well well basically you know over the last thirty years particularly for our community. It's been very rare that we've been able to get our ancestors back and one of it because we're not fully recognized as one. We don't have the capacity in terms of Our communities in order to take on that task the other issue is that we As a not nice try. We don't have a reservation. So we don't have lands that are controlled by our tribes so it becomes difficult or have been difficult for us to make those claims because if we do and then make the claim and get ancestors repatriated back to us. We had no place to remarry our ancestors and so it's only been very recently Where through working with The museums that were requesting ancestors from that we were actually able to find land to rebury those ancestors. So for instance. In two thousand sixteen the university of california at los angeles repatriated over two thousand three hundred sixteen ancestors in one thousand one hundred in nineteen thousand funerary objects and those were two tribes of both the gabriella no tonga the one end you As well as the fernande. Daniela tabacum and to mash and we worked together with ucla to identify ucla owned in managed. Land to rebury those ancestors. And a lotta. Those ancestors under nagpur were culturally ended up viable because they had connections to the knoxville. They recognized tribes but working with federally recognized tribes to make claims on our behalf. We were able to get those ancestors repatriated and reburied ancestors what inspired your work as an archaeologist and also with repatriation well for me. It's always been about one being told that we didn't. We were extinct that we didn't exist anymore. So people in los angeles area don't realize tom are still a vibrant community and then also seen our sacred sites spaces places in burials being destroyed. And you know archaeologists quote unquote going in and studying our ancestors but then as community members being separated those ancestors so i dedicated my life to getting that education to make sure that i protect our sacred spaces and places but also get the ancestors back into the ground as they wanted in during their lifetime. I know this is radio. But i'm smiling because that just sounds like very purposeful work and it's amazing an impact. What you do Shannon can you share about your I mean you work on the national level on these topics what is it like working locally with tribes like in california with people like does right. Well we always take the lead from What's going on on the ground and and want support those efforts as much as possible so we do what we can nationally to help build capacity and provide tools educational resources And whatever else legal advocacy and other things that that tribes may need to affect you wait repatriation so and and and we're happy to do that. We have a repatriation conference. That is coming up in november. Where many of us are going to be talking about these nagpur regulations And and what's happening with them and it'll be a place for folks like delray To join us and work to educate not just other tribes and their Tribal cultural heritage programs but also museums The public dealers artist Auction houses And federal agency. So they're all a part of our conference and We're really proud of the work that we're able to do. As part of that conference it just sounds like so much of the success of their repatriation is about education. Do you have any comments about. How education really impacts your work and also about some of the important repatriation efforts. You've been involved. And yeah. I think education within our own communities is very important. And that's one of the things that you know i've had the ability and the To to go to schools And be able to. You know not only study my community but study the practices that museums and other scholars have Done in order to to look at our ancestors and then you know not necessarily use it against them but use it against them in order to to to get our ancestors at my community looks at me as kind of a translator. Mediate mediator between our community and Various museums and one of the big things about those people people that work in the were tribal people that are doing the work that we're doing is that we all have these small experiences and this is one of the reasons why the repatriation conference is great is that we're able to share our our tools the tips and in some instances you know Back doors in order to get what we want. for the museums To have the ancestors come back One of the projects that i'm working on with. Ucla is called carrying our ancestors home. Where we're actually reaching out to various community members. That do this work. Both nagara repatriation as well as cultural resources interviewing them and asking them about their their history In working with getting our ancestors home and protecting our sites so that it's available not only to tribal communities so they can learn these tools and tips but also educate museum officials to see how our ancestors being on shelves impacts us emotionally and physically. And how it it's how important it is for should just come back home to us but then also educating the incoming Students and just like shannon says there are some people that you know. They believe what they believe and were never gonna reach people to have them change their mind. But it's up and coming. Aspiring archaeologist anthropologist tribal members that we also want to you know bring up in have a better understanding of of what this has done to our communities and for them to understand in order for us to heal. We need our ancestors back in the ground since about education. How his co. Cova impacted the ability to connect with people and have these conversations. It's been really difficult You know one of the big things that i always talk about you know in educating anybody is that it's always good for somebody to see and physically be in front of a tribal member speaking you know the the message is much more powerful when it's coming from a community member as opposed to being filter down through you know Various other people summarizing. What a tribal member has said to them Doing the zoom meetings that we are doing. Now 'cause i am involved in in a couple of different cases right now even though you're showing your face there's there's something about being present there's something about there's a different atmosphere and when you're in this atmosphere You can that message gets carried differently. One of the things that i know i've written about in in talked about when you're working with people that are non native that have control over ancestors you can tell whether somebody has a good heart means that they're open to what you're saying that they are going to do everything possible. In order to make sure that the goals that you both agree on occur unfortunately with covert and being virtual. You don't get that same sense of understanding particularly if somebody that you've never met before and so to me i've lost that connection that connection that basically is it people recognizing the humanity amongst the both of us that you know in them recognizing that humanity of the ancestors you know. They're not just things or the ancestors objects they're not just things they're part of our community and continue to be a part of community to get that message really requires upfront in person Face to face conversation at least in my experience shannon team give input on this as well. How has Coverted nineteen impacted your work and repatriation. It has I agree with does right. It's it's made it more difficult But at the same time it's also allowed more people to come together. Who even before cova may not have been able to so we've been able to have meetings at pull people together almost a drop of the hat right and our For example on a repatriation conference which we had last year was virtual We were able to reach three times as many people With that conference than we had been in the past with are on the ground conference And the same goes with this year. We have a a conference portal. Were able to us. We're able to set up small networking sessions Consultation sessions and really helps support doing our best with what we have right now to bring people together but i think another negative thing about cove is it has brought out more looters to Lands that are aren't being protected because Either the federal government doesn't have the staff in parks or no one's paying attention so it has increased Looting of current site. why i- anyways that's the larger conversation so it can give us insights into what might come from the department of interior investigation into boarding schools We're we're still wondering what's going to happen there. What i hope what i would like to see is legislation that will not be dependent on where the gravesites of of these children are located. So that it's not just federal lands like nagpur only applies to federal and tribal land boarding school legislation. That would allow tribes to reach wherever that cemetery is and bring their children home for proper burial I i hope that's in the works. But i you know we're just waiting. I think we're all waiting together to see what that investigation willing to know. So it's directly related. I guess going back to my exclamation of why. Why do you think lueders are just becoming more prevalent during kobe. Nineteen what's the mind what Well because they can What we're finding is We have known dealers in the us. that are exporting items outside of the us for sale and in countries like france. So they're looking for those those items that can get a good price And then of course. There's always the looky lose to people who think that by by possessing our our human remains and other sacred items. That somehow they gain power from that of some kind some kind of Mythical power So you know you've got all kinds out there. But there are known dealers who are looting and exporting to other countries there's a current piece of legislation before congress right now called the safeguarding tribal objects patrimony. Act that we're looking to pass to help. Prevent that exportation of our cultural heritage god. There's some safeguards going in place of. We're about to close out our shows. Desert any final final thoughts or comments then shannon as well. I'm just thinking about the the regulations and some of the issues that not only rich recognize tribes. Have there is Within the regulations of when you're culturally affiliating ancestors or objects to a tribe. You have to have a preponderance of the evidence in these. New regulations will allow us to make those claims based on our oral tradition. So much more of this conversation that needs to be had so thank you so much does ray in shannon for being on the show today and also thank you april. So that's all the time we have for today like to again. Thank our our guests. Shannon keller lachlan desert martinez in april counselor. Dreamy again tomorrow. We'll be live again with a discussion about paying reparations to tribes australian government allocated hundreds of millions of dollars to compensate indigenous people there. We'll get a perspective on what it would take in this country. I'm melissa london. And this is native. America calling off the association of american indian physicians and the centers for disease control and prevention remind you receiving the cova nineteen vaccination protect you your family and your community and urge you to please contact your tribal or urban clinic to get your couva. Nineteen vaccination if you haven't more information at a p dot org or cdc dot gov slash corona virus. Who support this. Show support by the smithsonian's national museum of the american indian presenting the other slavery histories of indian bondage from new spain to the southwestern united states of virtual symposium that considers the hidden stories of enslaved indigenous peoples focusing on the legacy of spanish colonisation in the americas and asia and its impact. On what is now. The southwestern united states available on demand from september twenty fourth to the twenty seventh at american indian dot sl dot. edu native america calling is produced. Annenberg national native voice studios in albuquerque new mexico by kwon broadcast corporation and native nonprofit media organization funding provided by the corporation for public broadcasting with support from the public radio satellite servants music is by brent michael davids native voice. One native american radio network.

us department of the interior association on american indian shannon nagpur melissa london olympic museum america alaska native heritage centre melissa yucky London department of interior antonio gonzalez public council of governors mexico legislature Rachel guzzle legislative education study co Brian via federal government economic support office steven rayle lewis doug ducey
New Gaming Deal May Expand Gambling In Florida. But First, It Heads To Federal Officials For Approval.

Florida Matters

28:01 min | 4 months ago

New Gaming Deal May Expand Gambling In Florida. But First, It Heads To Federal Officials For Approval.

"Welcome to florida matters. I'm bradley george. Gambling is big business for the seminal tribe of florida. And it's about to get bigger last week state. Lawmakers approved a new compact with a tribe. The thirty year deal with let the seminoles run sports. Betting operations across the state and in the tribe would pay florida. Five hundred million dollars a year in gaming revenue. You'll still needs approval from federal officials and legal challenges are likely on today's show. We look at the future and the past of indian gaming in florida. Darah cam is a reporter with the new service of florida and cupboard. Last week's vote on the gaming compact in tallahassee. We spoke via zoom. Just give me a quick overview of what's What's in this gambling deal that the legislature approved last week. It was a two and a half billion dollar minimum agreement. The seminal tribal chairman marcellus osceola junior and governor rhonda santa's without agreement on april twenty third and it allows for a major expansion of gambling in florida on a number of levels including what people are probably most interested in. It opens the door to sports betting and they auspices of the tribe and we can talk a little bit more about how that will operate. We'll we'll get into that in a minute. But i i know there had been talk for a while of of the state and the tribe trying to come to some kind of new deal. What happened in the last couple of months that brought the two sides together to the agreement. Well i think one thing was the the. The governor really wanted to emerge successful on this deal with politically for him. It's a major achievement that other legislative leaders and his predecessor governor. rick scott was unable to attain. The tribe had stopped paying the state. They were paying annual payments of about three hundred and fifty million dollars as part of an old what agreement. Let's known in federal laws as compact and they had stopped paying that in twenty nineteen because of the designated player card games that are being offered at para mutual card rooms throughout the day. And the say so the state has been missing out on three hundred fifteen million dollars a year that the tribe had agreed to for revenue sharing a from proceeds from their blackjack and slot machines operations at most of their casinos. So the governor really. I think he wanted to do a deal. That helps the pira. Mutual operators pair mutuals horse tracks highlight franz dog tracks. Now are not racing any longer but they have been in florida for over one hundred years and at one point they were people came from all over the country to to campbell at these facilities and they were pretty ritzy glamorous establishments that's changed over recent years but the governor saw an opportunity to get a deal with the tribe the lucrative deal with the tribe. It's a minimum of five hundred million dollars a year over the first five years. This the money was a really good deal at a time when the state might be looking at declines in general revenue funds and something that would give new products to the existing para mutuals and allow them to continue to operate in a world where they've seen their numbers just declining pretty dramatically. So let's look at what's in this deal. And and sort of the biggest aspect in terms of the expansion of gambling in florida is allowing the seminole tribe essentially a monopoly to run sports betting in the state. What what will that look like once. It takes effect so this sports betting provision allows the tribe to essentially to serve as what they called the hub for sports betting and they computer servers that generate these mobile bet. So you'll be you'll be able to pull up an app or what they call a skin on your phone and place a bet anywhere in florida they will serve as the host and they will contract with at least three para mutual operators who will be to also offer sports betting again the tribe will serve as the host and the pair mutuals will get sixty percent of the split on that and a portion of the proceeds from the sports. Betting will go to the state in terms of taxes depending on where the where the bed is made the problem as you now and everyone is aware of at this. Point is whether that sports betting conducted off of tribal lands whether that is permitted under federal law and whether that it requires a statewide vote under a constitutional amendment florida voters approved twenty teen that requires statewide approval of expansions of gambling. What about the seminal Rock hotels and casinos the one here in tampa in south florida. How will things change their under this agreement match and like an. I don't know you know what you and your listeners are familiar with. But i would imagine that at their facilities in tampa and hollywood that the tribe would have some sort of a sportsbook room or facility where people can come in. They'll be a bunch of you know tv screens and they can watch games. And they can bet on them while they're at the facility. A lot of money is wagered on sports betting but the profit share the revenue to the operators is not that great. So they're going to make what i've heard. The rule of thumb is is that people make about five percent off of what's being wagered so the amount while the numbers are very high they can be in the billions of dollars wagered on sportsbook the actual amount of money that people draw down from that did operators or computer platforms. Draw down from that is is not that. Tremendous what it does do though. It does a couple of things one is if brings people to the facility so that they're spending money on cars blackjack or slots or food or drink or something like that. So that's something you can imagine. Maybe parties of people will go birthday parties or things like that be question becomes because of the legal issues. Would this agreement leave the tribe possibly as the monopoly for having online sports betting on their tribal properties only and then people would under those circumstances depending on what happens in the federal courts state courts and with the department of interior that has to approve the compact with really truly give the tribe a monopoly in terms of sports wagering conducted on tribal lands. So governor desanta negotiated this deal with the seminal try brought it to the legislature. Lawmakers had a special session. That was three days long where they pass this thing. It a major deal at thirty year agreement sealed through the legislature in three days. Do you get a sense from your reporting and talking to lawmakers if they understood what they were voting on that begs the question do lawmakers there there are many many situations where lawmakers vote on bills voluminous bills and their unacquainted with all of the elements of the bill. This this bill did change significantly because there was a provision the had provision in it that required the state to to negotiate with the tribe within three years for online gaming basically online roulette online blackjack line slot machines and that was a bridge too far for many house members and so they quickly amended that on monday they met for three days they they would probably not had the votes to pass it or may not have had the votes to pass it unless they took that provision out so did they understand all the complexities of what is seventy. Five page. agreement does for the tribe. Probably they understood from thirty thousand foot perspective. Did they have a lot of questions about whether those issues that i laid out for you. Just now on federal court Federal law state corden amendment three. Yes they still. They passed it even while some of the leaders said they don't think that it will that the sports betting provision will hold up so. Why did they do that. We'll governor to santa's he still holds the budget governor de- santa's made phone calls directly to legislators over the weekend leading up to the special session on gaming directly and his stat. Hannes staff reached out to legislators obviously wasn't privy to those conversations directly but one can imagine that your budget shoes or your future legislation could be in jeopardy if you don't support something that the governor has come out publicly signed this with the tribal leader and they as you've seen on many many other issues. The legislature is in thrall enthralled by governor disentis than he says jump and they say how high will you saw some lawmakers as well saying you know. I don't think this is a great deal. But it brings in revenue in. Florida doesn't have many sources for revenues as we don't have an income tax So if we don't approve this agreement we're leaving money on the table. So that's that's why we're going to support it. That's true and i think. The governor believes that this provides some stability for the pair mutual industry for the pair mutual operators and it does bring in some guaranteed revenue for this day other lawmakers have objected. Not only that. It wasn't enough revenue but that it's a really long deal that thirty years in an arena. Where you're talking about technology. The technology changes very rapidly. And so thirty years is quite a long deal to say to set up these parameters in these boundaries. And this is what gambling is going to look like and it can't change unless there are some pretty high bars such as legislative action or constitutional amendments. What benefits will the tribe. See out of this deal. What what are the the the the tangible impacts in terms of the tribes finances from From this agreement will the tribe. Obviously they get to add craps and roulette. They get the certainty of knowing that there will be no competitor's within a certain mileage range of their tampa operation and within fifteen miles in a straight line of the hollywood operation they also are allowed to add three casinos to their hollywood operation. Having a compact with the state does help them financially. It helps their investors their global enterprise. So it does provide some stability for investors as they expand in other countries and other states that was derek a reporter with the new service of florida. This is florida matters are show continues in just a moment. You're listening to florida matters. Wsf eighty nine point seven. I'm bradley george. The seminoles were among the first tribes to get into the gaming business. It all started in nineteen eighty with a bingo hall and broward county. Ucla professor jessica catalino has studied the tribes history with gaming and wrote about it in a book high stakes florida's seminole gaming and sovereignty. How was it that the symmetry particular got into this world of gaming. Because as i understand it they they were really the first native american tribe to get into this enterprise in on a on a pretty large level. One of the common misunderstandings about gaming is set at something that the federal government decided on and then sort of granted to the tribes looking at the seminole tribe shows that. It's actually the opposite. They pursued tribal gaming on their own of their own volition under their own understandings of their sovereignty and then the federal government and the states had to kind of deal with it and figure out what to make of it. It's important to put gaming in the longer. History of the way that the seminole tribe and other indigenous nations have tried to keep the economy's going so gaming isn't the first thing they tried before that there are things like commercial cigarette sales Before that cattle ranching there's a whole ways range of ways that indian tribes have attempted to bring in revenues to support their government and their people It happens that gaming and other highly taxed and regulated industries are ones where they can see a bigger profit margin. So with a seminal tribe. It started with this one bingo hall in broward county and today we have these hard rock hotels in south. Florida here in tampa. How do we get from that bingo hall to where it's this huge multibillion dollar operation with a brand name like like hard rock attached to it was quite a journey so the seminole tribe as soon as they open that little casino in hollywood florida. They got sued by the state. The state of florida said This doesn't fit our regulations around gaming. You can't do this. seminal tribe. Went into court and unfought this up into the federal court system and ultimately won and prevailed in ways that allowed other tribes to then start doing this as well so they had to fight this in the courts. The also had to kind of fight this in the court of public opinion Whether people supported them doing this which affected the the legislators in florida and whatnot so they had to kind of express why they were doing it and what it meant to them they did. Things like contribute philanthropic -ly to local organizations to show that they were good neighbor for example and time passes and they began to expand of the unique things about the seminole tribe. Is they have reservations across. South florida distributed geographically including urban places. No casino gaming tribe can make money doing this. It depends a lot on your geography so the the big cypress brighton. Reservations aren't the moneymakers right. It's the ones in hollywood and tampa where there's a big population and both tourist and residential so its geography its law. It's business savvy. There's debates and negotiations with the state of florida that's a whole nother story on. There's a history of these compacts and then eventually they contract with hardrock to build these two big facilities one in hollywood and one in tampa That changed the game. A for gambling in saas in florida and a lot more revenues in the around two thousand seven eight the seminole tribe finds out that hard rock international is actually going to be sold and puts an silent bit and silent auction bid for iraq there to facilities. Were making so much money. And they were paying. In hollywood and tampa and the seminole tribe was paying so much to hardrock licenses to use their name and have hard rock franchises that they had a comparative advantage and bidding to actually by hard rock much to the surprise of almost everyone because his negotiations were very quiet The seminole tribe is hard rock international And it's the largest purchase of a multinational corporation by indigenous nation anywhere ever in the world and shocks the business reporters and everybody else so we go from a little tiny casino to the seminole tribe owning hard rock international. Not only their own casinos in tampa and hollywood but hard rock cafes and a resorts around the world And that all happens in thirty years and that's pretty fast. How does the revenue that's been generated from these casinos. How has that changed. Life for the seminole tribe casino gaming has brought a single generation transformation from pervasive economic struggle to overall economic security and comfort. That's a huge political and social and cultural experiment. That the seminal tribe embarked upon. What does it mean to take. People not just a family like if someone a lottery or an individual but whole community information and in one generation go from Real economic struggle pervasive economic struggle to a new way of living. This has affected people at the individual level and at the collective level so one of the important things to know about. Indigenous gaming is that indian casinos are not owned by an individual. They're owned by a tribal nation so their governmental operations when revenue comes in too when someone goes in plays blackjack at the hollywood or tampa casino that revenue goes into the coffers of the seminole tribe of florida at the tribal council and it gets budgeted through irregular budgeting process. Like any other government would do so. It's not just like it. Goes into someone's pockets as an individual or a politician or anything it goes into the tribal coffers goes through budgetary process and gets allocated backout Seminal has balanced an approach that redistributes those funds to individual citizens of the seminole tribe. So that people can have economic security in their own lives on the one hand and on the other hand going into tribal endeavors things like economic diversification things that cultural programmes like expanding social services. One of the most consequential effects of casino gaming for the seminole tribe and many other tribes as well is that They were able to take back their own social services and shape them in their own image so they have their own health clinics. They have their own emergency response. Services their own schools All the kind of big questions people are asking in this country and around the world about what should government do and What's adjust way to take care of people. Those have been things. The seminole tribe have been actively and creatively engaging for ever since casino gaming started changing the revenues. That were coming into the tribe. Casinos have really changed The possible ways of living for not just individuals but for the tribe as government and that piece of it is really important and too often overlooked when people just focus on the dollar signs. How has the relationship you talked about this a little bit early. On when when when seminal try i got into gaming. How is the relationship between tribal government and the state government in tallahassee evolved. And how does the relationship here compared to the relationships between tribal governments and other state governments elsewhere when the seminole tribe started gaming The first approach of the state of florida was to try to shut it down and there wasn't ever serial relationships there for some the seminole tribe of florida. There's a there's some legal technicalities which we can talk about if we want to. That require tribes of if they're operating certain kinds of games to negotiate with the state in which they live. The state of florida for a long time was unwilling to engage in good faith. Negotiations with the seminole tribe of florida and in fact the seminole tribe tried to bring this all the way up to the supreme the supreme court case. Us supreme court case about the failure of the state of florida to negotiate in good faith as required by federal law. Now that also meant that. The seminal tribe during that time didn't have to share their revenues with the state of florida or have anything to do really with the state of florida. They could just regulate their own games and So they were able to build a lot of revenue off of that that began to change over time When the state of florida began in the two thousands to Negotiate more with the seminole tribe leading to these in call compacts and. They're all over the news right now. I know in florida Let me just give a quick bigger picture on. What compacts are they are. Negotiated agreements between sovereigns between indigenous nations as sovereign governments and state governments. One of the underappreciated. But i think really radical effects of indigenous casinos in places like florida. Connecticut other states is that the states and their budgets have begun to depend on the revenues that come from casino gaming tribal gaming The revenues that are shared with the states. So we have this interesting situation in which like the state of connecticut for example would have been operating in the red for many years in their budget. Had they not had the revenues coming in from their compact agreements with the mohegan an mashantucket pequot tribes when we look at these gaming compacts third the a lot of money that's coming to states and so seeing that it's the trouble nations who are some time shoring up. State budgets is a really interesting development in the history of the economic relations between these sovereigns. Seminal started gaming and as many other nations with conviction that they are sovereigns who have the authority to regulate economic activity on the reservations that their governments who get to do this. Us law came along after seminoles and others had opened casinos and began to regulate that and that u. s. law is what required that if if seminals annals operate certain kinds of games or do certain sorts of gaming that they negotiate compacts with the states in which they live. That law was a big compromise that tribes were like. We're doing casinos. We want this revenue the states. This is in the nineteen eighties. The states were like whoa suddenly. We have this competition. Nevada was worried New jersey was worried because they have their own gaming industries so the us government forged a law called the indian gaming regulatory regulatory act. That compromised in the compromise was to support tribal gaming but require that the most lucrative parts of it have to be negotiated with states in which the tribes live Which then allows the state to have some control over it. Some tribes see that as a real compromise of their sovereignty because they're nation to nation sovereign relationship with the united states not with thick states in which they live. That was a long answer to your question but it gets at the complexity of this. I just want close on that point that you talk about state revenues and that was a big part of the debate over this new compact that passed legislature last week. You had lawmakers who said. I don't support what's in this compact. I may not totally understand it. Because i haven't had time to read it but if we don't pass this. This is leading leaving money on the table. And that's important in a state like florida where we have. No income tax in were most of the state. Revenue was based in consumption consumption-based. Taxation comes from tourism so this is another avenue for for revenue to plug those holes in the state budget. And if you don't have it then that's money that you have to find elsewhere that you have to cut elsewhere. The reliance of states on revenues from any gaming is a microcosm of a much. Bigger idea that. I want to leave your listeners with Which is too often. People think of indigenous nations as Sort of just like other people and maybe they depend on government and stuff for their To get by. But what really. Americans don't think about enough is how much the economic wellbeing and wealth of americans across the board has really been built on resources from indigenous nations. Right now the most visible example of that is these gaming. Compacts were states are relying on indian nations for state revenues to keep their states afloat and provide for their citizens. Thank you so much for your expertise. We appreciate it. Thank you for happy. Jessica. catalino is an associate professor of anthropology at ucla. and author of high stakes florida's seminole gaming and sovereignty. That's florida matters for this week. Nor priebus is our producer. I'm bradley george. Thank you for listening and join us again next week.

florida tampa bradley george hollywood legislature Darah cam bingo hall marcellus osceola governor rhonda santa rick scott department of interior governor desanta governor disentis tallahassee
Full Episode: Wednesday, June 9, 2021

World News Tonight with David Muir

22:05 min | 3 months ago

Full Episode: Wednesday, June 9, 2021

"Tonight several developing stories as we come on the air president biden landing in the uk just a short time ago making news already addressing american troops. What he said about our allies that the united states is back and what he said about vladimir putin with his upcoming face to face meeting after the russia based cyber attacks in the us affecting gas prices and the us meat supply. Cecilia vega traveling with the president in england. The coronavirus in the us. Will we meet that fourth of july goal. A reality check right here. Tonight and dr jaw with us on the concerning delta variant first seen in india now the dominant strain in the uk. It's being seen here in the us. Already americans need to know and the doctor of the big difference. How effective the vaccines are against this variant. After one dose versus both doses of the vaccine the dangerous storms moving across the northeast and the record heatwave in the mid west. It'll feel like one hundred degrees in minneapolis. When does this end. Rob marciano with a slide time. This out there is also news tonight about the crippling drought across multiple states. The alarming images tonight of lake mead at the hoover dam part of the colorado river system. The water supply for forty million americans. Matchup at the hoover dam tonight the new report from the inspector general at the interior department. That finds lafayette park was not cleared out for that photo op with former president trump holding that bible. So why was it clear. Giancarlo was here tonight here in new york city the bus on a busy street crashing into cars then veering curb. Slamming right into a building. Tonight cured the video inside the bus of the driver leading to many new questions. We have reported here on the cicadas showing up after seventeen years tonight causing this accident the mayor of cincinnati and the police there with the new warning and america strong tonight the principal brave enough to sing. I will always love you in front of hundreds to make a point from. Abc news world headquarters. And you more. This is world news tonight with deal. Good evening it's great to have you with us here at wednesday night and we begin tonight with president by on the world stage his first foreign trip since taking office landing this afternoon in the uk three countries in eight days meetings with allies with queen elizabeth and that high stakes face-to-face summit with vladimir putin. The president and first lady arrived in england on air force. One late today. I stop speaking to a thousand american troops and their family members. The president saying his trip is to reaffirm our alliances telling our allies. The us is back and telling autocrats. The democracies of the world are standing together and on vladimir putin. the president saying he will quote. let putin. no what i wanted to know. Of course the upcoming meeting with putin comes after those crippling russian based cyber attacks in the us affecting gas prices and the us meat supply but the list he'll bring with putin is law abc's chief white house correspondent cecilia. Vega in cornwall england. Tonight traveling with the president tonight. President biden kicking off his first trip abroad with a visit to troops and a blunt message for both allies and adversaries heading to the g seven then to the nato ministerial and then to meet with mr putin to let them know what i want him to know. President immediately drawing a stark contrast with former president trump's tense relationship with america's european allies. We're gonna make clear that. The united states is back and democracies of the world are standing together to tackle the toughest challenges and the issues that matter most to our future trump bash needle from the very beginning questioning the value of the alliance itself president by now making it clear these relationships matter our lives as worm built by coercion or maintain by threats. They're grounded on democratic ideals shared risen to junior and where every voice matters the president then turning to that high stakes meeting with vladimir putin. I'll travel geneva to sit down with a man. I've spent time with before president vladimir putin on the table russia's efforts to meddle in the us election the recent ransomware attack on the colonial pipeline that led to gas shortages and price spikes and the cyber attack on the nation's largest beef producer both believed to have originated in russia. Also on the agenda shared issues like arms control. We're not seeking conflict with russian. Want a stable predictable relationship. But i've been clear. The united states will respond in a robust and meaningful way on the russian government. Engages in harmful activities and to celia vega with us. Tonight from cornwall and cecilia president. Vines message was clear. They're saying that. America is back ready to lead but of course one of the questions tonight are. Us allies fully ready for that. It really seems like they are in fact the president has already heard from a number of them in their praising. In words for president biden. Reengaging bring america back to the world stage but make no mistake. This is not going to be an easy task president biden. He says this is just the beginning of these conversations to rebuild america's standing on that world stage. David he says the timing could not be more crucial for this country and these allies given repeated threats from adversaries like russia. All right. cecilia. Vega leading us off tonight. She'll be with us here every night. Following this. and this is celia mentioned president vines strips of busy one. It will end with that face to face meeting with vladimir putin and i'll be right there with our political team next wednesday our coverage throughout the day here on abc and on world news tonight. Next tuesday and wednesday night. We'll see then but the news does continue tonight. And we move on now to the other major headlines the corona virus here in the us the vaccination rate is slowing down so the question tonight will the us meet that fourth of july goal. A reality check here so far. Thirteen states have reached that benchmark seventy percent of adults with at least one dose at the other end of the scale. Six states are at less than fifty percent mississippi. The lowest of all at forty four percent of adults with one shot and doctor shaw with us right here tonight on the concerning delta variant first seen in india now the dominant strain in the uk. It's being seen here in the. Us already the doctor here on the big difference in how effective vaccines against this variant after one dose or after two doses of the vaccine marcus more from mississippi tonight tonight with vaccine demand slowing the us news that unused johnson and johnson one dose. Vaccines are do expire. At the end of the month. The company would suffered setbacks in early april due to safety concerns about blood. Clots in a very small number of women sang today. It's working to try to extend the shelf. Life of its doses. We still believe that we are going to be very relevant. In terms of getting back needed around the world this coming amid president biden's announcement that the us will by five hundred million doses of pfizer to provide to poor nations the race vaccinate the us facing challenges even as concerns grow about the highly contagious delta variant first detected in india that strain now dominant in the uk with transmission rising among twelve to twenty year olds raising concerns for experts. Here in the us out. They're really pushing and beating the bushes and trying to get people to understand why it's so important for them to get vaccinated on average about three hundred fifty seven thousand. Us adults have gotten at least one shot every day in the last week. That's down nearly twenty percent far short of the approximately five hundred forty thousand needed daily to hit president. Biden's july fourth goal of seventy percent in oklahoma where vaccinations have plummeted. The health department saying it may have to throw out tens of thousands of vaccines six states now reporting that half of their adults still have not received at least one shot at just over forty four percent. Mississippi ranks last two is horrifying in the small town of forest pasture od is trying to encourage people to get vaccinated after he nearly died from colbert in april. Eight days in the house eighty days. I didn't know whether i was in the world out of the world and two percent chance to chance. Survive into marcus morris. With now and marcus we know this. Fourth of july goal of having seventy percent of americans with at least one dose of the vaccine isn't just a goal authorities say. There's an obvious reason for this. A real correlation with what they're seeing as far as new hospitalizations in counties and states where they're not even close to meeting these numbers and abc news as looked into the numbers. Yeah that's right an abc analysis. David looked at the counties with the lowest percentage rates of vaccinations of residents and it found that hospitalizations in those areas actually when more than double compared to the counties where they had the highest rates. Vaccinations david marcus more on the virus tonight and as you heard marcus report their concern over this delta variant. The very first scene in india is growing tonight given what they're now seeing in the uk and what we're beginning to see here in the us. So let's bring in. Dr she shaw dean of the brown university school of public health. Doctors are going to have you with us. We know this very from india is now the dominant strain in the uk. I know they're very troubled there by what they're seeing. Young people were now beginning to see this variant in the us president biden that rare warning about the variant the last twenty four hours and we heard dr fauci say we cannot let this happen in the united states. So let me ask you. Is it a possibility that we're going to see this. Spread in the us. And what concerns you most about this variant david. Thank you for having me back in. Fortunately it is a possibility. We still have almost half of americans not yet vaccinated about a third of adults get vaccinated and what concerns me. Most about this is how incredibly contagious. It is it's the most contagious variant. We have seen so far and it is really caused devastation in country after country after it has taken off so we have to really take this seriously even though we're seeing cases plummet in the us. That's the good news but we still have to keep our eye on on these other headlines including this variant. We reported last night here on that new study in the uk that showed that the pfizer vaccine was only thirty three percent effective against this delta variant after one dose and eighty eight percent. Effective after two doses. So i gather it's really important to encourage folks to get that second shop absolutely. Everybody needs a second shot. And if you've missed it you can still go get it. Being delayed is not a huge problem. It's absolutely critical. Everybody got their second shot. Whether it's pfizer or madonna and doctor before we let you go tonight. The president has set these goals before these benchmarks. We've hit them as a country but seventy percent of adults with at least one shot by the fourth of july. Are we gonna meet this goal. David is looking harder and harder every day and we really are going to have to redouble our efforts. Were not on pace right now but i think if we try new. That's really reach out to people make it accessible. We can get there but it's gonna be a lot of work all right. We'll continue to track dr jaw with us tonight. Thank you we turn next to the dangerous storms. Moving through parts of the northeast tonight again. Fueled by heat and in the mid west. It'll feel like one hundred degrees in. Minneapolis them yet. But it is coming. And see your meteorologist rob marciano with us again tonight. Hey rob hi david. We broke a couple of records here in minneapolis reaching a high temperature of ninety six degrees. Maybe making it. The earliest seven day stretch with highs above the ninety degree mark. And i think we're gonna make it a take a look at this. This is climate change in your face with the humidity is going to feel like a hundred degrees in minneapolis. Lincoln nebraska sioux falls. We are cooling down in the northeast but believe numbers on friday. Seventy s that is going to feel different but the flooding. that's not changing arkansas alabama. That's gonna last at least another day as will this heat. David barseguian with us from minneapolis. Tonight rob thank you. There is also news tonight about the crippling drought across multiple states. The alarming images tonight of lake mead at the hoover dam it's part of the colorado river system. The water supply for forty million. Americans are chief national correspondent. Matt governor tonight at the hoover dam tonight. The images of this mega drought across the south west landscape bathtub rings around reservoirs show where the water once was. But marinas and fields bone-dry experts say lake mead part of the colorado river system that provides water to some forty million people in seven states is at just thirty. Seven percent capacity officials say it'll dip into its lowest level ever recorded tomorrow over the past two decades or so. The water level here at lake mead has decreased by about one hundred and thirty feet. That's like a thirteen storey building revealing islands. That used to be completely submerged and the water from this lake makes agriculture possible in the desert southwest. Were farmers are struggling. It's an economic disaster. We don't plant crops. We don't have jobs and as we saw during the pandemic you know. This industry is essential for everyone. Lick me hoover dam provides hydroelectric power to the region but the dwindling water supply forcing the dams output to be cut by nearly twenty five percent at at some point officials warn. It could be forced to stop producing altogether. Nearly three hundred thousand miles of the southwest are in exceptional drought in area. Bigger than the state of texas last year was the worst fire season in this year even drier and experts as being driven by climate change really important to stay on this and math. The federal government could soon be forced to take some unprecedented steps. Here their major steps david for the first time this summer the federal government is set to announce a water shortage along the lower colorado river that triggers automatic cuts to water in nevada and in arizona. Starting as early as next year david with a lot of people got and thank you and next the new report tonight from the inspector general at the interior department that found that lafayette park was not cleared out for that photo op with former president trump holding bible. Here's our chief. Washington correspondent. Jonathan call now donald trump's infamous photo op holding that bible in front of saint. John's church last summer began just twenty. One minutes after the surrounding area was forcefully cleared by. Us park police and other law enforcement at the time and appeared. The protesters were forced out to make room for the president's visit but a new report today by the internal investigator at the department of interior. Says there is no evidence. The operation had anything to do with trump's visit. We did not find evidence that potential presidential visit to the park or saint. John's church influenced the park. Police is decision making or their deployment. Instead the report says protesters were cleared out to allow contractors to build defense in response to damage done during the previous two nights of rioting. The report says the park. Police didn't even know about the president's plans until hours after it began planning their operation operation to remove peaceful. Protesters became violent. Many people were injured and beaten. Something that is not addressed by the report. The report does find tear. Gas and other chemical irritants were used against protesters and most of the crowd could not hear the audio warnings. Issued by the police at the area was about to be cleared out. Donald trump issued a statement today. The inspector general saying that the report totally exonerates him from ordering the removal of those protesters. Although david at the time he actually praised the actions of the police to get the protesters out of the area around this church saying that they had done a great job. Jonathan karl tonight. Thanks john here in new york city tonight. There are many new questions after new video from inside and mta. Bus of the driver after that bus crashed into cars and then slammed into a building. Here's gio benitez tonight. Authorities investigating this shocking new video from inside and new york city bus showing driver crashing into several vehicles jumping a curb and then slamming into an apartment building. The violent wreck in brooklyn monday injuring at least sixteen people and forcing all residents out of that building officials with the metropolitan transportation authority initially investigating reports that the driver's foot may have become stuck between the brake and accelerator but the video inside the bus raising new questions. The mta calling it disturbing on many levels. Investigators citing numerous apparent violations including the bus driver using a cell phone. While driving deactivating the buses break before closing the drivers protective barrier or buckling his seat belt and having two bags in the bus driver area while driving with one of them at his feet and david tonight officials are concerned that basic safety rules might not have been followed here. The bus is still stuck in that building because if not the structure may collapse david. Thank you when we come back here tonight. The important recall involving baby food. And we've reported here on the catos now leading to a car accident new warning tonight okay. So you're staring at the wall. The one that's looking kinda sad. You know the one and you know you need a painted but what are. The trendy colors does read work with wood. Floors is blue to bold with this couch. will beige field to blah. How do i even choose a color. Luckily the color experts at dallas bar have heard it all and they're here to help find the perfect color for any room by working with your vision and answering all your questions. Start your project off right with a free consultation. Vows spar dot com slash color. Help when they say mental health is a journey. They mean it. That's why it's important to prioritize your mental health and wellness will work on yourself. it brings positive changes in all areas of your life. The long term effects of therapy can give you the tools to deal with challenges as they arise. Strengthen your relationships and give you a more positive outlook on life. There's no better time to invest in yourself. Now talk space. Is the number one online therapy platform that has thousands of licensed therapist. Trained in over forty specialties including anxiety depression relationships and more your therapists can help you set and achieve your goals talks basis secure and private using the latest end to end bank grade. Encryption technology to store client information and complying with the latest hip regulations as a listener of this. Podcast you'll get one hundred dollars off of your first month with talks base to match with a licensed therapist. Today go to talks. Space dot com. Make sure to use the code tonight to get one hundred dollars off of your first month. That's code tonight at talks base dot com tonight here. The latest headline involving the so-called takeda invasion list-serve You've likely heard it yourself that familiar sound from billions. Say or more of route. Ten cicadas coming back after seventeen years underground and in cincinnati an accident. They say the driver blaming the swarm of cicadas. Some coming right into the car hitting him. In the face of the mayor police now warning drivers to be mindful of the cicadas to the antics of other news in beech-nut issuing the voluntary recall for some of its baby rice cereal. The company saying it will no longer sell the brands single grain rice cereal because they say could contain high levels of arsenic above. Fda limits no illnesses related to the serial have been reported finally tonight the principal and his solo graduation day at t wingate andrews high school in high point north carolina. Marcus gos- principal and he is loved by his students and what it was time for principal gos- to say goodbye. He knew exactly how he wanted to do it. The way whitney houston did singing. Love you principal with us tonight. I david principle loss on his nerves. And on the song. I written and performed by dolly parton. Of course there's a nervousness because nobody seems behind whitney houston in the great slight valley part in both the lyrics Really what. I was trying to portray to massoud heyday the graduating senior. Mccown mcrae mr gov. Singing to us was something i will never forget. He is a big part of wyant ryan today the principal and his message and we didn't make him sing it one of the things that the pandemic as really told us is that we need more love the students know that we love and care for them we love. I'll see tomorrow. Connect who was up everybody. This is l z. Granderson here to tell about my new podcast. Adc audio called life out loud. This show is all about preserving the history and honoring the contributions of the lgbtq community. Each week. i'll talk to some of the most fascinating people paving the way for the more inclusive world these conversations can get heavy but this show is also going to be filled with so much joy. And i mean after we are called gay people right so gotta be some happiness in there somewhere checkout life out loud with me. L z granderson. Wherever you get your podcast.

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New Gaming Deal May Expand Gambling In Florida. But First, It Heads To Federal Officials For Approval.

Florida Matters

28:16 min | 4 months ago

New Gaming Deal May Expand Gambling In Florida. But First, It Heads To Federal Officials For Approval.

"Our taxes. Florida presents exclusive viewing of masks in troubled times by the key chorale for a limited time only at our taxes. Florida dot work. That's eight x. Is nfl outboard presented by the community foundation of tampa bay. Welcome to florida matters. I'm bradley george. Gambling is big business for the seminole tribe of florida. And it's about to get bigger last week state. Lawmakers approved a new compact with the tribe. The thirty year deal with let the seminoles run sports betting operations across the state and in turn the tribe would pay florida. Five hundred million dollars a year in gaming revenue. He'll still needs approval from federal officials and legal challenges are likely on today's show. We look at the future and the past of indian gaming in florida. Darah cam is a reporter with the news service of florida and cupboard. Last week's vote on the gaming compact in tallahassee. We spoke zoom. Just give me a quick overview of what's What's in this gambling deal that the legislature approved last week. It was a two and a half billion dollar minimum agreement. They seminal tribal chairman marcellus osceola junior and governor rhonda santa's eight that agreement on april twenty third and it allows for a major expansion of gambling in florida on a number of levels including what people are probably most interested in. It opens the door to sports betting under the auspices of the tribe and we can talk a little bit more about how that will operate. We'll we'll get into that in a minute. But i i know there had been talk for a while of of the state and the tribe trying to come to some kind of new deal. What happened in the last couple of months that brought the two sides together to this agreement. Well i think one thing was that the the governor really wanted to emerge successful on this deal. That politically for him. It's a major achievement that other legislative leaders and his predecessor governor. rick scott was unable to attain. The tribe had stopped paying the state. They were paying annual payments of about three hundred and fifty million dollars as part of an old what agreement. Let's known federal laws a compact and they had stopped paying that in twenty nineteen because of these designated player card games that are being offered at para mutual card rooms throughout the stay and the say so the state has been missing out on three hundred fifty million dollars a year that the tribe had agreed to for revenue sharing from proceeds from their and slot machines operations that most of their casinos. So the governor really. I think he wanted to do a deal. That helps the pira. Mutual operators pair mutuals horse tracks highlight frontier and dog tracks. Now are not racing any longer but they have been in florida for over a hundred years and at one point they were people came from all over the country to to campbell at these facilities than they were pretty ritzy glamorous establishments that changed over recent years but the governor son opportunity to get a deal with the tribe a lucrative deal with the tribe. It's a minimum of five hundred million dollars a year over the first five years. This the money was a really good deal at a time when the state might be looking at declines in general revenue funds and something that would give new products to the existing para mutuals and allow them to continue to operate in a world where they've seen their numbers just decline pretty dramatically. So let's look at more. What's in this deal. And in sort of the biggest aspect in terms of the expansion of gambling in florida is allowing the seminole tribe essentially a monopoly to run sports betting in the state. What what will that look like once. It takes effect so this sports betting provision allows the tribe to essentially to serve as what they called the hub for sports betting and they computer servers that generate. These mobile bets. You'll be you'll be able to pull up an app or what they call a skin on your phone and place a bet anywhere in florida they will serve as the host and they will contract with at least three pair. Mutual operators who will be able to also offer sports betting again the tribe will serve as the host and the para mutuals will get sixty percent of the split on that and a portion of the proceeds from the sports. Betting will go to the state in terms of taxes depending on where the where the bed is made the problem as you know and everyone is aware of at this. Point is whether that sports betting conducted off of tribal lands whether that is permitted under federal law and whether that it requires a statewide vote under a constitutional amendment. Florida voters approved in twenty teen that requires statewide approval of expansions of gambling. What about the seminal hardrock hotels and casinos. The one here in tampa in winston in south florida. How will things change their under this agreement. Imagine like. I don't know you know what you and your listeners are familiar with. But i would imagine that at their facilities in tampa and hollywood that the tribe would have some sort of a sportsbook room or facility where people can come in. They'll be a bench of you know tv screens and they can watch games. And they can bet on them while they're at the facility. A lot of money is wagered on sports betting but the profit share the revenue to the operators is not that great. So they're going to make what i've heard. The rule of thumb is that people make about five percent off of what's being wagered so the amount while the numbers are very high they can be in the billions of dollars wagered on sportsbook the actual amount of money that people draw down from that that operators or computer platforms draw down from that is is not that. Tremendous what it does do though. It does a couple of things one is if brings people to the facility so that they're spending money on cars blackjack or slots or food or drink or something like that. So that's something you could imagine. Maybe parties of people will go birthday parties or things like that. The question becomes because of the legal issues. Would this agreement leave the tribe possibly as the monopoly for having online sports betting on their tribal properties only and then people would under those circumstances depending on what happens in the federal court since state courts and with the department of interior that has to approve the compact with really truly. Give the try a monopoly in terms of sports wagering conducted on tribal lands so governor disentis negotiated this deal with the seminal. Try brought it to the legislature. Lawmakers had a special session. That was three days long where they pass this thing. It a major deal at thirty year agreement sealed through the legislature in three days. Do you get a sense from your reporting and talking to lawmakers that they understood what they were voting on that begs the question do lawmakers there are many many situations where lawmakers vote on bills voluminous bills and their unacquainted with all of the elements of the bill. This this bill did change. Significantly because there was a provision had provisions that required the state to to negotiate with the tribe within three years for online gaming basically online roulette online blackjack online slot machines and that was a bridge too far for many house members and so they quickly amended that on monday they met for three days they they would have probably not had the votes to pass it or may not have had the votes to pass it unless they took that provision out so did they understand all the complexities of what is seventy. Five page. agreement does for the tribe. Probably they understood from the thirty thousand foot perspective. Did they have a lot of questions about whether those issues that i laid out for you. Just now on federal court Federal law state cord and amendment three. Yes they still. They passed it even while some of the leaders said they don't think that it will that the sports betting provision will hold up so. Why did they do that. We'll governor just santa's he still holds. The budget governor de- santa's made phone calls directly to legislators over the weekend leading up to the special session on gaming directly and his stat handed staff reached out to legislators i obviously wasn't privy to those conversations directly but one can imagine that your budget issues or your future legislation could be in jeopardy if you don't support something that the governor has come out publicly signed this with the tribal leader and they as you've seen on many many other issues. The legislature is in thrall enthralled by governor disentis than he says jump and they say how high will you saw some lawmakers as well saying you know. I don't think this is a great deal. But it brings in revenue in. Florida doesn't have many sources for revenue since we don't have an income tax threat So if we don't approve this agreement we're leaving money on the table. So that's that's why we're going to support it. That's true. And i think the governor believes that this provides some stability for the para mutual industry for the pair mutual operators and it does bring in some guaranteed revenue for the day other lawmakers have injected. Not only that. It wasn't enough revenue but that it's a really long deal that thirty years in an arena. Where you're talking about technology. The technology changes very rapidly. And so thirty years is quite a long deal to say to set up these parameters these boundaries. And this is what gambling is going to look like and it can't change unless there are some pretty high bars such as legislative action or constitutional amendments. What benefits will the the tribe see out of this deal what. What are the kind of the. The tangible impacts in terms of the tribes finances from from this agreement will the tribe. Obviously they get to add crap. Sin roulette they get the certainty of knowing that there will be no competitors within a certain mileage range of their tampa operation and within fifteen miles in a straight line of the hollywood operation. They also are allowed to add three casinos to their hollywood operation. Having a compact with the state does help them financially. It helps their investors there global enterprise so it does provide some stability for investors as they expand in other countries and other states that was derek ham a reporter with a new service of florida. This is florida matters are show continues in just a moment. You're listening to florida matters. Wsf eighty nine point seven. I'm bradley george. The seminoles were among the first tribes to get into the gaming business. It all started in nineteen eighty with a bingo hall and broward county. Ucla professor jessica catalino has studied the tribes history with gaming and wrote about it in a book high stakes florida's seminal gaming and sovereignty. How was it that the seminole tribe in particular got into this world of gaming. Because as i understand it they they were really the first native american tribe to to get into this enterprise in on a on a pretty large level. One of the common misunderstandings about gaming is that it's something that the federal government decided on and then sort of granted to the tribes looking at the seminole tribe shows that it's actually the opposite. They pursued tribal gaming on their own of their own volition under their own understandings of their sovereignty And then the federal government and the states had to kind of deal with it and figure out what to make of it. It's important to put gaming in the longer. History of the way that the seminole tribe and other indigenous nations have tried to keep their economy's going so gaming isn't the first thing they tried before that there are things like commercial cigarette sales before that cattle ranching There's a hallway range of ways that indian tribes have attempted to bring in revenues to support their government and their people It happens that gaming and other highly taxed and regulated industries are ones where they can see a bigger profit margin. So with a seminal tribe. It started with this one bingo hall in broward county and today we have these hard rock hotels in south. Florida here in tampa. How do we get from that bingo hall to where it's this huge multibillion dollar operation with a brand name like like hard rock attached to it. It was quite a journey. So the seminal tribe as soon as they open that little casino and hollywood florida. They got sued by the state. The state of florida said nah. This doesn't fit our regulations around gaming. You can't do this. seminal try. Went into court and fought this up into the federal court system and ultimately won and prevailed in ways that allowed other tribes to then start doing this as well so they had to fight this in the courts they also had to kind of fight this in the court of public opinion Whether people supported them doing this which affected the the legislators in florida and whatnot so they had to kind of express why they were doing it and what it meant to them they did things like contribute philanthropy weekly to local organizations to show that they were a good neighbor for example and time passes and they began to expand one of the unique things about the seminole tribe is. They have reservations across south florida. They're distributed geographically including urban places. No casino gaming. Not every tribe can make money doing this. It depends a lot on your geography so the the rural big cypress and brighton. Reservations aren't the moneymakers right. It's the ones in hollywood and tampa where there's a big population and both tourist and residential so its geography its law. It's business savvy. There's debates and negotiations with the state of florida that's a whole nother story on. There's a history of these compacts and then eventually they contract with hardrock to build these two big facilities one in hollywood and one in tampa that changed the game. A for gambling in south in florida and brought in a lot more revenues in the around two thousand seven eight the seminole tribe finds out that hard rock international is actually going to be sold and puts an a silent bit and silent auction bid for all of hard rock. Chief facilities were making so much money and they were paying. In hollywood and tampa and the seminole tribe was paying so much to hardrock licenses to use their name and have hard rock franchises that they had a comparative advantage and bidding to actually by hard rock much to the surprise of almost everyone because his negotiations were very quiet The seminole tribe is hard rock international And it's the largest purchase of multinational corporation by an indigenous nation anywhere ever in the world and shocks the business reporters in everybody else so we go from a little tiny casino to the seminole tribe owning hard rock international. Not only their own casinos in tampa and hollywood but hard rock cafes and resorts around the world And that all happens in thirty years. And that's pretty fast. How does the revenue that's been generated from these casinos. How is that change. Life for the seminole tribe casino gaming has brought a single generation transformation from pervasive economic struggle to overall economic security and comfort. That's a huge political and social and cultural experiment that the seminole tribe embarked upon. What does it mean to take people. Not just a family like if someone wanted a lottery or an individual but a whole community in a nation and in one generation go from Real economic struggle pervasive economic struggle to a new way of living. This has affected people at the individual level and at the collective level so one of the important things to know about. Indigenous gaming is that indian casinos are not owned by an individual. They're owned by a tribal nation so their governmental operations when revenue comes in too when someone goes and plays blackjack at the hollywood or tampa casino that revenue goes into the coffers of the seminole tribe of florida at the tribal council and it gets budgeted through a regular budgeting process. Like any other government would do so. It's not just like it. Goes into someone's pockets as an individual or politician or anything it goes into the tribal coffers goes through budgetary process and gets allocated backout Seminole tribe has balanced an approach that redistributes those funds to individual citizens of the seminole tribe. So that people can have economic security in their own lives on the one hand and on the other hand going into tribal endeavors things like economic diversification things that cultural programs things like expanding social services one of the most consequential effects of casino gaming for the seminole tribe and many other tribes as well is that Were able to take back their own social services and shape them in their own image so they have their own health clinics they have their own emergency response. Services their own schools All the kind of big questions people are asking in this country and around the world about what should government do and What's adjust way to take care of people. Those have been things. As seminole tribe have been actively and creatively engaging for ever since casino gaming started changing the revenues that were coming into the tribe casinos have really changed The possible ways of living for not just individuals but for the tribe as government and that piece of it is really important and too often overlooked when people just focus on the dollar signs. How has the relationship you talked about this a little bit early on when when when seminal will try i got into gaming. How's the relationship between tribal government and the state government in tallahassee evolved. And how does the relationship here compare to the relationships between tribal governments and other state governments elsewhere when the seminole tribe started gaming The first approach of the state of florida was to try to shut it down. And there wasn't adversarial relationship there for some time. The seminole tribe of florida. There's a. there's some legal technicalities which we can talk about if we want to. That require tribes. If they're if they're operating certain kinds of games to negotiate with the state in which they live the state of florida for a long time was unwilling to engage in good faith negotiations with the seminole tribe of florida and in fact the seminole tribe tried to bring us all the way up to the supreme they had a supreme court case. Us supreme court case about the failure of the state of florida to negotiate in good faith as required by federal law. Now that also meant that. The seminole tribe during that time didn't have to share their revenues with the state of florida. Or have anything to do. Really with the state of florida they could just regulate their own games and So they were able to build a lot of revenue off of that that began to change over time When the state of florida began in the two thousand to Negotiate more with the seminole tribe leading to these in call compacts and. They're all over the news right now. I know in in florida Let me just give a quick bigger picture on. What compacts are they are. Negotiated agreements between sovereigns between indigenous nations as sovereign governments and state governments. One of the underappreciated. But i think really radical effects of indigenous casinos in places like florida connecticut Other states is that the states and their budgets have begun to depend on the revenues that come from casino gaming tribal gaming The revenues that are shared with the states. So we have this interesting situation in which like the state of connecticut for example would have been operating in the red for many years in their budget. Had they not had the revenues coming in from their compact agreements with the mohegan and mashantucket. P quite tribes. You know when we look at these gaming compacts third the a lot of money that's coming to states and so seeing that it's the trouble nations who are some time shoring up. State budgets is a really interesting development in the history of the economic relations between these sovereigns. Seminal started gaming and as do many other indigenous nations with the conviction that they are sovereigns who have the authority to regulate economic activity on their reservations that their governments. Who get to do this. Us law came along after seminars and others had opened casinos and began to regulate that and that u. s. law is what required that if if seminoles operate certain kinds of games or do certain sorts of gaming that they negotiate compacts with the states in which they live. That law was a big compromise that tribes were like. We're doing casinos. We want this revenue the states. This is in the nineteen eighties. The states were like whoa suddenly. We have competition. Nevada was worried New jersey was worried because they have their own game industries so the us government forged a law called the indian gaming regularly regulatory act that compromised in the compromise was to support tribal gaming but require that the most lucrative parts of it have to be negotiated with the states in which the tribes live Which then allows the states have some control over it. Some tribes see that as a real compromise of their sovereignty because they're in a nation to nation sovereign relationship with the united states not with thick states in which they live. That was a long answer to your question but it gets at the complexity of this. I just want to close on that point that you talk about state revenues and that was a big part of the debate over this new compact that passed legislature. Last week you had lawmakers who said i don't support what's in this compact. I may not totally understand it. Because i haven't had time to read it but if we don't pass this. This is leading leaving money on the table. And that's important in a state like florida where we have no income tax in. Were most of the state. Revenue is based in consumption-based taxation that comes from tourism so this is another avenue for for revenue to plug those holes in the state budget. And if you don't have it then that's money that you have to find elsewhere that you have to cut elsewhere. That reliance of states on revenues from inning gaming is a microcosm of a much bigger idea that i want to leave your listeners with Which is too often. People think of indigenous nations as Sort of just like other people and maybe they depend on government and stuff for their To get by. But what really. Americans don't think about enough is how much the economic wellbeing and wealth of americans across the board has really been built on resources from indigenous nations. Right now the most visible example of that is these gaming. Compacts were states are relying on indian nations for state revenues to keep their states afloat and provide for their citizens. Thank you so much for your expertise. We appreciate it. Thank you for having me jessica. Catalino is an associate professor of anthropology at ucla. and author of high stakes. florida's seminal gaming and sovereignty. That's florida matters for this week. The nora priebus our producer. I'm bradley george. Thank you for listening and join us again next week.

florida tampa bradley george hollywood governor disentis legislature Florida community foundation of tampa bingo hall Darah cam marcellus osceola governor rhonda santa rick scott department of interior
Social Media Pet Peeves - Fred Brown - WazaMedia Podcast Episode 12

WazaMedia Podcast

29:27 min | 8 months ago

Social Media Pet Peeves - Fred Brown - WazaMedia Podcast Episode 12

"Thanks for listening to our podcast. If you haven't heard about anchor it's the easiest way to make your own podcast. It's free their creation tools. That allow you to record. Edit your podcast right from your phone or computer and anchor will distribute your podcast for you. So can it can be heard on spotify apple podcasts. You name it. You can make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership. Everything you need to make a podcast. It's it's all here is here on on anchor so make sure you download the free anchor app or go to anger dot. Fm to get started now. Stay tuned to the podcast. Welcome to the waza media. Podcast was immediate is a digital marketing agency that believes in the power of storytelling. We showed businesses and individuals how to communicate with laser focus in a media saturated world on this episode. I am proud to announce that we have our first guest to the wasn't media podcast. We have fred brown today. We're gonna be talking about our social media pet peeves and recommendations on what to do instead. How're you doing fred. i'm doing great. Thanks for having me. So because wasn't media believes in the power of storytelling. I want you to give us a chance to tell us and also the audience a little bit about yourself. Please tell me a little bit about your story. So i work for the the army's digital media division which is A really great opportunity. Because i honestly get to influence social media like that is my my job is army social media and starting out my military career after Came out from college. You know went to film school and la didn't work out the greatest And then i joined the army. Because that's what i knew being in military and somehow fell into public affairs With that i went to a f n That's where i kind of you know. Facebook came out a couple of years before it. And let me couple years before i joined Joined the army. Facebook was only starting to be used When i was working for the american forces network in january and then also in afghanistan and we used it a little bit. That was the primary is mostly just telling stories For me i'm a i'm a broadcaster so it was a primary video stories In radio which was a lot of fun. It wasn't until i went to the i. Br i comment brigade first. Cavalry division Which honestly gave me where. I cut my teeth with social media our first commander who was kind of special forces background. You know was very like hand. don't you know. hey. I don't want this anywhere. I don't you know it was very disliked. Give this away. But then not too long after i got there. He switched out for a new colonel. This colonel ahead. We butted heads but he pretty much said. I want my message everywhere. Figure it out So with the help of Guidance really great public affairs officers I was able to well. We expanded into everything. We had twitter facebook youtube channel. We got into instagram. That's as far as we went. And that's kind of one of the pet freeze. We'll talk about later But you know with that. I was able to really we went and did a couple of major operations with like alantic resolve out in the baltics and combine resolve in We even want a keith aware award for digital digital media campaign One of the coolest things ever and it's it's sad that i had leave that back at fort hood with the unit but after that i took i took the chops from that and In korea was able to get my first job. Getting out of the military Working for booz allen hamilton as a public affairs specialists with a leaning towards social media Same thing i. I left that position for bureau reclamation and the department of interior which was a lot of fun and then i became. That's when i first started becoming a social media manager and controlling the messages and how we speak to everybody and then i took all those into the job. I have now Which is honestly probably the best job i've had by far you've been quite around the world and Interesting enough you've been some of the places that i've been i was in. I was in uniform in korea in thirteen fourteen. And then i hopped over the germany From fourteen to eighteen zero. We're going. we're going the other the other way. I i was in Was it. I was stationed in germany from a ten to thirteen And then i kept going back to germany when we were doing the multi national operations with first cab division Back and forth that in the baltics. And then i went. We did a rotation korea from fifteen to sixteen and that's not sixty was sixteen to seven half months of and i remember i was literally it was two in the morning and i was doing a phone interview because my was coming up and like hey where are you. I'm in korea. You know it's just a little late here so you know. Let's let's go. Well that's awesome and handling social media today a twenty twenty world. There's a lot of different things that were able to do. Now i keep you mentioned earlier but that you were dealing with the early stages of facebook and the first thing that popped in my mind was. When was the first time. I use facebook and then i also thought about what was i using before facebook and The two platforms. That came to mind. Were number one zinger pan so zanga and then my space. So i'll never did anyone wrong on my space. I on social media with my space because a girlfriend You know it was. When i remember when social media i started coming out. I thought it was like i'm not on the computer long enough. You know i have dial up like this is kind of ridiculous It's funny seeing. You know i had a girlfriend who's good at. Html code and you know made it all the dazzled and everything and the same thing with facebook. I didn't really see a need for social media at the time and it's crazy looking back from where i am in what i do now But it was a girlfriend who convinced me to get on on facebook. And now i can't you know now. I can't imagine life without all the tools we use to communicate with people. It's definitely made communication easier as far as communicating to the masses. No at no point now. In today's world we can communicate at scale to people not only in our own country but all around the world. And i know some of the things that you do currently. That's that's what some of your audience's yet. it's you know i. I look back to the first time i started cross training to doing more print media. And we're i was so excited. When i got my first article that was in the base newspaper and i found out what like the you know. The the cycle rate was and you know how many people usually read it and then posted. I posted a link on facebook. And you know and and it's got more sophisticated than it used to be where you just drop the lincoln and add something. I call it a day and the reach was would buy you know would double what the traditional newspaper was even for for based newspaper but still would double that and i started seeing how. How if we were gonna get our stories out on. How do we are going to really get these stories out to you. Know the the general public how we had to leverage social media like i said i had some really great public affairs officers when i was kinda you know when i was a young all young. Nco young sergeant Up and who gave me the freedom to try different things but also you know imparted some great wisdom. So we're able to do some some really good things you know. I've i credit all credit. The the one major and two captains that that honestly got me to our today. That's awesome speaking on the topic of social media. That kinda helps us lead into kind of our conversation today. That i really wanna pick your brain about is what are our social media pet peeves so what. I think fred we should do. Is we should name a pet peeve that we that we that really really gets to us really grinds are gears but also that pet peeve given alternate for audience on what they should be doing instead. How does that sound to you. That sounds great. So i'll start this first one. My my pet peeve on social media for me is that there are no subtitles on video now with if i'm on instagram or a Amount twitter Usually if i'm on those platforms. I'm scrolling i am. I'm scrolling heavily. I'm looking for something that catches my attention an unusually doing it without sound. And so when i'm looking at something that may be interesting but doesn't have any subtitles. I can't read it and be so. I just skipped past it even though it may it may be something in the comments word disruption. That may be interested me. So my recommendation is if you're having if you're producing video content for such platforms as instagram twitter. Make sure you take the time to subtitle to put the tax on there because you need to consider your audience number one who aren't able to hear what you're saying but also number two there's a large amount of people who are watching videos visually and you're missing a chance to share your message. Share your story if you're not putting in those subtitles and that's really goes into behavior of People who use the ace who use these platforms. I one hundred percent agree We have a term that. I've come to almost where i wanna tattoo it on me. It's called break the scroll and that's one of the elements that helps people break. The scroll and i knew it all the time You know. Facebook has kind of changed. For how i use it a lot of times. I'm using it for recipes and like you know how to Video stuff like our author besides dropping photos from my my grandmother and my kids you know and if i see sometimes i tend to like oh look and you know kind of being a better understanding of what is happening and makes me wanna stop metrics only count. If you're on it for every platform has kind of a threshold. But i think it's like facebook has got to be like three to four seconds But i have to actually stop for those metrics turley count. So if you're you know. I know it's sometimes it's it's difficult especially the longer form videos But honestly there's so many tools out there to help with your you know the subtitles in creating s. Rt files isn't as difficult as it used to be. That it's you know the juice is worth the squeeze on that. Definitely definitely fred. What's what pet peeve that really really grains your ears when we're talking about so i'm gonna stay in the same line when it comes to video. It's i i do not understand and it hurts my soul when great videos aren't watched because that first couple of frames are black screen. We find that you know. I used to do it. You know you've got these cool video you want a nice fade. Because we're all like you know. Francis ford coppola. You know we're all steven spielberg and we wanted to to bring you into the story and you know and i'm guilty of it i've done it before And it's been over the last like four years where i haven't because it's it really you see the difference We tell when people ask for advice. I tell him that. I the i frames. Need to be something like either. You need to have a thumbnail image. That's created that's engaging that makes you want to look at it or the first couple of frames really need to be spot on like it's bam. Here's the story because that's going to again break. The scroll you know if i deceive blackbox blackbox blackbox as i'm going through instagram or twitter or facebook. I'm going to ignore it. And there's i know there's a lot of really tapped people who've had content not really seeing to its full potential because they just that one little step isn't taken and you know just i know people freak out about you know bringing in music. Or if they're narrations turks too early all you need to take all that into account and then just come up with that. I that i couple images That way if it's something cool looking. I wanna stop. And you're going to get those metro. One thing i've i've heard about the beginning of the video is you need to want to hook your audience. You want to be able to want them to continue more into the video so if you can hook them the beginning with something either visual or something dynamic then then you know that the watch beyond a ten seconds continue the rest of the story and so and then going specifically the platforms. I know specifically for instagram. That you can change the thumbnail right in the beginning. So as you have your. Id story or your real more on your story. No sorry on your instagram. Tv you can change the thumbnail to be Totally different than what. The first frame is of your itchy story. Because what it'll default to that i frame so have you mentioned about having a thumbnail Something that's engaging enticing to lure people in you want hook them in so that can tell your story and something. I've seen really cool with that. Is people will take a really strong image. And they've started using like this bold. Like i know here at the army. We we use We have you know we have our own texts in color. Palettes and stuff like that but Our team which is extremely talented. If started they got simple template where they can they put out the words on there and it makes you like man. That's a strong image. And i already know what this is about. And people tend to you. Know to go towards that So you have you know. There's always you know ten ways to do things But i mean those that's to you they're going to have to cut your unit develop your Visual stories in a way. Where that i could be something like really dynamic or spend the time especially if you can get to create create a template so it's kind of a drop in e create But either in their way. You're going to you know you're up for success. Opposed to the the the intro of black screen. Because you know if you're just not going to get as many people that's right. Another pet peeve of mine. And i've seen this lately as i've now started the follow hashtags on instagram is hashtag hijackers. This really really annoys me. When i see images or content not actually related to content and i wanted to follow so one hash tag because i am a digital marketing agency is i follow hashtag marketing because i want to see what else is going online and i'm seeing lately. I've been seeing a lot of things that totally don't relate with it And the most frustrating part is. I'm seeing images of of people with less clothing so unlike this doesn't half this is just. This is not what. I signed up to follow this hashtag for an so Hijacking these people who are hijacking hashtags for views. And whatever their intent is it makes me not want to follow the hashtag anymore so my recommendation is as you are. And you can't really control these people from doing hashtag hijacking but the biggest thing that you wanna do My recommendation is when you're looking to have your company hashtag or find something else that you find something that's unique do your research on what the hashtag you're looking for and make sure it's not related to something else with that you don't want to be associated with particularly something that's obscene because that would not put your company or your organization in a good light. That's you know you hit the nail on the head with the research you know hashtags over time change Things that start off as you know pretty you know pretty mundane or printing bonilla. Just turn kinda crazy. Sometimes i've had people who freaked out because a hashtag been using for awhile got hijacked into something very non-kosher and they were worried because they are all of a sudden being brought into a conversation they didn't want to Even with you know even with us we are constantly rechecking are hashtags were constantly. Looking over I mean it's easy as typing it into the search bar and just seeing what pops up granted you know. It's never going to be one hundred percent clean and perfect But i mean if the threshold is mostly your content are mostly you know the stuff you wanna talk about your. You're you're okay. But when he starts seeing it dive dive closer to that thirty five to fifty percent of. Hey the converstation starting to to be fifty percent not what we want to be part of. That's when you need to take a hard look at your your team in your what your processes and figure out. Okay maybe do we adjust the hashtag or something completely different you brought up about how hashtags change over time one hash tag that i was using a lot with some of the photography and videography stuff is. I'd like to post behind the scenes of what are set. Was and what i'm doing and i would use the hashtag. Bt for behind the scenes while in two thousand twenty one hashtag bt is now have been hijacked. and i'm going to say hijack it was is now hijacked by a very popular korean boy band. Yes so there. He goes out hashtag so now it's becoming more more creative with either spelling out hashtag behind the scenes. So that way. I can make sure i get the intent of that hashtag out rather than hashtag. Bt yes or you just you. You accidentally tap into a great new a great new fan base that it will be vastly disappointed about what your continent compared to what they're expecting so you know it but it's funny it just things change constantly You know they talk about in. New cycle is used as a twenty four seven and we we joke a lot and social circle sets. You know social media twenty four second you know cycle and the hashtags mu evan flow. Justice quickly So you know you have to really be just kind of on your toes when it comes to just making sure your stuff is right because it only takes you know people will forget all the great content you put out but it only takes one mess up or one being involved in something Even a hashtag on accident. That hurts your your and hurt your organization's reputation and then it takes a while to build the backup. Fred i wanna give you. The last the last pet peeve and also your recommendation for audience on what not to do it from the for the pet peeve. So i'm going to give the last one to you. Want this one when we were talking about pet peeves prior that i've been kind of you know playing with and it's kind of a two parter one is i cannot stand it when organizations create more presence than they can. They can manage constantly. It's an issue that when people come you know people come to us all the time. Hey we're looking at a link to an account. I want to a facebook account or twitter account and then every so often. I'll get somebody we want everything And then when. I actually finally when i get a chance to explain. Hey this is kinda what you need. Look for this of organization to create this kind of continuity go for and they realized that they can't meet the demands that honestly having you know having a presence each platform really you know really demands. You know we. We have a good sized team at the in the army. But even sometimes i'm like man. I really wish we had a couple more people because it takes a lot To create the content to develop the plans to develop the goals into develop content to meet those goals. Because if you don't do that you can't engage. That's the second part is you know people aren't engaged as well as you know having these presences. They aren't engaging all these presences social media for reason Engagement is such a huge factor. Of what we do that you know. Some people think that. I can just i concur. I found this article. I'm going to write a little bit to it. And i'm just gonna let it be and let it let it soar on facebook and twitter but when people you know there's always an opportunity for people when people ask questions to answer them to find conversations on those platforms that meet your objectives that are in your line and far too. Many people are freezing fundamental social media. Which is engaging with other people So my my my biggest suggestion is if especially if you if you've already got the platforms you know. Maybe take a hard look at. You know where your priorities are lying. But if you're if you're yours ation has no social media presence instead of trying to just put your name on everything that moos digitally mean Take a second and just get on one platform fine. What's best for you get. On one platform create create a plan create goals create content. That meets those goals and then see how it goes from there Some people can go man. You know. I enough bandwith where i can move to something else and other times. You know man. This twitter is hard enough. And if that's the case then be good at one platform you know. Do it really well. Instead of being less than mediocre across the board and that goes with the engaged as well really get out there and find those conversations if you can you know. I've had people who were like. Oh i wanna do this. Why don't you start off as lincoln because it's your alley. It's what you wanna talk about. And honestly it's a little lower speed you know that first year And it's something that you know you cut your teeth on and tell people all the time so if you can consistently produce content be a couple of weeks out of content. Because that's what we tried to try to be least two weeks out so we're never missing anything and we can always adjust if you can do that as an also engage with people in on different conversations aunt as well as on your own Post you know you're going to be good and you'll have you'll set yourself up for a good social media program and then if you decide it's time to expand or hey we need to add another person so we can move into another platform that you can make informed decisions and overall you know. Make the juice worth the squeeze on this one. I totally agree with you. And as as you're mentioning your points Two things came up to mind. Is that most people. When they are looking into establishing their presence on a platform they forget that each platform requires time money and resources. And if you're trying to over yourself on multiple platforms you're extending your time energy and resources across all of these platforms so he have to look at what your your organization. Your company's ban with is in order to support all of these. And the second thing i was thinking about is what some people do. Is they post. The same thing on each platform. Lincoln is not facebook is not twitter is not instagram is not tiktok. It's not step chuck. Everyone engages With these platforms differently in so you have to keep in mind what the end. User's behavior is in order to make sure that your message and your story is getting out appropriately. And that's a that's a great point. I see it all the time where the same the same everything hashtag Wording some people will create. You know 'cause you know these social media tools that we have out there who'd sweet sprinkler sprout A gore paul's. They're great tools. But sometimes it does lead people to be a little little lazy bill. The off set it up in twitter and then just copy and paste for everywhere else There in the issues with that is if i go on twitter and i see a post okay cool and i am scrolling through and i see the same thing your facebook i'm just controlled by it. i'm saying you can't use the same content but using the same content in the same day at the same time With the same. Wording if you're gonna people are going to tune out well you can take that same content having on twitter and then maybe maybe another day or two having on different platform at a different time with different wording and messaging like. I know when it comes to lincoln. I can expand upon what i wanna talk about twitter. I operate both twitter and linked in which is great because it gives me to separate sides of spectrum when it comes to I got two hundred eighty characters over here so have to kind of get to the point while also making sure we got the right hashtags in the link to whatever and then on the other side. I can expand i. Can you know i can. I can do more to bring people in so even though i'm creating content for both they'll go out on different times they'll have different messaging. Because i know my audiences are different on facebook then only did and it just really like you said it takes time and that's why you know if you if you know you guys can't not everything can be the priority we see. This is the priory in this the party. Something's always on the back burner so you either have to add to your team or decide. Hey for us. Facebook is the priority. We're gonna lean on that everything else is kinda. Let's let's valuate fred. It's been a pleasure talking you about our pet peeves on social media. I'm sure we have more that we could discuss. Swear oh man he also Do you have any closing remarks for audience I guess the biggest thing is its social media for reason Engagement is key when people ask y you know what what metrics you looking for. Biggest one is engagement will lead to everything else when you when you talk with people when you jump into conversations When you when you're actively out there on the you know on these platforms you will see a return on investment. you know. I have on the platform. I operate that even if it's something like hey you know for the army. My kids going off to basic training. You know what. I'll see those. You know that sneezy Pass it but i'd rather the. Us army say thank you. You know we're we're we're proud of your son or your son or daughter service. Thank you for what you do is supporting them and that makes them feel good and other people see that that message of this is the army family is getting out there and you can do the same thing with your organization your platforms just have to get out there. Be vulnerable because it is going to be you know. Not every engagement is going to be one hundred percent sparkles and an amazing but you have to get out there and take calculated risk of. I want to interact with this person because they either have something to say. Or there's something i can say to them. That might help them. So folks if you're going to do anything take some time and engage on your platforms. Social media is social. thanks fred. how can people find you honestly. Hopefully you can't finally but you could always find what i do on. The usr platform is at us army. We're on we're on all platforms. Like i said we have good team But you can also find me at on twitter. Hash the mighty fred because i am But you know. I try to. I try to keep my work into the work So if you could find me on social media ten points to you. But i'm also on linked in as well so if you ever have it If anyone has a question or anything they'd like to discuss about social media. I can always find me on their awesome fred. Thanks for being on our show today and Man we need to have you back anytime you let me know. Thanks for listening to the waza media. Podcast if you found this podcast helpful. Please share this with a friend. Give us a review. It only takes a quick moment. Be sure to follow us on our social media platforms at was a media. That's w as e a media and if you're looking for an agency to help you take your business next level. Please visit our website. At was a dot media to schedule a consultation. Thanks again for listening and tune in next time for the next episode.

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Connecticut approves online poker

Ante Up Poker Magazine

37:07 min | 4 months ago

Connecticut approves online poker

"From the anti headquarters in tampa bay florida. It's the anti poker and now here are two guys who think they know how to play poker. Chris costanza and scott. Long june fourth. Twenty twenty one. You're listening to the best book on the interwebs. I'm chris costanza. And i'm scott long. Wouldn't it figure right. Wouldn't it figure that. Almost thirty years. After i moved from their connecticut allows online poker right. Just had to get rid of you. Yeah they're just waiting for me to leave very happy for them. Get governor ned. Lamont has signed a law allowed online gaming including poker and his state starting july first the status of seventh in the nation to regulate online poker Widespread bipartisan support in both the house and senate. The states to indian tribes will be permitted to run their own sites wants a new compact ratified than the all house for connecticut. The joint other states in player pool if it wishes. Yep i mean. It's not going to make that big of a deal to the overall thing because not a large state but one by one. It's just happening in. It's just ridiculous. Just get it done. You know it's just funny to my. Here's another wine Warn when big in the senate the governor immediately said he was going to sign in did and then you're down here in florida hold on now. We're gonna negotiate a new contract. We gotta get rid of this online gaming. That's crazy stuff. So it's just it's frustrating that some states completely different than other spot. Oh you did say the log on july. it'd be not expect pogo. I i because there's a lot of stuff that has to happen. They have to hammer out this new compact and then the department of interior s sign off on it and then obviously they needed to get into licensing and testing all that stuff. So i don't know when exactly it will start but It's approved so that's good right l. Yeah absolutely and i'm sure all the other states that have already had it ratified the the plan will be easily to follow their and most the shortcuts order to be in place for them to to to get that stuff push through quickly and I would say before the end of summer. They'll have it. Yeah we'll see but So very cool so all seven of our listeners. In connecticut i got. I got a huge bunch of people there that you know my family and everything. You're listening or not. Formerly booker sham. Chris moneymaker has sued pay pile claiming breach of contract unjust enrichment and bad faith when the payment processor sees twelve thousand dollars from his account that that was entry fees for his friends and his fantasy football league. Winning maker says the process should return the money to eleven entrance instead of seizing. Yeah what the hell was that art. So i i don't really know where to come down on this so i've always i run fantasy. Football leagues do so. Hopefully pay pals not listening in here but When i have people pay entry fees. I'm like do not put anything fantasy football football fantasy anything at all on note on it to send me fifty bucks because they've flag me before for this so they take pretty seriously on pap- house so i'm actually kind surprised that i do fifty thousand dollar league on my. Why would you pay for this. So that's one thing i wanted to say come on. Let's be a little bit smarter about this. Chris to all right so i see aids. Nice criminal. Getting caught and then negotiating. Yeah all right. I understand what i did was wrong. Can't you just make it right by doing this. And hey no big deal. It's not really other world works so it's hard to come down on his side on that one now. Also i i kinda get the unjust enrichment that He's claiming there. There was a way to resolve this without stealing. Twelve thousand dollars but But that's in the terms of agreement. I mean no one reads things right. We're all the way down and click the button but that doesn't mean that it doesn't exist right so i don't know they need to come up with the codename manhattan project when they put it in the don't put anything in or whatever i mean just to remind him that they all any seven fifty dollars a year. I know the spore moneymaker. Here's your money code argo. Something just tells them what it is a lot of. Tell them what it is but but you know one of the things. I'm wondering too is. When is it a what defines poker news for our show. I'm trying to figure this out. Louis way i would say depends on the week how desperate we are so you know. Chris moneymaker got the the the towing package on his honda passport when he bought it this week. So we're going to put that on the show because that's that'd be i don't know i don't know what's news anymore. Because he's a former poker player. He's suing somebody. It's news sued the contractor. Paint his house right. Caller is that make the show to. I'm trying to figure this out to so some freelance stuff for another company. And so i've been working with the publisher on their stories. They like that right So we're going through google news. Which is what they use for the show right so and then it's funny. It's like if you see someone at the headlines a question that's always spam or phishing great and i'm like yeah i know but man so much content with that's classic too much right without i gotta so we need the question marks gambling items popular star recently a couple of weeks back. We told you about a civil war era gambling book. That sold announced vintage device. Chris that plo players cheat the contraption which solar has said was in her family for generations called a hold out and then allowed to cheat to hold a card and literally up his sleeve until you needed it. Yup it is the device that gave life the phrase ace up your sleeve after battling the seller agree to sell it for nine hundred bucks. Is that shocking to you. I think that the device that was literally responsible for the freeze gets more than nine hundred bucks and civil era people. That had holdouts back. Then i mean this is like one thousand nine hundred early one thousand nine hundred so it's not as old as the book but still then you come on and it's a contraption. I mean that it's got to be that you know that scissor metal thing whereas sort of pushes it out and pulls it back like mad props the people i. I'm not gonna advocate cheating in any way here but the people that could pull it off of that because that's like way too much work for me. It does to construct it back then. I mean that's that's pretty much all respect the right there for that whether they're cheating or not i mean that's that is not easy to do next or man he don't eat anything he just like mingka. Turn into a pigeon. Faculty had a strap. This thing on jeez explains why they count the deck out all the time too when you're in poker rooms and he goes also got fifty three cards or we had fifty one stars in fact do not want while oh man we got sound effects come out of scott long and not just the squeaky voice in the morning i put that the end of the show Now you said. I can't believe that's always worth now. Remember it's worth more than that. It's what the con- shop is going to buy for. So they can flip it for two thousand a you so true. That's true they know somebody you'd want to buy it. That's the thing network. Got all these people who are willing to buy all this again all the collectors in the country or the world and know what they're you know sucker to born every minute kind of thing by something that for way more than you bought it for. Who's going to win. This bid i think worm that was just thinking. I was thinking about worm earlier to the ace tattooed on the inside of his arm. Matt damon. Oh my game and can you give me whereas number. 'cause i got something he's gonna wanna hear two thousand clocks his. I'm sure he's in prison on. Don't they can get that. Contraband in there for them. But i it depends on how many cigarettes he has friends if morgan freeman there with them now. We're going to many movie references today for you know. Ten o'clock in the morning what happens. We have no real contact. I was going to say what there's a lot of them did a lot of things today. Update weeks data poker room. Ryobi digs colorado monarch casino resort. Spa blackhawk has opened. Its poker room. That's a brand new resort by the way yes in new mexico in the mountain gods resort seem reopened its poker room in illinois. Grand victoria casino. Elgin has reopened poco in california. Garlic city casino has resumed live poker and oklahoma wind. Casino will reopen his parole on june nine in arizona. Cliff castle casino has permanently closed. Its poker room. We now have to wonder fifty-one reopened boca rooms in the united states and go to anti magazine dot com slash reopen where we verify details on puckering poker reopenings of any updates emails editor anti magazine dot com and remember to subscriber weekly us. It'd be a great like Promotion for gerwig cities that they hand you a meant as you walk and that'd be a great little thing to say. Welcome to garlic city. Here's a mint. Actually do is probably better. I'm a goof on. Give me like a garlic palm chicken wing or something garlic not for us chilling on in front of the slot machines. Okay any updates pates the fans free online tournament series on pokerstars play. Money site is available everywhere. Details how to join can be found at bit. Lie slash games are on sixteen sixteenth and twenty six every month and rotate disciplines with a main tournament followed by a second chance event. Pokerstars let you claim fifteen thousand free shifts. Every four hours joined the anti fans group. Facebook page post within the group to get feedback on hands. Ask four questions are just discussed. Anything poker check out our eleven vintage antioch logo designs on merchandise and es magazine dot com slash shop by t shirts hoodies sweatshirts phone and laptop cases. Coffee and drink months and much more with your choice of any magazine. Any up poker cast or any poker tour logos and it very handle the week listener spotlight or call the floor submission. Email us at podcast. Any magazine dot com or posted any fans group on facebook. I'm starting to think we shouldn't call any updates anymore. Updates these are more out dates it out taste any updates or any up furniture or something you know. It's always there all right. Listen to spotlight each week. We spotlight a listener. Emails is a podcast magazine. dot com. If they haven't won something from us in the past year just like we do with called beforehand of the week. We sent him something cool. This is matt hayward he was playing five cent. Ten cent pilo online. He raised pre flop with asia. Spades hearts queen of hearts. Nine of clubs. Flop comes jacket clubs jacket diamonds for diamonds. Small blind goes all in and the middle position player calls the all he folds he says. Don't see how there's any other move here. Turns out the cutoff. Had jack of hearts. Four a heart's king of spades do spades for a full house. Jack's over force small blind had acis spades ten diamond. Seven of diamond nusa diamonds. It goes running runner. Ace ace giving me quads. had i stay in. Is there any way to avoid tilt here boy. Does this suck. I feel the fold is right. Omaha is a game where you have to have the nuts or a very good draw to the nuts. otherwise still it's really crappy to see what they have at showdown. Yesterday cut off voted up book. W t f are you really. I'm sorry are you. Are you doing with that hand. My thoughts are. I should be happy. That my opponent's plays that poor. That is actually a great for me. Long term. I just have to bide my time so my question here is. How do you avoid that nagging till feeling it ended up a twelve dollar and fifty cents or one hundred and twenty five big blind pot after all. Well this is an easy one. Right is easy. i think it is but But you and your until to you. Vito it as clearly as people think that we've always professed on this show for online. Is that if you took a split second mortar call or if you took a split second longer to fold. It didn't come as a random card generator. It's not set in stone on point. I even bring with them so yeah so right there so right there you don't. It's not like it's the the deck and you're like all of that. That definitely would have come. Ace ace but and then i'm sure you said some more things to him but clearly you have to make the right move at the right time. You can't make moves hoping for what i like to term miracles. You know 'cause there are no sting miracles. But in this case i would say to have it. Go ace or ace ace. I mean even if you at the time. Got the ace on the turn. You still don't have the nuts you know. Somebody could jack jack. This is after all. So i mean you really literally go as as what's the percentage on that less than two less than one percent so i mean it's ridiculous to be on tilt over something that one probably wouldn't have happened. Had you stayed hand anyway and two for it to be literally. All the planets aligning in your favor for it to happen. And it's only twelve dollar pot. So i could have gotten over this a lot easier than that. I think he did. I don't know about you i think. Probably less the runner quality which obviously always hurts It more so just the garbage hands that his opponents are playing to raisins right. So this is why this is not a big tilt thing for me because i want those people on my wall exactly those kind of people you order playing with and yeah so it's frustrating when you fold a hand like this but i mean you imagine the tilt had you folded the best hand at the time would you did not so So yeah so if you that will be different. So i mean You want these players playing garbage hands Beans you're going to lose some good hands with. We were good cards. But you're going to win a lot more money from these folks so you want them playing his game We might mean to make some adjustments. Because they're in but But i would much rather have people playing garbage hands in my game. The people you know knowing what they're doing so well and this this comes with the territory of planning a five cent tencent game online. Well we like to talk about you know. Try to make it in your mind that you're playing like a five dollar ten dollar game other people aren't looking at it like that and they're thinking you know i've got a thousand dollars in my account and i'm gonna play for dollar buying and who cares if i lose ten bucks still have nine hundred and ninety dollars in my account and so they're playing all hands to dudes specifically this to you and i mean you know. Yeah sure was. King jack for deuce. You know a terrible hand. Yeah but when you look at it as two spades comes on the flop at any other spain now. The guys are enough love straw if he comes queen ten on the flop with a rag. Now he's got an open ended. Draw they they think they don't think nuts they think possible nuts. You know they put you on 'til eight. Seven ten deuce. Yeah okay now pushing it especially but he was in the small blind of raise and then a call and ahead of them in a call or whatever and then you're looking at you know whatever you're like okay. Well whatever i got some suited cards here and some straight cards and you know. I'm already committed for some money. So it's only if i said ten game. Let me throw in a little bit more. Whatever that raise was and then you know because it is omaha. And they think oh. There's so many cards. They don't realize the real thing to do to tighten up even more the more cards you have you know. They don't realize that. So i let it be. You know something that just you know. Like water off a duck's back you know and just be like. Hey he's going to stay in my game. I'm gonna make a lot of money off them long term and the ace. Ace thing shouldn't bother at all that the for that to happen brutal but absolutely rare than you know anything. And so i don't know i wouldn't have until outta are you kidding me and then on the next hand so i would just forget about it. The other thing. I'll say is that we. We could talk for hours about how you adjust to a game like this but the one thing i will say is when you definitely need to do is get out of hands flops that you miss because players are playing garbage hands like this that are hitting something usually right so they are those two aces you have in your hand which are really not all that the antastic omaha and begin with are really not fantastic on on this board So that's that's the one that just to make is just. I mean he would fold without any regret in. My mind is like that. Yeah and another thing too. The first line of his letter was basically a second line. I re race pre flop so okay now. Do i agree with that or disagree with that. I don't know if i agree with re raising. I think you're basically telling the world. I have ace ace and at least one of them suited and so they're like okay. Well i pretty much know what you have if i call it any car. You're gonna have no idea what i have. And i hit my flop. I might get all your money. You know so. There's another reason why people do that. You know they. I mean there was a story once with mike madison. Were i remember it. It was like that big tournament champions. Or something i don't know but he. He played a couple of cards. That you know people like what is he doing. He knew what everyone else had because of the way they're raising and everything went and he thought well after the big stack if i get into this flop a little cheaply or just what i can afford to call these raises and stuff. I can put these guys on these hands. And if i hit my hand i could bust a few. And that's exactly what he did. He busted like two or three people in one hand because he knew what they had by the way they played by the way. They raised their history of what they've done with their betting patterns so nothing. You had a betting pattern here but clearly when someone who raises pilo and someone really raises. Somebody's got as ace. And if you have abc's and you know you know that. They're playing their cards face up. Now you have jack king four do so whatever but you know if you hit four four blank you're going to be ahead of those aces and you're going to get their money. So that's something to think about to maybe just calling a raise because you might have been the field anyway and if not you know it's it's it's not that good people. Think of ace ace and hold them minutes the best hand and yet so you can say as as jack ten race as king being raised can clean or something like that is the best hand but really it doesn't matter after the flop once f comes it's like shrivel up very quickly in in omaha whereas hold them as can hold up to a lot of stuff and in this case i would never re raise again unless i knew i was going to heads up with the person who raised i or if i could basically get them all the fold which hardly ever happens appeal especially in a five cent ten. I mean remember. The reasons for raising one is the drive people out of the pot or to to build a bot right so in this game. Obviously no one's being driven out of pot so we don't do that now. There is an argument for building a power with aces and ceuta days days. And you know he has a other combinations here so that's a different story but But if your mindset is hey i'm raising here to thin. The field in a game where people calley a three bed with ada spades diamonds diamonds. Diamonds don't do that. You're right so that's an adjustment. You need to make as well too. I agree so i wouldn't go until i would just pick spots better and not worry about it especially the acc runner runner that that was just nothing. That's nothing new with you or are you played how come would have been had you called would probably wouldn't have come easy so i wouldn't worry about absolutely we have a new o'malley's move a hello and welcome to another o'malley's move malcolm o'malley this week. We're playing in a one dollar three dollars. No limit holdem cash game at casino. We regular the game is eight handed. The casino allows us straddle from any position. Action follows regularly with the straggler acting last pre flop and then in turn on the following streets. We've moved our seat to be to the left of maniac who straddles every hand the maniacs straddles from the cutoff. The blinds post. It's folded all the way around to us on the button and we look down at the ace of clubs king of clubs we bought in for three hundred lost one fifty and then added on another three hundred. So we're in the game for four fifty but currently sit with fourteen hundred. It's been a good night. We make fifty five dollars to go the blindfold but the maniac calls leaving him with about seven hundred. The pot is one ten and the flop is the eight of clubs. Seven of spades deuce of hearts the maniac Out for one hundred. We totally miss this flop. But i think raising and folding is extremely weak in this scenario plus he has been known to slow down if he has absolutely nothing after a flop. Bet we call. The pot is three ten and the turn is the queen of clubs are opponent thinks briefly and shoves yikes what's the move. It's time for the advance poker training dot com in your hands for situations. Podcast at antioch magazine dot com. We haven't wasn't made the show you'll get a free membership advanced portraying the world's number one poker training site and i feel like it's the end of an era chris is. This is the tenth of ten hands at jerry haynes sent in all of them have been fantastic. So this one's guaranteed to suck jerry. We very much appreciate the this. Every week he sending revised for the next one so everyone gets a little bit better for us so we appreciate that. It's kind of weird jerry. You can't spell jerry. Haynes without era is the end of an era all right so of course you've been following along so he's been playing on this website called poker now dot clog. What's a bunch of friends Stakes are twenty five cent fifty cent no limit and he says this being the last hand in the series of hands i also think was the last hand the session but we are still five handed. Start the hand with two hundred and twenty four skittles down seventy six four the night but up eighty six cents. Hand one of the series. I have the effect of stack against the main villain and look down at the queen of diamonds. Jackie diamonds from under the gun. Well it's a good hand for five handed and under the gun or not. I mean you're basically middle position player if you're at the full table so you might consider raising with this. I think Theory of poker would have you raising with it also. It doesn't matter what the cards are. If you if you know the players well enough and you know their tendencies well enough that if you get into this play it they call you then you know you can adjust accordingly. The cards aren't going to really matter. I'd rather be in position with these than i. Act but i guess it would depend on how my night was going and if i knew it was the last hand i might get involved just because i'm down for the night and it's a suited broadway. You know connector. So i'd probably just raised or whatever standard raises. I agree with everything you said there. I mean we were five handed so this this hand looks a lot better than it. Those ten handed nine ended Last hand of the sessions ios go broke so you can't get off of that but no i l seriousness When when you are in a game where you know the players as well as appears the jerry in all players in the game know each other. This is the kind of hand. I like to have because Because one i'm going to be able to represent all kinds of different hands with it but to a powerful hand because you know you've got the straight end. The possibilities so those high suited connectors are are agree cards especially in the last hand of the night so yeah definitely doesn't get raise here so now he says a full table. I would fold his hand however since we were five handed. This is like being in the hijackers. He fall table. And that's about always raising with these types of broadway hands sooner raise game ranges from two to three bucks because no one game would fall to a seventy five cent dollar but i make it on the larger side as his last handed night so mostly guys get pretty wide with their calls. L. want to try to get as many goals as possible. I raised three dollars. Oh what he said though last night because it was really honestly really hard to get people the fold the last hand night alike. Think about every home poker game. You've been to if you call last hand right. I mean. I don't do that but we usually do. Ray we always have a time last hand. I don't care what garbage. And i at least for a little bit and i think most people are too. Because you know you've got gotta wait to hold another week or two weeks or month or whatever. It is three years record four or five years so you don't wanna miss stand so so yeah. I think he's doing anything right here by By juicing pretty high here and We'll see what happens here. He says the cutoff and both blinds goal. So yeah so you know five in a game in four of going to the flop when you've raised six cash game so yeah it kind of proves the point here. All right the law. So much for reducing the feel but at least i tried with twelve dollars in the pot. The floppies the queen of hearts tray of hearts six spades blinds. Check us. Well this is good a fob. As you could ask without making two pair or set i mean. Yeah there's a little wet the substrate possibilities lowest rate possibilities but nothing's there yet Sets or possible people could call raises whip pocket. Trays or sixes. So that's the kind of stuff that could be on your radar but we're talking last hand in the night. Those ranges are wide. We're talking five handed the ranges or even wider than the grand canyon. so i'm likeness. I'm going to bet. Probably you know three quarters of the pot normally. I'd bet like you know half the pot or two thirds of pot. But i feel i feel like three quarters of the pot maybe even pot but i still wanna make money on my hand on. I'm on just get the initial nine dollars that might through the opponents here. So i call here i think so. I'm not too worried about losing value. Here so yeah that nine spot. My minimum and i probably think about the pot size bed here because again we'll be set pre flop kinda continues on right so if you've got any piece of this flop in my any piece i mean even a fleischer australia trawler at this point being lasting that you're gonna call right because that's just carry over from we already said so So i want those people with lesser hands to pay pay a lot of money in this last hand to to catch up to me and Sure as possible. Somebody has a beat right now. But i think it's unlikely so yeah I think i would start at nine. But i've probably said what twelve just because this last hand so you know or a ten dollar bets. Nicer may ten ninety nine. You know haven't really funny. But yeah i agree. Somewhere between nine and twelve is fine. Absolutely pirker all right. Here's this. I know. I have top hair with four players in the hand definitely went to bed. Here's i should be a head. Most of the time molest someone has hit a set when thinking best sizing with us being last hand the night most draws and even hands like nine nine would probably come a long provide. Don't get too crazy with my bet size on the other hand. I don't wanna get draws the right price. I decided to bet just under pot size at nine nine ninety nine right in the middle of what we would have done so cut off calls and bulk blindfolds so we ended up heads up all right. That's what i'm saying. So we get ten bucks out of this. You know there's other guys probably weren't going to stick around. Maybe bet four or five or something like that. He would but but then. Then you're drawing against those folks and remember we have one pair with you know medium kicker here so i mean i think the the ultimate goal here would be to get exactly what happened. One caller and beheads up i succeeded. All right says the cutoff is tighter player. But also love the chase's draws for the implied odds especially flush crawls there's now thirty one ninety eight in the pot and the turn is a deuce of hearts unions aboard queen hearts trae hearts six spades doozer hearts and cut off shows hers remaining eighteen fifteen thought we would be i act there but you know kinda odd well all right so this could be the worst car in the deck for us. It complete straights flushes. Now why would he shove. Though the ninety one values on scare us off. So i'm calling Pretty quick here. I i mean it's a big enough pot with his eighteen and thirty two in there. You're looking at fifty bucks. You gotta call eighteen hundred fifty with top pair. And you know a decent kicker. But the only thing i can think of is that he has a pair and a heart in his hand and he doesn't care if you call these are gonna make a flush it's better or he's afraid of drawing and he has something like you know a set and he's trying to protect it but that's the only thing that would make me follow that if i thought he had a set or already flush but i wouldn't believe a flush at this point so i would think set is the only plausible hand that would shove their and make it a legitimate shove. Because he's protecting his hand against a four card flush so other than that you know a straight maybe a straits doing the same thing trying to protect against that. But i still think he'd want value on the last tan. I think he would bet like half of that eighteen. Like you know ten or something so for me. I feel like we're ahead. I feel like this guy is just trying to take pot real quick or he's semi bluffing. The theory of poker. And so i'm gonna call. I'm gonna call. It's a pretty big pot for eighteen bucks you know. I'm not going to let it. Go with top. Decent kicker in a an all the situations that scott i laid out here where it's the last hand nobody likes to fold or ranges are wide. It's five hand to the rangers are wider. I think all of that adds up to me. Call here and seeing. What happens yeah. I'm definitely calling the bed eight. I don't think there's any information that i feel comfortable gleaning from that. I mean thirty. Thirty one ninety eight in the pot. So it's called thirty two. You know a normal bid might have been third to a half of the pot so but that kind of bad that that's really kinda ridiculous with what he has left. So i think his only bet is his stack which is eighteen fifteen. So i think he's doing this with She's doing this straight. He's doing this what they semi bluff. He's doing this with a pair. He's doing this with anything. So i don't get any information out of that For me the pasta bigs last hand. We've got a piece of this knock. I be surprised he turns over flush with means they're going good or a street. Which means you're going dead but also feel like there's money in there that it's worth finding out so yeah i still would evaluate it if i had the street or the flush i i don't think i would. I know i know they're always say no. If you're going to bet fifty percent of your stack you might as well bet your whole stag. I don't really agree with that. Maybe tournaments but in cash games. It's legitimate bed. I might as well just make a legitimate bet. So the turn. We tend to bet half of the pot. You know half the pot would be roughly sixteen dollars and yeah so he has eighteen. So i guess then you would show but if you're looking for value you might bet half which have ten you know it's online too so you can make it nine ninety nine. It looks like it's a lot more than it is. But i guess you're right to. It's hard to say that. What what the same thing we're doing and realizing his last hand he's not worried about losing value. Either for nine dollars here so i. I don't know whether he's doing that. He describes a tighter players. Maybe he's not thinking the same way that we are but But i give them credit for thinking that that you know. He's taking his evening. We are last and people were splashed around all kinds of stuff so you might as well get it all in so i agree. All right are here. Says this is definitely not a car. I wanted to see in the show of maybe wanna barf any flushed or four five. Just got there although that hands pretty unlikely. This opponent other than a kleenex suited hand with lower kicker or one pair hand that he's turning into a bluff. I'm struggling to find a hand. That i beating here on the flip side is shove a small enough that i'm getting almost three to one. So he's making a play on last hand night. I am getting good odds the call. It's almost like we wrote this for jerry. I know it's weird even earlier. We were talking about a nine ninety nine and all that is this bizarre. It's like what he's saying we're of because we've been analyzing his hands for ten weeks so we're getting to know our player a little bit ranked normal game all right. Here's the close. My eyes grit my teeth and decided to make the call flips over the queen of clubs. Ten hearts boy to heart and take down the sixty eight dollars. Pot minimize my losses for pipped. We picked them. Yeah and talk about somebody being wanting to barf now lots him. He played his right at the end. I mean he got the point. Where a i mean. There just wasn't be had more his stack. He could've could've affected that different link but he just didn't have enough stack to get off so essentially what we said too. I said he's got a piece of it and a heart as a back door semi bluff. And that's what it was. It was a queen with the heart and he got lucky or unlucky. They didn't pair of Fit to flush but while it'd be outfits like that too that's brutal for that guy. Yeah well but hey. I mean this is the way you want to end a losing night. Right is way winning that last pot making the right call pipping even helps rate home a little bit more confidence. i mean. think about all those nights that you lost last handed to sticks with you Especially loser for the night so glad it ended on go for jerry and very much appreciate the effort he put these answer us absolutely and you know after that win. He's almost too. So you know you look at it like you entertain yourself for a few bucks entertaining when you go home. The white guy did broke. Even you're always great so all right jerry. Thanks for sending them in and we really appreciate it. Always appreciate what our fans do for. I'm chris costanza. We'll see you. Anti-us is a production of antioch magazine dot com context. This show podcast. Magazine dot com. If you'd like to advertise send an email to advertising at antioch magazine dot com or call seven two seven three three one four three three five. Some music used in this episode comes courtesy of the pod. Safe music network.

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Wild Fire, Public Roads and Wildlife with Mark Penninger

Seek Outside Podcast

1:18:51 hr | 9 months ago

Wild Fire, Public Roads and Wildlife with Mark Penninger

"Hello everyone and welcome back to another episode of the outside podcast. My name is dennis today. Kevin is exploring. The southwest i believe is in arizona. So it's just gonna be me and our guest. Today is mark penan pending gir- penny gir- correct. Did i say directly correctly. Hurry up in market. Let's i would imagine we're gonna talk a little bit Or at least. I would like to talk to in kind of notes that we share before the podcast were talk a little bit about wildfire today in in what that means in kind of the intricacies of of wildfires. Can you i give us a little background in your history with kind of wildfires or or at least your your history in. Why why am. I know a few things here. So i'm actually a wildlife biologist. And i i worked thirty years with the us force service that doesn't department of the us department of interior or me. Yes department of agriculture. And as wallet biologist. I worked on a variety of things from timber sales road-building recreational developments grazing permits and fire in the service there's a rich tradition of firefighting fire prevention of prescribed fire. And there's much reasons why the force is for services so heavily involved in the fire fire world just as an employee with the four service regardless of what your area of expertise or your duties. Are everyone up to help with the fire with fire suppression. When the need. When the native rises so in oregon here inspectors northeast. oregon are fire. Season generally starts late. June and twenty to thirty years ago. That season would run through mid september sometimes into late september early october. Now that far season runs on into november some years and when a wildfire starts of it's kind of all hands on deck if the resources that we have on hand are or have been deployed to other places than folks like myself as biologist are our civil culturists are other other people in other areas of expertise are called up to help the fire effort and so it does that. Does that mean that. Like are you trained in fire suppression than is is that kind of a you know. I guess i imagine being called up to work me. You're out helping you know cut lines in. Maybe inspect places i mean. I guess i don't know too much about it. Yes so. The minimum amount of fire training that everyone gets. Who's gonna actually be out on. A fire is used to be called guard school. I think they call it fire school. Now it's basically a week training where you learn a just enough to be dangerous about far behave far behavior of why the four service tries to put out fires a winning why we choose not to put out fires sometimes when i say we. It's a tough to break out of that habit. When i was an employee of the agency for thirty years. I'm no longer with them but it's still hard to break that habit very but anyway you also learn a lot of safety of safety considerations for providing fire how to dig fire line how to pump water from small pumps etc and so. That's kind of the minimum training. Everyone gets who deals with fire. In addition to that there's a lot of specialized training and so my role in fire over the years has been. It's been pretty tertiary to my main duties. But for many years i did help. In whatever capacity at could so for several years i was an aerial observer so once a a lightning storm would come over the next day i would go been a fixed wing aircraft with contracted pilot and we would fly. The storm's path of a given piece of landscape. And i would look for smokes which is basically where lightning struck a tree alive tree or a dead tree and Ignited a fire and oftentimes those just smoulder and there's not actual active flames coming up but there might be smoldering. Smoke only visible from certain angles. Sometimes and so that i would. I would map that smoke. I would call in the fire to someone in dispatch and sometimes i would stay there circle that that smoke until an engine got there and i could lead a man by voice radio right to the smoke because a lot of times that might be a few hundred yards from a road and engines parked on the road a fairly closely but they can't see it churn out from aerial view. I can see everything plainly. Also i also dug fire. Line of class b Sawyer arena chain solid some fires and then did some trainee roles for things like cap manager and resource advisor. So those were my fire duties but really on my thirty year career. Those represented a relatively small fraction of my experience. You know ten to twenty percent over that whole career was involved in fire in fire in. I kinda know so far as as far as go. I am a. I was up in steamboat springs. One time my wife. And i were doing a bike packing loop up there and we and we chose specific trail and we started going In in for those that don't know glint steamboats probably about four hours from grand junction. We're we're located two super familiar with the area red and we get up there and we we pick this trail. It was early summer. June so there hasn't been a lot of traffic yet but they had. They've had like in a very intense beetle. Kill so all these dead trees. Standing is like everywhere. The forest is kind of looks almost dead and then all of those trees from the snow loads enough they were. They were tipped over and so we ended up. It took us in our to go a mile on our bicycles. Trying to just go up and over trees and down it was just kinda. It was very difficult You know in my thought instantly was like wow. I thought it is either either. Start this place on fire. I can't imagine it would take much. you know. I would imagine one storm in the summertime. We just ignite the whole thing. 'cause it's just dead trees standing dead trees that are very very dry Just i was kind of taken aback as as to one why it hadn't burned yet or or why they wouldn't burn it dumi indiana in. Yeah let me back up one step before we. Before i tried to address that question specifically the reason reason having this conversation is a kevin contacted me a couple of months ago when a historical scale megafires were happening in western oregon and california and a couple of significant ones in colorado Very very fast. Moving large wildfires that affected a lot of people's lives and burned a lot of homes and businesses and human infrastructure and add there also human fatalities involved so fire was on everyone's radar particularly those who live in the west so that always Ignites conversation over Could force be better. Managed is climate change effectiveness Should we be continuing to build homes and buildings in the for wildland urban interface where we have a history of them burning up all those questions become part of the conversation in the media social media etc and so You bring up a good question. When are several places around the west that have immense areas of public lands with dead or dying trees. And it's a really it's very. it's very different depending on where you go. I've seen it in western montana a seen it in parts of oregon and you mentioned the example there in colorado. Each one probably has its own set of circumstances but some of the things that play there are one is a a warming warming trend in our climate I don't want to open a can of worms about whether climate change is happening or not. Because i see it happening in my work as far as why it's happening i don't want to engage in that one But the The fact is we've seen fire seasons which You know the fire agencies or natural resource agencies that deal with fire. They have an official fire season that they recognize each year and they declare it open at a certain time of year at it closes at a certain time of year basically and When i started my career over thirty years ago karen oregon particularly northeast oregon. That fire season went from usually late. June said earlier into late. September early october varies depending on where you are around the country today. That fire season has increased on an average of forty days in some places as much as eighty days now longer so a month to over two months longer the year period during the year we can expect wildfire conditions that that we feel could endanger people and property. And if we're going to minimize that The the damage than suppression tactics should be should be used now as far as the dead forest with a warming climate You end up with some species of insects and diseases that tend to kill trees and some of those are now with a warmer. Climate are allowed to To basically function for a longer period of the year In higher elevations and on different aspects than they would under a cooler moisture. Climb so we've seen bark beetles That are killing trees. At higher elevations. They're affecting species like white bark pine in some of their some of its range which they used to rarely be affected by by bark. Beetles and on cooler north northeast aspects. We're seeing the expansion of the effects on those slopes as well and at higher latitudes On the globe so those are indications that these insects are are able to Basically kill more trees in a shorter period of time than they would have historically and that often outpaces an agency's ability or the funding provided by congress to get in there and treat before or as the events happening simply they're outpaced by the the pace of the trees dine so some folks like the like to blame the environmental groups for suing the suing the land management agencies and preventing a sound force management from happening. That is a part of the equation. But i think the probably the most important thing that affects whether the forest service or any other agencies log scenario not boils down to economics at parts of Part of economic considerations are the size and the quality of the material and a lotta times within months of tree dying it loses a lot of its market value A lot of these areas have younger smaller trees. That are not nearly as valuable as as a you know. A slightly larger diameter tree Another economic consideration in there is access If it's an area that's unloaded. The new roads may need to be built to get in there or Helicopter logging is a possibility in some places. But it's very cost prohibitive in a lot of cases because it's so expensive So and companies who buy and sell timber economics you know. Everything revolves around economics and so a lot of times. You'll see dead trees standing out there on public land and they're there because of various reasons but many times of it was not economical to get them out in a timely fashion. That's why they're still there. And any any questions on that before we move onto you've brought your brought up suppression in in what i think that's a it's a hot topic you know about whether we should when these fire start burning whether we should stop them from from happening. Maybe even just happening or once. They've started we work very very hard to make them stop Just so. I'm gonna play devil's advocate Theoretically they're just gonna start again next year in the same spot because there's not a whole lot like we're not going in there removing any of the fuel when i go in there taking down those trees we just made it. Stop at this at this road or this fire line in the next year. It's just going to get a lightning strike on that side of the road and again is going to continue like. Why don't we just let it burn in like is there something to suppression. That's a huge huge topic. That basically back in one thousand nine hundred ten the big burn they call. It was a enormous of wildfire that burned from eastern washington. All the way over to western montana and the forest service was only. I think five years old at that time. Several people died in. That fire was an unprecedented wildfire event. That basically helped shape policy in agencies missions. And i don't know it set the tone for many decades on how people should be reacted to wildfire in the west and at that time we didn't have a fire sciences to rely on that tell us will fire is a natural beneficial disturbance event in most western forest In some types of forest. It's way more important or more frequent than others others very less frequent but it still plays a role in shaping a healthy functioning forest. But we didn't know that then And the public. After losing a small towns and a lot of lives and valuable forest they wanted to see fires put out and so the forest service and other agencies did a really good job of putting out fires as fast as they started for nearly one hundred years. Well that would that's allowed. The landscape to do is build up more and more trees. More and more forest fuels So if you were to look at old photographs from the nineteen twenties nineteen thirties and they compare the landscape photographs of today. You'll see that the landscape was much more patchy back. Then because of smaller more regular wildfires you ended up breaking up the contiguity of the fuel loading and so there were more Open meadows Open young forest With old forest with but as the forest service and others have been so successful putting out fires for so long it's allowed many of those gaps to fill back in with trees and get mature and some of those trees start to die and fall and so you end up with this enormous accumulation of fuels Forest litter on the floor. Which is when i literally referring to dead needles and small twigs and lichens that follow on the floor. All of those types of fuels that fuel of fire and so now Now that we knew a lot more about the value fire and how fire behaves under certain Circumstances we see that it's beneficial a lot of times to lead a wildfire. Go when it starts now. If if human life and property are at risk. I think all the agencies involved will do everything they can to suppress that fire to protect life and property but the agencies have really come a long way. In considering what conditions would a should we allow fires to burn and Or back way off with suppression tactics and go to the next road or the next ridge miles away to start putting in fuel breaks instead of trying to attack the fire directly in and keep it as small as possible and it took over one hundred years to accumulate and get into the condition is in can't be fixed overnight so the agencies that deal with the agencies that manage public land there They can only do as much as congress funds them to do and they are. Chipping away strategically at Treating stands treat stands of trees. Thinning them To reduce the the tree density to alter the tree composition so that the trees on that particular site are best suited to survive when they occur and break up that contiguity of the fuel bid across the landscape to keep fire smaller and more mosaic when they do occur That's an interesting so we had in just outside of grand junction. This year The pine gulch fire which was the largest in colorado. I think for like two weeks and then it got surpassed by another fire in colorado bit. it was on the kind of a desolate piece of land with with no roads in they. You know they've they pretty much. Just let it burn right. It was very hard to get to get. Her was no no houses. No in other wasn't there wasn't any threat to a property or or lives in they pick some strategic hit it at least looking at a map some strategic roads in just waited for it to get there essentially in a lot of cases that makes a lotta sense and i think the agencies learned from several different catastrophes where firefighters lost their lives to really step back and look at that landscape look at prevailing weather And look at resources that are at risk and and asked the question. Do we really need to put firefighters in their close to this thing to keep small And run the risk of losing lives. And i'm glad to see that Most of them are decided. No we can easily back off your and reduce that risk to two lives and really not put other infrastructure homes and things at risk so it's a question that every firefighter asked now who are met those who manage fires and it's a. I think it's a really positive trend. In the way that agencies are going so you you talked about it a little. Bit dead some Some forest benefit from being burned. Some force do not benefit from being burden. What about wildlife like other certain certain wildlife that you know that are that benefit a lot from having a forest kinda kinda burn either either in a big way or small way or vice versa. Get hurt you know. We probably should have mentioned a or emphasize this point a little bit. More right at the beginning of this podcast. Because kevin asked me to to be a guest because of my background is a wildlife biologist in because those big fires were going on he wanted to know what effect is this going to have a wildlife and the public land in the public glenn hunter and the wildlife Portion of this discussion is where more my my my expertise lies all. We just share it over the last fifteen minutes or so has been things. I picked up by working. With very qualified and trained fire professionals over my career we get into kind of a little more my forte here so when people ask me is fire good for wildlife. You say it's good for forest but is it good for wildlife. You can't really simplify the question like that and I think it's useful to discuss species in just individual species but groups of species and wildlife. Biologist often talk about generalists versus specialists. While why species so a generalist would be a species like deer l. Many of the migratory birds some of the forest grouse coyotes barrier those type of animals that basically are widely distributed and can tolerate or require a broad range of environmental conditions to to get all of their life. History needs taken care shirt and a black bear can is great at home eating a donut as much as he is Scraping for slugs under a rock or something to do exactly. And that's a benefit to that species being able to be flexible in both its Dia and it's covered needs of etc and so often those generalist species that that do well in a mosaic of habitats tend to be benefited by by fires because fire will can come through an area and if it's not extremely intense to kill everything and and and damage soils then. Fire usually does a lot of things for as far as Conditioning grasses where burns old older woolsey grasses that have died and rejuvenate new grass growth and forbes herbs shrubs are often rejuvinated by fire you'll see older decadent shrubs that are highly palatable to deer and elk and moose and other arguments if they're not burned For many many years they can become very decadent. They lose vigor and they can die back. We'll fire will burn those dead parts and often a trigger a response to for that plant to flourish and they come back with highly palatable leaves and stems along with that you get you get the structure that allows songbirds nests dan or grouse can use as cover or grouse can use the berries and other birds used the berries on those shrubs for forge. So i basically effect the effect of rejuvenating Creating a mosaic and some edge of probably heard the term edges are really important in wildlife number of i'm referring to natural type edges between burned area and burned area or a severely burned area. A light burned area species. Do well in that zone where they have simultaneous access to forage and escaped cover and reproductive habitat in a very small area got started. Can you just give it an example of a specialist. Then like who. Who would be oculus so i was gonna move into that next Specialists tend to have a very near Tolerate or require a very narrow range of environmental conditions are one that pops to mind is the northern spotted owl That one was in the news from the early or mid eighties through the current and of their highly specialized species that requires mature growth Temperate rainforest in the pacific northwest to reproduce an find his origin. And all of its needs It's causing the great growl or the bartow they would be generalist that can use a much broader range of of habitat conditions. Other other specialist. Might be like redback. Vol- or marble mural at american martin formerly called the pine marten. Those species tend to have a just a narrow range of conditions that they they need to find everything. They need to live and reproduce and those habitats in order for those species to exist at viable levels. Those habitats need to be quite stable. I'm not gonna say stagnant but or static fairly stable and in large enough amounts all the landscape at any point in time to allow that species to persist. That's not the same fire doesn't set back or change that those species habitat because it does. But historically i think it did it at a scale the species could still tolerate because it left intact large enough patches for them to function when when you add fire suppression and decades and decades of fuel accumulation. You add that with a warming. Climate an increase in human caused fires. During the hottest driest time of year we ended up seeing larger patches of that More stable habitat burned and set way back in succession and so those specialist species tend to not benefit as well or at all from you know from large intense wildfires. It tends to be quite detrimental to them in. We really haven't touched on intensity of fires but intensity is influenced by weather conditions relative humidity at fuel build up basically and topography to a certain extent and most of the fires that benefit wildlife are lower to moderate intensity fires. That burn in a mosaic. They tend to leave soils relative relatively healthy. They don't consume all of the duff layer off of the floor but they they create patches in that dust layer whereas a highly intense fire Can be really damaging to not just wildlife but to the habitat and the soils for a long period of time when all the organic material on the fourth floor is consumed all the large woody material. All the trees are consumed by intense wildfire. You tend to get hydrophobic soils it damages changes the chemical of the upper surface layer soils and basically those soils won't take a water in so when it rains or snows in the fall followed one of these fires. You tend to get massive run off. Because that soil is not permeable to moisture and you end up with landslides A lot of sediment delivered to streams that kills fish or damages fish habitat and so those those events are quite detrimental to even not just the specialist group species but the generalist also and they they also they also tend to not burden mosaics. They tend to burn in large patches which is also not desirable for wildlife. Okay in in just as an example. I guess if you had to say most of the fires that burn burn this past fire season are they are intense. Fires are they you know. Are they doing harm. Essentially because of all this feel because of how how long how big they can burn. Okay so It's tough to talk about them. In general terms because every fire has its own unique set of conditions so from aerial images. That i've seen of the fires that occurred this year you will see patches. Large patches of intense contiguous wildfire that were detrimental to most species and soils but around the perimeter and some inclusions in and around those intense fires. You'll also see a mosaic of fires of less intense fires. So what little bit. I know about some of these larger fires It's probably safe to say that. They are a combination of both beneficial mosaic low to moderate intensity burns with patches of larger patches of intense more detrimental fire conditions that. Make sense it does it does. And i'm just wondering. I guess my follow up would be like what makes them more intense. Like what are those environmental factors. Is it just what the humidity was that day in. You know in and around the fire. It's multiple factors and humidity relative. Humidity is a huge one. Us one example. I don't actually remember the name of this fire. Oregon western oregon had several really large wins. from the cascades toward the willamette valley this summer and many of those started when we had an episode of east winds which were dry warm winds coming from the east instead of from the ocean that brings slightly cooler and more higher humidities. High fuel buildups in those forests in some of those forests the warm dry east winds and high winds forty forty mile an hour winds was quoted in a lot of these in higher in some cases. those things combined with other being an ignition source in some cases of most of those were human caused fires from what i heard. Some were may have been powerless. Started by downed power lines because a win lamps fallen on the limbs so without a source those conditions would have just been a windy wendy few days but when you combine The fuel loading and patterns that were on the landscape with the high winds and admission source. You had all three parts of the fire triangle to create basically a perfect storm for fast moving a detrimental wildfires. So it's all those factors and the relative humidity. One is a real important one. God temperature temperatures another one just the ambient temperature that drives fuels also contributes got it so he would just in my thought if nobody knows the The climate around grand junction hearing colorado. It's gonna be very very dry hundred degrees for many many days in the summertime. I would imagine most fires that happen. Here are fairly detrimental Just because the humidity is going to be in the In the single digits you know four to eight percent most of the time in a very very very dry so anything that starts around here seems like it would be really harsh. How long does it take for. Something like that. Got relatives. Like how long does it take for for those soils than that kind of have. This layer on that don't allow them to absorb water. Like how long are we talking. Like ten years fifty years until they can maybe break loose of that and start growing. Start coming back you know. I don't want to try to get into delve into an area where i don't have particular expertise. We have really good soil scientists out there. That know this way better than i do. But i've personally seen areas that burn really hot and thirty years later they're still some residual damage to those soils I think it it could take many decades for or ganic material from new vegetation to start growing and building up on that site to start changing the way that top layer soil functions. But i don't want to try to get too deep into an area. I just don't have expertise in a back to your your comment about grand junction and being dry up here. Where i live in. La grande oregon. We get about seventeen inches of precipitation a year. The majority of that is in snow. Snow snowfall and So we're quite dry here. Man does the amount of moisture various depending on elevations but in the drier portions of the west the dryer end of forest. It's really important to allow fires that happen. Or to use prescribed fire as a tool in the spring and fall when we know whether conditions are going to allow us to either keep them smaller or control a little more because when they happen during those peak fire season times when it's really hot and dry and potentially wendy. There's nothing that humans can do to really influence some of those fires and i've heard him refer to mega as megafires of heard him referred to as the two percent conditions so only about two percent of the time. Do you end up with the hot dry high winds high temperatures. It's those conditions where a lot of the fire started this summer. That people can only do so much with aircraft and filled ground crews. But in the end it's gonna be a weather event that eventually comes in the fall. It's gonna slow down and put those fires out. The those are the ones that Are the most concerning the ones that are becoming more and more common As we experienced a drier warmer climate are in in you. Call those the two percents. Fires are the two percents that could two percent conditions is what i've heard them referred to as got it. Yeah got Yeah i think the the pine gulch fire here north of grand junction. It doubled in size overnight in. They said it was just a perfect alignment of forty mile. An hour winds in the in in the direction of the canyons. Like they face straight down the canyons into overnight. It went from you know it. Just it doubled overnight. It was it was a big The yen in my my question along those lines is what does that do for wildlife in those areas with these kind of very intense burns. Dezei leave are they going to be like. Oh well this is. There's no food here. Essentially we have to move. The we should probably consider the effects to wildlife in those intense bern areas in In terms of what happens while the fires go on at the direct mortality or indirect mortality. That happens dan. And then once the smoke clears and The fires out what is it made a wildlife so initially some wildlife. there's a lot of species that have the ability to move. Highly mobile species around the perimeter are obviously going to run move or fly and get out of the way because these species have evolved with fire for thousands of years. We shouldn't feel like we necessarily have to take care of them even though we we help when we can They've dealt with they've dealt with fire. Envy volve evolved with that disturbance but unfortunately sometimes in these big fast moving fires while life gets trapped in you hear about instances of entire herds of elk or bighorn sheep in some cases of burns up into the pine or deer livestock etc dine in wildfires. It happens but a lot of species from rabbits to insects amphibians. Snakes etc other reptiles having ability to burrow under rocks in towel slopes Some retreat to water or moisture. I period areas. Where fire is not going to burn his hot. In some cases a lot of this species surprisingly will survive now when they emerge after the fire they may find conditions that are not conducive to life there anymore and so if they're mobile and they're able to move and not get preyed upon by some some opportunistic predator that they may start recolonize in the next closest habitat they encounter so the mobility of species and how many of the individuals survived these events. Kinda dictates how quickly the surrounding forest is going is going to recover in terms of wildlife long-term wise Those specialist species. We talked about the say. That animal like a like affiliated with becker that requires a quite a pretty large tree or snag to nest in In in order for it to reproduce it's going to have to find a forest with those conditions for it to find the insects to forage on and the proper size trees with the rot conditions in the interior those trees and snags to make roost cavities and nest cavities to make a living and reproduce and perpetuate the species well fortunately affiliated. Woodpecker is highly mobile. So they can fly and usually find that type of habitat. If it's in the area but in the meantime they're really vulnerable to be killed by things like goshawks. Great horned owls There are large showy noisy bird and they're really vulnerable to some of those predators but avian predators So so there's a time those very open burnt conditions are gonna make some species highly vulnerable to predation but over over the next few years. If the if the soils had not been too damaged you're gonna start saying sprouting of under under story. Vegetation a shrub shrubs Forbes grasses herbs will start coming in and those species of Some of those generalist species like some the the l. the bear etc. Rabbits hares will start using that habitat as it starts to recover and some species. You snowshoe hares an example They used us habitat based on what it provides for them at the time of year. They need resources. So if you can imagine a dog hair thick lodge pole pine stand and then picture what that stan looks like from the From the scalp perception of snowshoe hare. So get down on your hands and knees lay on the ground and your eyes are now at about ten inches or off the ground. That's what a snowshoe hare is going to be seen in a dense lodge stand They're going to be protected from predators. Generally they can escape they're going to have a pine boughs at snow level so they can reach them to feed on and You know they can make a living in that now. They may also move out into a burned area during the spring summer and fall. That has a a fairly dense layer of this and other vegetation because during the non snow months that provides a good layer forage and cover thera- level. But if you add four or five feet of snow into that open area. There's no longer any cover at their eye level. So they're going to have to shift their use into a stand does provide that cover it their from their Their level of you. And you know i can take almost any species and give some examples like that of how their needs change. Based on the time of year the reproductive status their need for forage or to escape predators. And whether there's snow on the ground or not that's always a big component here in the west So i from a- from a wildlife in a in a hunter hunter standpoint. Guess how long in some of you know like is it two years. Is that when it's prime. You see a lot of people hunt for areas for elk. Say or deer Is it two years as a prime time. When i'm when i'm cruising the on and looking at burned out areas you know. Twos a good place to start again. It depends on how intense the fire was and the patchy nature or Basically the pattern that the fire bird So there's a range and in moderate moderate to low intensity fires at the end of that next year it can be really good to to six or eight years in. My opinion is prime for a lot of the That's when you're shrubs shrubs and forbes and grasses have had a chance to recover more and start to provide that some visual screening so things like elk are a little more comfortable spending time in there and another factor though is whether you have opened motorized access into those areas if you have low human disturbance or more difficult access getting into some of these recovering burned areas than things like elk or going to have a more secure foraging areas than if you have atv trails and mountain bike. Trails and roads criss crossing that landscape. That plays a part into how comfortable the zale are gonna be in that setting how effectively. They're going to be able to utilize that that good forage resource this now recovering. God yeah We had you had a note to about about motorized access in in motorized access. Mainly for on kind of kind of that. Fire steph Or or maybe just as a topic motorise access just. Are you saying that in in of these harder to get to the elko. Use it for longer as well. Maybe like the burn area. They might they might use it for fifteen years or something because it's harder to get to and there's not as many people pushing them around they're going to use it as long as they feel comfortable using it and as long as it continues to provide a good forage source now some places like this Say they've burned your fiber eight years post fire and they're recovering. If you do have quite a bit of human disturbance there elk may use it just at night or they may use it. During pre brief periods of the year when human activity is lessened. There where you don't have that motorized or high human disturbance. You may find more daily at night. Use over more months of the year but when you talk about accessible roads what that means to firefighting over the years. I've heard a lot of debates and discussions about what roads main to not just fire suppression but to fire starts. The potential for human fire. Starts there our ability to use roads as firebreaks and what that means to the hunter for access so you have reasonable access to get into an area and get game out without compromising the security of the or other wildlife said that they'll actually used area and i keep using elk as an example here. Because they're they've been the poster child for the debate on road closures motorized access and enhancing forage through logging grazing burning. And the best science out. There says you basically cannot decouple forage from security habitats. I hear a lot of agencies in a folks who wanna do some logging and burning and maybe livestock gracing and then tell all the benefits that they're providing for elk deer in that area but the truth is if it's crisscrossed with with disturbance of motorized trails etc. It's the effectiveness of that. Newly created forage is going to be way lower than if you were to reduce or eliminate that motorized disturbance so. There's just a lot of science out there. That used elk because elk seemed to be more sensitive to that disturbance than than deer or some of the other species that we work with. But if you think about a landscape that is open to the public it's public land and criss crossed with really high densities of roads. And i personally worked on landscapes that have had roe densities rob zero to almost eight miles per square mile of habitat. It's almost how so much hard to imagine you. Literally you literally could shoot a compound bow from one road to the next and those really high landscape high densities tude of five miles per square mile is not that uncommon across a lot of public lands in the west of ope of roads and in those types of settings it's really tough for help to find security And so when you start closing some of those roads. That's when the debate started about closing people off of their public lands or shutting people off out of their public lands. The truth is i think roads need to be thinned just like trees in some cases that's not an original thought a friend of mine who is a research Range scientists for years here in in legrand. In central oregon. I think he might have come up with that idea. Thinning roads so you so you take landscape with five miles per square mile road. So what if you closed the majority those and you ended up with a mile and a half per square mile road. You can still get in there on a mountain bike or a tv or a truck. Whatever an access that entire area own foot fairly reasonably but you've reduced a lot of potential negative effects of having all those roads open so with jairo densities you end up with increased chance of noxious. Weeds spread their spread by vehicles seeds. That get stuck under. Atv's tires and things. so you end up with noxious. Weeds spread back in there. In the on this road you end up with higher road maintenance for the agencies who are already suffering pretty low budgets that aren't able to maintain the road system up to standards and it's not just a matter of the road starting to look ugly it'd be inconvenient and rough it's a matter of a covert washing out sentiment dumping into streams where you might have federally listed fish species or sensitive amphibian species living there affecting the long-term You know function of the soil in the watersheds there. I think there's There's also increased chance of litter vandalism to of public land infrastructure like signs and fences and gates and things. There's just there's there's just something about a national forest sign that begs to be shot with a shotgun for some reason. I don't know what is there. There's something about it you know you hit. You can't see a you can't see a new up very long before it's got holes in it which is really sad because our public land legacy is so amazing so unique in the world and these very people that would do something like that are out there enjoying themselves doing whatever they choose to do. but i I wish more of those folks. We get caught in the act but more importantly over the long term i wish more public land users learn to appreciate what goes into put signs up in what they really mean to our our enjoyment and benefit to our society as a whole so another another topic another issue with roads that you hear fire of folks talk a lot about is if if an agency closes a road that it makes it more challenging or time consuming to get back in there to fight or fire well first of all the chance of a fire starting back in their from human causes is lower. Because you don't have everyone driving back and forth in there now you might have a human caused fire from a hunter who walks near starts little warming fire because it's nice and cool and drizzly that day but then they walk away in within the next eight to ten hours The clouds blow away. It warms up the next thing. You know you have a wildfire. Some of that happens. But when you have a say a gate or a or a metal barricade on a road agencies public land management agencies allow for administrative access so when when a fire starts back in their fire crews can swing that gate open or remove that metal barricade and get in there now. If it hasn't been used in years they may be having to cut out some trees and fallen but they can get in there now. In in the case cases quarter the road has been closed with an earthen berm or a bulldozer is put up this big earth berm if a fire starts back in there and it's too far for fire crews to walk. They need to get an engine into it would take a piece of machinery to knock that thing down and open that road up but i think the trade offs over the long term of reducing open road densities but keeping close roads open for administrative uses far the benefits far outweigh of just leaving. All all motorise routes opened everybody all the time. There's no question in my mind there. In that's from a wildlife perspective that the benefits to wildlife in this instance we're going to focus on l. The benefits to l. Would immense if you were able to remove like lower the density per square mile of just motorise also when when those roads aren't having everyone to access them. You're not having logs and snags being cut down for firewood. So species like the pilion. We mentioned and red tree squirrels. And other woodpeckers and other things are benefiting not just l. but all further than just wildlife out the human recreation experience i think is enhanced because we have this whole spectrum of conditions on public lands from wilderness areas where you can't use mechanized or motorized equipment so it's either livestock or foot in there. You've got this back country zones in some states that allow some some allow motorized backcountry use others are non motorized backcountry us but in those countries you can use your mountain bike or you can use a game cart to wheel out game which you can't do in a wilderness and then you've got the working part of the forest. The forest service refers to his general forrest. That's where you see the whole plethora of logging in thinning and burning in livestock grazing etc. Going on christmas yeah. Christmas and firewood gathered so in that setting. I think it's important to have a spectrum of opportunities for those who want to go out ride their motorcycle or their atv or their truck. It just dry for pleasure and look but there should also be part of that landscape for the person who wants a quieter experience. But maybe the aren't physically able or have the capability of access in that backcountry and wilderness because You take someone who has physical limitations or from age or injury that could park it a gate and walk on a flat closed. Road enjoy seeing wildlife or hunting or gathering getting that kind of experience without having to share with somebody on a motorcycle and atv going past them which is probably gonna be displacing some wildlife and so you see where i'm going to turn by closing some some roads in areas on general forest and have a nap spectrum from highly rooted in high disturbance to almost very low disturbance in wilderness it provides more more activity opportunities for more people term hyper and i have an example here in colorado that i would. I'd like your opinion on by steamboat. Just just by chance. They're having these new mountain bike. Trails built Around the steamboat area. In there there's a lot of concern with with the mountain bikers seemingly displacing lot of elk in their In their calving zooms in the spring on these mountain bike trail sob- again non motorized threat. These people are peddling around doing their thing but they're still displacing wildlife. We're kind of veering off of the The fire wildfire wildlife thing. But but i'm glad you're getting into this. Because i think more hunters and more public land recreationists needs to needs to hear and understand what we're starting to see around the west Let's go back twenty five thirty years ago. When i started my career a lot of these forests that i've worked on would only see a pulse of human activity in the fall so during the summer there were some mountain bikers. Some people driving for pleasure and some firewood cutters. And then in the fall you'd have this archery season for daredevil postseason and then you start having your rifle. Darren alcs seasons that scattered through october november december. She had these pulses of human activity and then in winter some backcountry skiers across country skiers cetera and snowshoe hares as more people started to recognize this these values of living near public land in places like oregon or several the the cities and towns along the front there in colorado along the rocky mountain front in montana on you see it all over the west energetic people who wanna get out and be physical and connect do something in the in wildland in public lands. We've seen this trend toward more people in the woods For more time of the year and not just daytime either. There's now back a little bit in oregon. Right where i live. We used to not have wild turkeys at spring. Bear seasons were quite limited With increases in bear spring bear hots and now spring turkey. Haunts we start to see more hunters in april april may and june so there was another pulse with mountain bike with mountain. Bikers mountain climbers Snowmobilers cross country races Some of these ultramarathons run twenty four hours and then the popularity of mountain bikes. Where the the bike the bike trails and roads that provided by the agencies the demand outgrew the supply so people started pioneer in their own routes terms. And you really see where we think. Just this round the clock around the calendar presence and activity. People is starting to display some wildlife. And it's just now over the last few years starting to recognize this being an issue. A friend of mine in bend oregon of maury turner. She works for the forest service there on the disputes national forest. She's kind of. She's been working on this issue on her forest over the last few years. Several partners looking at how you can model Secure areas for wildlife and be strategic. About where you develop a mountain bike trails with and still maintain some secure areas for wildlife. And i think that's happening more places as we recognize it's becoming more more of an issue to him in you can just in my again. I'm not. I'm not colorado native as it were of been near six seven years But you can see it already. Changing in the amount of over the counter licenses in certain areas that are mountain towns or would not very very popular areas that are now a dry unit for archery in into first second and third rifles. Just because of the cath calving retention. That they're losing In you know a lot of the time it's it's just said they don't know why the numbers are going down but they know that the numbers are going down in. You can look at it in. It's all these kind of very very popular mountain. Towns that are you can recreate their year round. Yeah exactly yeah in his stuff to keep up with technology. Seems like every time i turn around. There's a new machine whether it looks like a motorcycle but it has snowmobile tracks on it. ut's where the atv has evolved into this big thing. This about the size of suzuki samurai. Now it's like we're recreating the full size vehicle with these off road vehicles and unfortunately there are some members of the public out there that believe because it exists and because it sold they have a right to us it anywhere they want to on public lands. That's not necessarily the case. Just you can go buy lamborghini that will go two hundred miles an hour dead. You're allowed to drive it on the highway Two hundred miles an hour. Yes i like. The did not gonna try to stir the pot. I mountain bike. So you take that for what it's worth but E e bikes right these electric bikes kinda came out in the the idea that they would be called anything other than a or classified as anything other than a motorcycle. The definition seems pretty obvious. It's a motor on a cycle right. It's it's a bicycle. Yeah seems seems kinda is very interesting to me. That people would argue that. It is not the same thing again. I'm i'm looking forward to when i can get a a dirt bike. Say that is electric. Right it's quiet over the place with it. You're just full full of good topics today at i. I'll tell you you're hitting up. You're pushing all my butt of things that i have strong opinions zone and when i was working for the forest service i couldn't necessarily share those binion's as directly as i wanted to i. I made it a priority to stick to what the science tells us and try to be fair about how we manage public lands and i think that should continue but so e-bikes bikes are an interesting one. I think it's important to think about when when an agency closes a road to general public access. Why are they closing it. If it's been closed let's say just for a short period of time during fire season. it's because fire. Resources are being stretched so thin. They don't want fires to start way back in there On a on a bigger portion of the landscape where they're more difficult to get to And we end up with more. Human fire starts to that spreads the fire resources even thinner. So if that's the case well maybe. An e bike doesn't doesn't represent the risk of internal combustion engine. Perhaps it's if it's just because of the risk for fire starts from the machine that it may not be a risk now what it does do. It allows someone to get way back into an area. Maybe behind a gate. That's open to the bike. And that's where they start the warming fire or they start a campfire or throw cigarette butt down now. The machine start the fire but the fire still was started. Way back in there where it's may be difficult for crew to get into interrupt me because my favorite my favorite way that these not my favorite is not my favorite the maybe the most comical where these fires get started is someone trying to burn their toilet paper yet. I'm a toilet paper burner myself. But i'm extremely careful about it and a if it's a time of year when it's absolutely not safe albeit or pack it out. I'm ziplock bag. But i recognize that as a source and there's a big fire so that turned turned into big fires because of that but then there's the also if you have a road that's closed to reduce disturbance to wildlife again. I'll use elk elkin. Other wildlife are disturbed by motorise vehicles. While the fact that the mountain the the e bike is quiet someone might surmise that while if i take this back in their Disturbing the wildlife another component. Though that i think are the hunting culture has grown to understand. Is that a closed road. Provides you with a fairly an easier but quiet access into a piece of public land and So if you get up earlier than everybody else and you put the effort into getting back in there before everybody else that you should in your mind have first dibs. Hutton that area where you get almost to the spot you plan to go and here comes an e by zips right by a. There's this whole fairness discussion that comes into play And i and i think agencies really need to be looking at when they closer road to general public access. They need to be clear about The reason or the multiple reasons they're closing it. And i think more of them should bay for fire risk wildlife disturbance and to provide a range of recreational opportunities in those cases. I think they should be close to all things with a motor not necessarily wills but a motor origin to get it that fairness thing now. I enjoy mountain biking to I don't do nearly as much of it as i used to. But mountain bikes are not without their effects to wildlife to and i've got a personal observation i'll share with you and i'll also mention a study that was done here. Legally are locally in northeast oregon the pacific northwest research station here in la. Gran some of the scientists there along with organ barbara fish and wildlife. Researchers did did some studies in the start. The experimental forest at one of them headed up by mike. Wisdom look looked at A comparison of the effects of atv's mountain bikes horseback riding hiking. So they put radio callers on on elk and and ran these trials on a set a network of trails and they rest area for a few days and then they would run do the run the the horseback riders almost same trails and then it would rest and then they'd have hikers mountain bikers etc and they measured the response of the l. to those disturbances and in their response by like how far they would move away from a few things How how was the was the perceived disturbance from when the animal started moving How quickly moved or the velocity How far it moved and how long it took for to return to p- redistributes activity 'cause you think there's an energy expenditure when you disturb an animal it stops feeding or resting or tune it scud and it has to run until it feels secure and it hangs out and then returns to do and what it was doing before you came around. That's an energy expenditure. That may take away from it avoiding predators or producing milk or producing a calf. Those more important. There's more important things in animals life. So i'll just simply Summarized the results that the motorized. Atv's caused the animals to start moving further away from the from the disturbance so the the animals detected the disturbance much further away than the other three sources of transportation they ran faster and further and it took them longer to return to p- redistributes activities with the atv disturbance and then. I think what's might surprise a lot of people. i think. A lot of folks expected horseback hiking. Mountain biking be grouped way down lower in those effects while mountain bikes came in second second underneath. Atv's and then then quite a bit lower than that were the effects of horseback and hiking so horseback and hiking had similar effects in in all those factors that were measured that i mentioned and in my opinion the the mountain bikes probably have that affect our little bit greater effect in the fact that they are quiet but there faster and they all of a sudden appear to an animal. So let's say a heard. Alker are feeding in a meadow better. That's otherwise quiet quiet and they aren't used to having people come in through there and all of a sudden here's a machine with a person on it even in it's quiet and it's there and so they respond by running In seeking cover and and so my personal observation with a totally different species was in the elk horn mountains. I was helping oregon department of fish and wildlife with the annual mountain goat Survey where we count the goats and look at the composition of the herd males females yearlings and kids and our. There's a ridge trail that's open to motorized is not a wilderness area. It's open to motorized and Mountain bikes and hikers and it used to not get very much traffic. Mostly was foot traffic now. It gets quite a bit more. But watching a group of billy's they were all spread out on a hillside. They weren't really grouped together but they saw me and they looked at me. And i'm trying to confirm that there actually billy's and next thing they get up and they run as fast as they can open over the ridge into the next basin and i turned to look behind me. An amount biker had just appeared in that basin and he rides along takes him a few minutes to get to me and i talked to him for a minute. He asked me what i was doing. I explained and then he stopped to have some lunch or something and i walked into another base where there was a group of nannies. Kids in your wins. And i started copying nose and next thing you know twenty minutes into this they take off running and a turnaround that same biker had just entered my base again now. Very small sample size is an anecdotal observation. But we believe with with with mountain goats. Nanny is a great mother as long as things are going. Okay but when the crap hits the fan it's every goat for themselves and knows nannies. Took off at left some of those little kids in the rocks that were struggling to try to keep up that that could predispose those kids to predation from golden eagles or cougars. Bob cats whatever try seek them out but again it was an energy expenditure that to me. It was blatantly. Obvious that those things kind of freaked out from this fast moving quiet vehicle and it wasn't really that fast but it's faster than i could walk and in both in both circumstances those goats news was there because they clearly looked at me and i didn't didn't perceive me as a threat Itself in anyway. In your opinion in european do think it's the speed or the fact that like it looked so different right being on a bicycle versus hiking. You're walking you know like is it maybe a both of those things you know because it is. It is interesting right. You know. it's hard to put yourself into an animal's head But my gut tells me it's probably not the visual as much as it is the speed and the reason i say that is is the way i've seen animals respond when i'm on horseback versus me. Walking some animals they see me walking in the run But if i'm in a horse's back those same species might look at me and go back to feeding or just look at me a stand there and be curious so i don't think they're their reasoning. That look there's another animal with four legs like me and they're some setting on. Its back i should. I should be suspicious of this But that's just me speculating. It's stuff to get into animals in. Yeah sure it makes sense. You know that Bikes bikes go. Fast you go fast. Easy in their in their quiet easy to sneak up on people I have one more question and then we can. We can be done today. We've we've been running on kind of a long time. I wanna ask in in. Maybe this is a long question. We cut a short bit fire restrictions. i know in colorado we kinda upstage one stage two. I'm not sure how it works in oregon if that's the same stage one stage two What does this mean in. How sometimes especially this this fall in in colorado we had stage stage to fire restrictions and it was snowing outside so that i believe that varies by state. Because i don't recognize the stages that you're referring to but what i'm used to are two levels. There's industrial fire precaution. Level and there's is used fire restrictions so the industrial refers to being able to run a chainsaw or logging operations or road building equipment. Things that use equipment on the forest and at least in oregon those typically will go into effect when far conditions start getting to a point in the summer we start getting concerned about wildfires starting from human causes and so a lot of times those initially come in slowly with restrictions After say one o'clock in the afternoon so those type of operations can work from ozark thirty until early afternoon. Then they have to shutdown. As the fire season progresses of restrictions start increasing on those uses in a can shut down completely Then there's the personal use fire restrictions where it's basically you and i going out into the forest camp or hot or whatever those levels tell us whether we can have campfire not or whether we can have a campfire only a designated a camp ground in a fire ring in a lot of cases high elevation wilderness areas Don't have fire restrictions a lot of times. I think because the the fuels are discontinuance up there in the rocky high of asians and there may be other reasons for having fire restrictions. As far as visuals or up all the would cetera but oftentimes wilderness some wilderness areas. Don't have the same restrictions as you'd find elsewhere but it's really important for anyone who recreates on public lands during the fire seasons to get online or check in with the local government office manage zetland to find out what the restrictions are. And when i you store because of a forest protection officer some supplemental duties to be in a biologist. I would come into hunting camp in october. And it would be drizzling snow and there just cussing me because there's fire restrictions. They can't have a campfire. The reasons are. I think those folks don't see the bigger picture of what our fire managing folks see and no they. We may have a weather front. That's coming in and literally in less than twenty four hours there. We go from fairly low. Fire risk in that area to extremely High fire risk and maybe the local fire Resources are deployed to california or north carolina or other places and we know short bitter time conditions could change and we're not going to have the local resources to put out there. You know deal with those fires so it can be tough to explain to someone standing in the rain. Why they can't have accountant him can't be one in my experience fire. Managers are very sensitive. People being able to recreate be comfortable out there. So as soon as they're comfortable with relaxing those restrictions they'll relaxed them and the decision maker on that forest or will make that decision so awesome Well mark i appreciate it. We covered a lot of topics. We've talked for awhile. I appreciate you troubleshooting. Our technical difficulties in getting this podcast. Today appreciate that as well thank you. Yeah i mean for everybody else out. There will have another podcast sometime soon. This will get posted up if you have any questions. Comments concerns for us You can send those to podcasts as sieg outside dot com and yet again thanks mark. Thank you very much. Everybody have a great day. Thank you very much bye-bye.

oregon colorado grand junction mark penan us department of interior Sawyer arena karen oregon montana glenn hunter kevin steamboat springs congress department of agriculture Dezei
6-10-21 The Mike Gallagher Show Hour 2

Mike Gallagher Podcast

35:37 min | 3 months ago

6-10-21 The Mike Gallagher Show Hour 2

"Is podcast is a production of the salem podcast network for more podcast like this. From courageous for of conservative reason visit salem podcast network dot com. This is your source for breaking news and what to make of it. All this is the mike gallagher. Show a lot of what you're seeing as a tax on me quite frankly or attacks on science dovetail foulsham each to cut the crap. This isn't about dr fauci. it's not about its feelings. No maybe he audubon emotional support president combo harris back in the united states after a trip to guatemala and mexico. Some of what she said on the trip has white house. Insiders plex from the relief factor dot com studios. Here's mike gallagher. Little perplexed about the state of america here on june the tenth. Twenty twenty one. Here's a headline from the new york. Post trump hails exoneration quote unquote after the inspector general found that. Dc's lafayette park was not cleared for the event where he showed support for the church that had been damaged the day before by black lives matter protesters that got turned into such a a weapon in attacking the trump administration and in a little noticed. Follow up an internal government investigation determined. There's no evidence whatsoever that the protesters were forced out of the park near the white house to clear the way for president trump to show his support for the church had nothing to do. There was no in the interior department. Inspector general mark lee green blat released thirty seven page report. That said that the clear out had nothing to do with trump's photo op. Oh you mean it was probably had to do with their violent behavior. the protesters no no tell me more. Tell me that you're pulling our leg. And here's a senator. Tom cotton writing for national review speaking of vindication the wuhan labs are the prime suspects for corona virus as they have been from the very beginning lab league theory proponents own. Donald trump have been vindicated. According to tom cotton. Here's another study on the subject of covid. This is not good news for dear friends of mine who followed the doctor's advice they were given even with covid scientists from the cleveland clinic. A world renowned clinic found vaccinating those who had been infected with covid nineteen offers no additional benefits to the individual. But what about how. Dr fauci is very angry. He's upset at being criticized. Because you don't criticize people like tony. She just like you. don't criticize people like kamala harris. She's still reeling from lester. Holt clobbering her with wanting to know when you're going to finally go to. The border prompting her goofy response. Why haven't been to europe either. She was just flabbergasted that somebody from. Nbc news would dare to say that. You don't challenge people like this. You don't challenge biden course poor biden's trying to wonder who ordered the veal cutlet. He's telling us he's he's won't roaming around with world leaders say i forget. I'm president yesterday in england. He's he's talking to. I guess cadets with the us transportation command. Here's cut number six. The this is your president. Hope you're happy. I know your next assignment is transportation. Command start soon. So congratulations and thank you. Thank you thank you and sidney. Fourteen years old. i was fourteen. If you please daddy's i keep forgetting i'm president. Well we don't we want to. We wish we could forget your president. We're wishing we could forget. The events that led to november the third. We wish that we didn't see the perfect storm of covid upending election laws and changing the way the whole world is changing. I drove into work this morning. Listening to my pal. Mark davis talk about and he's not wrong extolling the virtues of working from home. You realize they're going to be people. Never go back to the office again. They're going to be complicated pavlina smiling over there on the screen. See i could see her. I she. Eric i can see tracy i can see. Derek i can see eric but you know what we're in. We're in eight different word. One two three four five six locations in america all working our jobs and hate to break to you. they've never been more efficient. Pavlina has never. She's already good. She's never been as good as she is now as the video producer airing all the video clips and do it all that she does. Eric hanson poor guy. He's never left the office. But eric is the rock of this operation speaking his operation. I just have to. I hate to our own horn. But i am so humbled and beyond grateful at being listed as number seven. On the talkers. Manual talkers magazine. Annual one hundred most important radio talk show host in america. It's called the heavy hundred list. It's a great honor. You know movies. The motion pictures have the oscars tv. Tv has the emmy's we have the heavy hundred list and little. Oh mike gallagher is number seven on the list of one hundred most important radio talk show host in the country and that is such an incredible honor. We're going to talk a little bit too. Michael harrison from talkers magazine. That's a tough task to come up with a list of a bunch of blow hards and a bunch of egomaniacal narcissist should how you rank them one through one hundred But we are really really excited about it. It's a it's something that goes back. Many years to the days. That i worked as a local host in south carolina and then in albany and when i first started making that list was such a big deal. I remember my my denise. And i were so we're happy and so i'm on the list. I'm ninety three whatever it was and now all all these years later number seven on the list and we are just just profoundly grateful to you because you made it happen and you've made all this happen. You're the reason we come to work every day. I don't wanna ever lose sight of the importance of our customer. And you're our customer and i'm grateful to you for everything you do including the extraordinary achievement of we are today could be the day that we pass. A quarter of a million dollars raised to send over twelve hundred and fifty children to summer camp for the prison fellowship ministry. We are right now at one thousand two hundred and thirty four kids. We're sixteen kids away. And i promise when we hit twelve fifty. I'm gonna get off your back. I'm gonna stop haranguing you to lift these young children up. Who are the children of prisoners in the country by sending them to a week of summer. Camp with your sponsorship. It's two hundred dollars or sponsor a kid. You've done it again. You are coming through like well. No other audience has come through one two three four right now. We're at twelve hundred and thirty four kids. If we hit twelve hundred and fifty children's sponsored that means you will have donated over a quarter of a million dollars twelve hundred and fifty kids at two hundred dollars a child. That's two hundred and fifty thousand dollars that you've donated to the prison fellowship ministry mike gallagher show campaign about three and a half weeks that's incredible that is astounding and i am overwhelmed by your graciousness and your goodness and your generosity. I started the day challenging. My buddy. Joey hudson he popped in one thousand sponsor. Five kids matched him with a thousand sponsor five more. Maybe we'll have some people that'll do that. Patty and from clemson south carolina. Our dear dear friends from south carolina. They matched the thousand. Maybe today the day we have a bunch of thousand dollar matches And we'll get way over but listen. Today's the day that we're going to be able to say we did it. We raise a quarter of a million dollars for these deserving children and exposing these kids to the word of god and the goodness of god and the gration of god's redemption. They're going to have a week of fun canoeing and being outside. Please go to mike. Online dot com. Click on the angel tree. Better make a difference in the life of prisoners child. Maybe we'll hit that quarter of a million dollars this hour as as a celebration. Maybe you'll want to do it. In honor of trumping vindicated. I mean this headline trump hails exoneration quote unquote. It's that's not alleged exoneration. He was completely exonerated. He sent out a message. Thank you to the department of interior inspector general for completely and totally exonerated me in the clearing of lafayette park trump had nothing. No nothing to that lie. How many lives have they told. Hydroxychloroquine doesn't work. Well now studies showing it does. All that was trump the wuhan lab responsible for the virus. It wasn't that was trump. My goodness how lies are going to be proven lies before the american people say enough no wonder capital hill. Aides in an overwhelming percentage. Believe that we're going to retake the house in just a few short months in twenty twenty two. Got a lot to talk about here. On this thursday. Episode of the mike gallagher show in the relieffactor dot com studios. Here's our number one. Eight hundred six five five mike in seventeen past the hour. Eight hundred six five five six four five three. I don't even wanna play a montage. I'm sure it's out there. I don't wanna even play the montage of all the journalists and the trump painters who said look at how trump cleared out peaceful protesters from lafayette park. You mean they weren't peaceful protesters. Oh where they rioting were. They will look at the church from the day before. Of course there were violent people. These are radical anti-american criminals and we gotta stop lifting them up. Let's talk about how she's threatened by flags all day long. Normal people have to prevail in this country. Normal people stand up and join us here. On the mike gallagher show one eight hundred six five five. Mike press one to come on air with us to to leave a voicemail. Text us on the my pillow text line which is also eight hundred six five five mike however you get here get here. We're waiting for you celebrating my gallagher's twenty three years of radio coast to coast. We're so grateful for your support over the years and the best is yet to come. He makes only knows do. I'll bet you've seen payton chef talbot on the tv. The father and son owners of relief factor boyer. They great guys. They have a heart for the hurting. They just want to get out of pain. They also do a whole lot of things behind the scenes that you'll never hear of in fact let me share with you a little secret. The nine hundred ninety five quick. Start that i always tell you about where you could try the product. The one hundred per cent drug free relief factor for three weeks for nine hundred ninety five. They lose money on that deal. But they know you're probably gonna keep ordering because it does work and they want to prove it to you. Relief factor is made from wild caught fish oils and botanical. It goes to work on the inflammation that causes back pain or neck. Pain hip pain pain from a workout at the gym. I want you to try. Go to relieffactor dot com. If it doesn't work you notify them after three weeks. And you're out twenty bucks but if it does consider what life could be. Life could be like pain. Free relieffactor dot com relieffactor dot com or call eight hundred five hundred eighty three eighty four eight hundred five hundred eighty. Three eighty. Four for relief factor. Gallagher is god's gift to the left. Yep jane fonda revealed a lot about the left cove. It is god's gift to the left lane is usually in california goofball gavin newsom and the the loonies in california. They're gonna make kids where masks in the fall despite these plummeting numbers despite this virus finally under control. They're gonna make kids in california. Wear masks it's going to be the virtue but aren't they aren't they gonna fade away aren't these aren't these crazies. Gotta just kind of fade away and people are realizing what a joke. It's it is to continue to virtue. signal this way. Cdc guidance they say oh cdc guidance despite encouraging vaccinated people to ditch masks for nearly all activities the cdc recommends that everyone keeps masking up in schools for the foreseeable future. Oh i guess. They ignore their own science. These people don't know what they're doing and when fau she cut to. here's With a salivating chuck todd. Oh doctors folks your show and brave and wise. Chuck todd. my gosh. what a joke. He's he's about the worst. Here's foul with chucky todd on msnbc. It's very dangerous chuck because a lot of what you're seeing as attacks on me quite frankly are attacks on science because all of the things that i have spoken about consistently from the very beginning have been fundamentally based on science. Sometimes those things go after the science jeff europe pay you doing jeff by mike about you today. Budding pretty good. What do you think about dr fauci. Not happy about his criticism used to be getting. I don't care what he's done. Happy but i'm happy to be free lived in florida but i got a comparison. Dr patrick reminds me of simon bar sinister. The villain and underdog. He looks like the come to think of it. There's there's a similarity there isn't it diamond. I'm i'm in no position to make fun anybody's appearance but yet come to think of it. He looks a little bit like simon bar sinister. I think you're right by me. I was watching it on the chuck. Todd show a picture up seen it does. He's got the white lab coat on and the dark eyebrows and the the the high forehead. Jeff you're onto something then we gotta start talking calling dr fauci. Simon bar sinister. How sinister is it to believe to believe that flags are a threat. They're doubling down on that. Stick around and look at where we are one thousand two hundred and thirty seven kids. Hey sunny halston a lot of racist mike gallagher. Listeners are sending black and brown white kids to summer camp. Did you hear the mike gallagher show. What's an assault weapon. Senator the bill to ban assault. What is your husband's the pages. No way could define the salt weapons. You don't have any running this agency and you don't have a definition of salt weapon. I'll give you one. Definition that eighteen year definitions. I can give you one definite. Vote for him. We'll get an answering the relieffactor dot com studios. Here's mike man. I like that guy. We gotta get senator. John kennedy here on the mike gallagher show. I wonder if we'll give us fifteen minutes. You think he will he might. He might busy guys on fox a lot. He fired back at faucher yesterday. Boy the caller was right. What's the name of the character again with the lab coat. What's the character. Who is it. What what what sinister sam. Who is it again. We got that that works. So here's simon bar sinister. Thank you tracy. I simon bar senate signer simon bar. Sinister got it. That's very funny. That's who that's dr fauci. So here's senator kennedy cut fifteen calling foul she out yesterday saying enough this last night on sean hannity show on the fox. News channel dumped found. She needs to cut the crap. The sitting about dr algae. It's not about his feelings. And i'm sure if his feelings were hurt. No maybe he audubon emotional support pony. But we're not debating dance moves on tiktok we're talking about millions of human lives and here's what we know. Dr fauci gave a lot a us taxpayer money to the wuhan lab for chinese scientists to research corona virus. Neither dr fauci nor any of us people can guarantee us that the chinese scientists didn't use that money to gain of function research. Interna a normal virus and do a supercharge virus is right now. Maybe the first thing. I'll ask senator kennedy if we can get him is what he makes of. Tv stars who make millions feeling threatened by the american flag. We already know about the new york times columnist and editorial board member mara gay. Who on morning joe on. Msnbc earlier in this week complained about the flags. She saw out on long island. You know over the weekend where we were commemorating the anniversary of d day. But she didn't like that it's disturbing. I saw dozens of american flags. Which you know is just disturbing also justice turban. The message was clear it was. This is my country. It's not your country flying a flag to the left. I guess now means we're pretending it's our country and not your country. I always thought it meant. It was our country all of us even the left. I don't want to exclude mara gaye from being able to celebrate america's greatness. I don't want to exclude sunny halston but sunny austin doesn't like what she sees she doesn't understand why there's any pushback on america shouldn't even understand. Let's play the clip. Here's what number is a guys. I've lost track here. Here's i think it's cut. Oh here it is. Thirteen sean. Hostile on the view yesterday and she's a green with her fellow media. Type that flags are a form of our symbol of white supremacy. And so yes. When i drive into a neighborhood and it's not july fourth and i'm not in a predominantly military household neighborhood and there are flags american flags everywhere alongside trump flags alongside flags with with stars in a circle. I feel threatened because the message is very clear. It's a message of white supremacy. It's a message of racism and it's a message of their country not my country and i don't understand why that would receive backlash people need to listen when i am saying. This is how i feel. This is my experience in this country. How isn't that amazing. Now others cheese such something even more profound in terms of her feelings to whoopi goldberg. And i've got the transcript here. We'll try to get the right clip here for you in a minute. But or the or the the more illustrious example of her contempt for the united states. Whoopi goldberg said to sonny halston. So for many the flag has been a symbol of freedom has taken another meaning sunny and she answered yes it has as meghan mentioned during the last segment when someone of color a black woman is telling you her feelings. People need to listen. And not you know repudiated not say well that cannot be true because you have in many respects. The former disgraced twice impeached. One term president to thank for politicizing the american flag. Here we go again. It's trump's fault. That sunny halston hates the flag. It's trump's fault that mara gaye hates america. She continued remember on january. Sixth just a few months ago you had the capital rioters tearing down the flag and replacing it with the trump flag. They didn't they didn't tear down in american flag. Put up but trump flag. You're lying. You're making crap up as john kennedy would cut the crap you had them beating. The police officers with the american flag was actually a poll. Not the flag. I don't think the cloth is gonna hurt him sunny. That's what was going on on january on january. Sixth it is their country not our country. I remember very well. There was a confederate flag being flown around the united states capitol. Oh don't worry that we got rid of that. You're like the we'll take that down. Everywhere can have a confederate flag. There wasn't a civil war. Didn't happen north-south never happened. Just blink it away shunning. It'll go away. I remember. I was with my children. North carolina in the outer banks with people in pickup trucks with confederate flags flying alongside the us flag. That scared me but scared me. So when i drive into a neighborhood and it's not july fourth and there are flags american flags. I feel threatened. Now listen. I don't doubt that she scared. I really don't i don't i don't doubt that there are people who are still cowering in their basements with nine masks on. They're afraid. I don't believe there are weak. People who cower and are timid and i gue- although she's not timid big mouth with a nasty attitude she's a radical on the view making millions of dollars to run her mouth like we get to do. I don't make millions will make what she makes but good for her. I'm glad she succeeded. I'm glad she makes millions to tell us how terrible america is with its flags and it's patriotism and it's love of country and support of the rule of law and the rejection of rioters and looters and criminals unreal. I'm sorry i'm i'm the this fires me up but it ought to fire you up to eight hundred six five five mike. More coming up. In the relief factor dot com studios surely is the mike gallagher. Show podcast at mike. Online dot com mike gallagher. What flag would need to be flown for them not to be afraid of it. Which country's flag does not inspire fear in them memo kamera gay and sunny. Hush damn right. This is my country. I spent twenty three years in the military defending that flight. Powell fly every day. I love that. I i get so viscerally angry at this. I'm i'm sorry. I'm looking at this number and i'm gonna just say. This is directed to sunny hostile. My listeners are about to surpass a quarter of a million dollars in donations to send over twelve hundred and fifty children to to summer camp and these are the kids have prisoners which means there are a lot of brown and black and white kids. Who are going to get to spend a week at summer camp now. Sunny probably doesn't like it because it's these camps where the kids are also going to learn about the gospel and the word got maybe like that either. I don't know. I don't know what's wrong with people who complain about the american flag like this in symbols patriotism and get a little motion when i think about what this audience is done because the fact of the matter is this audience is comprised of people who are veterans who did fight for their country who are proudly displaying. The american flag and people like sunny hossen are trying to make people like you and me be ashamed of our country and and and be reluctant to fly the flag and this audience has donate listen. These numbers are astounding right now. We're twelve kids away from hitting twelve hundred and fifty kids which means two hundred and fifty thousand dollars in donations in three and a half weeks are you and you are not everybody. We've got listeners of all kinds but this is largely an audience of patriot loving american loving patriots who loved president trump who voted for president trump. Who are disgusted and mortified with the direction of our country and light. Somebody just texted me on the my pillow text line. Hey sonny if you broke off Broke down on the side of the road these people. You're afraid of with the flag on their car. They'd likely pull over and help you in a heartbeat. They don't see you as a black woman. They see you as a fellow american gosh news i would give anything to hit two hundred and fifty thousand dollars in the next five minutes watching this counter. Go to mike. Online dot com. Click on that angel tree. Banner at the top of the page. All i need twelve. We need twelve kids twelve kids. That's twelve america. That means twenty four listeners. If you if i can get twenty four listeners in the next five minutes to pop in one hundred dollars we will hit two hundred and fifty thousand. And i promise. I'll be off your back and we can tell the world that american loving patriots are sending twelve hundred and fifty children to summer camp to the tune of quarter of a million dollars. Yeah that's some racism sunny those flag-waving bigots terrible speaking my pillow. Don't forget the father's day around the corner portions of the mike gallagher show sponsored by my pillow. The my pillow is now twenty nine ninety eight forty dollars off the premium. My pillow is normally sixty nine. Nine hundred eight you'll get it for twenty nine ninety eight when you enter the promo code mike g. Take care of dad for father's day whether it's towels whether it's the giza dream sheets the my slippers or the pillow at south. You're going to get huge discounts when you enter the promo code. Mikeg clock is ticking. Come on chill june twentieth. His father's day take caridad. Mypillow dot com promo code. My g mypillow dot com promo code. Mike g. or call eight hundred nine two eight six. Oh three four eight hundred nine two eight six zero three four promo code mikeg. Here's john on long island where there are flags. John you raise his big you. Oh my son my son through my son and my fifteen year old daughter will hang him every. yes from. What from memorial day veterans day. And i take him down in the winter and that's been my father's an army vet but we're so racist we just see red white and blue and little bit. She no long island new york went red for donald trump. So she's gonna wrong area of low alan and that's why she didn't want to go to long island. That's why that was. That's what put her in a bad mood. She had to leave the starbucks on the upper west side to go out to long island us up in a great town of babylon. We put our veterans up pictures of veterans. And the us that they dedicated their life because service active. Exactly what do you want to know bigotry. John you wanna know bigotry. Let's face it. Sunny hostels a bigot. She thinks she's better than people that fly an american flag selling point on one of these breaks. You gotta play off different round here by riley green. 'cause that's the put on facebook video. And what does facebook do they mutiny. Because you now you know we gotta play. We gotta pull out lee greenwood come on. Let's play it right now. I'm in that mood i want. I want to send a message as i'm waiting in fact. The song's about two minutes long. I'll bet your we're gonna hit two hundred and fifty thousand dollars in donations while we listened to lee lee greenwood. This is of course the anthem. That president trump always uses when he comes out onto stage. You're gonna be seen a lot of this and seen a lot of these rallies coming up and that's pretty exciting stuff. Let's play it. this is for sunny johnson. And please go to mike online dot com as we listened together and sing along make a donation to the angel tree camp. Let's get over a quarter million dollars. Let's show sunny hostile at love and compassion really looks like only gone. Were start again just my children and my school. The flag still can't take that how clean the studio. I thank my lucky stars that I get to live in a country where i can express myself in front of people who lift us up and look at that We are now. I've got two kids away. And i'm sure it's just a matter of the counter catching up one thousand two hundred forty eight kids to kids away. We'll get to twelve fifty and we will have We will have seen this audience. Donate a quarter of a million dollars to send kids to summer camp white kids black kids brown kids asian kids. Thank you for your support for your generosity. I That's what matters the this flag hating america. Hating crab doesn't matter but something like this. That's what matters five minutes before the hour portions of our show brought to you by shalem now in the streets where my father as we talk about fathers day my pillow gifts and all kinds of things to celebrate dad for too many others. It is a day to get through. You have reached out to these children. Many of whom had don't have father fatherless-ness drives a lot of bad outcomes in this country from teen pregnancy to incarceration eighty five percent of kids in prison youths in prison. Come from fatherless homes. As twenty times the national average there is a path forward from these grim statistics. That's why i want you to powerful. New film called the streets. Where my father features the journey of three men from chicago through their whole path from fatherless-ness to gangs from life in prison to prison ministry programs like the prison fellowship ministry that you contributed over a quarter of a million dollars to descend all these kids to summer camp through the angel tree program to see this great movie the streets where my father and you should order it. Get the dvd or watch it online. Just go to salem. Now dot com by a copy or copies and give anyone you know who is impacted by the the lack of a father in their life or doesn't believe in the power of god to change lives because we do we believe in the power of god to sale now dot com coming the family of ashley. Abbott has sued for records on the officer who fatally shot their loved. One you some details on that. And i hate bragging i hate. I don't wanna brag. I hate to gnarled horn but man we made it to number seven on the list of the one hundred most important talk show host in america. The publisher of talkers magazine coming up.

mike gallagher dr fauci Tom cotton america simon bar Dr fauci mike lafayette park department of interior president combo harris Inspector general mark lee gre senator kennedy south carolina Eric hanson Manual talkers magazine talkers magazine biden mara gaye
Romen Borsellino  TV Staff Writer & Producer and his incredible stories about working with Lilly Singh, Kal Penn, and President Obama!

South Asian Stories

53:04 min | 4 months ago

Romen Borsellino TV Staff Writer & Producer and his incredible stories about working with Lilly Singh, Kal Penn, and President Obama!

"All of the the minor successes. I've experienced so far. Have just been the direct result of a supportive community. Hi and welcome to south asian stories. I'm your host samir. Desai in this episode i chat with rahman borsellino rahman is a staff writer on nbc's a little late with the leasing. It was the executive producer and co creator a free forms. Twenty twenty election series kalpana approves this message. Raymond has written for adam. Kid will thrill in this giant piece that his the global economy on amazon prime and has worked on michael shirts. Twenty nine thousand nine primetime. Nbc comedy sunny side. Robin privy served as a political appointee in the us department of interior under president obama as worked on the number of high profile political campaigns in his home state of iowa. In this conversation we discussed a lot including the hilarious story. Where rahman's dad took his family to see harold and kumar in theaters for the first time how rahman worked on the clinton campaign and how dc broke him. Refer moving to la as well as going from cal. Pens assistant to co creator of abc's free form show in less than a week rahman had me laughing throughout the entire episode and shows us the power of serendipitous moments so without further. Ado please enjoy my conversation. With rahman or cellino raymond will come to south. Asian stories podcast. We are so thrilled to have you. How are you doing this morning at you so much. I'm very excited to be here. I want to start off by saying thank you for the work. You do elevating south asian voices. It's incredible and there are not enough folks like you. Doing it will thank you. We really appreciate it. And you know you have a special place in many south asians hard because you know we were talking about before we started recording is you are in the entertainment industry and an industry that we honestly don't have wonderful representations so the fact that you're doing what you do is just incredible and i know our listeners. Just so thrilled to hear this. But i wanna wait the beginning. Wait the being rahman his in his childhood form. Tell us about what your childhood was like growing up. And how south. Asian was your family. And and what was it like totally so for one. You may have noticed that my last name is not particularly south asia. My name is robyn borsellino rahman comes from my bengali grandfather. Ramachandra basu and that's my mom's side of the family. Borcelino is very different gruff. Bronx new york italian family so i have a. I have a very different background than most. Yes and so. The question was how was i as a child. Total goofball fear question. Not that i knew. I'd end up in the entertainment industry But i guess that was just inevitable. I grew up in des moines iowa. Kind of mit rest. So there were not many people who look like me for one. My mother Mabul both my parents rather For the local newspaper demo- That stor and by virtue of that family had a fairly public image. So for lack of a better phrase We were to some degree the token brown folks in iowa. I think if if people were to have any questions of people related they would probably give my momma call right right and did you feel like when you were growing up that you struggled at all with your identity m. i south asian. Mit talion. Am i american. Those all. come together where you haven't been golly food with italian food and like how is that for you. I ate very well. Say that i still do. You know in some ways the fact that nobody else really looked like me. I used very much to my advantage. And i think you know. I mentioned that. I was a goof ball. I think that being the tendency to wanna be a class clown to wanna stand out and twenty different came from the fact that i felt like they were already allies on me for you. Know to some degree right. You're sitting you're sitting in a class in des moines and the vast majority of your peers are white. You already feel like they're sort of a spotlight so i could be quote unquote model minority. Which i already knew is not going to work. There was just there was no way. I was I was good enough at school to pull that one off. So why not go class clown right. So i did my best with that. The other question there was very much a a spotlight not always good on on being brown and oftentimes well intentioned. But it'd be the type of thing where i'm walking home from school in my friends. And i say something about your my indian background and a buddy says which she thinks is a compliment. The most the most earnest compliment he can give is man rahman i forget that you aren't white like the rest of us to which it's like thank you and and so that's on you know that's something that's on my mind. There's there's the time that my mom goes to the eye doctor. Because she's she's having a minor vision. Problem goes to a new eye doctor and the doctor says well let me ask you this do you do you use curie and my mom is like what i don't know you aren't you Is an indian. Don't you cook you cook with with with Curium i saying it right into the well first of all. No you're not saying rates well. Is it possible that maybe some of the spices have gotten in your eye and that's what's causing the irritation and it. I mean this is a this is a respectable in the community. Doctor who is suggesting that because a brown woman is having a hard time seeing its because she got curry in her i again is is that dude A racist brick probably not but has he had many exposure much learning brown people know. And so he's these folks differently and there's a lot of that going on. Yeah no that makes makes a lot of sense because these microaggressions especially with the environment rim now when you know there's asian hayden and and it just like things like this are coming to the surface that our community has dealt with for so long especially our parents and our grandparents. It's and we keep it under wraps because we don't want to cause too much of like a you know a raucous but now like you know seeing our asian brothers and sisters and grandparents to stuff. Like i'm like wow okay you people think is happening to you and you're like wait everyone and we're all speaking up. It's sickening it and something to add to. That too is an. We'll get to this more. I think as we talk about representation south asian community and entertainment but some of the really just the biggest advocates the strongest allies that. I've had our other asians in in the entertainment industry. And that's not necessarily south asians right now. Got a lot of east asians in the folks who are really going through it right now. I think a lot of people will tell you this that after you know this after nine eleven. That's when you know we. We were really struggling. And i think right. Now i've had folks reach out to me and say you know hey is an asian. How're you doing. I've been thinking about you. I know about the violence against asians etc. And i'll be like a really appreciate that thoughtful. My role right now is to be an ally more to the folks who are really at the receiving end of this because you know not to minimize the the hate against people that look like us to but we are. I think at this moment at least we are not the true victims and so our our our goal should be to really elevate and help those. That are do agree with that. I agree i agree totally and when one of us is hurting all of us is hurting and people as you said. We went through our time where we struggled and had a lot of people reach out to us in the east asians. While we're all asian american like we always have to support each other and and that's why the this podcast exists is to give voices two people were underrepresented in jobs and careers that you know may not. We don't have mentors for but before we jump into that. I want to go back into writing. You know so you grew up in iowa and your parents were in the journalism business to that inspire your own writing and our ability into the arts. Or what what. what what. What was that for you. So i actually. I don't think it did. I think that on some level. I was sort of trained to you know to know how to write and to take it seriously but i never really thought about about it that way. It's so funny. Even today someone will read something. I wrote and And be like all. Of course you come from a family of writers and i'll be like what. Yeah i guess i do. You know writing writing sketches and monologues jokes. I don't sometimes in my mind. Tend to make the connection to reading these articles That my parents did but you know writing comes in in in many forms. Of course. I think that did have a big influence on me. That is to say. I did not intend to be a writer i had. I had no idea that i was going to write professionally. And frankly i had no idea that i was gonna comedy entertainment. That was for me a sort of a combination between a pipe dream and just something that. I never thought i could or would do seriously. Yeah and i'm happy to happy to walk you through. How at least that was my next question. Because sometimes these serendipitous moments are the most unique right. You're in the right place. The right time someone knows something small that you know so talk about your unique story of how it happened. That is exactly what happened to me. I very very serendipitous. So i am from des moines iowa where you for. Some reason have to go every four years to become president of the united states. Those are the rules. I didn't write them but the iowa caucus system who knows maybe rest in peace could be on its last legs the iowa caucus system for those unfamiliar we are the first state we have been historically the first state in the nation to vote in a presidential primary so the the exposure in momentum. You get from winning. That i state is unmatched. Which means that. Every presidential candidate from both parties effectively lives in the state of iowa For up to a year leading up to it so growing up. I thought it was normal. You get to meet all the presidential candidates right like eventually. You'd meet someone eventually. You'd meet someone in another state and it'd be like oh. So did john kerry pronounce your name correctly the first time you met him and and so. It's this crazy privilege. So in two thousand seven. He was my senior year in high school. And you've got obama polling third to To hillary and john edwards down thirty points but his campaign look like a lot of fun and i thought his message looked incredible. So i felt myself given that i live at the heart of the political world right now and you've got this candidate that i really believe in. I wanna be a part of this. So i joined on his campaign as an intern While i was in high school incredible experience getting to do events. Getting to sign up other students was the first vote i ever cast a was my caucus vote for obama. One of the things that came with that though was we'd build this this great foundation for his campaign At my high school such that the campaign called me and said would you like to do a surrogate event It means that you can build a crowd of folks to come. We will send someone cool that young people would like. And and i of course was like yeah. Give us give us a celebrity. I'll get you fifty one hundred people who were you thinking. And they said we have in town cal. Penn who played kumar in the harold. And kumar movies now. My dad had taken the entire family to see harold and kumar on opening day. A few years earlier. The midnight showing. Yeah exactly and we were. We were like you would count camp out for a star. Wars movie camped out in our store owners here now. That is very much joe. But for my dad knowing that i like to joke around and then and then seeing seeing an ad for For this movie about a south asian dude. Who's the film is not based on. His identity is not about the fact that he was south asian. My dad was like we have to see this as a family and mind you. My dad is the white member but one white meh but thankfully but he got it so so soon as i saw that i was like what i saw the movie like. Whoa this is really cool. The identity of the kumar character is really cool. I had seen the namesake. Another film by cal so i was very very excited to meet him. So we did this event at my high school and believe it or not i. I ended up making this friendship with with cal and we stayed in touch and throughout the years he became a close friend and a mentor. And sort of at some point said to me. I think you're a funny guy. I think you're clearly interested in making people laugh. why not pursue the detainment career Seriously it's something. I never would have thought that it so when he told you that. What does that make you feel like how what was going through your head like may like really you think me like. Oh yeah it was like this is one of those you know we've all we've all seen the movie carry you you you get the The loser onstage. So you can humiliate them and dump pig's blood on them. I was like kelly's playing the long con here to get me in the in the public guy And and i. It didn't happen in one moment to be clear it was like this ongoing friendship throughout the years and again it was not something i would have considered so i went into career in politics and entertainment. I didn't. I didn't take a stab at comedy around start i went to. I went to a career in politics and government. Those a freudian slip because we know that that government is very much a form of entertainment. Unfortunately right right so. I went to college and i got out and i worked on the obama campaign and then i worked on another senate race and then i worked in the obama administration for a couple years because again. I thought this is the most tenable trajectory for me. It is something that i think. I would for lack of a better phrase Have the least shot. failing at wrong enjoyed. It was great but it was during those years that i got to know better and he was sort of like you know if this is something. You're you're interested in you should pursue it and more than that. I didn't i didn't know what types of jobs existed in the entertainment career. Not only did he push me towards that type occurs he pushed me towards specifically saying i see you as a writer and i think i think based on what i know about you. Writing is what could be. You know your background. And so i ran with it and again very much under his his guidance and mentorship he. I'd be working in dc in the administration and he would call me and say. Hey i'm gonna be on colbert in new york on tuesday and so i would I would get take work off and take a bus. Take a mega bus to new york. Had i don't know why i had to specify that taking malcolm omega buses. That's how i was smiling. Thing samir you. And i we need people to know that we got a good deal from the one dollars people out here paying eighty dollars for For an amtrak. And i'm pocketing the seventy nine dollars profit two hundred percent so we got that out. There was a mega. And so cal would go on cobra for example and bring me along and i chill in the in the green room and wright jokes for him some that he would use some that would land and get a big laugh. occasionally some that would and then afterwards he he would introduce me to say this my writer rahman and that is a holy shit moment for me. Wow why you want to. I want that to. I want that to be how. I see myself in how i'm present. He'd so that that story. That was a specific moment. But i remember that is being the moment of. I don't just want this to be a part time thing. I want this to be what i do professionally. Managed somebody questions. The first question is. Do you remember the jokes that hit versus the ones i didn't. I somehow magically remember the ones that hit and not the ones they didn't. So i can only tell you the one short term memory. No so yeah exactly. No so this one was for. It was the first presidential debate of thousand sixteen so kobe went live so cal was like. Let's watch the debates together and then if you can brainstorm jokes so long you know this is not brilliant material here but one was that one observation i wrote down in my notes was a cannot tell if trump is saying that he's going to do something about attack a. T. t. a. c. k. s. or a tax a. t. a. x. because no one can figure out what the hell this dude is thing but it does not really matter because he doesn't have a plan for either and so cal said. Some form of that. Much more articulate than i did but it got a big laugh and then the other one was colbert asked asked him. Do you see yourself potentially so basically what could you do to. What would it take for you to. Support donald trump. And i think he was able to slip in again. Not a brilliant line that he he couldn't see himself supporting someone who is actively trying to deport harold komar now that that's good that's good. What was it like a surreal. Moment to see cal share. The you know the the jokes that you had come up with right. Wow that came from my brain now. It's spoken to colbert. Were like the like the pillars of comedy. You know is that it was like a pinch me moment. Here's the thing. There is no doubt about that. And and more than that even i think. A lot of writers come to terms with the fact that we we live in the background to some degree. You know our job is to make the folks that we write for look good. And that's great. I i truly love doing that when i you know. We'll talk more less. But when i'm writing for someone and you read the online comments thing. God lillies thing i. I love that joke knowing knowing that. That's why there's not even a part of me that wants acknowledgement by the opposite. I wanna be the person in the background. But and to be clear the folks i've worked for what has been great at shouting out there writers but in this moment with cal especially he was so quick to introduce me as writer and and give me that credit and that was especially felt really really good about it. That's amazing taupin is one of those people. That's like the pioneers for south asians entertainments. I feel like he's on a special mount. Rushmore off of people. That like south asians because look up to because when i saw that movie the first time i'm like wow he's actually a cool indian guy right not someone that you see the the stereotypes in a movie. You're saying. Wow that person talks and acts like me. But i'm curious to know what was it like knowing cal behind the scenes behind a screen because a lot of people listening have seen the movie but they don't know what's he like as a person. Can you describe that total ashville. I'm just like what a what a prick you know. Sorry cow if you're listening obviously a joke nicest guy funniest guy so actually let me tell you a little more about limited sort of continue on my plan line because it's still very much involved him so i'm working I'm working in the obama administration and we know that it's gonna wrap up. We know that it's about to end. And so we are thinking ahead to the future jobs that said we were told there is a chance you know. Obviously hillary is gonna win and maybe it will even take the senate and the And you know the house and therefore there could be way more jobs in. Dc for folks you can maybe stick around in the new administration so in the back of my mind i was like i'm looking ahead for future jobs. But you know the the likelihood is that i'll just kick around dc for awhile. Jump between branches. Suddenly you know complaining about not having a stable job in dc truly the the least of anyones worries when we got the election results in two thousand sixteen. But i was like. Oh okay i will not be staying anymore. It is time to get serious here. So i in some ways did the chase the starving artist dream of all right. Well this is it. This is the time to move to. La it's something that had been weighing on me for a little while. I had started thinking that. I had missed the boat on that that it was that it was too late to pursue the entertainment career. How's willing sorry for myself about it. I would rick in turn on an episode of entourage and be like oh man. I don't wanna watch this. This makes me just feel jealous of Of of being out there and chasing but when when my job ended in january two thousand seventeen. And i knew i was leaving dc then i was like. Let's do this. i moved out. I stayed on a buddy's couch again very much. The cliche i will not say i had like five dollars in my pocket to my name or or any. Bs like that. you know. I had a very small amount of saving more than that. I had a. Who is incredibly supportive. And my mom saying to me. I want you to take this risk. Because it's what you care about and if you fall flat on your face thinks she said if and not when. I don't remember exactly but i think it was. If you fall flat on your face that i will support you and for one. I was incredibly touched for another. I think it's important to tell that. Part of the story. Because i came from a place of privilege that i was able to have that safety blanket. You know we're not a wealthy family. Ed say midwest middle-class. There's something along those lines. Yeah noble i want to highlight. Two is the fact that your mom did that for you. I've talked to so many people on this podcast where they didn't have the parents support right and they just you know they want us to take conservative jobs because they don't want you to fall flat on your face and because all these other jewelry don't have people that look like us in them don't have mentors they just feel like oh you know. The the chance of a failure is higher so that i just want to highlight underscored like having. That is amazing. I'm so glad you brought that up. Because i think that is something i i hear all the time and i think you've in many ways hit the nail on the head in terms of why why there aren't people that look like this industry. I think for a lot of you know white folks you can turn on any movie and tv and then you can imagine yourself being an actor being an entertainer. Because that's what everyone out there looks like and so it is so easy to envision yourself or for a parent to envision that being their child with with folks who are a little less traditional when it comes to a background in famous it takes some serious imagination to imagine that and not something that everyone has. I'm glad you mentioned that. But again i want to highlight the fact that i was fortunate enough to come from a place of privilege that i was able to take risks but i know that many folks aren't but i came out here. I worked a few different jobs. The first job i had was at creative artists agency the biggest talent agency out here. And it's really funny because they got my resume and they were like we just signed The biden's for their posts speaking their post administration speaking engagements and we are looking for someone with a political experience. That would want to you know work with their team. And i was like you know i'm a big fan of the biden's but i came out here to get away from the political world and that was me Being a moron because you know you fight and claw offer any in in the entertainment industry. Just any reason to get in that building you'd say so after thinking about it and and you know talking to the folks being like hey. We also represent a bunch of comedians. Trevor noah. you know colin. Joe's julia louis dreyfuss you know this. This is something that could put you on. That trajectory did that for a couple of years for a year and a half. Actually i feel like joe biden. Did his last paid speaking engagements and then left to run for president. And then i left the like a couple of weeks later so i saw that one through. It's alright no needs to give me credit for his winning president. That's totally a lot of definitely put you in the footnotes lease And men around that time. Cal reached out to me and said i need assistance because my nbc show sunnyside just got picked up and he said i'll be honest. I have reservations about hiring a friend as an assistant to which said you know. Put me in coach. Let's do this. And that and i then i then worked for him. We were buddies. But you know. I still still got him coffee into the assistant stuff gave him. My advice often solicited sometimes not Which i think being friends with the with the person you're working for has that bonus that to some degree you can get sort of an adviser in addition to An assistant yeah. Yeah and the other thing is you're in the room right where the decisions and where the with the content where everything is happening. I think the biggest thing that i see is exposure and being in a place where things are actually happening versus. You know somewhere else. Where you're looking at your. You're watching the entourage episode on the side. No you're in the episode right totally totally and thank you for bringing that up. You know this. Show the cow did sunnyside. It was co created by matt. Murray former saturday night live writer. Good place writer and it was executive produced by mike. Sure who created truly some of the biggest sitcoms out there including the good place parks and rec brooklyn nine nine so to be a fly on the wall in that writer's room and wall challenged dime was just like you know in terms of jedi training into the entertainment world. You could not ask for for you. Know better opportunity would happen. Next was i was cows assistance. And it'd been maybe a year and a half. Cowl was in cow was in london for a week for work so i had little to do for him. This was little over a year ago. Twenty twenty election was gearing up. And i just had it in my mind. You know i thought to myself. I need to write more in my free time. Why don't i use this opportunity to write some sample material since. It's a light week and i thought one of these sample things i could do is a pitch for potential show. I'm gonna presents a cow. I'm gonna present to him when he gets back an idea for a show that he could host about young people getting engaged in the twenty twenty Knife thought obviously. This isn't gonna go anywhere. I have no experience coming up with a show idea but my hope is that he will see this. Hopefully he'll like it. And i'll have the experience writing it and he will know that i take it seriously that i'm trying to take my career to the next level and come up with ideas and come up with show premises so i took it to him. I probably didn't express timely nature of quite enough. Because like a month had gone by. And i was like. Hey dude. have you read that thing that i sent you yet. He's like oh. I'm totally going to look. You know it's sort of About the election which is coming up really soon. So if you would mind do any reads it. And he's like oh my god. This is great. Let's do this. Let's try and make this show and let's pitch this show and one thing led to another and like a month later we had sold a show and I was the executive producer of a free form. Show reform is of disney's youth arm. they air Grown ish and a couple of really phenomenal shows that give great representation to under under heard voices in a lot of ways and we did this election series and suddenly i had gone from being. Suddenly i'd gone from being an assistant to a co creator of a show within literally within a week. That is amazing. That is amazing. Like i can just imagine you from like in your room right writing this thing. I got this. Is you know my sample hope. Hope hope calories is to a frigging show like you know. That's amazing it. it's really funny. I went to. I had one of my one of my closest friends miles. My buddies miles in heaven had been telling me for a while for well over a year. We have a writers group that meets on sunday. If you ever have any sample material we workshop each other's material it's a great. You know supportive group. Come just never had anything to share. And so i took this and you know. I presented the my ideas and they were like you know i can see this having some actual traction and now it's like you know dude you show up. Who are writers group one time and then you sell that idea. I golden hands right. That's why do be clear. I shop the moon. This is never going to happen again. This is not a yeah. This is not a everything. I touch turns to gold a beginner's luck situation So so talk to us what that was like like being executive producer i show like what does that entail. What does you how. What was that like will. The i mean the first thing that we do is like were pitching the idea of the show. You know to different folks. And so it's a the first call we have is samantha b. Who's like interested in it. So it's me and cow and samantha b and on her team and like. I'm not sure. If i would be qualified to interview for a job on samantha dese show so let let alone tell her why should she should buy a show that i myself created so it is a to some degree of fake it till you make it out of than when the show actually got made. I was partnered with our show runner This guy stu miller who was the field director for the daily show for a while and He had just gotten off. We didn't even know this movie was being made because it was secret he had just gotten off heading the field department for borat too so this guy knows what he's doing and he became a close friend and an ally and we're on the phone like twenty four seven talking about ideas for this show and again it's like in this moment. I am the students equal like coming up with ideas even though he's been doing this for so long nose so much more than me but it's a learning experience and the show was an absolute blast. We ended up booking incredible guests. You know Labor leader dolores. Huerta was our first guest. She marched alongside cesar chavez. Our second guest was hillary clinton. We had cameos from criminal. Non johnny and from joey king and mark cuban and just what an incredible experience and also getting to hopefully make a difference in an election year. Yet that's a credible and again we talk about pinch me moment that you probably wouldn't like hillary clinton is sitting across from cow. And you're like gosh. Like i i was. I was the engineer of this. This is the genesis was in my head like man. That's so cool. I'm so happy for you. Thank you do. That's i appreciate is very much. Apente say it was very much a pinch me moment it was like the you know the highest tile ever feel no not because cal was giving these some of his good stuff he is not as far as i know but the highest high will ever feel but at the back of my mind. I knew that i had shot the moon right. Like i was like this show is gonna end and i will go back to being an assistant at best or unemployed right all right. Hopefully hopefully under a new administration I don't think back to all it takes in government. But i could always do that if i fail. I suppose but. I had that in the back of my mind again. I got very in. That may be the week after the show wrapped actually show hadn't wrapped. We were still working on it. We had maybe one week to go my team at united talent agency who. I had just started working with the week before to you know sort of help me find the next gig was like oh lilly. Sing is hiring for her season. Two and so for me. It's like right at this time in my life. The one south asian late night host. Someone who. I really look up to really. Respect is looking for riders. Could this timing. The any better. And again i got incredibly fortunate and and after several rounds of submissions in interviews landed a job with with her. Show that started. You know the month after our show ended. That is amazing. Better serendipitous moments totally. The timing worked out incredibly well on talk to us when it's like working with lily and your experience as writer for. Oh my god for one lily is you know she's probably not gonna listen to this. So don't think i'm pandering She's the hardest hardest worker. I've ever seen and she will. I mean every every single script that goes before her for want you'll have approved it but for tusch for another she will have done edits and pawnshops and added jokes herself but working on her show has been such a fun just they said to me in the in the interview actually used to work in. Dc you come from a from a critical background. This is not necessarily going to be a political show. Are you sure that you know you wanna do something. That is maybe a little bit outside of your background and outside of your your taste. It turns out to their credit. I think they were under selling that a little lily. Is you know paul politics. Politics doesn't have to mean you know horserace running for office election it can be about the tax on farmers that are happening right now in india or right The attacks on trans people that are happening right now in this country both of which among many other things we've been fortunate enough to cover and i've been fortunate enough to to get to write about but during that initial interview being told. Are you sure you wanna do something. That's not as political as you might like. It was very easy. Yes it was like. You know what there will always be politics. There will always be government. This just seems fun. I just the fact that it is a one thirty. Am time slot the not Not to knock your ourselves the fair amount of respect but it's like that affords you chance to really experiment with fun ideas right and rent he stuff and you know writing just the silliest stuff one of one of the first things i wrote was it's like an inside the actors studio type thing and it is an interview with lilly. Sing is playing a british actress named rima. Grant and reema grants claim to fame is that she is the actress who plays lily sing on a little late with lily thing and so the premise here is. That lily is not a real person. She is a character played by an actress. And it's just like would would fallon ever entertain that at his eleven thirty timeslot. Who knows that is. That is some one thirty. Am stuff right there. Yeah right right what what were some of the highlights of like memories that that you've done and maybe even sure some of the lowlights because i want people to know that you know you you've had an illustrious career you shot the moon but i want to talk about some of the harder moments can you can share a bit of both of course and so you mean in in the path like throughout this correct. Yeah so i will say that. Hollywood i mean i'm i'm not one to talk because i'm still consider myself. I'm still a good age. I'm thirty one. I'm still young. But hollywood is like very town so sitting the fact that i the fact that cam to hollywood in my late twenties with no experience At least in that industry. I was competing against people who were twenty one twenty two years old and just out of college. So i'd be an assistant aside. Someone seven years younger than me or watching agents A few years younger than me down. The hallway was a humbling experience and it was not a bad experience. It was a it was still an incredible one but it was like. Am i up against the clock here. How quickly do. I have to make this work. Because i don't have the luxury of digging around for ten years and hoping that something sticks so you know that that was i think again. I don't want to call it a low point but it it really put my back up against the wall but you know all of it. All of it was fun. All of it was a good experience. I'm i'm very fortunate that i i can't think of any any sob stories At least anything of it it would make someone feel sorry for me in the known. That's great because i think having perspective just to know is wide open because the goal of this is if someone listens and say hey i want to be a writer. No what is wide open when it's going to be like the goods the bads the uglies but glad there's not too many uglies in your story which is which is amazing. Well i think. I mean i will say this to when i was younger between political campaigns often times meant meant months without without a job so i think before i you know earlier on in my twenty s before. I made it to hollywood. That's where some of the low moments were. So i think a lot of people you know i. I experienced those those same anxieties and fear of being unemployed for the rest of my life. And all that stuff. I just experienced it in a different industry. God such that. When i got out here i was a little more battle tested at. That's right hardened. Yeah exactly you can't break me in dc has already done that for its right. That's right man. That's amazing okay I would love to transition In our last few minutes to a rapid fire questions and for everyone listening these are questions. Invest all our guests. And i'm so excited to hear your thoughts on these god okay. First question is. Is there a item or service that you've bought recently. That has dramatically improve your life. It can be big or small but something that you've bought recently that you're like man. This is something that i love. I really freaking wish. Someone had told me thirteen months ago when we started using doom that i should get airpods. That would have been really really nice. Especially when you've got the hair that i do that you can just hide them under these like a month ago and i'm truly like what have you been doing until until now manner games a boring answer but you wanna talk about a utility item. You know anyone else out. There wants ipods. Tell them that you this coun- right if you already not into like half your work. Things apple products right. Yeah exactly okay. So i wanna ask you this and maybe a different answers. When you think of a south asian person you look up to in the entertainment field who say comes to mind. And why and i think we've talked about few yeah so So let me guess. Let me let me think of some others. One person you had The surgeon general vivek murthy on their show. I thought just what an incredible interview. What an incredible person. he's someone. I very much look up to i. You know i think kumail nangiani just what about at us. I think he's so funny. Hussin disease was really one of the first one of the first. Stand up that. I was like i am obsessed with this guy. I you know. Stand up wise. I would would love to be like this guy. that's awesome. Yeah those kind of guys and gals is just like you know every time you see someone like that who breaks a barrier like who does something that we as a community haven't done you're decide. Wow like it just so comforting right like even dr vivek murthy who is a doctor. A lot of us are doctors who become the surgeon general. Like the top doctor and like when i was doing the interview just the humility has in the role right. Even dark moments right. The guy who has seven degrees right has dark moments. You feel better about what you're going through in your life. Yeah exactly although yeah. I mean having a brown guy as the surgeon. General certainly has its downside. Can you imagine every every brown every brown person whose parents made them go to med school. And you're like all right. I finally did it and now they're like. Oh but you're not you're not the surgeon general right about outcome right. You got nine nine hundred. Where's the last point. Yeah yeah we've all we've all heard that one that's great okay. This is a great one. I'd left to hear your answer. Is what is a movie or book that has had the most impact on you got a you know. I i gotta go kumar. It's just how can you not. It's it is about a dude who looks like me just smoking weed having a being a genius being a bad ass having a good time and again i just the fact that the fact that my dad took me to see that in theaters when i was fourteen years old hella awkward moment with this like truly I don't know if you were with your family. Samir when you saw harold and kumar was not made that a point a good good call okay. Great yeah and i have you. I'm curious to you revisit. That movie later on in your life and have you noticed things that you're like. Oh when i i watched it. This was something that i miss star. Something about with your experience. You've seen big question. I know there's a moment when When kumar says thank you come again in the abu voice and getting to know cal i know that one of the things that has always really really bothered him was was abu from the simpsons and the fact that anka's area white guy but his abu so knowing that and revisiting that saying knowing that it's our real fu the white people who talk in that voice. Our i think is really cool. That's cool that's a good thing. I didn't know that. I bet that You know yeah. And i don't know. Have you seen the problem with. Who the hari kondabolu. I've not seen it but it's definitely my list. It's great and it got results like it. You know one. Could you read the comments on will never in the comments but if you do read the comments talking about it on on twitter it's just all these angry white dudes and to be clear. I'm a simpsons fan. I grew up on the simpsons. I love the simpsons that is obviously something to reckon with the the thing but the video the the felt the documentary which with towels for got results and now they are recasting an actual person so and that is so cool. That is so cool. Because it's like small steps like that right things that you thought were like you know sentenced on this is the symptoms. So you can't touch that you we as people can make change if you just you know. Raise the voices and bring concerns up. And like i think i think you hit the nail on the head words. There are still so many barriers broke right right but even one small step gives a crap. Got it okay. The this questions are so my favorite so excited to hear your thoughts behind this. So imagine someone who's south. Asian like who is who wants to become a writer who wants to become an independent the entertainment industry. What what advice would you give them to. Why awesome great great question. I'm excited to to answer it. There are so many supportive groups out there who i think you groups and people like cape the coalition of Coalition of asians and pacific islanders. I believe the ap entertainment and these are folks. That that really elevate voices and help people. And i think i just imagined that if you are a young person who was interested in pursuing this and you don't have the support system there are just so many of these people looking to give back. You could frankly you know i. I'd say i'm one of these. People have responded to the blind messages on instagram and twitter of you know hey really would love to pick your brains about how to do this and how to get involved and i think there is absolutely no harm in sending those messages sending those emails do the research you know people you look up to reach out to them it. It may not be a you may not have as good luck sending a message to someone like calla lily. Who get emily. The million of these a day As you as you may orion borsellino who's desperate to feel validated a. But but truly. I think a lot we you know. We've been talking about this. A lot of a lot of folks like us do not have parents who understand the industry and so you may not know anyone who's ever done this reach out to folks blindly and i think you will be very pleasantly surprised in the feedback you get even if that requires Not giving up and reaching out to a number of folks after after this year having been other than tape with any other organizations are helpful things that you can share it the listeners. That would be useful for people that you know. Want to do more research or any books or interviews that are might be helpful. Yeah let me think about that. The obama campaign in two thousand seven then will strike gold. Get a time machine and go back two thousand seven with little rahman and you guys can. Yeah big okay directly but just watch just watch and learn right. Immerse yourself in this now. Think i'll hollywood is one of the few indian industries where you can watch game of thrones or parks and rec and be like what. I'm doing research for work right right. This is part of my homework right here. Yeah truly awesome. Well this has been an amazing amazing interview man. Like i'm so you can see. I've been smiling like nine five percent of the time before we close anything. You'd like to leave the audience with any anything you'd like to share before we we wrap up. I mean look. I'm still very much. Hopefully at the beginning of of my enter payment career and i've had some minor successes and i'm sure there will be periods of unemployment that cetera and those those down moments we talked about earlier but all of the all of the the minor successes. I'm experienced so far. Have just been the direct result of a supportive community A support very supportive south asian community people who may not know this world but just wanted just saw that. It was something that i was interested in. Wanted to be supportive folks. Who may not be of the same background but in the industry but know that it's time for a change and time to to make this industry less wipe male loved ones mentors. It's just i think any success should be chalked up to the bose around you helping and supporting you and a lifting and so to me. It is very very important. That i give back and you know when i'm when i feel like i know enough that i'm in a position to mentor. The next crop. I want to be doing that. But i also right now. Wanna really just be thanking everyone all of my mentors and the folks who who have who have helped break into an industry. The you know may not may not be that easy to get into but has been so much fun. I mean what a blast weld. This conversation won for best one. One d one. If people want to reach out what's the best way to get in touch You know try sliding into the into the dm's yes at rahman borsellino on instagram. Okay perfect well thanks again We cannot wait to see your amazing work on lily. Sing it in and beyond thank you again. For what all you do for our community and lifting the voices and the trail-blazing more than that is praise. I do not deserve. I will take it out the validation. They were looking for exactly the before we started before we started recording. We scripted this out but no thank you for elevating voices. Truly if you'd like to hear more amazing stories on south asians around the world please check out south asian stories podcast dot com and subscribe to our email list. That south asian stories. Podcast dot com. Thanks a lot and see you next time.

rahman iowa kumar obama administration des moines harold Nbc rahman borsellino rahman obama Robin privy us department of interior cellino raymond colbert robyn borsellino rahman Ramachandra basu Borcelino Mabul samir Curium samantha b
Episode: 330 Just Some Things to Know.

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

2:04:37 hr | 3 months ago

Episode: 330 Just Some Things to Know.

"Up the people this genocide on arif new. This was a quite every other saturday native opinion. We are an indigenous information and radio show and podcast every week. We talk about current affairs related to and from our own native american perspectives. My name is michael kicking bear. Mike is a little bit hot. Let me bring that back okay. and the with me as always that guy in florida you know him you love him. He is david gray. Al good morning everybody. Our brother brother a little. Like i said it was a little under the weather. Here and I don't know if it's with they constituted a summer cold Maybe it's covid no. I shouldn't even joke about it. But let's hope not. You've been inoculated. So that's that's called the breakthrough if it is. I think you know. I'm gonna make a lotta money call. Cnn we have our first case of somebody that cuts full-fledged cova with the vaccine injected bolt injections so. Yeah i don't know. Yeah there's there's some reported cases across the country breakthrough infections after after both shot so well i don't know it's like every single human walking on the planet that's had the shot and is walking around with a huge question mark over their head so i don't know it is what it is. Sorry you're under the weather. And i hope you feel better soon. Now it'll be all right. we'll i'll just. What are they saying. You got to suck it up. Show must go on. Unless i unless i do the show like the fourth joe going to talk about that later gonna talk about that later. Ought to be fun. Ought to be fun but But you guys how you can reach us here on this show as we always like to say is you can Email us with s host. That native opinion dot com Can also reach out at twitter or facebook Facebook page facebookcom forward slash native opinion. Podcast our website of course is native opinion. Dot com Our our cat room is in beta on We're still doing some tweaks so that is not visible today Saturday we hope to have that back shortly We just wanted to check a few more things on that would some some other controls Our show is also a podcast. Which means you can subscribe to any of the major podcast directories and get that way On your favourite device of choice he could also leave us a voicemail at eight six zero eight hundred five nine five eight six zero eight hundred five five nine five. Is that number good morning. Amanda intimated into chat and So any of those ways will work perfectly To reach us great. Great yes we love to hear from each. And every one of you either voicemail and text or email absolutely. Please let us know what's going on in your lives and as you know. We produce a podcast twice a week the wednesday edition and our live. Show which you're listening to right now and we thank you for listening and we want you to know. We appreciate every bit of support we received from you no matter what form that support in and the financial support we see goes directly to our cost and expenses associated with producing the show and some of those expenses are things like website and podcast hosting music licensing content development and curation and our daily business operations such as marketing advertisement. And more. so if you would please join other wonderful folks who have contributed to this show by becoming a patron and you can see those details on how to do that. On our website at native opinion dot com forward slash support and on our facebook page and just click on the learn more button and another great way to help. Its by telling your friends families colleagues about the show and gibbs a five star review on items and we thank you all for listening sharing our show and growing with us or you can give us a four star even three star. You could do that or you can just write test. Say we sog. We prefer popstar drive for five. Almost ryan's we strive for five. Absolutely let's see we also wanna think well. He can trading post our our sponsor for their continued patronage of our of our program. We appreciate that very very much. They make a handmade craft and beadwork ribbon shirts embroidered hats dream catchers and other specialty items in the also make cloth mask says we still continue through So all of those items can be found on their website at mohegan trading post dot com again. We appreciate their continued support of native opinion so as as i was getting ready for This morning show brother and actually Amanda in chat. It could probably weigh in on this as well. I saw a commercial. That bothers me a lot because the three of us our dog owners right and They were hawking this product. The only way i can describe as a vinnie of you guys use Like those air wick. Little things you plug into the wall That you know make your the makes a room smell. Fresher and things like that This was a product leg that but apparently in the solution. That's that's in the device Has something in it. That apparently is supposed to relax. Your animal your dog and it's being pitched as a way to counteract a dog that might have separation anxiety and i just got to say i i myself. I went under percent disagree with the existence of this product. I mean it's one step away from. Hey before you go out you know. Why don't you can inoculate your dog. So why live with your dog. Barking excessively whining and hiding can be caused by fear and anxiety. Adaptable is a clinically proven. Drug free solution. That helps your dog feel calmer available from veterinary an online at smart learn. More at adapted dot com. Stick a needle in your dog and to get him to calm down or or give them a pill I just i just. I just don't agree with the premise of the product. I guess yeah. I i think. It's a gimmick. Actually i really do you know what i like. I'm going by your description and what you described is like you know. The manufacturers calling bleach disinfectant or antibacterial soap. They're both antibacterial and disinfectant. But you put these little catchphrases and buzzwords on there to make people believe that it. Something something spectacular stupendous new and improved and improved soap by. Its nature is antibacterial. Amanda just said. That's very strange. I would go to the vet before buying those chemicals from from wall source. Yeah well that's the thing i mean you know. It's big because also it just the sort of putting half of a conspiratorial hat on right so if this is obvious this is obviously been. I can't say it's been fully approved. I don't i don't know how are what goes into approving a product like that for use in the house. But i mean you're basically saying let's see how the public reacts to medicine in the air right being able to spray something in the air that has The ability to alter one st. I'm not talking to you. Know it's this is different. In my opinion than say you know choosing to smoke marijuana right And your pets. Don't have any control over either. Rely one hundred percent on right but they're pushing this product as a means to drug your animals In the form of an aerosol more or less That you know that slow released and I don't know. I just don't agree with it. Yeah i hear you i think. It's more of a gimmick than than anything think of think of the the timeframe that it was released right. Yeah you know the fourth of july fireworks and the sort. Exactly so yeah. That's why i think it's more of a gimmick than anything because you know if something like that is produced. It has to have some sort of governmental check and balance because people are inhaling it as well so yep yeah exactly i mean. We don't know. I mean yeah i mean i. I'm totally judging. This based on the ad. I have gone to a store and read anything about the product or gone online or anything like that so so just just to be fair to the company. But you know. I don't know i just didn't land right with me. You know and the ad is like upbeat kind of like you know. I don't know how to describe it. I maybe what i should do is try to pull the audio at some point. I just won't do it today but because i've seen it on the air now for about a month and So i don't know. I don't know if anybody else has seen this. Let us know man. Let us know what you think Right wrong in different you know. Do you have a dog with a separation. Anxiety i mean one of mine does but Our solution was we got him a sister so he's not alone. You know But But i don't know maybe maybe other people have different point of view on it i was. I was just curious. So i still think it's just a gimmick. I think there's really nothing in it to to benefit The the targeted Animal really do i. I think it's a gimmick you know. I could be mistaken but in this day and age. People are are so gullible. I'll just use the term again. I hearken back to the the marketing ploy of disinfectant soap. Bacterial soap come on. Yeah exactly so scrubbed. Do you bleed. Then you'll be clean okay or exactly. I can't think of. I can't think of two items that will survive a bath. Bleach any kind of pathogen. I can't think of two or human or human so distant disinfectant bleach. Us buyer disinfect disinfectant. Bleach by now people and they run out and buy a case exactly before can't get it anymore but all right we'll transition to back brother. Thank you and this bit of listener feedback comes to us by way of listener. Aaron and i appreciate your providing this input earn and it was on equality versus equity and the feedback reads. I was listening to saturday's episode in your discussion of why folks are using the term equity now as opposed to equality I do a bunch of work in the diversity and incision space. I think that was supposed collusion. I am i think so. It wasn't sure. Okay incision space and the way we frame equity is providing assistance according to need so for instance a bathroom could provide three sinks at the same height and it would be equality but providing two things at the same height with an inevitable. with an available step stool for one and a third sink. That's easier to reach for people who require wheelchair. That's equity another analogy. I've heard used often. Is that if one person is a situation if one person in a situation. Excuse me cuts themselves. You don't give wanna a bandit equality would require that you do. Equity doesn't to circle back to the importance of this distinction with news items. You've covered recently. The white farmers won't equality when it comes to grants and such but what's needed. Its equity for indigenous and black etc farmers in order to make up for past inequalities when it comes and when it came to program administration which robbed them of opportunities those white farmers and their ancestors got similarly in a recent supreme court ruling in the zona voting case alito makes very strong equality based space by saying that all boating opportunities or equal as in your race doesn't preclude you from participating which is incredibly disingenuous. Because in ignores the structural and equalities and physical realities that do impact native peoples black folks and so on because of their race. Imagine saying we are only going to place five voting machines and every precinct in every county in a state that's equality but if one precinct has five hundred people in it and another has five hundred thousand that's inequity and more equitable equitable distribution of resources would be per capita in each precinct. For instance. same with drop boxes for balance et cetera. And that case it would need to be per capita but what also needs to take into account geography population distribution road placement and quality quality transit options etc in other words equity requires a lot more effort. Anyway i thought i'd share how we explain to the difference. Which is i suspect. Probably in line with the language changes you've seen from the white house etc as always keep up the amazing work. Y'all cheers aaron aaron. Thank you good. Explanation Just wish the white house would present it that way. Well you know in my view because laying it out that way makes makes a lot more sense than some ways Rather than i the way. It came off to me when i started hearing President biting using it was You know more like a buzzword you know And and putting it in a speech in such a fashion that you know Was promising things for in particular indigenous people without any real substance by that i mean give me some concrete examples away. You're going to do to make things to make it You know under under you know in other words you know. He's he's out there right now. Making the case for get yourself more shots making the case for an infrastructure planning using specific examples of why that's important right. But when he was talking about equity and the context of you know Donnelly restoring but Presumably improving travel consultation. Let's say crickets like no real examples. So you know. This is my version of okay. You're you're pitching a case of new word that maybe i'm not as familiar with and the application of that word As it applies to myself as an indigenous person make the case. What are you talking about. And that's where he failed in my opinion so but i appreciate that explanation though. Aaron i think it makes it makes more sense to me Laid out that way any thoughts. Yeah i do The the sentence the sentence that Use the band aid as a as an analogy. If you apply that to groups of people the the sentence reads i. I hear used often. Is that if one person in a situation cuts themselves. You don't give everyone a aid. Equality would require that you do. Equity doesn't well if you you look at that and you apply it to people groups of people it. It appears that the white farmers who were whining about not being eligible for those loans. You know what they. They feel that they should be qualified to receive those same debt-forgiveness loans and what they're not looking at is the inequality that's existed for literally generations before the fda or the usda. Excuse me decided to make everything even across the board or to give those farmers that were disadvantaged for generations an opportunity. So i it just it just doesn't ring true trying to synonymous the two words correct to me. It just doesn't because if you look at the word equity it's used in a broad sense and a lot of areas you look equity and home everybody's not gonna have the same equity in their homes because of what because of factors that exist a price or the region the home is an etc etc. Correct so you know. I think the administration is using the word equity in a fashion that does it ingenuous period. I don't think it's looking at using equality as the main source of what should be taught about or the main topic of what should be talked about how it should be talked about. And how you get there. I think they're using equity as a means to say well. You know if this exists. Then you know there's a little more equity that can be gained or if this condition exists. There's a little more equity that can be gained. See that's how i feel that. They're trying to use the word. Not doing what's right and making it. A fair in level playing field for native peoples and in relation to the the farmers of color getting the debt forgiveness loans and that that in itself it's an oxymoron debt forgiveness loan. What exactly exactly. So you know all of these little catch phrases and buds words. You know you gotta to in my opinion you got to drill down and and look at what they're really being used as and how they're being used so that's so true and it's it's exhausting sometimes times right up sometime because because of this source of from which where it comes from you know so that that that's where the term often forked tongue comes from. So yeah i hear you but thank you. I appreciate the feedback as well as my brother. Definitely definitely hurry. We have another Email that came in from erica. You want me to get it or you got it. Yep and erica rights. Hello hello back. Thanks for sharing your thoughts with us twice a week. I'm curious to hear what the land back movement that has burgeoned online within the last Several years despite existing in other mediums. Long before that means to you. What kind of work will we all be required to do to actualize this goal and in your eyes what might turtle island look Look and feel like if land back is successful. Thanks again for all. You do Yes so Actually answered this I think you have to define the goals right. And i think those Specific goals are different from For different people I always look to history to keep me grounded In my understanding of what transpired here for my own people. First and then. More broadly on the north american continent right I do that To properly set the right context for the lamb back efforts. And i think that the The efforts needs to be measured and and actually realistic as an example of an unrealistic goal. would be to kick out every man woman and child of european descent from north america right. Even though sometimes some of us may wish we could the simply isn't going to happen Lamb back to me is about empowerment taking back control. A pieces of our history that history is a an explicitly tied to the lands that we all occupy for example that may be in areas such as encroachments of our hunting and fishing grounds where foreign entities called lawmakers Took away our ability to feed or people because those grounds Where these activities take place. Our creator provided The struggles continue to this very day. There are also examples from other indigenous communities of Efforts of success under land back Take the recent example. The united states department of interior announcing A program to the restoration and transfer more than eighteen thousand acres of land Better known as the national bison range to confederated solution kootenai tribes From flathead res- on in montana right. Those lands will now be an indirect control of the tribes at least We hope they follow up and ensure that That does happen They being the government. you know one thing One thing that continuously bothers me is that in so many of these cases we either have to ask the oppressor of federal or state government if we can please have our land back right or we must by these lands back from the descendants of the oppressors slap in the face. Yup so when guys to think about this too will some fact The united states as a country border to border controls. two point. three billion acres of dry-land k now this control Further extends to an even greater amount of land which is now submerged between the atlantic and pacific oceans within the united states which it considers its quote federal waters so it forces me to ask why to me when when you look at this to. Tally will come back or two things. Power ingred so powered define to control other people in particular at the detriment of people of color but more specifically us as indigenous people and ingred. Which is you know. Self evident profitability capitalism some of the very foundations and core of of of colonialism Let's see finally erica. Also asked what might turtle island look and feel like if lamb back is successful. well for that My answer is going to be a little generic is it depends Each approach is different but Well that's that's what i'm gonna say for now but Later in the show today We're going to revisit this a little bit in the form of an article That brings an additional but important perspective. So so i want to thank erika for for that Give anything you want to speak to on that brother land back. You know it would be great if we alternate people's didn't have to buy our land back. And there are some instances where land has just been given back by non-indigenous people and i applaud those people for doing so absolutely that shows you know forward thinking. It takes courage to do that. Because i'm sure they've gotten a lot of criticism for doing so but again. I applaud them for doing so. But the efforts to provide native peoples with lands were taken and say the land back movement if you will. I think it's positive it still makes me wonder with some federal tribes at least if the land back acquisitions are still actually under. The control of native peoples are under the control of the department of the interior. I e because if those lands are considered trust lands if they're granted back to those people those tribes who in fact is still controlling that land. That's that's my question right right. Well you know because again From from the context point of view trust lands. Let me let me frame it this way to. That's the government going. We have as piece of paper called deed and keep that deed for you. Trust us stas you know if you need to use it by all means just just come. Just come and ask us but we're we're not going to do is hand you'd deed and oh yeah by the way so we just asked that. There's certain stipulations that we put on how you can use that land. Okay but for the most part used as you see fit this is. This is the context of trust today in terms of trust the way they term it. It's it's also an oxymoron. Lutely wow but again for the audience. I want you. You know if if i can you know. Put some homework on you again. look up l. Louise coble was black blackfoot. She's no longer with unfortunately In her case against the united states federal government who At issue was a trust lands. Land entrust by the federal government and the miserable management of that practice. And how long that lawsuit went on. I'll say when i'm more than ten years and And there's also a documentary which i'll try to find him. Put lincoln show notes for you guys I can't remember the title of top. My adam so sorry I think it was called the first one hundred or something like that. One hundred Was is part of the title. But anyway i'll i'll try to get it for you guys and find it's well worth watching Very well done But you'll understand much better after watching that The challenges we have is as indigenous people with Trust lands and As we always say on this show you know it's a it's a bland That we use with very distinct. Stipulations around it Because you can also tie it to more trying to say my brain is just isn't working today guys. I'm sorry Sovereignty right When we talk about being a sovereign indian people be at tribe or a nation. Very careful with the word nation even because current legal structure but but needless to say We are not completely sovereign in this country. The way we our ancestors once where before colonization So everything is stipulated to us in dictated to us even to this very day so even even the use of land is dictated to us as to how we may and may not do certain things with that land but yet everyone else has comp carte blanche the only the only difference is privatization of lands. If i if you own it win in have the deed in hand presumably. You can do a lot more of that. Land than a lot of our tribes are able to do They're still rules. Acknowledged that as well but But we were talking earlier about equity versus equality. It's not a level playing field by any stretch and imagination. So no it's not all right morning don and chat to see you good morning all in yep so as we move on again. You're listening to episode three thirty Just some things to know is the title this week Today we're going to talk about The ma lobster harvest are a mic. mock lobster harvester. Want some answers another article be. This is our time in. This is our show not us per se. But i'll let you guys try to guess on that one and then last but not least again A story that's published through at most Entitled refining democracy. This fourth of july. I wanna have a. I want to have a discussion today about About the fourth of july holiday. That's coming up here in the united states tomorrow. So yes. I'm gonna have that discussion so it's important brother europe. Well before we do that. Let's do listener voicemail. You're right. How did i miss that. How did i miss that. That's okay I did. I know how i did it because they because i grouped in the wrong place. Yes we do. Have one voice message. put it. Put it over here and this was from listener charles Who who called in. Here's what he had to say. According to baca the acc there was one hundred and thirty nine residential schools in canada. And something like. I don't remember what it is up. Top my head. Three hundred and forty seven in the united states. So why don't we hear about the ones in the united states gonna happen when they start finding bodies in the us. Let's just one thought. I got Love you guys and the other one is so. I get an overwhelming Consensus a lot of young people and people in general whether it's in canada or the us and they all say the same thing about this residential school stuff. What happened and young. People old people as well they say. What do you want me to do about it. Why should i have to pay for you. Know people the past did. Why should i be held responsible. And this is all over. Not just not right. Thank you for that charles. Yes Wholeheartedly agree On your last point Another quote my father That it's a come. It's incumbent upon Our younger folks as well as ourselves To to not let what happened in the past happened again the contexts. My my father used was In i asked why why we have so many native people that are in the military service. Why are we defending a country. That his you know taking a dump on us time and time and time and time again And that was. That was his response as he sought to prevent a foreign power from coming over here again and doing it again And so for these young younger people. And i and i know i i believe charles was referring to non indigenous people That would still be my answer because now you know at least in canada you. It's much harder for you now to turn your heads away with thousand bodies in front of you here. In the united states there are efforts underway. including Under secretary talent is Has opened a what i understand is an investigation here in the states at the federal level and and We'll have to see how that precedes Also of some privatized efforts to fund programs To do gp are In you know around in the vicinity of these of these residential schools here Because you can bet and rest assured And i don't see that in a positive sense It went on here. And you're going to see stories come out Relevant to this country's own sins in this area Because it's it's well documented Here as well. So but but yeah but those are my. Those are my initial thoughts Is coming for sure. So more into sandra and chat just mature. Say that before but go ahead sorry. Cut you off. No that's okay. Good morning sandra. Anybody else came in that. I didn't see charles. Thank you for your voicemail. There's there's a reckoning to be had whether or not the country is ready for it is a discussion to be had whether or not the country. It's going to allow that reckoning to happen is another discussion to be had. But there's a reckoning that's coming and non indigenous folk that have assumed the power of authority for many generations are worried but they're worried for the wrong reasons they're worried about retaliation truly and that's not why they should be concerned. They should be concerned because these things have happened and they should be concerned because they should be teaching their children to not let it happen again. They need to be concerned with acknowledgement. They need to be concerned with accepting responsibility and they need to be concerned with the task of teaching. What happened owning up to what happened and writing. The wrongs that occurred and put in place practices policies and behaviors keeping it from happening again dismantling the prison system in its current form dismantling policing in its current form dismantling other aspects of systemic racism. That's how you can show your concern instead of being afraid of retaliation on trying to retaliate against you. That's not what's happening here depends but but okay well. They're they're looking at retaliation in the form of you know native storming their houses and communities and dragging them out by the hair. That's that's the kind of stupidity i've heard. I hear that you know. I'm coming out of in the context of would it be justified. Would it be justified. No it would not in my opinion would not be justified nor would it be necessary. It wouldn't be necessary but From the context of history. I'm gonna disagree with you on that. Well that's that's all well and good but it's it's something that's not necessary and i don't think it's justified. Because approaching an evil of that's sort with another equal eagled does not does not move the needle forward now and i hear that. And that's what i. That's what i was referring to and i said you know from the context of history. Let me let me frame reframing. The feeling of wanting to do that. I think is very real. Oh absolutely i. Would it solve anything. No that's where i agree with. You know it would not so. That's why i wanted to reframe it but But i don't want to just ignore that feeling that oh no no. All of us have right. Don't know one in the native community. Or i should say a majority of us in the native community. Aren't ignoring it that that's not going to happen. That's not happening correct. Because it's it's very much alive in our dna It's very much alive and cultures. It's very much alive and who we are. We will not forget. We cannot forget it. It's that's the core root of historical trauma absolutely so that that that's why again i bring it up in the context of history. So so thank you charles. And you're absolutely right. A lot of people are young people especially in and you know the older generations are well. I'm i'm not to blame. It's not my fault blah blah blah. The these are all statements of of people not wanting to take some sort of accountability acknowledgement and participate in dismantle dismantling a system that they've been a beneficiary of for generations those statements of a lack of willingness to do their part. And i've heard that a lot in the last month. Yup in the last month the more the unfortunately the more these stories come out and they must come. I will dig my heels in the ground on that the more the opposition rises because they don't want the opposition meaning the the the desire to keep keep these stories in a box in a bottle up on a shelf in a closet with the door closed right so because they don't want to address it because it's a truth that they don't want to admit to and the day that the the day that i'm talking about unfortunately in i i hear the arguments about you know People just didn't know you know in man. That's a factor too. I i recognize that but the problem is there's enough people that have known these histories in these in these conditions and still refuse to do anything except to do anything You know turned a blind eye. Whatever whatever you wanna call it so The the backlash coming from of what i referred to cautiously as the dominant culture Is is a result of feeling cornered. Because they're now being forced to face at least in this one instance the the and i don't mean one instance as in one case but this one area that they must now address at least in canada And i was listening to your episode on wednesday brother in The the statements of of Justin trudeau relevant to Pointing a finger. At pope francis and trying to obfuscate his responsibility is is beyond laughable saying that they the pope as as One of the highest representatives of the catholic church needs to apologize For those deaths well no Even though canada has made A has done a as made more of an effort. I'll say in in apologizing to indigenous people than the united states has it's still laughable that he would turn around in in in point a finger at the pope and try to deflect responsibility said he has himself january two to to salsa in general Just i couldn't. I couldn't let that go by. Yeah yeah get your own house cleaned up there buddy. That's our message and You know we were still Still after that the there are a called the first apology from our own government here. So if you haven't listened to that episode and my brothers talking about episode. Three two nine title. Is that a scapegoat smell cooking. Did you see the art together for that. No i haven't seen go take a look. It's exposed it it it it. It should be on the website. Oh outside entity here in a minute but so yeah i think it speaks volumes but anyway i just thought that was rich trying to point the finger at and say hey you need to apologize it happened in your country your buffoon. His his own father who was the prime minister before him correct allowed it to happen anyway in the current episode. It's time for native news unless there was something else wanted to know that i'm pretty much done again. I think charles for the for the voice message. Yes thank you charles. All right. we've touched on this subject on the show in past episodes and this one is about mc my lobster harvester wanting answers and this article is written by angel more for a pt and national news posted in indian country today dot com matt cope of north nova scotia. Canada wants lobsters seized by federal fisheries department accounted for. And you know he should want them accounted for. You know being a lobster harvester at somebody takes his catch. He should have a right to know what happened to it exactly. Yeah they took his fishing gear. They took everything and for the the you know the agency not to say anything is appalling but typical but typical. You know the man's geared been sitting in a federal fishery compound for who knows how long and he spent months trying to get it back. Well he just kept fighting. And i don't blame him exactly. I don't blame him when he unloaded geared that he finally got back this week it was damaged traps were damaged. Ropes were cut and as he states in the article. The traps are cheap. Ropes aren't cheap and you know. They took his property for months at a time in all of a sudden gave it back when it's all damage in. There's no way he can use it to fish. You know that's that's pretty sad for an agency to do really sad now. Cope harvests lobster off the coast of south western nova scotia. Asserting his treaty right to catch fish to earn a moderate livelihood. Now that right was affirmed by the supreme court of canada in nineteen ninety nine and the landmark ruling the martial ruling said that ottawa can only infringe the treaty right if it has substantial compelling purpose to do so obviously. They didn't i mean. How much is one fisherman with. Pots going to damage the fishing industry in in nova scotia. What's going to happen. We've reported on similar articles where mcmath fisheries lobster fisheries were confiscated traps. Were damaged. crops. Were still caught. Crops were stolen cropped. The catch was stolen. Excuse me and buildings burn vehicles. Burn on the catch. I mean you know. He he He in this article stated you know openly. I want know what what was in there. What was what was in the traps and because he should be compensated for the damage meaning they they need to replace those traps and they need to and they need to compensate him completely for the lobster loss all right so to justify what they did to this man charged for fishing out of season without a license really You know the supreme court says that you know the native people to that area have a right to fish regardless of what the season is. You know if your family's hungry you're not gonna wait until it's lobster season to try to feed them so you know. They seized the agency seized sixty nine. Seventy to sixty two of seventy two traps. Excuse me now. They're going to hold part of its its traps. And they're not going to release them for a time undetermined which will be sometime after the court case and the department didn't say whether the what happened to the lobster. Now mr pope says the cats whose worth seven thousand and he plans to file complaint. And i don't blame him. I would file a complaint. I think they're in violation. According to the way this article positioned itself that they were in violation of federal law that mr cope but the agency that confiscated his lobster equipment. Exactly it should be the catch plus the cost to replace every single trap that was damaged by the department. The question and what. Mr cope states. In the article he will harvest lobster again as soon as his gears repair. And he's to appear in court on july eighteenth. Well if this judge is going to be fair he's going to paul. Mr copes right to fish under the nineteen ninety nine treaty. That says he can. Under the one thousand nine hundred ninety nine landmark marshall ruling not not uphold not uphold the treaty with. You know speculative condition no correct now agency that took mr pope's stole mr copes property they didn't have substantial a compelling purpose to do so out season come on So you know. I wish mr cope luck in his court case. I'm hoping the judge will say. Hey you know. Canadian federal agency. You were out of line and i hope he wins. Some sort of you know monetary compensation for the damage that he's received and for the pain and suffering that he's received so good luck to you. Mr cope you win. I'm gonna try to keep an eye on this case and find out what the disposition is absolutely and it's how it's always one of these things too when you're when you're waiting for the judge's decision judge of all right it's during the table with clinched fists right know and white knuckled because you want justice to be served in in you have such a high level of skepticism about that right and it takes them forever to process anything. Meanwhile he's out at least seven. Granted this point. Oh yeah you know. They don't care by by the article. I'm not even clear why the heli took the traps begin with thank you so it's like you know what was your reason spot check. You have to take all of his traps as a spot check. That's why they don't. They don't provide in article they don't provide substantial and compelling purpose for confiscating mr copes property It's just like when they they confiscated all the lobster from that Fishery that co up a couple of months back they didn't have a substantial compelling purpose then either so but like you said they don't statewide. They took took his property other than he was fishing out of season. Not good enough. Pay up rent is due. Rent is due hurry. Our next article is entitled. This is our time. This is our show. The indigenous presence at the twenty twenty one tribeca film festival. New york The article goons is for through indian country today. arco goes on the same when filmmakers taika What t t hope pronounced that right. Who is maury and sterling. Harjo was seminal and muskogee creek Would trade funny stories about their indigenous upbringings. It initially seemed the comical tales would stay between the two friends then one day. They were struck by an idea. What if they made a show about these stories Kind of like two guys at sadhana couch and goes you know what if we did. A news show opinion laced about the happenings in the world that affect indigenous people. Yeah it sounds quote. We'd been zombies and westerns too. long native. people are some of the funniest people in the world and our communities are rich and vibrant and quirky and weird and lovely and beautiful and sad. And that's what this show depicts. Close quote said harjo of his new comedy show reservation dogs which premiered at the tribeca film festival last week. It wasn't the only indigenous story. Founded the twenty twenty one tribeca film festival the prestigious film festival which had occurred annually in new york city since two thousand and one featured eight films that either centered indigenous stories or were written by indigenous people. The lineup included reservation dogs boroughs joe buffalo catch the fair one Cap them wa. I probably pronounced which of that. I apologize Sheikha wa primera. And they're trying to kill us. Indian country today attended the screenings and interviewed cast members the takeaway native storytelling on the national level is more present than ever quote. We've been part of cinema from the very beginning and we've we've never been portrayed in a realistic way and that's happening now and it's beautiful close quote. Harjo said his highly anticipated comedy reservation. Dogs will start running on fx on hulu later this summer on august ninth but had an early screening the festival it followed the adventures of four indigenous teenagers in rural oklahoma as they attempt to make their way to california and stars defacto Wanna tie who. Jim jimmy devry jacobs. I can't pronounce it. I'm so sorry Who's of mohawk descent. Pollino alexis alexis nakota Soon nation and lane factor. Kato and seminal creek The break through production involves a radical it. Which is in quotes concept. Which harjo hopes won't be rare in the film industry for long every writer director and series regular on the show is indigenous quote. That shouldn't be a radical thing That they're showing us as human beings but it's very radical and it's about time and twenty twenty one hydro said throughout the interviews cast members who had gathered in new york to celebrate. The show's release continuously emphasized. How much The all indigenous production felt like a family gathering quote was the first time i had ever experienced feeling of home on set and community. Jacobs said this family reunion. Atmosphere seemed to extend out into the audience as well. Many viewers at the premiere were indigenous hailing from various native nations across the country. But now living in new york city they had eagerly signed up for a ticket when they heard that reservations dogs would be premiering at tribeca. It's really cool to see an all native ca true and cast especially living here But being from oklahoma close quote said to audience members who were muskogee creek quoting again. We'd been hearing about the project for the last year. So it's one of those things where we we'd follow up. Follow any updates. That came out. Close quote one attendee. Patricia tarrant amanda. An era was especially looking forward to the comedic aspects of the show quote. We use humor as a coping mechanism through trauma. Interject generational trauma. We use humor to help us recover from it and move on close court. She said that is so true. That is so true. Jacobs echo death. Set this sentiment. According again it makes sense that this is a comedy because native people are funny and tell me one native person who doesn't use humor to cope with all the say with all this shit that we that we deal with the jacobs in a post screening panel the show demonstrates that sense of humor that we have and that's like making fun of each other. That's like a smart ass type of humor. That's also mourning and celebrating the and healing all in one close quote. Our jobs said it was a chance for non native audiences to be invited into the type of teasing humor in community that indigenous people know so well quote. I'm excited for both indigenous and non-indigenous audience members to watch reservation dogs and to see indigenous stories at the helm jacobs said excitement about the show and the potential for future indigenous. Lead projects was apparent in the engaged audience as well as in the cast behind the scenes comments. All four lead actors had similar advice for the next generation of indigenous actors writers and directors. And the rest of this will be in the show. Notes you guys. It's a good article very very glad to see The rep there. It's it's so so very important Yeah it's like. I would say also in a way i probably get probably get an not not push back on this but Capturing the essence like they were talking about you know A family reunion environment onset. And things like that. I understand exactly what you're talking about. And that's usually the best recipe for successful Production no matter what. It is right if If everybody has that failing it you know the end result tends to be much much better. It's not fake. It's not you know contrived your or Manufactured right so. I think that'll be a dynamite thing. I always look for but yeah. That's i wish them. Luck hall. tribeca fair is. It's been a good thing. For filmmakers specially indie filmmakers so sandra sane and chat yes native actors and crew. As does rutherford files falls. Excuse me rutherford. Paul's my voices wavering. Wavering wavering here problem brother me. Let me give you voice. Give your voice arrest. I'll do racism in america all right. That'd be flow. we do that. We have to play this a talk there. You go thank you michael. all right. The ugly the ugliness of of racism still still lurks slithering about to and fro waiting to bite us when we least expect and at the academic level. It's more prevalent than most people know. Racism lurks behind decisions to deny black high school students from being recognized as the top in their class and this was written by jan djamil k. Donor so associate. Professor of education at william and mary at william and mary and published in yahoo news. Okay got i i. I thought i'm sorry. I misread her heard that wrong. I thought i thought you were saying that. The offense to place it william and mary no no okay. Sorry that's why i was like twice fragility the reason behind to black mississippi high schoolers. Losing their valedictorian solid salutory status. You dog said yes. Yup marley like gosh to students of color. I era washington and layla. Temple where named valedictorian salutatorian. At west point high school in mississippi and twenty twenty one is a salutatorian. The valedictorian is the student. That has the highest academic score for four years in high school. Right and the salutatorian is the second second highest near loser. No shortly after two white parents question where the school officials said get ready had correctly. Calculated the top academic honors so they they questioned whether they calculated the the the scorch properly implying. That black kids couldn't possibly attained aspire to those levels that's what they were implying ultimately alternate as per status quo. The school superintendent named to white students et co ballot. The colts a libertarian. On the day of graduation high school seniors with the highest. Gpa in their graduating class or chosen to be valedictorians and offer and are often. Excuse me responsible for delivering the graduating speech. Salad outs solid solid. Turin's bell who were high. I'm convinced brother that words like this. We're not we're not supposed to pronounce probably people. I'm sorry who are high school seniors with the second highest. Gpa and the graduating class often give the opening remarks. The superintendent attributed attributed the mix up to a new school counselor who was given incorrect information on how to calculate class rankings. So it was a mix up. Somebody didn't stand and they gave those black kids the top score. It's when they didn't deserve him. Yeah as an educational researcher who focuses on race inequality the article's author says. I am aware that the controversy at west point high school is by no means isolated. No it's not because the same thing happened to one of my cousins when we graduated high school. he was a valid victorian. And don't you know. They did the same exact thing to him so this this is not new folks. It's it's been going on for decades for some reason it It reminds me of Louie anderson's a one of his Routines comedian route. Louie anderson you talked about how racist father was and you go. He goes that black guy over there. No no no no look at them. It's like it's like always under under your under the breath the breath you know 'cause so so in this kind of situation you know it's like quietly in the background. Let's pull the dean inside and going really sure was calculated correctly. I mean look exactly the same thing it really same thing a history of overlooking black valedictorians back in one thousand nine hundred ninety one a federal judge in covington georgia resolved a dispute between a black high school senior that a black high school senior had with the white student over who gets to be valedictorian by making them. Share the honour okay. That's to me that. That is a cantu participation trophy later. The white students family asked the school drop his candidacy from the academic honor. Now whether they did that because it was the right thing to do or that. They didn't want the kid sharing the stage with a black kid. It's glut never going to be known but it begs the question in twenty eleven camberley wimberly. Okay a black student in little rock. Arkansas had her valid valedictorian. Honor stripped away by her principal to be given to a white student with the lower. Gpa wembley's lowest grade. During all four years of high school was a be the rest of wimberly's courses honors and advanced placement. She received as in her lawsuit. Wimberly claimed that a day after being informed that she was the ballot. Torian for mcgee. I'm sorry i mckee high school. The principal told her mother molly bratton that he decided to name. A white student co valedictorian. I became familiar with these kinds of alex. Victorian dispute twenty. I examined the two thousand seventeen lawsuit of jasmine shepherd. A student at cleveland high school in mississippi shepherd had the highest grade point average in her class. However the day before graduation she was forced to be co balloted tori in with heather boss. A white student with the lower gpa white fragility plays out and my peer review article analyzing shepherds case. I examined from the standpoint of critical race theory. Critical race theory is a theoretical framework that examines racism as a social construct ingrained in the american legal and political system in my analysis as the author i conclude that the decisions to force a black students to share top honors with a white student results from psychological discomfort down as white fragility. This is a state of stress experienced by some white people when they are presented with information about people of color that challenges their sense of entitlement. You think i maintain that when students of color and named top students in the graduating class as shepherd was in two thousand sixteen white society may begin to fear that students of color are encroaching upon their social turf so to speak. The rest of this article will be on the show notes. It's a good read and it does happen folks. It happens all the time is it. Is it's a concerted effort to deprive children of color of an honor that they have strive to achieve. It's designed to deflate and disavow those children's account accomplishment. It's designed to continue to treat them as other. It's designed to enforce the belief that children of color are inferior to white children. Yup ball hockey so this systemic racism sickness is not something that's new. It's something for sure that people continued to to deny and as long as people are going to deny that systemic racism exist. You know. I hear people ask me all the time. Well what can be done to to help. Set things in motion to to make things equal. And i tell them time and time again until you're ready to acknowledge that systemic racism exist and you. You're willing to accept the fact that it's caused harm to people of color and until you're willing to do something to dismantle the system it's always gonna exist so you know. Don't come at me talking about you know how much you're you know you believe that such and such is so wrong and you include a but no sorry. Don't don't ask me why. I'm just one individual. What can i do well if you have to ask me that question. You're not really concerned with doing much. You're not willing to look at look at the the the problem and do the hard work. You're not willing to you when you come at me. But i'm only one person that you already told me that you're just providing lip service. I don't wanna hear it couple of a couple of episodes ago. We did a a show entitled if you if you're not gonna talk to talk don't walk the walk Because it's disingenuous it's phony and it's a lie period. That's all i got on that brother my my nine. Oh i hear you so with that. Women are say to west point high and to complaining parents. Yup got to say about that. Okay so these two holidays thanksgiving and the fourth of july are problematic for our people in many many ways Today we're gonna talk about fourth of july a little bit and earlier in the show today I mentioned revisiting Lamb back and in researching content for today's episode I didn't really want to end the show without talking about this fourth of july holiday For which the united states supposedly celebrating this country's independence from what has been written as oppressive control by england. Right now that till abrasion officially is tomorrow here but honestly The very existence of this holiday on its own ish. The sheer definition of hypocrisy celebrating independence. on that basis after committing murder against indigenous people in justifying under under the The doctrine of christian discovery and The taking of our lands largely by force and then later through illegal sales Honestly is the very hypocrisy that i speak of. So while researching i came across an article published through atmos On one of their frontline call mists yasina funes interviewed. Nick tilson. Who was the president and ceo of indian collective an organization which is dedicated to building the collective power of indigenous peoples through justice inequality for all people and the planet. So this article is really a. It's in an interview format right and so to open it. Your senior writes every fourth of july. We see red white and blue flags blowing in the wind and as a matter of fact yesterday yesterday brother because again we have we. Have we have to casinos here right. That are that are indian right. This old man gets out of a car dressed head to toe and it looks like it looked like he was naked and then decided he was going to stand in front of a humongous american flag inches role until it wrapped his whole body. And of course looking for directions to the casino right you standing. Yeah he wasn't that far. This is actually in a storefront down the street from it and then asking for directions and he looked like he was half lit right. God good luck but Anyway i was struck by again this over patriotic stance right but again. You've seen a writes every fourth of july. We see red white and blue flags blowing in the wind. We see so called patriots grilling their burgers and hotdogs celebrating the creation of the united states of america. However many of us are still not free not the more than two million people currently incarcerated not the black brown indigenous inquire communities under siege by a military militarized police state. None of us are free until we're all free. This holiday is often day of rest for me. She she continues a day spent a day to spend time with family and friends. However why don't we make it a of resistance instead. That's what it that's what it should become said. Nick tilson the presidency. Yo again of indian collective So from here you see no Conducted the interview in and I i pulled a few of the excerpts that i wanted to dish care figured we could. We could talk More amber so so she goes on and ask nick. What does the fourth of july mean to you. And nick responded. July fourth is a celebration of a so-called democracy that has been used to steal land from indigenous people. So when i think of the no when i think of july fourth i think of it in the same way. I think about mount rushmore. It's an entire hypocrisy. It's this false narrative of democracy that continues to be lifted up and celebrated the problem with it as they celebrate democracy as a purity rather than actually saying. Hey this is an opportunity for this country to reflect on what it hasn't got right and that people are still suffering as a result of this democracy to me. When i see the american flag being waved i see this false over Jemma ties version of patriotism. It pisses me off because this so-called democracy is about giving people's rights is about giving people rights and then how how is it that this entire nation has been built from stolen lands of indigenous people. And that the act of returning the land to indigent people has not yet made it into mainstream society today. It's important that we push back against the narrative on the fourth of july. It's an opportunity for people to take action. it's an opportunity to challenge those false narratives and it's an opportunity to introduce new ones. That will actually help. Move the nation forward. What do you think about that brother. I think he's Spot on a you know until this false narrative of this land that people call america being the greatest country on earth and the free country on earth until that false narrative is killed You know there is no. There is no equality for people you know. It's it is a false democracy. It's over-dramatized and it's false patriotism. Patriotism isn't what these fools consider patriotism to be. Call yourself a patriot. You care about the hungry. You work towards finding ways to feed them you care about the elderly. You find ways to to protect them and make sure they're safe you care about you talk about patriotism. You wanna be a patriot. Make sure the homeless people have somewhere to stay. Work towards andy homelessness. You call yourself a patriot then work towards equality for everybody. Not just those people that fit into your narrative of of being a patriot. That's what being a patriot is. This country is as far from that as as you know. The east coast is from the west coast. Well it's been it's been redefined by Radical right politically speaking. Exactly why. I said what people consider patriots now is not patriotism No has it ever been exactly and And then you get you get white supremacy leadership such as the former fool in the white house Saying things like our country is sick right meaning meaning. They're uncomfortable with the browning of the country if you will. Even though i physically looking at me i'm not. I'm not brown in that context. But he's referring to everybody who is not like him correct the white european history necessarily that very laughable that. That's their that. You know that that they take so secretly in their in their little holes in caves and whatever wherever else did they hang out in are saying we'd take our country back. I always loved that phrase to have to take our country back. We'll from who challenged people with that all the time. When when president obama was running and when he became president we have to take our country back and get in their face. And i said from who have. We been invaded trying to invade us. What happened they you know. Throw this premise of you know Country won't be perfect until you know it's absolutely you know lily white. Everybody has a house with the white picket fence. And gotta gotta get that that whole scenario that that they're now crying is being lost. Let's see what they don't if they don't what they failed to understand. And what they don't what they don't see as their knowledge ing the systemic racism that they've been a beneficiary will for generations. They don't see that acknowledgement. They can't understand that they're acknowledging. Systemic racism is alive and well and wanting to be on the increase. The other piece. You know that that always gets missed. Is that as well. You know and Now i'm gonna go back to a wet nick headset here. toward the end of one of these paragraphs he goes. I see this false over a dramatized version of patriotism a pisses me off because in this so-called democracy is about giving people's rights. Then how is it. This entire nation has been built from the stolen lands of indigenous people and that the act of returning the land to indigenous people has not yet made it to mainstream society. Well i watch. I watch unfortunately a lot of mainstream news cable news and if you were to turn on the tv right now you would see exactly what he's talking about. You'll see everything but that you'll see ya okay. Cbs this morning was doing a story. About the riemann unification of two families. That have a connection to betsy. Ross okay betsy effing ross. Because of her connection to the flag all right so you know. This speaks to a narrative problem in this country. The telling of only one small part of the history right And that is why we have a a narrative problem in this country. When you have mainstream news media that will not run a story like we're doing right now that will not Put a alternative perspective. And if they do and i don't i don't mean to single out a particular group of people if they do it's generally comes from black community or they fit something in that because they're up against a an ad break and so oh well this story about you know Asian people being beat up by black people. We'll fit that one because it's six. It's sixty seconds or ninety seconds in length. You see what i'm saying. So it's it's a contributing problem that we have is. Is this picking. And choosing of stories when they have the power of influence over being the year hitting the eyes and ears of millions of americans. But you won't hear a lamb back story. You won't hear the rest because then put the different shade on this holiday that they're celebrating touched on earlier when i was responding to to the email now let me let me move on here a little bit. You seen then ask nick. How about the words freedom and liberation the words that this holiday is supposed to symbolize but actually doesn't for many of us. What do those words mean to you as an indigenous person she was asking right. And he responded. I never actually associated freedom and liberation with the american flag when i think about freedom and liberation as an indigenous person in this country i think about the time in which we as people were able to live freely. We were able to speak our languages. We were able to raise our children. We were able to be freely. Be on this land and stewarding in relationship with this land not managing this land and being in a relationship with this land i think about the unencumbered ability to be in a relationship with the land and with the people of being able to do everything from growing our own food to raising our own families and to do it without persecution without a system that keeps us down so when i think of liberation and freedom. That's what i think of the power to act in self determination so the words liberty not words but word the word liberty brother. It's another word that's brought up often by the right and certain politically again speaking often by white supremacist. We're losing our liberty. We're losing our freedom than they time together as if again crying like they lost something you know. It's very funny. How their own ancestors impoverished many of us especially indigenous people in this context because not just through enslavement but you encumbered our ability or my ancestors ability to move freely. Speaking of my own peak. What you know history. You see the same people that keep crying about losing something. losing freedom. Losing their so-called liberty puts no onus whatsoever on their own ancestors doing that to us taking away our ability to be free and so when you have an education system that also will not embrace another point of view another perspective. It's designed to reinforce again what we consider the false narrative right reinforcing perpetuating yet sadly feel to the white supremacy fire if you will also gives them a convenient excuse to didn't know i didn't know that affected your people that way setting aside that you know you live in twenty twenty one and you have In most cases the ability to jump on the internet and learn something from news sources that don't come from. Cbs nbc abc cnn. And most definitely fox. The most americans won't take that time because they take for granted their status in the country over other people whether whether whether they acknowledged or not and so when we look at a the fourth of july to them s- great have another hot dog. Have some baked beans. Let's go swimming. Oh monday by the way. I don't have to work holiday right with no capitulation of really what it means when you ask them straight when we asked him directly what is for july to you. Oh that's that's when we assessed our freedom from england we didn't want to be under the rule of king and queen will tell you if there have a moderate amount of care never about how the country was formed. Nope or anything to that nature. So you know It bothers me every time we have this holiday. I don't consider myself unique. But it's like you. It makes it. Some people might might even even within my own family right. Unfortunately we say colonization is a a disease right. It's a very real thing to me. Because we need more people within our ending communities to remember wh- where the holidays came from and not to celebrate them. So as you pointed out. Shouldn't it be or nick pointed out. Shouldn't it be honestly us doing the work of putting out content that differs from the meaning of this holiday. However people can do it right if it sharon his story like we're doing today or if it's actually going out and you know organizing Some activists whatever it may be to bring about another viewpoint. Because i think it's important. Let's see i've got one more. Extra pairs i wanna reach you guys see and it went on and ask nick inner interview. Something you really. You said really resonated with me. She said freedom is being able to raise your own families without persecution that feels especially relevant as we enter this movement of reckoning with our history as a nation but also as turtle island as we find more remains of indigenous children in boarding schools in canada. How do you see those discoveries relating to the lamb back movement and in reclaiming the way of life before colonizers came and inflicted all this trauma. And he responded. Oh yeah i think. There's this assumption that because we all say quote land back we just want to go back into the past and undo everything. That's been done when i talk about land back. It's about returning land back to our people and undoing the power structures and the system of white supremacy and racism. That made it possible for the stealing of our lands in the first place. So we're going to have a true and honest conversation about reckoning with this country's past and present indigenous peoples struggle must be center stage and the starting point of that conversation can't just be about healing f that the starting point of the conversation has to be about the return of indigenous lands back into indigenous hands when they stole the land. They stole our food systems. They stole our societal structures. They stole our economic systems. They destroyed. They took our children away from their families and put them in boarding schools. What's being uncovered through. All the children who have been killed by the boarding schools is a reminder that hey we're not just a a a bunch of radical indian saying to make things right. There's there's a systematic approach to colonize indigenous people and there are dead indigenous children in mass graves throughout this nation. Who are beginning to be uncovered. Is that what is really. Is that what it really has to take in order for people to realize that we are here that we're part of the cultural fabric that makes up this country and we're absolutely part of the cultural fabric of the future of this country. So quote land back is a war cry for the liberation of indigenous people. And it's unapologetic. We have to say what we want. We have to say what we mean. And the f. ing land needs to be returned and then we can talk about healing and then we can talk about what racial justice looks like. That's what i love about the land back movement. It's really simple. We as indigenous people have have learned throughout history through the court system through the process of colonization. That if you don't say exactly what you mean the system will try to twist it so go head brother no i. I agree with exactly everything that he said because it has to happen. It has to happen. And if we don't state what it is that we demand require want it will get twisted and so the the you know. We talked a little bit today about you know generational trauma that you know that that term terminus come up a couple of times today right you know for me again when i turn on the tv and if you you know when you're when you have this knowledge of the truth of the formation of the country all the flag-waving makes me sick to my stomach. And i have family members. You know when. I you know I'm i'm not invited to gatherings often times. Because they know it's coming. And i mean just me. I have to remind them. I don't talk about just not not just my indigenous relatives other people coloring my family here okay. Yeah i kind of got used to being shunned in uninvited to the holiday gathering's problem in my early early to mid twenties. Enjoy talking to you know consumed with it. No but it's still like they don't want to be reminded you know and so my message is part of those gatherings need to at least have a component of reminder. Just sit down for half an hour and talk about because it gets it out like us an example that you may have seen on tv for example okay during when the holidays conducted if you get together with family and go did you see that crap on cbs. When they were talking about blah blah blah t to me that's healing when when it can do it amongst my relatives because it's an reinforcement that we're not forgetting who we are where we came from and and and why it's wrong. Okay but what is wrong is not to invite relatives because you know a lecture is coming. That's not solving the problem. And by the way. I've tried flipping that inviting people over. They won't come if you're wondering so yeah it's kind of sad but i say yay more for me. Well what it ends up. As you know you'll you'll visiting with one or two people as opposed to a big big the big gatherings or what. I'm really referring to break nine. Like eight families or more with thirty two kids running around you know. It's sad to say but the education has to begin locally and when i mean locally i mean you know you mentioned family. That's where it has to begin at has to begin with family. It can't began with my opinion. It can't begin with community because you have those elements of community. That don't believe the truth. They don't want their narrative changed to reflect something that's opposed to their beliefs. So you know it has to start at the family level locally and spread from there and therein lies the damage and why the damage was so effective because when systemic racism got its start it started at the local level. The seeds were planted at the local level and it spread like wildfire from there So you know that's how we have to defeat it at the local level to approach. Nationally is it's great. I think that's great. And i think that part People will get it. A lot of people will say whoa. I didn't know that. Let me take a closer look But i think a the sustainability of changing the narrative has to start at the local level whether that be individual families or whether that be a tribal family. That's where it has to start. Take quick story. I had Some folks approach me to run for mayor of my town right And they were going to there. Were going to do like all the pr. All of stuff An actual campaign manager right and they all you have to do is say yes. I told him no. You know. I know because of the show I said because the opposition is going to immediately jump on every episode that we've ever produced and say he's anti-american and say he's anti this and that and that there will be people who just will not embrace anything that i'm saying because there they will not look and truly understand where i'm coming from i i said i appreciate the support but i'm gonna have say no i will back someone else possibly if you know and that's what people have to understand is i have the fortunate option. I'm not saying quote unquote americans. Don't have this option because we we certainly know. There's been low voter turnout in the past but it. It means something different when i say i have the option as an individual To vote or not vote meaning to participate in. An american system does not mean that. I consider myself an american. That's the that's the difference between who i am and who that person over there whose ancestors are not from here. I get to choose if i want to participate in the system or not. I also get to choose how i am to be defined now. Imagine if i was running for office and the question came up mr kicking. Behr do you consider yourself an american. I would have to tell them. No i do not. There will be people that will actually try to disqualify me to be as a qualified candidate. Because i would say publicly that. I don't consider myself an american citizen. I'm a citizen of the mashantucket pequot tribal nation and people. Don't understand that. No they don't and now i don't have to explain it to them but if i'm running for public office i would have to address that brick and the moment i do races over you see so at least that's how i feel and and if you go well obviously there are other native. Americans have held office currently do hold office yes. You're absolutely right but let's take deb jalan at least in public settings that i've seen i've never seen anybody posed that questionnaire you consider yourself in american citizen and see how we answer that question i think is telling so but anyway Thought started. Show that but yeah so. This holiday does not mean anything to me tomorrow tomorrow sunday. You know what i'm saying but that's me you know that'd be wanna go in celebrate the holiday you know. Do you boo right. You know but that you know for me. It's just another day and those are migrants y so cliff road. Intra excuse me history by myth myth story texas. It's wailing it's nappies over discussion of the actual events at the alamo idaho and other states. Crt of course. Apparently in idaho to kill a mockingbird is controversial. Some folks try to equate chattel slavery to indentured servitude and so he goes tough nut to crack with a certain chronological demographic and that demographic is i'll take white folks for five hundred thousand alex. The answer is ding ben away. Being that i'm i wanna start a game show completely different show. I want to start a game show in you. Know i'm trying to figure. I have some ideas but anyway i just thought i'd bring that up brother a different kind of you know if you guys are trying to understand my brain a little bit. If you ever saw the film let's see. Uhf with weird al yankovic the premises. Seeing that. one you all you haven't you gotta see it okay. The premises this without getting a lot of it away weird al yankovic plays this character who had a relative die and he inherited a television station and he had he decided to reinvent the program and completely on the show by by having content. That you normally would not see on regular mainstream and i'll i'll go as far as that and it. Was you know it was to pose a uf. So this how far back we're going. Uf a uf h. h Uff are sorry. i can't think anymore I forget what frequency but anyway in the old days before there was cable television. You had rabbit ears and you had Two frequencies that that they were broadcasting on at the time. Uhf and another one anyway. Uhf was considered the premier. Yeah it's kind of like Public radio is today right. You know like or public access that kind of stuff and so he had inherited this station in decided to run. You know unconventional content. That's the that's the kind of game show. I want produce. Let's get one thing straight. Don't kill people. Channel sixty two has the lowest ratings in the history of television. What they need is a new station manager. Not hand forget in no way a man of action. A man of courage a man of vision. Let shining billy what. What they get is a man so desperate. Put anyone on the air tallied. George how would you like their own. Tv show okay you the drake thumb conan the librarian teaching pools keeping the networks. George newman. He starts where the other stock with the number one station in town. Orion pitchers presents weird our yankovic. H of movie. Something people don't necessarily think about but anyway we'll talk more so right away. People would probably think you'd like the mouthpiece on dirty numb no not at all. It's vhf the luckily so. Yeah so look for. Look for yeah. We're we're down yankee vicks. Uhf h f was simply called very high frequency of remember correctly and the other one was ultra high frequency. Thanks for that don. Yeah thank you well. My bag is empty. yes my uses. Well guys thank you ever so much a very very fast update so know a still holding to the date of july eighth wednesday. So that's this coming wednesday. We're going to be launching indigenous peoples music with an associated website as well as launching the website of the indigenous peoples Radio and podcast network so fingers crossed So to websites to new websites that you haven't seen before we'll be going up and that'll be the launch of that. I guess brother come forward to both. Yeah so so drum. Roll please sac. And so it's it'll be it'll be cool it'll be cool looking forward to it so but all right So with that as a place out here again you can reach us. Any number of ways Most commonly is Email hosts with an s. hosts native opinion dot com and you can also reach us through social media for facebook and twitter. And you can also leave us a voicemail at eight six zero eight hundred five hundred nine five eight zero eight hundred five nine five. Is that number so my name is michael. Kicking bearing from the mashantucket pequot tribal nation in what other people call the state of connecticut. The guy over there he is david gray olive citizen of the military tribe alabama and i am located in right now drizzly southwest florida storm. Come into trying to figure out what this storm is going to. It's a cat and one so it shouldn't be too bad. You know buckle down and stay safe brother. Thank you so all right you guys. Thanks again to everybody in chat appreciate that and Don said interesting show today. That's school all right. Everybody have a great one. We'll see you on wednesday. Take care bye-bye.

Us Amanda charles erica Facebook canada aaron aaron department of interior pacific oceans david gray Aaron arif white house Louise coble mr pope mr cope Mr cope united states federal governme
States In The West Face Water Cuts After Colorado River Shortage Is Announced

Environment: NPR

02:50 min | Last month

States In The West Face Water Cuts After Colorado River Shortage Is Announced

"Support for npr in the following message. Come from y'all and pamela mon thanking the people who make public radio great every day and also those who listen residents in arizona. Nevada and across the border in mexico will have to cut their water consumption starting next year this the day after the extraordinary announcement by the us government of a first ever water shortage on the colorado river. Here's npr's kirk siegler. Some forty million people and countless farms rely on the colorado river and its tributaries. The shortage comes amidst a mega drought on the river basin. That's so far. Lasted twenty two years and as desert cities like las vegas and phoenix. Continue to grow at among the fastest rates in the us the entire reservoir system including lake mead with it's alarming white bathtub brings behind the hoover dam is now it just forty percent of capacity. Here's the department of interior secretary for water. Tanya trujillo we are seeing the effects of climate change in the colorado river basin through extended drought extreme temperatures extensive wildfires and in some places flooding landslides and now is the time to take action to respond to them. Arizona will be the hardest hit initially with these cuts. Losing almost a fifth of its entire river allotment for now california will not see any cuts because it's water rights are senior under century-old river laws. This shortage is monumental but it was also widely expected western. Water officials have been planning for this eventuality by ramping up conservation and water recycling. Tom bukowski directs arizona's department of water resources. This is a serious turn of events but not a crisis for now. Most cities won't see water. Supplies cut but farmers will in arizona. Thousands of acres of fields are expected to go fallow. Ironically the arid southwest is a huge producer of water intensive crops like cotton and alfalfa water law experts like marks quill lachey at the university of colorado say climate change will force this region to rethink how it uses its limited water. So many people rely on. We can't handle anymore stresses we're looking at a pretty dire situation right now on the river. School laci says climate. Change is drying out the soils and leading to rapid. Evaporation even a near average winters. Like this last one in the rocky mountains where snow melt feeds the river. That dry soils are acting like a sponge and they're soaking up a lot of water before that water can make it into the reservoirs. And that's likely to continue and federal water. Managers warned the shortages to will continue and probably get more severe. They'll reassess whether more cuts are needed in the next year. Kirk siegler npr news.

pamela mon colorado river kirk siegler npr department of interior Tanya trujillo colorado river basin arizona Tom bukowski lake mead river basin department of water resources us government hoover dam Nevada mexico phoenix university of colorado las vegas
Poker Action Line 06/22/2021

Poker Action Line

1:03:09 hr | 3 months ago

Poker Action Line 06/22/2021

"Everyone knows how to play poker. Honker burger well get ready to coker strategy with the people who run the games here interviews with the stars did information on wenda play and had to play better poker host. This poker action live a weekly poker. Show with your hosts. Big dave lemon and joe rodriguez. And how's everybody doing. Speak and joe the show a lot of big news today. We are going to discuss. What's happening with the online poker world because basically The doj stood in the way by challenging that wire act ruling years ago and in most recent one team back in january In the new hampshire lottery lawsuit and they Ruled in favor. The judge ruled in favor of the new hampshire lottery and said that the wire act does only applied sports betting so What that will do now is You know it left it open for the doj to make one more appeal and they had one hundred and fifty days to file it well. Today was the one hundred fiftieth day. They let the time run out and they are not going to appeal which means that could open the doors joe for a lot of online poker everywhere. Wow that finally great news. isn't it. tremendous. We just wondered you know if we would ever get past all the legal cases and always seems to kind of drag its way out but There's a limit on everything and it looks like You know this opens the door really For a poke around the country. Of course we just added michigan and now connecticut got their Deal approved by the department of the interior in their deal with the indian tribes up there so they will be going to online poker west. Virginia's also the was the fifth state but they actually have not operated anything because they're they're population of poker players is really too small to really probably make any kind of dent but what this does really joe in this goes back to. The old randy casper terminate brought on the show in the very beginning liquidity Being able to share the pools with other states in this could open the door for that. Well my question here. Dave is okay. I would imagine the doj did not challenge because these other states have opened it up just to their own states. We do know that. Nevada new jersey have Some sort of deal because of the tournament and the w so p that was online and everything but the this open it up for you know Party poker pokerstars You know these companies no longer having to to make deals with the individual states and going back to what we used to have. Well they will have to make a deal with the states but it will be to combine the pools and there's not a lot of stuff blocking at now that's the great thing The they'll be very Happy to discuss it with the other states and make deals and put things together and You know obviously there's some greed factors that good Stand in the way of that but there is now seven states. Playing legalized online poker. And they could all be playing against each other by the end of this year. Well you know. But i i would imagine. That sat was a possibility if they had decided to do that amongst themselves. No yeah i guess they could. They could do it that way. I would think they tried to get everybody in the same room and have meetings and come up with a you know Mutually beneficial plan to move forward with that That's really the only way it will really take off. You know my experience dave. Unfortunately if that's the way it's got to work out You know look what's happening in the state of california in right. They can't seem to get anything together. I would imagine the seminoles would have a lot to say about that here. In the state of florida right you know. Give up a little bit to make things for everyone. California's been trying to do this. You know for you know how many years now you know and and they just can't seem to get together between the You know the tribal nations and and the local whatever you wanna call them para mutuals go. You know the the other places that have casino. They just can't seem to come up with an agreement with this To me this is great news because obviously that's one less hurdle that people have to go through but unless we have something similar to what we had. You know prior to the shutdown. You know. it's great. But i just see this being mucked up Within the states themselves holidays going to divide this pot out. How are they going to handle each other's You know players from from different from different states The different casinos that have different agreements with the different things. I i. I don't see it's great like i said it's great news for online poker but so much more has to be worked out and and whether the states tried to sue or these like party poker and some of the other online big sites try to come back into the country without being persecuted and allowing players to deposit legally We do know that. Prior to all of this remember i think it was the state of washington that made it illegal for their citizens to play online poker My guess is these other soka site. They're going to try to do that without having to make a compact and pay all these taxes and And the states will probably come up with laws to prevent their citizens from playing this so again to me a double edged sword. It's great that they're not challenging this. But but i don't see how you're going to get all these states or large majority of them to agree to anything they just haven't been able to do it now. Let's bring back the poker players alliance great grassroots organization that is their total goal was to try to bring back online poker and after years and years banging their head against the wall. A lot of the people dropped out and eventually the i guess they sold it to somebody I don't know exactly who owns that name right now. But you need a good group of people that involved on their board of directors players and officials and legislators and let them try to bring everybody together. Have a open door meetings of for these different states to send representatives to the first thing that's going to happen. I think from what. I've been reading that michigan which just came online just starting to get their places openness already talking with pennsylvania about pursuing an opportunity to commingle their pools. You know a small state like a west virginia which couldn't do anything on their own. We'll all of a sudden that makes it more feasible for them to operate. You got connecticut. That just happened. I don't know what's going to happen there. But of course the big money pockets in the mohegan sun in the foxwoods tribes. So you know it's very interesting to see what might happen if there's some sort of organizing body and When we were unable to get traction out of that group at one time now might be the opportunity for them to return whoever Owns that name. If that's the direction they want to go. I think we could really start to unite You always will have the problem with people being greedy about Their cut of the pie but You know this is the only way to get things going and get things can happen. Well you know. I love the fact that you're positive person. Uh concern You know because the poco alliance their big thing was tackling. You know The federal laws against this and trying to get that. That doesn't seem to be the issue anymore. You know but now you know it's individual states and again knowing how to work here in the state of florida knowing that you know the state of california that had could have had a gold mine you know the amount of citizens they have their you know can't figure out a way between all those parties to get together to allow this to happen You know i. I'll give you an idea dave. I don't know this is allowed. Under the way they're the the laws are written in different states but this allows people in any state to sign up. Let's say like you just mentioned michigan. We know the new jersey pennsylvania. I think just came on you mention a few weeks ago right with the poker's headed for a little while. Now you know nevada allows us to someone like like we did with party poker that whatever globally while now you know nationally hook up with. Hey al i wanna play the wwlp online circuits. Can i play from the state of florida. And now that the doj will they have those restrictions of you have to be within. The state borders to be able to play now. That would be a game changer. Right there no question no question but you know if you have say save at four states You know you obviously have the one that you mentioned with nevada and in new jersey but the other states got their own and you know provided some good competition to the The pools in nevada and new jersey and all of a sudden you know that opens the door. Well you know. you can't beat them. Join them so everyone get together. Maybe and put together some kind of interstate online poker network and move forward with really. You know getting the excitement going. I think it's i think there's good possibilities here. You know i want. I don't want to say that there's no chance because of People just want to keep the huge slices of pie. So let's see what happens. You know this is a huge thing. Though a lot of people were just waiting to see what was going to happen here if the us government was going to further appeal in this is really a big case. Now that this is a ended in they have announced that they are not going to to fight this case. Well and again. i don't see them fighting it. Due to the fact that they know that states have already approved. And that it's been going on and and you know like you mentioned four or five six states now and probably in the very near future you know however many. Have it up you know before the legislators to to try to approve this with With sports gambling but again dave. I hate to be the pessimist here. But i don't know you know the the two big questions will be one. How do they share the revenue It's gonna be based on you know. a percentage of how many people come from your state and all of this and the fact that different poker sites run different casinos. If i'm not mistaken right you know You know so so. It's not one company. That's doing this. Which would make it that much easier. So i'm not exactly sure. The ins and outs of how you know. They would even try to claim a certain part of revenue but You know if if if you have your site In a couple of different states. And you're working together with some of the other companies. I think whoever plays in your site. That's the money that you take in in the problem. Was you know it just wasn't legal to To combine pools in and let players playing the same tournaments from different states. Now it will be now now. It's not a huge problem. Exactly it's not going to be a huge problem. That's kind of like what. I was mentioning a little while ago. Will it be legal for. Let's say you and i to be able to play you know because if if we live in nevada new jersey. Yeah it's fine now. What you're talking about is people in new jersey say michigan as you just mentioned you know. Wanna play in tournament. well you know. that's fine they. I'm an tournament wise. I'm sure they could come up with some sort of you. Know percentage based on how many people from from your state or plane in in that tournament come up with a revenues Solution there but you know the long haul you need the cash games to be able to play this and based on that alone again with so many different You know poker sites that have been you know proven and are paying you know large money to get licensed in different states and each state having their own laws as to you know who can play and you know the the nuances of how they want this to be run. Is that something that you think could be overcome with this. You know they do. I do and You know. I'm not smart enough to know all the ins and outs right now. I'm definitely going to want to read some analysis of this. But it really this landmark decision just comes down today because of the end of the one hundred and fifty day period For the us government file another appeal For those who. Who really don't know what's going on with this. The big case was the new hampshire lottery versus william bar and trump's doj Basically what they did was they were trying to get the wire. The decision of the wire act to apply to online poker in addition to online gambling and online sports betting The the obama doj under eric holder came out with a ruling that really opened the way for the first states to open their online poker by saying that the wire act only applied online sports betting so even now that's been kind of overturned as people as more and more states are move to operate online sports betting but they actually in two thousand nineteen Try to appeal. The first circuit court of appeals decided against the trump doj and When this ruling came out back in january you know they. They ran this case back in the summer last summer but a twentieth this case was finally decided and that gave them the one hundred fifty days from january twentieth to go ahead and in make one more appeal to the supreme court so It could have actually gone but of course now we have a new administration. The biden doj Is not as against it. As the trump doj was so That opens the way if you if you haven't been following this whole story and wondering why new hampshire lottery was involved in this. They just simply filed this lawsuit to to keep the government from Preventing them from running their lottery games online so That's the story and Subsistence breaking today. We're going to see some articles written by people are doing all the research and interviews and that sort of thing and i think we'll have a better idea and another week or two you know where this will take us but the early indication from people who know a lot about this stuff says this can happen very quickly that pennsylvania in michigan could be right together to open up a commingled pools You know since the biden. The oj did not appeal and You know the the shared the quantity that they have will lead to further expansion for other states wall. Yeah like you mentioned here. The states that are already running within their states I would imagine they're the ones that are going to be able to hopefully come to some sort of agreement that will you know set the groundwork for the rest of the states that you know that want to eventually have their you know their state government approve it however this is going to work out whether it's gonna come back like it was before where it's a national thing and you know individual states have to make any legal like washington did like i mentioned earlier. it is definitely positive news dave but as we both know when when it involves different governments different bodies that have different interests This'll probably take a little bit longer for the collective group states to you know to get this to the point where we used to have this before The it may never be that day or whatever. It was that april keep accent now. It may never be that good as things were back then. I think we took it for granted at that time but I understand your skepticism. The certainly um you know it's not going to happen overnight but You make these little steps along the way and things move forward. And i think something good could happen again I hope to god. I am very wrong on this and that you are hundred percent correct. Sounds if it's just you know. My my experience of dealing with the state of florida You know you know as you know what we're going through here now especially since it's controlled so much with the seminal Indians and and the compact and everything else I can only imagine how other states are going to be with this but again Even though i'm a little pessimistic on how quickly this happen. I really hope. Because i used to enjoy playing so much and i don't know how much you play back. Then dave talked about that. You didn't have very much money online. Whatever be closed down. And i believe i had just about one hundred dollars. I think i'd one hundred dollars in a few pennies in there and You know never filed for it but it was just so much fun playing online like that and and as you said our old friend randy catholic used to use that word liquidity We got a quick education as to what that meant and Obviously you know for poker players all over the country and the world. It'd be wonderful of the. Us got back into that market. Yeah well we'll see what happens You know i. I don't know what's going to happen. And all i know is there's a bunch of stories on poker fuse that i've been following It said three weeks ago. They came out with a story There's a really interesting article on there. That says twenty. Twenty one is already the most significant year in the history of regulated. Us online poker. Even though we're only halfway through the year seismic changes in the industry. They talk about so Michigan going live bed. Mgm getting into the game The launch of Borgata poker and that mgm poker and pennsylvania These are all the things that happened in the first part of the year party poker's licenses been extended out in nevada The connecticut online gambling. Bill is now signed into law and now the first thing that they talked about lining up for the second half of twenty twenty one was the end of the wire case. And they said that's gonna lead to share to quit liquidity. So they've been talking about this online there for about three weeks and You know this stuff is already in the works. There's already been discussion There's an online poker room slated to go online in west virginia after this news today You know there's bret really big companies that that are really already trying to work out the kinks in this all set up that. That leads us to a lot of excitement. Dave and then like i said i. This is one of those times when you say. I really hope. I'm very wrong on your audrey percent correct. 'cause the quicker this gets up you know on a personal basis and selfish basis. I'd love to see that happen and obviously so would so many poker players around this country. I mean you know. It's in way too damn long for us to get to that point so This is great. it is great news for sure. Let's look at our current situation. Here in florida obviously agreed between the governor and the seminole tribe They are moving forward waiting for. You mentioned that you had heard that the department of the interior in as not even received the request to approve of the compact here in florida right as of last monday. I don't know if it's changed in the last eight days. But i was told by very reliable sources that they had not received and had not reached. Who's ever desk got to reach the For the compact here and once they do have it they have forty five days to act on it I believe we spoke welfare. You said that connecticut had something similar and they approved it immediately yesterday. That came out right. And i'm not expecting any delays. You know as far as that's concerned but until it is approved by them nothing can go forward here in the state of florida as far as our compactors concerned right I was just looking at some of the reaction. And i wanted to talk about some of that one of the big things. That's been out in the news a couple of weeks ago was that the city of wral Started worrying about all this talk. Talk about Bring it to the trump Property inderal Moving one of the casinos. They're having online not online but Brick and mortar casino and poker in the durrell area. And they actually the city of durrell out and filed a bill to ban casinos in durrell. So that's that's the first fight against him right now. They weren't restricted because they're about eighteen miles from hollywood casino and You know so. They'd trying to be proactive and cut us off. The durao city council voted for four two zero to ban gambling in casinos from the city unless improved or excuse me approved by the residents of the city in a referendum so it's not impossible but You know just what's one more legal hurdle in the way while remember you know. The state of florida has a law. That says any expanded gambling has to be approved by statewide vote and it has to be sixty percent now. The the opponents against this compact You know as far as sports betting. I'll get to the sports betting part of that You know are fighting that you know very hard now. They're starting to file lawsuits against that There's even talk that the seminoles Will not have a walk up window. Let's say like in vegas. I haven't been back to jersey. I know i'm sure you can go into any of casinos and place a bet like you could in vegas but that they want you to have You know an online account so you can bet it through your phone or your computer at home and opponents against are saying well no because you know the the i. I don't know if the technical word for for for the this up. But that's you know you have to actually go into the casino and make the bet there right. The seminoles has to be on. Be on technically property. They're saying well as long as the I don't know what it is the receive or whatever it is you give my age here for the listeners but you know and so there's the argument that's going to go on. You know once the compact is signed and then you have lawsuits. Had already been filed by people like dr king's and Fan duel who. Wanna get a piece of that pie. You know and You know they. They set forth the taxing purposes. And the way that it's supposed to work dave I believe we mentioned this. Maybe on the show a couple of shows ago you know but according to the compact It's supposed to be a twenty percent tax for the state on sports gambling and the seminoles if it if it is allowed to go to other properties like ours you know casino miami and all over the state of florida They will also charge a twenty percent tax. And from what i understand everybody will just send forty percents to the seminoles and they will forward the state money from there. So you know Gamblers in the state Definitely wanna see this properties. That don't have casinos. Definitely want to see this because it will definitely make a big impact as far as their revenue is concerned but You know. I don't know if you know how much this usually works out to dave. You know in the big casinos. When it comes to sports betting the the average hold is somewhere between five and six and a half to seven percent of your handle. You know so if if you handle you know argument's sake one hundred million dollars of of action over the course of the year you know. You're expected to show prophet somewhere between five and seven million dollars. And then you're talking forty percent of that between the state twenty to the state and twenty two the seminoles Goes out and the rest is yours. Which is significant. A lot of income for a lot of properties outside of the outside of the counties of miami dade and broward So you know. And and then again how they going to handle the people like fan duel and dr king's and anybody else wants to get into the game Because uh of right now. I believe it's supposed to be just for the para mutuals in the state of florida outside seminals as far as i understand it in the compact. You've heard anything different. I haven't but Just to clarify something we were discussing earlier about whether the department of interior has even received a request. I'm reading an article. That says That brian neulander pity assistant secretary of the department of interior Received a letter from From whoever is the state of florida sent. The letter was dated june ninth. It just came out yesterday People weren't aware of it for a few weeks but they have forty five days. I guess from that. June ninth date to make a decision but most of the people expect a that department to hand down a decision before the end of june. So we're definitely in the works here The next nine interior. No while it's supposed to be forty five days from the time that they receive it shut. Why was seen jeff ninth. That just came out that You know there. There wasn't a lot of public knowledge of that but it did came. Come out yesterday that that letter was sent. So that's the date for them to to mark forty five days from. Oh okay well. Monica chan formation. That i got earlier. Like i said nearly knew about it and you said last week so you know nobody really heard anything about it but You know the governor. The excuse me the mayor of miami beach as already You know Dan gelber he has already said that. you know. He wants the department to reject the compact the department If they were to say no Than florida would have a chance to renegotiate the deal. So you know they're basically starting from scratch again but the nokia casinos dot org is standing on goal waiting to file their lawsuits after this This decision by the interior department and You know besides the miami beach mayor the dowell people up in arms you got the people coming out of orlando big editor oriel in the orlando sentinel just came out urging the rejection of this whole compact so A lot of fights are on the hands as you said. I think you know the interior is not a rubber stamp. But i think there's a good chance they will approve it and then things will be moving forward and then we then we're back into the legal jeopardy once again. I'll be honest with you dave. I don't believe they've ever need Knocked down any expansion of Of you know indian gaming in any in any State that i know of you know so. I don't expect them to have any issues with this. I think the The people that are against the expanded gambling in the in the state of florida. Are you know not and they. They know they really can't do a whole lot. As far as that's concerned with the with the seminal tribe once that gets approved they just don't want the expansion for places like you know casino. Miami dana where you're working at and and the other racine os in the state of the state of florida in that article from the orlando sentinel it. They're zeroing in on the fact that The deal with the seminoles would allow sports betting to take place anywhere in the state which is in direct violation of the indian gaming regulatory act which says they are set to regulate on indian land. Only so well. Yeah and that's the That's probably the biggest part of it. As far as that's concerned with the pact is that they're trying to say if i mentioned earlier that you've got a gamble on indian property you actually have to set foot on you know and that if you gamble if you set up an account Which i'll be honest with you. I don't believe the seminoles would have an issue with it Dave you know. The governor said it up i believe so that places like seeing them my an eat called or magic city. You know the the other all the other para mutuals Have a chance to profit from this. But the seminoles wouldn't have a problem but there are already starting to state the fact that you know the servers. What whatever the technical word is Services on on indian property. You know on on on on the indian land and that's where they're going you know that's where they're they're a drawing the line in the sand and obviously the opponents are going to say now and you know obviously this is going to be decided by the court down the road. Yeah well that's that's been debated since the early two thousands You know that When there is online casinos trying to open. That's why they all move to costa rica and other Central american companies for their computers to have the servers there and that's how they got away with it for a while. You know common sense would make you believe that you know if a guy makes a bet from his living room on his telephone that he's making the bet they're not at some server on indian land but right but i think what the president is going to be set is You know new jersey nevada now ever since the that law came into effect that they can do that. Online is the fact that the servers are on legal property in his longest. The person sets up and account. You know even if it has to be in person you know and then the gps Technology as we already know you know for for online poker as we've said we talked about last year how a new yorker had to drive into a walmart or whatever target parking lot to win a poker tournaments as long as they have the technology approved and You know that you are in the state of florida. I honestly don't see how this is going to be challenged on those grounds -pends on how they interpret the law but as far as that's concerned you know therefore they're already doing this and other states and they're trying to protect you know that the integrity by making sure that your gps is in is in the within the state borders. Well bottom line is things are moving forward at least somewhat I think things will be a little bit clearer in july. And we'll see what where we move forward to but You know it's i. I kind of An pining for the good old days when People just made decisions on common sense in your handshake was your bond and i guess that's a little naive to think that Today's world can be anywhere close to that but You know hey we'll see what happens. You know politician sir. I know i know. I don't know if i mentioned this other show before but my father used to tell me. There is a saying in cuba. You don't wanna man stops. Being a man he goes when he becomes a politician. They'll you know there you go. Well i'll tell you what though the target date for people in the state of florida who love to gamble on football and other sporting events If all of this goes through one way or the other is going to be october fifteenth. So that's gonna be an interesting day one way or the other. So we'll see what happens for sure Let's take a break here on the program too big tournament's going on they wanna talk about one is the w. p. heads up championship which is taking place online. They are playing the final there. patrik antonius against phil ivey. What an interesting matchup of two guys. That were so huge. Twenty years ago in the in the online poker industry They are playing in the final. It's best three out of five match. I know that ivy one the first of the matches and they're playing right now it's being Streamed on twitch and you could go check that out if you want to Actually by the time you listen to the show of probably be over but If you pick it up right away Maybe it'll catch the end of that match. Also w. p. t. is playing their season opener for season nineteen And that is being played in tampa the seminole hard rock in tampa and they are at the final table there. They kicked off today at about noon. Here on tuesday and From what i hear. They're down to two players so we'll update you on the tournaments and we'll talk about a couple of other things here in the match. Also have a very interesting article that i pulled up from the past having to do with ways to speed up a poker room in the dealers to be a little more efficient so we'll get to that devours absolutely. We'll check that out when we come back. You're listening to poker action line. Dave and joe you know. Pick us up on the poco refused. Podcast page great site poker fuse. Also the holden radio network cares our show on a regular basis. And of course. The standbys for any podcast. Soundcloud spotify apple podcasts. I tunes all different places where you can pick up the show on a regular basis and we hope you do rate this show You know give us Give a five star rating Hopefully or you can You know follow us there and get Absolutely a free subscription to get notified when each new show is up so We hope you'll do that. Bill right bec- days. Always email me at Lemon david yahoo dot com I have a couple of people that are sending regular emails in so i'm answering some of their questions Getting a lot of good information from one or two of them as well so You know always drop me a line at lemmon dave at yahoo dot com lemon with two. M's dave at yahoo dot com. So we'll be back with more on the show some month things to move onto When we return here on poker action zoos broker action line. Hi this is big day from poker action line. Radio dot com one. Let all avid poker players know about a great new lottery game that was developed by one of our sponsors atlantic west management group. This game is now available. Worldwide on the internet will be served as player chips caribbean and operated on the internet. As an international lottery by atlantic west the texas holdem poker like game is perfectly legal everywhere presented as lottery game tickets available on the internet. 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Antonius is nearly complete They've only been playing for less than three hours and That one's just about over as they are in the third match ivy the first two against antonius. And how has patrick down to just crumbs in the final game the latest hand You know they were pretty even at one time. And then a very big hand with antonius opening with a six of spades and phil ivey had four three he did call four three off suit and then the tremendous flop six five deuce to hearts left antonius with nothing He made a pretty sizable bet. Iv check raised him and Antonius called and then you know if rub salt the wound. He got He got an ace on the turn. but you know still not good enough. Iv made a big bet in tunis called and then the a- another deuce on the river ended things in that hand As iv now has one hundred ninety one thousand ships to eighty four hundred four antonio just about done here so like the old said the ladies warming up the arena. Exactly if you haven't been found this thing's really interesting matches Not just poker pros. But as i mentioned on the show last week You know you gotta japanese pop singer. That's in the tournament to play poker. you've got General bear balon the former survivor contestant. Well-known pro steve ao. v will noon. Dj played in the event. Then we got Several other players see we got like Know big name pros like darren. Elias lucky we opened in his first round match with stephen chiswick only to lose Anthony zeno was knocked out by phil ivey in the second round and Six schulman the broadcaster who also tremendous book layer was in this thing as well so they played on down in the are now in the final against I wanna say twenty five thousand. But i'm not sure exactly fill these name again. Yeah for sure. Let's see if i can get that By an and it doesn't say right here don't have by its invitational tournaments. I'm not sure if they they actually. I know you mentioned it last week dave. I'm sorry to bring that up. I thought you might have had that right there in front of the tournament. Page up and it doesn't under buying it says invitational the so i don't know if they were required to pay anything who knows seems kinda weird but they wouldn't be but anyway the major finalists Down to the final. Four antonius knocked off dance smith to get into the final and phil ivey defeated Chris crock dance miss that many years ago. The article with jason supporting him was he. The was that the dance miss. I'm trying to remember. Remember there was an article about him. Backing certain players was dan smith. The one that that He was backing and then all of a sudden had a had a great run No i remember. I'm thinking that was Either alan berry or forget the other player but you know that that that said old story that was in Espn the magazine right right. And they were saying all the other as soon as that article came out one of those players that he was backing Had a great run and so spread anyway article by our old friend. Mike smith let me get to that in just a second because i want to update also the tampa tournament which is going on now at the seminole hard rock in tampa. And let's see they're still playing. Brian altman who was the chip leader at the end of day. Three end of day. Four is down with head to head. Play against. Gabriel abu saadeh. Let's see the last ship counts. Have altman about three to one chip lead. Thirty five million to eleven million four. I'll be sada. So that was the way things randera in tampa a very successful tournament. The numbers not what they had hoped there was talk that Since as as opposed to the big tournament here in hollywood where it was just a single re entry this was unlimited re entry so people were wondering actually if they might be able to somehow rival at twenty four hundred and eighty two players that That played there In hollywood earlier this year but the final total was only eleven hundred and sixty five. Which i guess is nothing to sneeze at but They went into today with nine players left in altman had a pretty sizeable chip lead with a bottle. Eleven million ships next closest was jonathan jaffe with just under six million so that was the final and obviously it was right in that same Six million dollar range south brian. The the danger. Dave of running these tournaments a little too close to each other and You know people deciding they're going to plays one instead of the other and you know the the multiple buy ins made scare off as you've said many many times before in the past you know people who only have one bullet to shoot these ornaments of well they did. They did blow by their guarantee which was the two million guarantee. They didn't quite get it on day. One but i think before even the cards are dealt on day two. They had passed the guarantee there was like three two hundred seventy five players at the tables to start day to or actually date won't be it would be but they are the i don't know the price pool is is up there pretty i right now. I mean it's very successful regardless but three three point seven three point. Seven to eight million is the tournament like you said nothing to sneeze at so so they're finishing that up down to head to head play and they should have a champion By the time we finish this show alderman by the way a few years ago. I was right there. When he went to i think it was the rock and roll poker open at seminole hard rock in maybe five or six years ago. That was his first major tournament. He's the guy at above the boston area and He won that tournament there since then put his name on the wbz champions cup again and as probably one of the top players around i would say looks pretty good for him to Put put his name under the third time. That would be very nice. Okay let's get to this other story. I wanted to talk about the original article. I do not have handy But i was looking through the letters to the editor from any magazine from about ten years ago and i see a letter there from mike smith. Our good friend. Who's at the back then. A director poker operations in pompano park in the article apparently was about ways to speed up the game in the the story had talked about dealers needing to be efficient but no shortcuts. It was an article by chaz allen. So mike responded and i want you to get into this a little bit. What what he's talking about here but he said there's a major shortcut that he teaches In that is to leave the bets out in front of the players then burn turn and start the action bringing the bets and take the racal in one smooth. most tells a little bit about that procedure. Well dave you know for someone. And i know that mike smith was the person answering that there and as a poker manager obviously the more hands you get more revenue you generate for the rule but the the other side of that coin is the positive side. It's a too positive on that coin. Is that dealers. Get more hands out. And and what he was answering there is any poker manager and anybody who's been in this business for a while knows okay. Is that really good dealer stave and he was talking about the sense of betters. Bet and if you have your players playing the right way. They're getting beds out there okay. So the vets are out there so if you take the time to drag into bets. You're losing three four seconds each time you know and And then you put up the burn. So i believe what mike was saying there and what i've said countless times to so many students i've trained over four hundred people to be dealers is put the burn. Let's say you've got You know The flop out there. You start the beds people. Bet you got everybody's out there. You banged it. You tap the table. Put the burn card out. Put the turnout there and as it turns out there a good experience dealer will tell the small blind. Let's say they're still in the hand who's ever i act. It's your turn at that same time with both hands. They're dragging in the pots from from whatever players are still left in the hand and at the same time you know. I used to teach them worked math in your head so you don't have to sit there and look at the pot and figure out what you have to rake. You know i. i'm very good with numbers are been blessed with that with that talent. And so are so many other dealers that i've trained in in my lifetime so you already know what you're dragging in there. So as they are now the best for the turn you have brought in the the The flop bet started to rake it. And you haven't slowed the game down one little bit about that would take in those bets prior to putting up the river it could take you one or two three seconds depending on how quick you are depending on where the bets are. Okay and dave. This is one of the big things that i've tried to teach might dealers and i've explained this to them okay and it doesn't seem like a lot of time correcting you know. I'll tell you one second. So let's assume those you know the the the flop the turned the river takes you nine to ten seconds. Okay and you saved that on every single hand some people may take twelve seconds. Okay as you think to yourself. That's not a whole lot of time. Well really good dealers as you get better. You know better at your at your craft. Okay you should be getting out without any major issues in down. You should be getting out fourteen. Sixteen seventeen hands down which is a half hour so now you're talking anywhere from twenty eight to thirty two hands. Thirty four for really fast plate depending on the size of the pot and the hands. So if you're able to save nine to ten seconds twelve seconds hand you're now talking about four four four minutes three minutes. I'm you know whatever it is you know. Because you're talking about three hundred seconds. Okay with when you when you do the multiplication two hundred and something seconds three minutes you might be able to get out an additional two to three hands within an hour okay and that doesn't seem like a lot but when you break that down and the busy rule you're you might be getting tipped on average three dollars. Let's say a hand and you're getting an two three hands and our and on an average down you know in an average shift. You're getting six hours of table time. Dave so you're talking anywhere from thirty six to what fifty four dollars extra a day. Multiply that time five day shift and then multiply that times the time sir whole year. You're looking at anywhere from you. Know making an extra ten thousand dollars six thousand dollars a year. I used to have dealers telling me. I work the exact same tables that these guys are making that much less money and i would explain it to them like this and i said because they're not making mistakes. We're not even talking about other mistakes. Mike smith was just talking about the generic part of saving that. And when i used to tell dealers when people talk to you. I was very good at keeping a conversation going if i had to but i never stopped the action. I never stopped shuffling. Never stopped my hands. You're right it's more tip money for the dealer. It's also more money for the room and you know the players are all happy to have a few more hands on our and think about it. Yes they're more happy to get more hands on our. They're not really thinking about it. In those terms of ten or fifteen seconds to houses but now you want to know where the players are thinking about that when they're paying time in the bigger the bigger state games or when i used to play thirty sixty at the balaj. I'd go to vegas okay. That thirty sixty game was a time. Rake okay so when a new deal would sit down for their half hour push. Everybody had to put up whatever. It was six seven eight dollars whatever. The rate was for that half hour so everybody paid for that okay so now you didn't wanna dealer messing up making a mistake which obviously now kills one or two hands that down for professional poker players. That's that's a cost to their business. You know and and people don't realize that and at that point for the house it's really not a big difference when you're taking time rake but now you're pissing off players ryan so the bottom line is yes you could affect your bottom line because these players have oh somewhere else to play. Their game of the original article. Was that You know the shortcuts could lead to mistakes by dealers and then it would be counterproductive. But mike's final line in his little article says i agree. There's a fine line between which shortcuts are acceptable and which aren't but learning. The proper shortcuts is important to the professionalism and profitability of the dealer. So you know. I think the bottom line is this is one that i think is very important in. You've taught it over the years right and let me explain something to you dave. Have you ever been in. I mean. I'm sure you've played. I know you mentioned about playing more tournaments writing. But when you're playing in cash games i'll give you an example between an inexperienced steeler and experienced dealer and then someone that you think the potential okay is when people are all in okay if you remember if you go back to the last time you played a cash game if somebody went all in a real experienced dealer will announce to the table this person's in for twelve dollars you know and if you have multiple plans that's where you really workout your talent okay. Let's say you have one person all that you go. This person's in for twelve dollars. There's five people here. So sets sixty dollars goes into the center pot. The rest is on the outside. You've explained to the players so now you don't have to worry about an and inexperienced dealers. I'd only recommend this until they have good enough at this. But what they call that cherry. Picking dave and they'll say t- you teach them to cherry pick twelve dollars from this person twenty dollars from this person twelve dollars. And then whatever's left goes on the outside as i'm explaining to you. See the differences. Okay but again if it's an inexperienced dealer and they're not confident with their map then cherry picking is the only way to go because if you do make a mistake the time it takes to correct that you food. Three hands in that down alone. So that's all like mike smith is saying he's talking about the most generic part of people you know shortcuts but that's another shortcut right there. If a dealer can explain to the dealers sets twelve dollars times five sixty goes in. Just bring all the money into the side. Take sixty doesn't matter how you take it from the players an experienced dealer will just go to you know wherever the most chips are from from whoever players around the table take sixty and it doesn't matter the rest of you know was on the outside you know on on the side pot so these little things that you go through dave to save time and again. I always tell dealers. It's not just for the house the more yes. The house makes money but this is a double edged coin. In that sense that you also make more money because you have more opportunities to get tips time in the show and you know. I don't want to say that. I had already given the title brian. Brian but gabriel abu. Saada is staying alive using some heavy aggressive shoving to Pick up some chips here and there. And he said he's up over eighteen million now and He feels very relaxed. Sixty two big blinds for obvious outta while. Brian and still holds the lead. He has ninety three big blinds. Just under twenty eight million. But they're playing it out for the title here in tampa huge tournament kicks off the season for the w. p. t. as far as the the heads up tournament which is being played online w. p. t. Antonius and phil ivey. They are not done yet but Let's see this it is over. It's going to stay with that amount of typically that he had amazing and it looks like they got a picture of them together so they were obviously in the same hotel out there for a big tournament and finally hand is over as tonio limped. Infield ivy checked Eight ten for antonio off suit to live. He had jack three got a jap on the flop and he folded when i be pushed on the The the the turn came out flops. Four jack ten and four on the turn and then he folded so He wins the match ended up winning by a score of three. Nothing and has taken the championships. The emergence of alive is something that a lot of people have been pointing out for a long time and as he mentioned he's gonna plan the wbz world series of poker this year. So a lot of people think it's a really good thing that he's back in the game. I think it. Is you know it's good to know that. I'm sure he's taking care of whatever legal issues yet from some after winning this tournament he'll be doing some interviews and we'll find out a little bit more about his situation. Anyway we are done for the show today. some interesting topics. We'll see what happens with the doj Deciding not to appeal the wire act ruling and that will lead to some interesting stuff here over the next few months Of course the tournaments will go on and in the brick and mortars and You know eventually. We'll get back to a time where we might be able to play in our own living rooms For money on state of the union's anyway that's going do. Thank you so much joe for your your input to the show as usual Joe castillo thank you so much as well and we will get back to another show next week. Always pick us up on spotify soundcloud two of the best places to get the show and we will be here awfully every week in semi or semi or emails Lemon dave at yahoo dot com. We'll try to get some of your questions answered some of your questions and and Maybe talk about some of your input to the show as we move forward. That's gonna do it. We'll see you next week on another edition of direction lawn. The views and opinions of the hosts guests or callers are not necessarily those the station. Its owners. Advertisers are agencies.

doj florida dave new jersey nevada michigan new hampshire connecticut dr king pennsylvania joe department of interior Honker burger wenda dave lemon joe rodriguez randy casper Dave department of the interior phil ivey
07-07-21 - Native in the Spotlight: Sharice Davids

Native America Calling

59:00 min | 2 months ago

07-07-21 - Native in the Spotlight: Sharice Davids

"Welcome to native. America calling from studio forty-nine in albuquerque. I'm monica brain when united states representatives. Cherise david's was a kid. She talked so much in class. The teacher made her move her desk into the hallway today. David is using her love of discussion to listen and learn more about the needs of her constituents in her kansas district. She's one of the first two native women to be elected to congress and she has a new children's book out called therese's big voice representative cherise. David's is our native in the spotlight. We'll be right back. This is national native news. Antonio gonzalez work continues on a boarding school project in rapid city. South dakota as discoveries are made of burial sites at former residential schools in canada. Mike mohan reports almost a decade ago. Volunteer driven effort was launched to verify details about native children buried at a former federal boarding school. On rapid city's westside that research pave the way for an historic agreement with the city to establish parcels of land for native purposes project volunteer valerie. A big eagle says news out of canada and the remains of two hundred and fifteen children found their as an emotional element to the local effort. We tried this horror stories of children. That were you know killed and buried and we've heard this from others and it's really really challenging new details about the land. Transfer will be shared at a public meeting this thursday including converting some of the property into a native american community center that follows a resolution approved by the city council. Last fall acknowledging that tribes were never given a portion of the land along after the school closed. fellow project. Volunteer eric zimmer notes. The non native population can share in this experience as well what we're talking about doing. This undertaking work that sort of raises the quality of life for everyone in the community through a long careful deliberate process of trying to understand and respond to the more challenging. Parts of our history in volunteers were recently recognized for their work with an honorable mention in the outstanding public. History project award issued annually by the national council on public history. That was mike mohan. Canada has a new governor general. The nuclear mary simon as dan carpenter reports. She's making history as the first indigenous person to take on the role of the queen's representative in canada in two in the lamb mega can among oxygen ramzan cassini began her introductory remarks in an editor. She went on design both prime minister justin trudeau and queen elizabeth for their confidence in what she described as a very historic opportunity. This is a moment that i hope all canadians feel part of because my appointment reflects our collective progress towards building a more inclusive just and equitable society. Simon also becomes canada's thirtieth governor general. The queen approved the appointment. On trudeau's recommendation. Canada is a place defined by people people who serve those around them who tackle big challenges with hope and determination and above all who never stopped working to build a brighter tomorrow in other words people like mary. simon. Simon is from nunavik in northern quebec. She has long been an advocate for inuit rights and culture. She has also worked with the federal government on several issues including nafta the repatriation of the constitution and the implementation of canada's. I land claims policy. She is also represented. Canada as ambassador of circum polar affairs and as ambassador to denmark. Simon's appointment comes as the country. Struggles with reconciliation and is more unmarked graves are discovered across the country on the grounds of former residential schools. It's not clear yet when she will take up her new post for national native news. I'm dan carpenter the. Us postal service and sealaska heritage institute are holding a release ceremony for the raven story. Stamp on july thirtieth in juneau alaska. It was designed by clinking artists. Rico whirl the ceremony is public and will be live streamed. The stamp is now available for presell. I'm antonio gonzales. National native news is produced by kohana broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting support by the center for indigenous cancer research at roswell park comprehensive cancer center dedicated to cancer research medicine and cancer care for indigenous population. The no charge online risk assessment tool is available at roswell park dot org slash assess me this reminder to get your cove in nineteen vaccination is provided by the association of american indian physicians and the centers for disease control and prevention. Who support this show info at aarp dot org or cdc dot gov slash corona virus native voice one the native american radio network. This is native america calling monica brain one november night in two thousand eighteen cherise. David's a ho chunk lawyer and small business owner made history. She became one of the first. Two native women elected to the united states house of representatives. We're going to chat with her about her life and career path that led to her serving in congress. She's covered a lot of firsts in her life. She was a first generation. College student raised by a single mom. Who served in the army along with deb holland. She's one of the first. Two native women elected to congress and david's is openly the first openly gay us representative from kansas. Today we'll talk with representative david's about her new children's book. Cherise zeke voice. It's about her own journey growing up and finding her voice to connect with other people. Welcome to native america calling representative david's. We're glad to have you here. I got good to beat that. Yeah it's great to talk with you. I think the last time we talked with you. You were not an elected member of congress so We're so we're so happy to have you on the air today. Congratulations Thank you. Yeah so okay so i really enjoyed this book I got to learn a lot about your upbringing. Tell us a little bit about you. Know who you were growing up. Well i think one of the things. That was pretty amazing about doing this. project was just Kind of taking the time to think about that actually and You know. I think that a lot of times you know kids look at grownups and they think oh man they've got it all figured out I think most of us know that's just not true And and as a kid. I always so You know i mean. I talked a lot which is in the book I had to learn some lessons from that. Like how to listen as well as talk And i just. I was like a a really high energy kid In addition to talking a lot. I was like obsessed with seriously so i was running around. You know trying to Be a martial artists. Even i am not sure i knew what that meant at the time but Yeah and then. And then of course You mentioned it in your In your kind introduction as my my mom was in the army for twenty years from before. I was born until after i got out of high school so I did get the get the chance to to live in a few different places. Although my mom will joke sometimes that she joined the army thought we'd see the world and we mostly kansas and missouri. Which is how a ho chunk ends up. Ho chunk from wisconsin ends up in kansas. And so what were some of the other places that you got to to visit when you're go and live when you were a kid. Yeah what we were So we were in germany for a little while My mom was stationed there a couple of times. Actually she was stationed there when i was born And then she was stationed there when actually when my brothers were born so i have two little brothers. They're eight nine years younger than me and You know growing up on on army bases It's funny because even though we were in germany and i got to see a a a bit about You know german kind of culture and food and the language and that sort of thing You know as a as a seven or eight year old. I mostly played with other kids. Who were from all over. The united states Whose parents were were stationed Stationed there and then my mom actually got stationed in korea And was at the base near the demilitarized zone. And so I lived with my cousin. In milwaukee In wisconsin for a little while my brothers lived in black river falls which is where You know the ho chunk tribal headquarters is there. And you've got palo grounds there and So it was you know it was interesting. 'cause we lived in kansas and missouri and and then a little bit overseas you. Your mom didn't want to risk it taking you to near the dmz. Oh i think it wasn't even an option Because she When she got stationed there I think that's an interest. That's interesting. Because i always say you know you don't take your kids when you go to the dnc Yeah i think it wasn't even an option she worked with the military police When she was there you know. I mentioned in the intro that you are first generation college student but i was also reading that you actually call yourself a former first generation college student because your mom went back and went to college tells about that. Yeah and actually just then when you were when when we were talking about the my mom getting stationed in korea and I was thinking. Gee my mom should write a book. I've been telling us for years Yeah so my mom actually started taking college classes Doing you know at that time. They call them. Correspondence courses think And and that was like during the time that she was in the in the army and after she got out of the army she did a couple of things and then ended up working at the post office And she just retired from the post office About a month ago And she during that whole time was working on On her You know coursework and then she ended up getting an associate's degree actually johnson county community college. Which is where. I also went and got my associates degree and then. She got her bachelor's degree at the university of missouri and kansas city Which is where. I got my bachelor's degree and she studied history So she was doing that while she was working fulltime and with also you know For portion of that time still raising my brothers because they were You know they were getting getting out of high school And going through high school during some of that time to i'm on is just a very determined person. She sounds like Yeah if you're just joining us today we are talking with congresswoman cherise. David's she represents kansas's third district and she's ho chunk and she's our native in the spotlight today if you'd like to chat with her Or you have questions for her gives a call. Phone lines are open. The number is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. That's one eight hundred nine nine native so representative david's did you. What did your mom share with you about the importance of education when you were growing up and you know when you graduated from high school. Did you know that you wanted to go to college. Or did you have other plans That's a really good question. You know my mom I always felt like my mom gave gave me the space to kind of Learn and Be kind of like a an autonomous little person growing up but then you know obviously gave me a lot of guidance and that sort of thing and she. I didn't find out until Years later but she is to take me to a lot of She took me to a basketball games. Like the We lived in south central missouri near but it used to be called sms. You southwest missouri state university. I think it's just called missouri state university now but she would take me to the basketball games The women's basketball games and years later. She said she told me that. Like part of the reason that she took me to those basketball games so that i could see women who were in college and also You know playing sports. Because i was very very sports. I played soccer and tennis and And she wasn't explicit about it. She didn't say. I'm i'm taking you to these. See you can see people in college She just it was just part of like trying to normalize Being on a college. Campus like going to You know going to places where you see people in college And then she also would signed me up for camps That with with You know the colleges would put on little soccer camps and tennis camps in that sort of thing and She told me that later Which i thought was interesting because it did impact and influence my idea about like. Oh well maybe. I can go to this college or maybe i can go to that college Without without her saying like you have to go to college. Because if you don't you won't be successful like my mom never said anything like that to me. And i and i think it really Was was very impactful for me. And it's part of when i think about what the you know. Some of the story of the book it's not. This is not a book about how to run for congress. you know. This is a book about like taking the things that we're learning along the way and and Figuring out how they impact what we want to be ourselves. Yeah that's one of the things. I really liked about the book as well Was getting to see you know your journey and trying out a few different things as well as eventually becoming elected i. We're going to talk a lot more about that as well as You know some other detours in your life and some of the things that you You really wanted to share with folks through this kid's book and if you're just joining us cherise. David's is our native in the spotlight. She is a us. United states house of representatives In the united states house of representatives and she represents kansas's third district. And if you'd like to chat with her give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight thousand hustle. One eight hundred nine nine native if you'd like to maybe ask her some questions Or congratulate her on her success Phone lines are open for you. Give us a call. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight one of the things. I learned About representative david's is that she doesn't like onions on her pizza and i have to agree with her. I'm not a big fan of onions on pizza either. What about you give us a call. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight the break. We're going to talk more about her journey to college and to law school and and being a lawyer and also we're going to talk a little bit about some of her priorities for The work that she's doing in congress so again. Your voice is missing from this conversation. We're talking with cherise. David's one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. The discovery of more than one thousand children's remains at several catholic church run. Residential schools in canada has indigenous leaders demanding a formal apology from the pope for generations of horrific abuse. It's also sparking discussions about reexamining native peoples relationship with christianity. That's on the next native. America calling support by roswell park tribal communities face persistent challenges in health equity such as cancer and higher death rates the centre for indigenous cancer research at roswell park. Comprehensive cancer center is dedicated to advancing cancer research that will lead to translatable science medicine and cancer care for indigenous populations worldwide. Are you at high risk for cancer. A no charge online assessment tool is available at roswell park dot org slash. Assess me yoho way. Your old show cut shop on lord. Oh way say you are listening to native america calling monica brain sitting in for tara gatewood and we are talking with congresswoman cherise. David's today she's our native in the spotlight Before the break representative david's. We were talking a little bit about Your your childhood and growing up in in your book. You share that Sometimes kids would ask you. What are you and Yeah i wonder if you could just share you know sort of that experience of talking to your mom about that and coming to understand your tribal identity. Yeah so that's actually like this is one of the stories. That it's kind of hard to distill down There's still down especially when you're used to tell the story for pretty much everything. it's hard to distill it down and figure out what stories makes sense to be included but I was pretty intentional about wanting to include Wanting to include this. Because i one. I feel like there's a lot of people who know who like know what that may not this specific thing although i have a feeling that Actually call this the the mommy. What am i story I feel like this sort of thing happens to a lot of people Not just needed kids but A lot of kids Depending on where they're growing up and and that sort of thing but it's it's part of feeling Kind of small or invisible in some ways. And i think a lot of people know what it's like to to Be the only person like them in a place And so i. I wanted to include this because it it conveys the hat but like we're not alone in those experiences That people You know pe- people feel that way In their lives and And then and then the second piece is is just Being able to share a bit about kind of both how. My mom approach things. You know like yeah. I'm gonna answer this question but also make sure that you know that like that's not. It's not really a nice way to To be curious about another person And and and then getting the chance to kind of Gave a little bit of the historic context of Of of why You know kids. I might be the only native kid In in a classroom or in a group of friends And and then not even realizing that. I you know in talking to my mom and you know with my aunts and cousins around and all that like i think sometimes we don't we don't realize the You know where we're at in a society because when you're little it's like you and your family you know And so i thought it was really important and You know coming home and and say and telly asking me on my my mom you know. What am i and my mom telling me you know your your hotel and And a bit about the the history of of removal of of native people from From our homelands And and then obviously Learning a bit about like ho chunk being known as People at the big voice or In the in the very very back of the book we got the chance to include some historical information about ho chunk nation and Former president of johns john reindeer Put some Information in there about about Our our language about our par- Clan system and travel history and and that sort of thing Which i was very very excited to be able to share that Through this through this book yeah. I think that that was one of the things i liked about. The book. too is You know it doesn't go into too much in the actual like body of the book. Just sort of Talks a little bit about it. Ensures that story but that There's this opportunity for more learning and more understanding about people who Are like you you know or who are different from you. Which i think is like the most important thing. When it comes to children's books is being able to both see yourself reflected and also learned something new. We're talking with cherise david's. She is a representative for kansas third district and one of Well now to Native women in congress and If you wanna talk with her give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight a steak a call. We've got aaron in albuquerque tuned in on k. u. n. m. Hey there erin hi. What would you like to share today. I was just wondering how you feel about them holland Be the interior and what you think. She can do for native communities here in the. Us go ahead three-sided about it. yeah. I'm excited about Now secretary holland I will say that it was a little bit bitter sweet when she got appointed only because For a lot of the for a lot of the first term her and i would do events together and go to things and And i would often tell people. Like i don't know how i would. I don't know how i would do this experience without debt here with me and And now she's not in housing Turns out i can manage it but You know the so bittersweet just because for an i are such good friends And now we have to really plan out how we're gonna hang out with each other and that sort of thing but On the other side of it. I do You know. I think that went her. And i got elected in twenty eighteen. I didn't really get to experience them as a kind collective Joy and happiness that came along with with The kind of historical nature of our elections But when she got appointed to to run the department of interior Both nominated and then confirmed and then Got sworn in I felt like. I could experience a little bit of like what indian country was experiencing when she got when she when she got sworn in and It's it's pretty phenomenal. And so there's like so there's that piece of it because it's a very there's definitely a very personal aspect of Of anything that happens with deb because she's You know like my sister and And then i think that like the impacts of having that holland is our secretary of interior Not just for indian country but for Actually for our planet because of the role that the interior department plays in conservation and way into management. The federal government has millions of acres of of of of land. That come under the purview of the department of interior. And i think that Her approach of of stewardship land Is is going to be really really impactful for that and then for indian country Know having somebody who really understands what. Sovereignty means What a government to government relationship Has looked like and can look like and should look like combined with her you know. She's a lawyer She went to law school. She understands She understands these issues and policies in a way that I'm like no no other interior secretary house before With her from her perspective. If that makes sense So i just. I think that you know it's gonna be it. It's it's it's just gonna be so impactful for generations and i don't even know that we're going to really truly understand it during our lifetime. Just how impactful it's going to be. Thanks aaron representative david's. Do you ever worry though that you might find yourself. Like on opposite sides of her Maybe you know some some sort of issue That interior takes up with the state of kansas That's an interesting question. I don't know that. I would say i worry about it And you know. I always tell people. I'm a very pragmatic person I actually some of the ways that i think about things is Is not if it will happen. But when And that's what a lot of things because We can you know we can Hope for the best but plan for contingencies. You know and and when when it comes to It makes this you know Secretary holland is also A rai- raised by in a military family In some ways. I think you can. You can tell with both of us. The level of responsibility and duty that we feel toward You know it sort our constituencies towards the You know the oath that we take when when when we Come into the offices that were in that. We're both going to be always trying to do. What's what's best for For like for the country for indian country for You know the that their role that we're in and and if we happen to be on the On different different in different places on an issue or something That's just that that just means that the the our our offices and our Roles you know requires that we just try to figure that out. Yeah in a cordial way. I'm curious Representative david's if you might talk about the differences between the two administrations You know transitioning like how things are different now. with the biden administration versus the trump administration That's a really good question. You know i think that I'm i'm just at the beginning of you know i'm in my second term and just at the beginning of it And the the difference that i can see so far Has a lot to do with the level of engagement. That the that this president has Has had and because because we're talking because we're talking Kind of a lot about native stuff in indian country That's the first thing that i would highlight is just President biden's Commitment to You know he didn't he didn't Only a point that holland for purposes of of having a native In the cabinet like she's obviously skilled and knows what she's doing but he's done so many other things that Make that make make that appointment. Just one data point in his effort to try to make sure that we truly have a government to government relationship with the federal government and tribal governments and And i think that there's been you know a lot of As a as part of those btcu plus community. I would say that you know the efforts to make sure that Lgbtq and spirit folks are being discriminated against I've appreciated those efforts and then You know transportation and infrastructure As one of my committee's and getting the chance to to really dig into and and work on getting an infrastructure Getting some infrastructure done is is going to be really helpful and i'll say that there has been You know i. I might be preaching to the choir here but Definitely the need to have some robust infrastructure investments in indian country is. I don't know if we can overstate the importance of that. Yeah i think that the pandemic is really sort of laid bare the infrastructure. You know that Whether it's access to internet or just having running water Yeah proper funding for ihs. I mean like so many things absolutely. Let's take a few more calls we've got congresswoman therese david's on the line today she's native in the spotlight and there's still time few on a chat with her. Give us a call. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. Let's go to gary in albuquerque tuned in on k. u. m. Hey there gary and what are you thinking about go ahead. I'm probably not the most politically savvy person and there's a lot of people that know know how to now political landscape really well and for for for me. It's sometimes hard to know you know who to trust. And so you hear politicians who promise this or that What sometimes it's it's difficult to sort of decipher what's going on and it's just wondering your feelings of how 'cause i'm no no feeling person in this position how you know we're we're supposed to sort of look at what's going on in politics and and separate the bull from from what's important. What's real gary. That's such a great question Representative david's go ahead. Yeah i mean. I think there's a couple of things That are super important especially these days. One is like figuring out kinda where to get information from you know i mean. I think that that's one of the things that we Because there's so much information out there like never in human history have we had access to the amount of information that we have access to now. And i think that You know for me. One of the things that i always do is And this is my maybe my mom. Maybe my mom is still dissing me as well. not sure but I always. I always ask the question. For what purpose And and that's with all kinds of things including like Like for for what purpose is this information being. Is this information being shared. And and you know who. Who is the information coming from. And and that sort of thing. And i think that Being able to find the the the people and that can be you know it could be It could be an elected official or it could be You know somebody in your community that you that you're like hey. That person thinks through a lot of stuff and And you know asking asking. Lots of questions is usually the approach that i take but You know. I think that. I do think that the more relationships individual relationships we can build up with people it will help us with some of the some of the the stuff. That's hard to decipher right now. And i think about that from the perspective of How the pandemic and monica you kind of mentioned the impact of the pandemic has had you know what exacerbated a lot of issues including access to things like broadband you know. Some people are getting overloaded with information and some people are getting no information and so For for those of us who have The ability to to help point folks in in a in a good direction I think some of us have a responsibility to do that. And then for the folks who are looking for information just asking tons of questions of people Because because i think you know like my office we tried to. We tried to really make sure that we were sharing Kind of you know here. Here's where testing sites are rooting for folks to get their vaccines and hang on one second congresswoman david's. We're going to go to a short break. But i wanna talk more about that about the conspiracy of covert support by southwestern indian polytechnic early childhood education program providing an affordable pathway for the next generation of native teachers who will meet the unique educational needs of native students cities. Early childhood education associate's degrees in all inclusive program with mentorship for success in education in an intertribal learning community information and application at s. I p i dot. Edu under academics then programs some are application. Deadline is april tenth. You're listening to native america. Calling monica brain sitting in for tara gatewood and we're talking with congresswoman cherise david's. She's our native in the spotlight today and a congresswoman davis before the break. You're talking a little bit about like how we can know who to trust in politics and And you're starting to mention a little bit about just you know at the beginning of the pandemic being able to put out that good reliable truthful information about What was going on anything you want to add to that I'm particularly curious. You know it if you had to interact with constituents who are calling and saying they. They thought this was a hoax or or things like that. Yeah i think so there. So yes there's been Absolutely you know I don't want it to seem like i think some some concerns and hesitancy or You know like there is. There is a long long history That we that we have In our country particularly as like native people of In some ways. I think one of the ways that we try to keep safest by saying. Wait a minute who's telling me this. And how like just trying to figure out who to who to believe in who to trust right. What am i signing here. Which is yeah. What is the paper and And so. I do think that i do think that there are There are some things that i know. I have experienced Growing up that have influenced that stuff. In fact you know i One of the things that In the book it's kind of funny. Actually how like how. Much of the person i am. I was able to fit into this into this book. But there's a portion where i talk about going to law school you know and like so much of of that process like i didn't know any lawyers growing up and then i started to learn more and more as i was going through school and then i and then As i started to learn about things like treaties about the ways that native people The history Like the legal history of native people in this country and And all of that sort of thing. Like i always try to keep in mind that we have to and this is me now as an elected right. We have to make sure we're meeting people in iraq. We have to make sure that you know if if someone if i say here's where you can go Get a cova test for a vaccine and the response and the response has something to do more with like a lack of trust. That's not necessarily about the codes vaccine or the covert Pandemic that has more to do with you. Know how as how as the people's government are we making sure that the people can trust what's going on And i think to me that is a huge huge issue That we have to be. We have to be thoughtful about. And it's one of the reasons that and Anytime when on talking to folks and and you're absolutely right. I heard from people who You know when. I got my vaccine. Quite a few people reached out to me and said like tell me what happens or Are you sure we should be doing this. And that sort of thing. And i and you know the only thing i can do is Let folks know why. I did it. that i you know the the the vaccine safe and effective I encouraged my mom to get it. You know so that people know that Like i'm i'm here to tell you And share with you and and Have a real conversation about this stuff. I'm not just saying something and then walking away. Which i think is what has been a lot of people's experience particularly in indian country when we're when we have you know a long history of being very what i consider to be a very a strong feeling of paternalism. You know and and it's written into some of the laws and some of the treaties and so trying to make sure that we're addressing that for people is really important Let's take a call if you wanna talk to representatives receive. It's there's still time. Give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. We've got mark in net lake on the voice for reservation in minnesota tuned in on k. B f t. Hey there mark. Thanks for waiting. What would you like to share more definitely. You know what you don't want on the coffee with a democrat and You know the all users a hopefully he's also hopefully on Helping people with alcohol addiction thing. You know native missed a lot. The reason okay you know what the all those Those okay more because we would do like national consciousness medium would get more appropriate those over. Okay mark thanks. We had a little bit of a problem with his line there. But i think what he's asking about is You know What your priorities are in terms of alcohol addiction or addictions in general yeah Yeah and I think i heard a little bit of Maybe mark might have mentioned something about making sure that there's Funding available for Ihs or a. i also having a hard time hearing. ihs hhs but A couple of things. I want to mention our that. We have There's a there's a group of us that's been pushing to make sure that we've got the funding necessary for For indian health service for ihs And doing that in a way that makes it. so if there's a government shutdown or anything That the that that funding is not interrupted because For so many reasons but the federal government trust responsibility is one of the main reasons that we need to do that. And i've been working with some of my colleagues tom. Cole is He's actually on the other side of the aisle and him and i have Both been working together to try to make sure that we can that we can get. Ihs funding done in the way that it needs to be So that's one piece is just making sure that the resources are there and then And then being supportive of you know organizations within the federal government that Do the grant making that do the research you know whether we're talking about santa or or the Nih work that's happening And then and then the other thing is just making sure that you know. I talk a lot about trauma. Informed care Actually and I think that when we think about how we take care of ourselves and how we take care of each other as communities the the level of of trauma that That we are experiencing and you know this is true in native communities. But it's also just. I mean we're all in the middle of Living through Or Losing friends and loved ones to a pandemic but has changed every aspect of our lives This is a traumatic time to be alive And that's stacked on top of everything else. That was already You know very hard. And so i think that from from my perspective from my office perspective making sure that we're thinking about those things and how we take care of each other's really really important When you think about when you're talking about funding for Ihs are you. Are you hoping for just like a fix if there's a problem if there's a shutdown or more encompassing like forward funding. Ihs like the way that they do with the veterans Yeah pushing for the Well we Forward funding advanced appropriations There's a there's a number of ways that people talk about it but making sure that that funding is there Ahead of time and the veterans affairs is actually a really great Example that i'm glad you brought up because that's That that is what we've been pushing for. Still working on speaking of veterans affairs. I mean i know that. That's probably an issue. That's near and dear to your heart. Are there any priorities. That you have In terms of helping veterans Yeah actually that's a good You know it is nearing gears. My heart i know we. We kind of already talked about my mom. A little bit that she Was in the army for twenty years from before. I was born until after i got out of high school and There's there's just a strong History and legacy With the ho chunk people of course but actually a lot of tribes. You know Native people serve In a service members At a at the highest rate of any other group in this country and And so i think. Because i because i know more about What that experience is like and what you know exiting Exiting as a service member Can be like for folks I it has been a huge priority in my office. in fact we have Somebody on our team. Who's the wounded warrior fellow So he served in iraq and afghanistan and it is And he's been in our office and he handles He handles the work with with veterans. And a lot of times it can. It's just so hard times to navigate the bureaucracy and if one thing goes wrong it can take years to figure out sometimes because it's so complicated so we have somebody dedicated on our team to making sure that You know we're we're trying to help address those kinds of issues and then For you know policy or legislation We we're trying to make sure that that The the services that are available are known to veterans In fact i introduced a bill called the serve. Act to try to make sure that That veterans have access to and awareness of all of the entrepreneurial Resources that are there. Because you know i well i think. Red native people are very entrepreneurial in general And and have had to be for a long time but Going into the to the service you. You weren't leadership skills you learn Problem solving a fortitude and that sort of thing like who better to be entrepreneurs than than our veterans and so just trying to figure out ways to make sure we're being supportive there. Yeah absolutely let's take a call. We've got michelle in albuquerque tuned in on k. u. m. Hey there michelle hi. Good morning I'd like to thank you for your outstanding service. And your ability to think broadly and more than just your State representative your state that you represent so thank you very much. I do have a question. Are there instances in which In indigenous peoples who serve in the us has representative such as bad herald from new mexico who I guess it's cherokee. I was wondering on that point do you. Are you able to work together on issues that affect indigenous peoples are just partisan politics prevent that from happening. And i'm know book boy. Oh yeah so. That's a that's a really great great question. Michelle and i think that One of the one of the things. I'll point to is the Is the pre-funding or advance appropriations for Indian health service That's actually Been something that in a bipartisan way. Has we've but we've been pushing for that And actually that started before. I got the congress but I've been working with tom. Cole who's He's a representative from oklahoma And the more and the most senior of the of all of us Natives in the congress right now and and then mark mullen is another one So because of the pandemic things have you know i it. It's been an interesting Thing 'cause usually we see each other on the house floor so we don't see each other as much but Tom cole in mark mullen. We're both in congress last time Or last session. And i got to work with them on on a number of issues Healthcare issues Foster care and adoption issues which i think You know We we could have a whole hour long thing about Foster care and adoption Issues at and then and then a ten hour conversation on the radio about What predated that with the with the boarding school issues that were like That is becoming a more mainstream conversation. We know that's been a conversation in indian country for a long time But yeah there. There's been plenty of Murder missing indigenous women and people issues or something that we come together in a bipartisan. Way to work on and so I think that this is one of the one of the brighter points. We can point to of of bipartisanship is that for issues For the most part issues in indian country are Were able to get a bipartisan support. Well we're just wrapping up now Representative david's What would you want Kids to take away from your book. Cherise 's big voice Well i think the biggest. They're probably three big picture. Things one is. I just hope that That kids can see that. There's a lot of There's twists and turns and ups and downs and all of that and Obstacles like some of us have some of us have more obstacles than others but everybody has some obstacles and that There's a lot of power in in learning to use your big voice Learning to listen and and I think that's important and then it's important to recognize that we get to decide what success means for ourselves. You know that's why i say this sh- racist big voice is not a book how to become a member of congress I just hope that people can see that You know we we get to decide what success means for ourselves and And that we all deserve to be seen and heard because too many of us when we're little antoine when we grow up know what it's like to feel smaller invisible or ignored and And all all our all our young people deserve to be seen and and heard i love it. Thank you so much representative. Cherise david's for joining us today. We're back tomorrow or we're going to have a conversation about christianity in native america. I'm senior producer. Monica brain have a good one. Are you a native american entrepreneur. Have a business solution for an issue like cova recovery or green energy. The indian loan guarantee and insurance program is a federal program helping private lenders. Make the business loan you need. They support most businesses whether starting up or expanding information available by emailing. dc at b. a. Dot gov that's dci at b. a. dot gov the division of capital investment. Supports this show. No lucon adore kind. A tax could become scoop. Tally mood sutin kook ensure kids. Now dot gov biographer one. Eight seven seven kids. Now we're knocking. Centers for medicare and medicaid services. You native america calling is produced annenberg national native boy studios in albuquerque new mexico by quantity broadcast corporation native nonprofit media organization funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting with support from the public radio satellite. Servants music is by brent. Michael davids native voice. One the native american radio network.

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Episode 243 Wednesday "A Case Of Why It Matters"

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

1:35:59 hr | 1 year ago

Episode 243 Wednesday "A Case Of Why It Matters"

"How? This genocide on slavery To these. New. THEIR CUTOFF WAS A. Had every. Day as going everybody, you have reached native opinion. We earn indigenous information and education radio show and podcast every week we talked about current affairs related to and from our own native American perspectives. My name is Michael Kicking Bear and the guy over there he is. So you. So you good morning, everyone. Good morning all on Wednesday Wednesday Wednesday. Wednesday. So great to be back in the studio. Great tap power. Again, we've had power since what Saturday night I guess. So they they finally. I guess woke up sleeping bear. Another bare. State of Connecticut. Continue to leverage pressure on its main. Electrical suppliers I mentioned during the last episode. Of that ever sourced. You remember that episode I had mentioned history of acquisitions and stuff like that, and so Senator Blumenthal from the state brother I refer to as blew me. Right. Right. Basically is repeating the same crap that happened with Connecticut light and power. They're like they're they're. He's basically trying to make a case that anybody that lost food in the refrigerator should be paid now by Eversource in that the the CEO of ever source of the president of Eversource should step down so. There you go. Same crap, right yeah. Now. I got a better idea blumenthal how about you break up ever source and make some opportunities available for other to come in and and do competitive bidding for customers in being our suppliers. You know wonder how it got to this point in the beginning. To distributorship. Well yeah, but your member. Bother had their own power company for a long time. Yeah. Well, we still have municipalities that do generate power for themselves such as Norwich, and also Groton Connecticut as to towns and example, and there might be other ones but Biron by and large they're not and these other providers. Are supposed to cover the. Last, mile if you will. And And you know when you when you ask customers. Who have experienced both companies both major companies meaning united illuminated as the other one in the western of the state they. They by in far love the customer service they get out of united, illuminated, but eversource. please. So So that's the latest. So we we have power. We actually lost power this morning though for about fifteen minutes about five o'clock and I'm going. Okay. No show. Because or anything any work that I'm. Doing. You know it's. Kind of sad in a way that we have to rely on. Utilities like that but at the same time. It is a world so. But. Anyway I'm not going to go off on another tangent about that. But we've got power. We're back in the studio and and happy happy to be here with you guys. So thank you. Why dear the Why don't we do our? We call house cleaning or just reminders for you guys beginning of every episode. So you can reach us here at the show. If you have any questions for US comments, you can email them hosts with an S. hosts that native opinion dot com that's one way you can reach us. You can also just through our twitter channel at native opinion over there are facebook page of facebook, dot com slash native opinion podcasts until such time as we transition away from that, which I'm looking at because I hate facebook I don't care for mark got sucker Bergh and and how he's handling himself these. Our website of course, native opinion dot. com. And, of course, this show if it's we broadcast live. Wednesdays and Saturdays, and then the audio is then converted over to a podcast. So we also have a podcast feed that you get some could subscribe to if that's easier for you. And you can do so through any of the major podcast directories, apple podcast Google podcast, you have spotify and a host of others you can choose any of those. And then last but not least, you can also leave us a voicemail. It's eight, six, zero, eight, hundred, five, nine, five, again it's eight, six, zero, eight, hundred, five, five, nine, five is that number. Thank. You. Thank you for that. My brother mentioned we broadcast live Wednesdays and Thursdays. And we do thank you for listening. And Just. So you know. We appreciate every bit of support we received from you. And the financial support that we do receive. Goes directly to our costs and expenses associated with producing this show. And it does take quite a bit. Expenses. That we have our expenses such as website and podcast hosting music licensing. Content Development curation in daily business operations marketing. And more. Please join our the wonderful folks who have contributed to this show, and there's lots of you that have done. So we greatly appreciate it. Details on our website at native opinion, dot com forward slash support. And on our facebook page. Just. Click on the learn more button. And another great way to help. By continuing to tell other people about the show and again, we thank you all for listening to this show. It truly does help us grow. And you're listening to episode two, four, three case of why it matters. Absolutely. Go ahead. And here on my show, we promote being safest possible during the. Corona virus outbreak, the country's worst health crisis since the the I won't even get into what the fool in the White House said about the one, thousand, nine, hundred, thousand flu pandemic otherwise known as the Spanish flu. Mask recommended by leading health professionals in the United States and from this help professional as well. Studies show that cloth masks coverings are actually providing better protection for both aware and those nearby. and. Just. So you know our advertiser. Trading Post is now offering cloth masks, some of which I purchased and they are working well as a matter of fact thank you brother you welcome with sizes for the entire family. These masks are made from one hundred percent pleaded cotton with various printed designs. Feature interfacing and a nose clip to help mold at the fit to its way over. These mask can be washed and reused. And it's a real advantage over the disposable face coverings. And if you're looking for masks for yourself or your family members, please visit Mohegan Trading Post, dot com, and check out their designs protect yourself while you protect others. So we can put corona virus behind us. and. Again, we thank MOHICAN trading post for being an advertiser on native opinion we do. We do think those guys so much. Appreciate it. Absolutely right. All right, we have a bit of listener feedback. We do. About applause queued up like. Their idea you get that this week. This bit of feedback comes towards from Listener Erica. And she says, hi, I i. wanted to thank both of you for your podcast will thank you. My family is originally from home, but now lives in northern Kentucky. And there's not a very prominent native community here so. It's often hard for me to find native community with in my everyday life and your podcast provides me a lot of comfort God i. just realized She's She's representative by Mitch McConnell. So sorry. Cut and hope sorry, hopefully the representation in that that. State. Change. We call him we call him. On this show. I heard drew no order. GO BACK TO SLEEP She goes on to say I wanted to know if you've had any resources for learning native languages. I am a citizen of they muskie Tariq nation and would like to learn my language and I am struggling to find absent videos to assist with this. Thanks again for all you do for the community. Erica while Erica you're in luck. I took the time to look for a couple of resources for you. And they will be in the show notes but here's one that will. Provide for listeners who also might be looking for Language resources for the Muskogee Creek language. and. It's www dot m. c. in. Dash in S N. Dot g-o-v e forward slash services forward slash they've abbreviated the Muskoka But I'll spill it 'cause it's. About. The Way Muskogee is it's MS K.. Okay Dash Language. Dash. Program for its laughs m M. B. S. K.. O.. K. E. Dash Dictionary. Are One, and there's a actually a language class on youtube the that I took a look at for a little bit and it's www dot youtube dot com forward slash watch. And you should be able to find it there. I'll give the rest of the link question Mark B equals TB K. Eight, one, M G C L, Z A. So it's It's easier just to go to the show is very hard to convey links. Is really difficult, but but it like I say it'll be in the show notes. Also. I'll add to that same same resource essence, but if you go to. Youtube and look for Mus Muskogee Creek. Excuse me their media channel and actually let me find it. So I'm not guessing here for you guys. And You to do I guess I do actually. Because I, have this I. Subscribed to it and Let me find it worth my subscriptions. Of course, they're way over their way. Okay. Hang on. And War, are they an. Opinion. Usually have heritage. Okay. So it would be Moscow the media. So again as Dave said M. V. S. K. O. K. E. E. Media. So if you if you search youtube for that, you'll find the channel and lots of great content there I'm not so sure about language, but the other link Dave provided is absolutely solid and and all that should be of great help. For you Erica. For for that because they have, they have a lot of great resources there. And? For the nation has a whole. So Cocoa. Cool. Thank you for for writing. Appreciate it. Absolutely. All right. Moving on. Let me Sir. Biden. Picks Kamala Harris VP running mate. What does Indian country think of Biden's choice? To leading indigenous news organizations have published articles with mixed opinions. I did read these articles both in their entirety yesterday I I was GONNA say them Saturday but today's good. Today is any why not? Since eight yesterday? This title comes from Indians Dot Com. And this is. An article by Ach. Ago. And the article. Read, she was not good for Indian country. Kamala Harris back in spotlight as Democratic vice presidential pick. Quoting a prominent US senator with a record of gung against tribal interest the running mate of Democratic presidential candidate, Joe Biden when Kamala Harris served as attorney. General of California. She opposed at least. Fifteen. Fifteen tribal land into trust applications. Her actions undermine the ability of Indian, nations to claim lands that they lost to theft fraud other negative policies. Using her position as the state's top legal official Harris also went against tribes in two prominent sovereignty cases are arguments put her out of step with legal doctrines that were formed by the nation's highest court in a historic decision last just last month. She was not good for Indian country here when she was Attorney General and that was a quote asserted rick. Cuevas. A California resident who has used his original depend. Chunga Dot com website to repeatedly call attention to Harris and record in a state that is home to more than one hundred tribes and the largest population of American Indians Alaska natives in the nation. But Cuevas who was the victim of discipline by Pechanga Band of. Seeing you Indians isn't the only one in Indian country who was raised concerns. When Harris will seek the Democratic nomination for president last year, she was asked about her tribal homelands record. At a roundtable with tribal leaders and again at the historic. Franklin ear native American Presidents Forum. On both occasions Harris try to deflect from her past she blamed her stance on the land into trust applications on the California governor arguing that she was required to take action at the at the behest excuse me of another state official quoting. Did your off. Suppose these applications in quote Chairman Harold Fraser of the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe asked at form. A quoting. Harris. It was I'm sorry I was the lawyer for the governor. The governor made decisions about feet, trust applications by California tribes in quote. Quoting again that's the lawyer. The law officer for the governor, we had to file those letters. Continuing quote, but this was never a reflection and has never been a reflection on my personal perspective. In quote, Hair said who prefaced to remarks by stating that the US government stole land and took land from tribal nations. There must be a restoration of that ownership and that was a quote from Harris once again. Embracing the feet trust process that she attempted undermine in California Reporting by China Dot Net, and independent native own outlet offered a different account governor had no idea Harris was sending opposition letter on attorney general's lender head to the bureau of Indian Affairs the Indian affairs site disclosed. Quoting again until she addresses these native issues, I won't be voting for her in quote Aaron White Beaver. Scott, who is one of Bago and Spokane told Indians. Dot Com. He pointed out that his sister Matt Harris last year and voice concerns about her record as well. So, let me let me backup in the article here a little bit so they're pointing to Harasses position although she's now refuting that of course. Position about land into trust cases from Fi land status. So let me elaborate on that a little bit more in this. There's a lot of nuances to this but the basic premise is as follows. Fee Lands are lands that are under a tribal control that could be where they have purchased lands but were those lands are actually still within the jurisdiction of a particular state. and. Then we're the tribe petitions federal government to take such lands and moved them under trust status or protection. Okay. So that's what they're referring to there. And seemingly the governor of the state at that time and also Harris as far as his or her Attorney General. Didn't like or didn't want to. Follow suit with tribal request to put certain lands into trust. So so that I think is going to have to be Looked at harder with proper skepticism. So. Also What I've noted in watching. News reports this morning. I keep hearing this quote. This is what I'm gonNA. I'M GONNA pick on CBS. A Jamaican father and Indian mother and a Jewish husband. Close quote. That is generally how CBS news reporters anchors end in political pundits described Joe Biden's choice for vice president and Kamala Harris. They're describing her as diverse candidate also rather. Interesting to me how they? Verse. It's interesting to me how they're they're. They're hyper focused on her ethnic and marital makeup for some reason. At least there were doing that initial well. It's it's lead into birtherism. It's it's coming I already seen I've seen. Yeah, I've already seen at this morning and facebook her. Then, then you know they transitioned to, of course noting that she would be the nation's first woman of color to hold the position of Vice President of the United, states. And then. Later, more about her career and some of the things you know, of course, we're focusing on issues. Or problems that pertain to her decision making around a native American concerns right. But But for ending countries initial reaction I'd say Here's how Indian country today another news outlet. aaliyah Chevenez reported her observations of Biden's choice in the title of her article is Kamala Harris record and Indian country dates ten years. And some of what she wrote is as follows. What is all beeping? Let's make falls worse than my phone Matt that my My. Phone just. Like have about half of my sound shut off 'cause I was driving me crazy. Yeah I'd sit there I was like China and. Yes I missed something I. Guess. You. Miss that Biden amid a BP Joyce now. Think. Thank my phone was blowing that yesterday when. but but. aaliyah wrote as follows she says, news broke Tuesday announcing Kamala Harris as vice presidential, running mate to Joe Biden. So. What is Harris experience working with Indian country she writes. Much of it stems from her time serving as California's attorney general her time as United States senator and from her ten month presidential run. Harris began serving as attorney general in two thousand eleven. where she gained both support and criticism from California tribes on a number of issues. The State is home to one hundred and nine federally recognized tribes. In her bids for election as attorney general in two, thousand, ten and two, thousand, Fourteen Harris received support from. California tribes. So, think about that despair g right eleven, tribes support her versus a total one, hundred nine. Now. I grant you some may just simply didn't weigh in but. The these are eleven she's she's touting as being supportive of so. Eleven tribes resulting in donations of upwards to one hundred, thousand dollars to Los Angeles. Times reported. She garnered criticism from California tribes following her decision to deny fiend to trust applications as already mentioned Dave mentioned. which asked for tribal lands to be put into trust native leaders asked her opinion about this contentious issue at the Franklin near a native American presidential form one year ago. where she gave remarks at that event, virtually pulled one win short clip here for you guys. So here's a quick exchange. We'll start again with our elder Marcello. You're. I'm not drooping here what you part of this. Great. My question today? Is. Home on the shine river reservation. I believe that there is a pervasive sadness at exists because the medals about abundant that were given a wounded me, there has never been resolution to that. I would my question is, do you support the removal of the Stain Act? That's my question today. Yes and. The reality is that the battle of Disney? killed at least a hundred in I think almost fifty, one, hundred, forty, six by recall native Americans on from the suit try it was a massacre and we have to again history has to reflect fact and at wasn't massacre and and I feel strongly that that given my long standing position about making sure that we acknowledged the wrong that communities have experienced that we acknowledge. That What we can do currently to address those wrongs is important. So yes. And thank you. So now I don't you know. I guess. Maybe my expectations are too high brother but If you're going to speak at a native American forum. I would think you would want to try to be up to speed on some some of the issues love but she talked very very generically there. When an elder specific question. Okay. So. I pulled a paper. that. Senator Elizabeth Warren. WHO's a Democrat from Massachusetts and Senator Jeff Merkley, a Democrat from Oregon. presented and it opens like this December twenty. Ninth Eighteen Ninety United States, soldiers slaughtered hundreds of Lakota men, women, and children at wounded knee on the Pine Ridge Indian reservation in South Dakota during what came to be known as the wounded knee massacre. Congress awarded twenty medals of honor to soldiers for the shameful acts that occurred during the wounded knee massacre to remove the stain, act would resend those medals of honor. So. I, kind of wish she had drilled into that further. My asking too much. Do you think? No I don't think it is asking too much. I just. I, don't know it just seems to me that. There was a lot of pandering going on at that forum. Sadly. There's a lot of pandering going on. Concerning natives. We're out the country throughout the government Basically Frankly. I'm sick and tired of it. But she should have gone more in depth to answer the elder's question. I agree with you there. Exactly. because. The reason I ask that is. Typically. Again. Maybe maybe I am. Putting too much on a particular. Candidate or campaign but. I look at it like if. Most campaigns have somebody trying to advise the campaign in you would hope that it would be somebody from. One of our indigenous communities that is up to speed on certain. Uncertain issues. Okay. And and so. I also acknowledged the fact that when questions are going to be posed at a form, you don't know you're not pre fed those questions, right? So I you know I can defend. Kamala a little bit in that sense but. I. Feel like you know. They they walked into that form knowing you know with these kinds of stats. Let's see There's a population accord, the United States census of approximately five million native Americans. Okay. Don't care. I'll show up I'll make an appearance and that's going to have to be good enough. Again. Maybe that's belligerent of me Except that but. That's just. The mindset. I agree but I have I have a suspicion. that. Quite, a number of them. Viewed it that way or that that sticks to to the researches. Well, let's look at that. Let's look at the top. Issues that we can find on social media really fast, and then we'll look at the United States census in terms of voting block, and let's see the form is in. Iowa. So that sort of the middle of the country and so. Let's it might be an opportunity for us to swing some red votes are way. By showing that, we are inclusive. Okay. I don't know but I'm being very. Ser- tastic I guess. But. So finishing up here a little bit with them what wrote. She says during her presidential campaign. Harris was one of a handful of candidates to publish a policy agenda pertaining to Indian country or plan was multifaceted including intentions to reintroduce a a tribal nation summit at the White House restore five, hundred thousand acres into trust and protect native women children. It also included increasing in educational opportunities for native students supporting economic development. Protecting voting rights and ensuring accurate census comments. Okay and so. The rest the rest of these articles. Of course, we'll have links to them in the show because there there was quite a bit more. But here's the thing is. Nothing new. Nothing new there at all. And so When I'm. If I were honestly looking for. Solutions I. Guess. which can only come from collaboration with Indian country. You know these talking points that mean nothing to me. We're going to restore five, hundred, thousand acres of trust land well. I'm going to get into this a little bit later but I have an issue with that even K.. and. Just. So you know Dave I am honesty struggling with even voting this year. And I know we've been back and forth about this This subject. But Some of it has to do. With my old my old attitudes in my old position, which basically was that, what's the point? Don't give in don't give in to it and also. But also it's it's about. Having to concede of being an American. Quite frankly. So. So it's quite a bit of that. But. Anyway that's for another day. I guess but. So here we are biting me this choice. And of course, what I had predicted with actually that he wasn't even going to choose a person of color I had I had said that he was gonNA. Probably see Greenwich. Whitmer from. From Michigan. So I was wrong. Acknowledged I was wrong. L. That line all year didn't, they. Know. So I was surprised that he. And I know that he said he was going to choose a woman color but I didn't thank you would fall through and I even posted on facebook where I don't think that he will. So I was wrong on that account. But I was hoping that he would not choose Kamala. Harris. That she would make a great attorney general great attorney. Gen. Yep absolutely I agree with that. But I will had aspirations for other women of color for that position but. A here's here's why think he chose her. Because Kamala, a Wall Street, Darling? That's why he chose her. She's an accomplished. Stateswoman accomplished stateswoman. Won't take that firmer either now. And she's qualified for the position. Yes. Yes. But the reasoning I think most and foremost was that she's a wall. Street Darling I think that's why she was chosen. and. That's sad if that's the reason. It is but but it's typical and. What feeds my attitude of why Bother You know they're not. They're not GONNA change. You know there's There are things that just in they have been bothering me for a while but I just sort of put them aside you know early in the year you know I was paying close attention to Progressive Democrat wing of the Party and how they're positioning themselves and and all their their chief complaints which a lot of it is centered around that very subject about. Being Darlings of Wall Street and catering to the dollar in you know in all the capital mystic aspects of America which is another problem that I have with the country as a whole. And and so I was looking to see if I could if I could honestly align myself with with With the Party even going as far as changing my political affiliation to Democrat from from being unaffiliated and I'm really really deeply second guessing that now. For a lot of reasons. They said, we can discuss later at some other point but But yeah it's. That's where. The progressives had. A good platform. It's just a shot themselves in the foot early. Like Two Thousand Sixteen early Right out of the gate, they shot themselves in the foot. By putting all their efforts into the brainy wagon. And I'm not. I'm not besmirching Bernie Sanders at all. That's not what I'm doing. But The Progressive Wing, the progressive movement was not forward-looking. They should have known that what happened to Sanders in sixteen what's going to happen to him in twenty? And it was an exact. Repeat of what happened to him in two thousand, sixteen with a few exceptions. So that's how they shot themselves in the foot. Had They not put all of their eggs in the Bernie? Movement. Held onto that platform. And fought to defame the DNC. Then, I think things would have looked much different in this landscape, this political landscape that we see before us now. From the Democrats. I think it would have been very different. But. Again a discussion for another time. You just two two quick points. I'm not disagreeing with with that But I just I just viewed the the the progressive movement more. So now just A. rebranded REBE rebranded ignorance. On on on a number of things Two examples. Sherve Problems related ending country but also their stance on green energy. which again, I'll get into another time. secondarily. As as you guys have heard I'm sorry. The long guys here. Even though the studios in the basement. Though the guy writes right by so. Sorry. Clears now mine was mine was here earlier. Mike until he goes away. All right. No problem So. The other, the other the other thing has to do with my earlier stance back in sixteen. About not wanting to be affiliated with a party even though now I may. Changed and very much regretting it. The Case in point pop singer. And you ve back. Case in point. The Young Turks announced that they had. Requested to get press passes to attend what is now a virtual convention for the Democrats Right. They were denied. which is sad. Okay. So. Again also relates to when you just said about you know Wall Street in you know money influences they don't view them as A. Important enough of a voting contingency Kursk constituency. Albeit they're all democrats, right? To be involved. And so I know there are similar things to some degree that go on with the Republican Party. But my my my my ultimate point is, what is the point? You know. Nothing changes. Of any real substance, no matter what team you choose to be on. And I think it just reinforces my my original. Political belief system which was I. don't give a crap about it. Why should I give a crap about it as an indigenous person? It doesn't change. Anything doesn't change the history that this country has as. Content or continues to. Be Infection. On our communities. And and. No amount of seemingly no amount of involvement by indigenous people. In the political process. Is really going to amount to anything. And I know that sounds fetus and I'm really really sorry especially to those at work very, very hard in the. Get the get out the vote of in Indian country. But fail to understand how we honestly are going to make any kind of real. Real, effective. Change. So. That's where I'm at. And that's okay. It's understandable. And it's valid. Excuse me. I'll leave it at that for now. We won't, type show with. With. Debate that you and I have often between ourselves. Yeah or even discussion tonight. So much debate. It's just discussion even though I now debated at three times even though I said I wasn't going through but anyway, but yeah, I like we just said we will leave it right there. It's just were I personally sit at the moment. All right. So let's move in ten native news I'm not to keep meeting brother. So why don't you go out no problem no problem. Okay. Care first article it's from native news. Today. PUBLISHED BY INDIANS DOT COM and the author of this story is tally nauman? And the title is Tried Jump On Census Bandwagon. And that you know that title could lend itself to a lot of different feelings and comments. Yup. I was waiting for that. But. It's a double edged sword if you ask me. And a lot of ways excuse me one second. Agree. Double edged. Sword. It'll make sense here in a minute. As to why it's a double edged sword. The CHOCTAW, nation missed out on many millions of dollars in federal aid for Covid nineteen. Relief. And other programs do to an undercount of tribal members in the twenty US twenty tenths cents. Leadership said Doing Forum July twenty one designed to encourage Indian countries participation. In the twenty twenty addition of the survey. Speaking of in quotes, painful illustrations of what happens when a census doesn't go well for tribe. choctaw nation chief Berry Batons Executive Communication Officer said quoting we've lost out on tens and tens of millions of dollars in state and federal aid which would have come to us if the census count would have been more accurate. Quoting again, that gave us an excellent. Impetus and a reason for doing the best, we could to get the twenty twenty census organized. On our end in quote he said. Like some of the other five, hundred, seventy, four, federally recognized tribal governments the CHOCTAW nation is taking part in what the US Census Bureau calls. Count Committees. In which representatives of different government government excuse me jurisdictions partner to promote citizen participation. In. The choctaw case this includes tribal representatives. Providing County and city officials information showing how much funding they failed to receive. Due to the fact that only twenty percent of the tribal nations. two, hundred and twenty, six thousand citizens were counted. As members in the previous descend census, that's a lot of people missed. The choctaw government conducted its own census for years before states got involved, showing that its members live on the eleven thousand square miles and eleven counties, hundreds jurisdiction in eastern Oklahoma. It's well as elsewhere in all fifty U s states. percent. That's all. It's about to happen again. Because, they not only them but everybody else because they've they've ceased counting. Well Go ahead. I know you're chomping at the bit. I'm so I'm so hyper sensitive to you know if people think I am hypocritical or or some or some other form of whatever. I engaged in the census this year. and. Not by mail or or online, but one of our. Tribal members. Was Conducting the census polling. And you're my surprise, it was very, very brief. I'm I'm trying to understand how they could ever get an accurate count of us to begin with. They were very very focused in their questions around. Damaging. Just, keep going. The guy that's like mo it. Above the window. It's one of these zero. What do they call zero degree mowers reset right over the top of the blades and and your those handles and pull them left and right and you can do a nice tight turn. He's mode over the same spot like twenty times now. I'm like dude, the grass is cut. So you. Just. Like. it's a long story but. So. Hyper focused on. Ethnicity. Are you native. Do you claim native are do you know if you do claim native tribe you from? Are you mixed heritage? If you're mixed heritage how many heritage is a do you claim to be? Ethnicities excuse me do you claim to be. And then you know the overarching, all of this, regardless of how you answer those questions. Show me. How overall you have increased budgets to make the quality of life or India for for Indian country. Better. This is what I keep harping on harped on all year. Ba. Can't. No And I I was honest with my cousin I said I'm only doing this because I'm curious to hear the question you're going to pose. It's research. Okay. But but honestly can't understand how could ever Make the. Claim that. They're going to get an accurate count. Because if you're so hyper focused on people that are mixed heritage. Only counting part of a person. The the way they have it broken down. That's that's always been the problem with the part of the problem with the senses since its inception. Because way back when during the first census, of course, you know they did them on foot. and. The census takers would only. Count The people. That were in the house at the time. The census taker was there yes it didn't matter if you know. GRANDPA. So and so you know punting or you know farming down in the field so did mattered they didn't get counted. and. That missed a lot of native people on that on that level. The other way other way native peoples were. Diminished in marginalized. The census takers were given the latitude to determine. What they thought, the person's ethnic category might be. So if you had. A native family that. Looked a little darker than what they thought. To look like. They label them colored or black correct. That's BS. So you had literally literally millions of native peoples. Mis categorized miss identified. Or not counted at all. Because of poor practices and policies for the census. And that's continued until this day. Agreed. The, other part of this I don't often talk about. Is that Like I didn't participate in the sense I clearly remember this. Ten years ago idea in participated in here. Here's the other reason why didn't and I haven't talked about this aspect of it By participate as an indigenous person at least I feel even though I've gone ahead and done it this year. By participating in the census you as an indigenous person in my in my view, you are admitting simulation. You're admitting your American. And and in in in that in that statement and argument I, it's justified because of a capitalistic country that was formed around us. And I also have a problem with the fact that you know they have to counter before they will pay us. What little bit they pay to begin with? That's BS to right. So there's this whole host of things that surround. The sensors and you know tr- nowhere. That I can recall. Any any treaty that exists that are that they they ignore anyway but they're supposed to be honoring does it say we have to count you before we will pay anything to support you And so you know. For us to have to. Be to participate in a in a census process is a is problematic from the GECKO. We can transition often to a thousand different directions trust responsibilities the practice of land to trust the practice of. Federal recognition it whole host of these things that fall under that same umbrella. There are, and that's one edge to the sword. The other edge, the sword is. If? We don't count as many of native peoples as possible. then. Voice. Is diminished even more. So the more numbers we can show as a as a group of people as an ethnic group of people. I think it's better for us because they're already trying to to continue to get rid. Of Us. Here that but but unfortunately, the financial numbers alone don't bear out a wall. No, they don't. But I. Again that's why said at the beginning it's a double edged sword. Of which we're always, we're always behind the eight ball where never in any kind of. A position of control in these circumstances no. So So that the you know that's Why all this is extraordinarily complicated not and it never should have been to begin with. Because none of these folks wherever supposed to be here. I'll leave it at that. But We are where we are today so. All right our next article here. The title reads lessons lost. Indian students have been short changed for generations. COMES FROM INDIANS DOT com. The subtitle reads the Federal Government gives native students an inadequate education and get away with it. And so this article reads I'm sorry I don't have an author on this. There was one other one. Okay. the article reads the Bureau of Indian Education. Remember everything everything federally based has bureau over it or an agency. Open you trace everything back and it falls under one major umbrella so I believe the bureau of Indian education still falls under the Department of Interior I think. Look but. All right. So the Bureau of Indian education has repeatedly neglected warnings that it is not providing a quality education for forty six thousand native students. Once called a quote stain on our nation's history close quote the school system has let down its students for generations. Okay sorry. That's sort of an extended subtitle. You guys The author is Alden Woods. I believe. Always okay. who So I guess this was taken from an article Alden wrote for the Arizona Republic Okay. And so going on here a couple of months after a commissions shorties son started sixth grade in an Arizona public middle school his teachers called her at home. He had trouble adding and subtracting and was struggling to read at grade level shortage didn't understand how it was possible that her oldest son excuse me her oldest child could be so far behind after leaving wide ruins community school the sole elementary school in the area of about a thousand residents at the southern edge of the Navajo? Nation He had been diagnosed with a mild learning disability that affects reading and math comprehension. But short he said he was doing. So well by fourth grade that he skipped a grade at the urging of administrators began attending a public middle school about twenty five miles south in Sanders. There her son was far behind his classmates, many of whom did not grow up in rural community and didn't spend their early years at an elementary school overseen by the Bureau of Indian education a little known federal agency that manages more than one hundred, eighty schools and dormitories across the country. Well Now. One person that does sit over that would have to be. Betsy Devos. The worst education secretary, this country has ever seen. Okay. And so she's aware of this bureau. Because she most likely is over it. or at least. Advises for it. And the other thing I would question. As far as what I read here, not not questioning the author. But. Very quick our school systems. POINTING TO A. Let's see I wanna be accurate in this. Many times are indigenous students are diagnosed with mild learning disabilities this. was stated here in the article or learning disabilities in general I argue that depending on the community of which the students are coming from, it isn't a disability. It's a difference in how we learn. Correct and that's basically all it is yep. Visual learning, for example. and. It's been proven that people learn in. A variety of ways. And our school. Our educational system is so antiquated I mean to cut you off a low. Professorship. Real quick. Our educational system and methods are so antiquated that were still pushing. On Old English. Mode of learning that has failed. Literally, millions of students Literally millions of students. I can speak to this article from personal experience. My first grade was in an Indian school. And I told the story before there were eight two grades in a one room class classroom and a one room one room school. Eight grades. Now granted people might say Oh my God how? Many kids in one one room. You have to you have to remember there were only. Small. Numbers of kids for each grade. So I think there might have been. Thirty thirty five kids in the whole school. But I, I can speak to the the. Difficulty of education because MS card. Bless her soul. She was teaching eight grades. In one classroom in one room. The room had to be I don't know. Forty by. Thirty type of. Space and you had the boys and girls bathrooms and then you know. But that's as big as that school was, and she had eight grades that she had to teach in that one room. So. Yeah. This problem about the bureau of Indian epic, the Bureau of Indian Education it's been failing students along time. And nothing's being done about it. Nothing's being done about. I'll give you guys sort of a mechanical example of what I'm referring to say different also, not that what you just said isn't is it wasn't clear enough with it certainly was. But another another example of this. In terms of difference of learning many of us probably remember the practice of showing tell. That, was conducted in school. Well. For some of our communities, that's how everything is taught. Language you pick up an object and you call this object by its traditional name. Whatever that may be? And the quote Unquote Building Block approach. But you see in western education systems, they call that a disability. Okay. And in. And I understand there's other nuances in you know there are there are. Other problems but but. We are often mis categorized as having a learning disability in it's a pretty way of saying you're not a simulating to the way we teach here. And that has to be acknowledged and. identified. When we're talking about. How they want to conduct programs and even and even funding levels. This is another reason why I continue to say in certain. Academic Fronts that you need to have indigenous educators leading certain certain classes. You know we talk about at the college level in terms of American Indian studies, programs all the time. But You know this is. This. is where some of the problem ladies in my opinion. This you know in in the early years of education. People learn in three basic ways. You either an auditory learner you're a visual learner or your tactile learner. And those those speak for themselves. Those definitions I don't have to go into each one of the MS, break. But the. Education system. Only concerns itself with. Visual learning. And does a poor job at that. Site an example of children that have vision problems. That get left behind because nobody. You know cute in on the fact that the child needed glasses. So that is one of the main. Reasons. That children. Fall far far behind. In in this education system bars the next category children fall behind his auditory. Children that are hearing things. But. They're not comprehending because either they have a hearing deficit. Or? Method learning is being. A loss for words their method of learning isn't cohesive with what they're hearing. Those children may be visual learners or tactile owners. And that's where the educational system false. They don't recognize or even try to figure out how these children learn. If you have a group of children that are that are tactile learners. They're gonNA pour fairly compared to children that are visual or auditory learners. And the same thing with the other categories it's like take here's a visual for you. You've got a group of animals. In front of A. Supposed-, teacher? And the teacher tells these animals you've got climb those that tree. Okay. Now, you've got a fish you've got to bear. And you've got picking your animal that's not a tree climber. which animal would you think is GonNa fare best in climbing that tree. The, bear of course. That same group of animals is now over to the next next area of study a pond. Now. which animal do you think is GonNa fare best in that pond even though some of the May swim, which one is key is a tuned to the water the fish. and. So on and so forth. You. Know. That's that's that's how we wound up in this situation that we're in in this country. With education. It's because those lack of awareness is. that. People just didn't want to care to pay attention to. The focus is around testing. Testing testing testing. Anyway and let's wait another quick area that that's ignored as well as there's just just an automatic assumption that all students in the United States. and. I'll probably get email. That's going to refute this but needless to say but I'm I'm coming at it from. Indigenous students and again there a great series. That the club museum are used to work at put out relevant to. College Students It's called Native College style. By Loren Spears, talking about how difficult native students have acclimating to college lifestyle but I argue this happens even earlier. So if you if you're if you're community has many. People living in one particular home in your in your speaking your original language like take Navajo Nation for example. Okay. Then, English becomes your second language, but the suction is you're an American you. Is are firstly is their first language won't who says? Who says? because. I argue the the growth in the birth of this country. Again was imposed on us. Imposed on however many nations there were. With however many languages there were. You can't sit there and say in put paint a broad brush in the education system and say. This is how it is. No. There are unique challenges that different students have for different reasons some of which we've already discussed. And then you have this overarching thing called the federal government. At. Already, woefully under funding, you know our our indigenous. Communities in so many different ways education yet another one. You really think betsy. Devos. is going to be able to adequately. Support. Our indigenous students in whatever level of support. Know Education in higher education the that that they're going to have no because she doesn't listen to. Indigenous educators. Who have? Continuously Tried to tell this federal government and for that matter even state level governments. What the needs are and what the challenges are. Very tired of you know again, I'm on this kick of just tired of the BS. Hear you so There you go. All right. We're going to transition now until other news other, than us, other news and. So here is a story that was produced out of NPR. entitled. The story would be more than one thousand acres of Esselin ancestral land returned to the tribe. So I WANNA play this clip for you. It's about four minutes. And then we'll be right back to discuss you ago the escellent tribe of big Sur California numbered perhaps only a thousand people when Spanish missionaries arrived in the seventeen hundreds, they were sent to missions to be converted where most perished from disease and it seemed then that their land, all of which was taken was lost to them forever. But in a deal that's been in the works for a year more than thousand acres of the excellence ancestral territory now been returned to the remaining members. Tom. Little Bear Nason is the chairman of the tribe and he joins us now good morning. Good Morning. How are you Lou? I'm very well. Wishes thank you. We are so honored to be recipients of this land. Your tribe was removed from this land centuries ago. What does it mean to regain ownership words cannot explain what we feel for. It's from our soul from our heart from are being we are so elated honor to be the recipients of our ancestors home and couldn't be a more better spot. For us to get more tailored spot than this land. Yeah. Because the exact land is home to your eight thousand year old origin story. That's correct. You know the whole origin story started right there on this land on Sacred Mountain called Pico. Blanco also known as Peachy in our language and it is the basis of our whole lives, the center of our universe. You've been fighting to get this land back for decades. Tell us how this deal came about. Over thirty years ago nineteen, ninety, one, the. Mr Adler whose mound from Sweden who came over and had been the massing large tracts of lands, old homesteads, and put us back together in one large ranch and we. He wanted to back in nineteen ninety two to give it back to the naval indigenous peoples of land. So it's taken us out long to get this land. You are not recognized as a tribe by the federal government if you had been that would have given you certain benefits but you've fought against that recognition in particular around this deal. Can you explain why? Yes. Reason why is that? If you were recognized tribe if we were recognized tribe the federal government. This land would become property of the United States government via the Department of Interior would own the land and they would give it back to us as a trust, but we would never have actual complete ownership. That was a big problem for us. And you just didn't trust the federal government to be a good steward when we were taken from our land, our language was taken from us. We were separated from our wives and our children. Our grandchildren families were separated put in different because there were over three missions in this area. So their home motive was to build a separate. Break our cultures and our traditions, and basically convert us from. He's an to humans is what they said. And without many of our people died off from disease from smallpox didn't have the immunity. So by within five to ten years pretty much most of our people gone only a handful remain. So under the governor and under the state of California and acting as a nonprofit, we are able to you know get this land and get it back in our name and this lands forever preserved forever ours. We're not developing the land in any way we're not billing. Casino. We are just said not into the federal recognition. Because of the things that come along with it. You've said that you're tribal share this land with other local tribes that were also nearly wiped out during the mission era. Why did you feel was important to do that? We felt very important to share the land with other indigenous our cousins, relatives because they to or land moved to. You. Know How to call home a place to repatriate one of the most important thing. So we are doing with us land as we're going to be able to repatriate or ancestors that are held in museums and universities and involves were getting those out through the native American graves protection requires universities museums to give back any human remains or any funerary items back to the land. So this land gives us a place where we can put our ancestors their final resting point where they won't be disturbed. Tom Little Bear Nason tribal chairman of the Esselin tribe. Thank you very much. Thank you very much. Appreciate it. So, there you go. Another. Example of. A tribe. Carving their own sovereign way. and. I think is very interesting is nope no interest in of land into trust? nope. No interest in being federally recognized. With very specific reasons. And so I figured you'd like that article very much brother but. So I did read and it's another nuance. Okay that we that we that we talk about see for example. Another. Challenge that we have in. The way the United States. was formed. When we talk about lands being stolen. and. Appropriated with at the point of a gun or a musket. When you roll the clock forward. Why should any tribe have to pay for land that they already once occupied? Because, it's a capitalistic society. So, this is a this is a big problem. Is You've forced. You pick a tribe. I don't care. I don't care who you know what tribe you name okay. But. In most cases, they're not living today necessarily in their original homeland. Geographically, speaking. Because of colonization slash settlerism. So why should they try to pay? The oppressor money. To get their their their homelands back. So. This is another component OBI. Ever. Long problem. For. Any country. So so I thought that was a very interesting article in. The share with you, guys. Thank you again produced out of NPR. by Lou. Navarro. Nice. Air comes a big one. Yeah. It is. Troubling at the very least. The fool in the White House my words. Pick to manage public lands has four. Decade has a four decade history of overt racism toward native people. William Perry pennsly- pushed rhetoric legal arguments and policies that sought to deprive indigenous people of their rights. Comes to us by. Way of the intercept. and. Eileen Browne is the author. And the five books authored by the fool in the White House my words nominee to lead the interior department's Bureau of Land Management. William Perry, penalty rails against environmental extremist. Excuse me endangered species protections people for ethical treatment of animals and Al Gore. All of whom in his view whether it lists will listen to. Limit Private Development on the lands of the West. He added another target to. Policies. Supporting Native Nations Treaty Rights. For years penalty was held us I'm sorry it was head of the mountain states legal foundation right wing organization. That has fault multiple high profile cases favoring private property rights and states west of the Mississippi including in native territories. In court. and His volume lists. Writings penalty attempted to undo protections. For sites considered, sacred? To. Tribes. Fought Justice Department efforts to support native voters. Rights are you in favour of toppling key legal precedents that uphold treaty rights and made statements about native identity and religion that and digital scholars and attorneys called deeply offensive. In its two thousand, six book warriors for the West. Ample. Pennsly- suggested that native people may soon ceased to exist. The Day may soon common. Congress and the Supreme Court will be asked to take a serious and very hard look at whether the air. Whether there remains a need for the federal government's policy of. But turn a listrik protection. That, we didn't look right for some reason. Penalty wrote apparently referring to the US government's legal obligation to fulfil treaty commitments known as it's trust responsibility. The statement continued chillingly quoting the day may come sooner than many expect given that with every declining blood quantum's per tribal member recognized tribes may soon be little more than associations of financial convenience in quote. Pendulum has been acting leader. Of the bill in. Black lives, movement. Which is responsible for managing the nation's public lands for more than a year. With confirmation hearings expected in the coming weeks. His long history of attacking indigenous people is getting new scrutiny. Piggly who has lately come under fire for his views on racial justice one toward the interior department in the nineteen eighties as well and it's record their provides further evidence that he could prioritize private developments under I'm mean over excuse me. Treaty rights. As Acting Assistant Secretary for energy and minerals under Ronald Reagan in the early eighties. Bengali's sought to delay oil and gas industry royalty payments to indigenous people according to documents shared with the intercepted by Western values project a publicly lance and accountability. Nonprofit. Real Yeah. Yeah. The guys are complete wack job. Honestly. So what I wanted to pull two examples of this guy right both relate to his love of Ronald Reagan. And of the fossil fuel industry as well as his war against environmentalists right both of these clips originally aired on Some whack-job program called the dove a concert conservative right wing TV and radio show back on July of two thousand thirteen. which was produced apparently out of Oregon. So. Here's example number one. Maybe. Now, you were also really instrumental in some of the policies, the Reagan administration as it relates to energy and minerals. Right. Absolutely, I had the privilege of helping to change the way we do the on Shell while gas leasing program, we from a program that operated as the novelist in which in. Cracks were made available to program made the entire outer continental shelf available wherever industry thought there might be an opportunity to develop energy and as a result, own gas development in the. Shelf especially in the Gulf of Mexico took. And I'm proud did a part of that had the backing of the secretary. Of the president of the United States and the program we put in place. Back. In the eighties is still in place today except for the fact that President Obama has plunged almost every area in the outer continental shelf, he's not the few areas open Reagan had the entire Outer Continental Shelf Open. So that was. A big chair. So he mentioned the Outer Continental Shelf, this is an area that I've forcibly men become quite acquainted with through. Our concerns regarding. Offshore Wind Energy. All of this development started through this guy apparently the oil oil and gas leasing program also mentioned the Gulf of Mexico, which is a heavy in. that. Type of production. He doesn't care. Guy Could care less about what's going on in hurting the planet. Let alone what we as indigenous people think about those actions. Here's example number two. All right. So obviously, his policies which you had a great part of formulating. Created the template that we can use today to kickstart this thing again, I mean I know we got an extreme president right now that's trying to unwind everything in fact, right here in Oregon as you probably know wait. We. We're fighting this like crazy as you can imagine in the force and we're watching our force burn up and then we can't get in there and clean it up. I'm you know the battle you know the argument but the president's President Reagan's policy is a template that we can go back to don't you think. Absolutely, I said Michael Sagebrush rebel chapter by Chapter Hunch Oil, and gas offshore oil and gas coal strategic minerals all the issues at the end of chapter after. Reagan believed what Reagan did. They always did what he believed, which is unique among politicians at the end of every chapter. I. Say okay. That was what's going on now and what do we need to do about and I think there's a great hope this this. Revival of our natural gas production in this country, which is taking place only on state and private lands. Not. Federal. What would have been fully investigated by Reagan because he said, the oil is not a monopoly the small independent producers of discover stuff and they do it with unconventional techniques and there's a hydraulic fracturing that we're using to. Great. Is a demonstration of Reagan's great competence with human beings and our ability to overcome adversity and create jobs and opportunity and the great tragedy of Obama. Is that the the minority community loves Obama but he's really. with your bar to economic policies with unemployment rate, and of course, to gas revival is one example of how breaking policies could forget 'cause. Yeah Thoughts brother. Herb that. You know. Twenty twenty heads been a year actually from twenty sixteen to to date. It's the first time I've ever seen so many anal cavities. Speak. I didn't even know they had tong's. That is twenty thirteen. So yeah, we're going back. We're going back. Yeah but I've noticed it even more. This last almost four years I just. Thought that that idiocy would would now I can't even say that because. After after I found out who the person would be. That was going to sit in the in the in the White House then to sixteen hundred Pennsylvania Avenue. I knew that that point and it was like now. ABC's going to get worse. So way worse and it has. But you know. All. Right. So let's take a look at this from the other direction. All right. So I've got another clip for you guys next. this is a this audio comes from an advocacy video produced in twenty nineteen. From. An organization called the years project a group that describes their efforts. As a quote, a multimedia storytelling, an education effort designed to inform, empower, and unite the world in the face of climate change. All right. So this guy clearly would be an enemy of William Penalty Right. After this plays brother I, want to discuss this a bit more. Sure so here you go. The managed charge of America's public land's wants to sell them off to the highest bidder. All of them. Every single. Acre. William Perry penalty is a conservative lawyer and career bureaucrat. Now, president trump has made him head of the Bureau of land management but penalty doesn't want to manage the land. He believes all federal should either be sold or given back to the state. So they can sell it themselves that could include every public park in America for gas oil and coal extraction. The magin. The Grand Canyon filled with oil rigs. That's the world pen-li wants to live. pen-li has labeled anyone who wants to protect public lands as an environmental extremist, but he's the one who's too extreme. He's written books claiming people who take got environmentalists or heroes, and he's written articles praising ranchers who used violence against the government. Penalty has compared climate change to Unicor us. He says, the endangered species act is run by a cartel of rich scientists and should be abolished. He led a lawsuit against the Interior Department on behalf of an oil and gas prospect. He criticized the trump administration for not shrinking more national, monuments. Tenley even claims the founding fathers would have wanted us to sell off over public lands and that environmentalists have formed. Any. Cola Garden. And that's just scratching the surface. Picture yellowstone being strip mined for coal These are the kinds of policies he advocates for penalty claims. He is advocating on behalf of the western US where most of the public land is located but Westerners don't want public lands to be sold most people in the West. Believe public lands should stay public. Year after year polling shows that Republicans and Democrats, alike or in. Wide Agreement. That public land should be protected. Over seventy percent of Westerners believed public lands or for everyone in almost every western resident has visited public parks in the last year and plans to visit again in a majority of Westerner, say access to public lands factor choosing where they live Henley also seems to have forgotten that public lands generate hundreds of millions of dollars for these states, each year and the average American tax payer only pays four dollars a year to help maintain them. But it's not just about money. This land is part of our cultural heritage. It protects thousands of species that could otherwise go extinct. Public Land's even provide drinking water for millions of Americans. And Right now, every American has a stake in public lands. The lands belong to always nets. And that's why Penn lease argument falls. Flat. He wants to take something that belongs to you and give it to fossil fuel corporations. He may disguises agenda in any way he. That the people and the final say over their heritage public lands or not his to sell. Own. Brother. Winter if you have been in comments on that. The dirty bastard. That's my basic comment. It's it's nothing new. We've heard this before we're going to probably hear it again. It's capitalism WANNA one. That's that's what it is. Capitalism one on one. This guy penalty is done all that he can't to throw his lot in with the group that's trying to destroy all that people care about. He's done everything. He could possibly think of to do to try to undermine the future of native people. I'm hoping native peoples are paying attention and not subscribing to some of his BS. That's what I'm hoping. That's the very least that I can hope for. The native peoples. That's that it's going his policies will affect the most. Are Paying. Attention Correct. He's concentration is the western tribes the western areas. So you folks better pay attention out there. Luckily his his tenure will be short. So that's that's a saving grace I guess. But I. Think it was a good PSA against the guy. Okay, yeah I agree. With. Everything you just said I also agree with. The concerns in positions made against William, Penn in the piece that you just heard however. Take a little different tact with it though beyond that I have major concerns about Some of that positioning. The video, the audio that you just heard from that video focused on what quote Westerners want it said. That, they want public lands to stay quote public. That they made the assertion that they are for everyone. that public lands generate millions of dollars for states each year, the video said. That very same video even stated that public land is part of our cultural heritage. And even when as far as say that the land belong to everyone. And again, I think you guys can tell where I'm going with. US. Yeah. I didn't even give that part of it. Eighty credence because they're just didn't. In my opinion and didn't even deserve comment. Yeah. The video itself, there'll be a lincoln shots to it. Is Full of Happy People enjoying the outdoors. Happy. Albeit mostly. White people. In fact, I struggled to find people of Color in that video at all. This is the problem with the quote other or opposite arguments against someone like penalty. They swing the pendulum completely the other way. And equally offend indigenous people while doing it right. So, this is your. His land is. No I disagree. And from one indigenous man's point of view who knows true American history the land isn't everyone's. It is completely insulting to make such ignorant and arrogant statements about land that they know. was once forcibly taken. And I tire of the head Games people play. How they claim ignorance by saying the classic quote. I didn't know that happened to native Americans close quote. Folks like this are largely politically liberal. They hide behind climate change arguments to make themselves feel better about what they know is the truth of how public lands were fired. They claim to be more sensitive to problems we as indigenous people align ourselves with. But did you notice that they didn't bring indigenous people into their argument? That they didn't suggest that maybe. The quote public land should be returned to indigenous people. Know they didn't. But they sure talked a lot about how everyone else should enjoy these lands. All the while arguing that they need to stay quote public. That makes them in my view. Every bit as bad as Willingham Penalty. So, if you're going to have a conversation a conversation. About, land in the United States. It must not only included in the indigenous voice. But take real action to return the lands back to our people. With no strings attached. Then and only then will we believe that true efforts are being made to correct historic wrongs Really. I. Want to say about it. All right. Thank you. Yeah, man. With that, I don't anything else. My bag is empty. T to right. Well you guys. We appreciate your listening again as I play us out here. and. Yes. You can reach us any number of ways. Sorry that's got real. Loud. You can't email US hosts with an S. host at native opinion dot Com. Can reach us through the messaging channels of facebook or. Twitter. At native opinion on twitter and facebook dot com forward slash native opinion podcast. Again, we want to thank the MOHEGAN trading post at Mohegan trading post dot com for against supporting this show and their efforts to help people protect themselves and others during the nineteen. My Name is Michael Kicking Bear I am from the Mashantucket pequot tribal nation, the guy over there he is. David Greg House citizen abused children Cherokee Tribal Obama. Thank you for joining us. Be well. Good rest of the week. All right everybody take care we appreciate it. We'll see you Saturday or talk to Saturday by by.

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06-29-21 June in the news

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 3 months ago

06-29-21 June in the news

"Welcome to native america calling from albuquerque. I monica brain. Shocking stories of the discovery of unmarked graves at residential schools in canada are continuing in us. The department of interior announced a new initiative that will search for and identify the remains of native children who did not return home from boarding schools. The supreme court ruled that alaskan native corporations can receive a share of federal funding for covid nineteen relief and johnny chiefs visit. The serpent mound are now hieaux to educate torrance and new agers about the significance of the area. There tried stay with us. We'll be right back This is national native news on tonio gonzales. The national bison range in north west montana is one step closer to being fully managed by the confederated stylish and kuni tribes aaron bolton reports the us interior department put the nineteen thousand acres of land into trust last week the transfer of the land out of the national wildlife refuge system into travel control is part of the cs kt water compact passed by congress last year. The land will still be owned by the federal government but placed in trust for the tribes. That means the land will be under management of the tribes for the first time since nineteen eight. When the federal government took the land from the flathead indian reservation the tribes began to take over management of the bison range late last year. Travel officials will manage the range with operational and financial support from the us fish and wildlife service over the next two years ceus kt will venture fully fund management and conservation of the range for national native news. I'm erin bolton the. Us supreme court has ruled alaska. Native corporations are eligible for shares of corona virus relief funds set aside for tribes last year tribes across the country including some in alaska inclusion the mountain west news bureau savannah mar has more four hundred fifty million dollars in emergency aid. Were on the line that was set aside for tribes in last year's cares act. The question was whether for profit alaskan native corporations which managed land and resources on behalf of tribes in that state or eligible for a kite. The court ruled that those corporations do countess. Tribes for the narrow purpose of the cares act funding stanford law professor elizabeth re says that means millions lesson funding for tribes in the lower forty eight but the ruling is limited to this particular aid. Package the outcome that everyone was the most worried about that. The definition of indian tribe would be totally upended overnight. Did not happen re says. It's not yet clear whether the ruling will have broader effects on how funding and services are distributed throughout indian country. I'm savannah are the navajo. Nation is encouraging citizens to take advantage of the federal communications commission's emergency broadband benefit program. Households may be eligible for discount of seventy five dollars a month and a one time discount of up to one hundred dollars on a computer or tablet during a virtual town hall monday. Fcc acting chair. Jessica rosenworcel says. The program helps households with broadband affordability. She says the pandemic has shown the need for home internet for education jobs and health. Care one of the things. This crisis has also demonstrated to us with painful. Clarity is that there are a lot of people in this country. Who don't subscribe to buy bad at home because it's costly because they're putting a priority on transportation groceries or rent any of the other bills that all of us have to pay eligibility includes people who have lost jobs or reduced income during the pandemic those who receive medicaid or snap benefits whose children are on lunch programs or pell grant. Recipients residents are encouraged to enroll in the emergency broadband program through an approved provider during the town hall. Navajo officials highlighted reservation white efforts to help close the digital divide including more than ninety communities taking part in the federal e. rate program for affordable internet for schools and libraries. They're also exploring other ways to expand broadband across the vast reservation. I mean antonio gonzalez national native news is produced by broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting support by the center for indigenous cancer research at roswell park comprehensive cancer center dedicated to cancer research medicine and cancer care for indigenous population. The no charge online risk assessment tool is available at roswell park dot org slash assess me this reminder to get your covid. Nineteen vaccination is provided by the association of american indian physicians and the centers for disease control and prevention. Who support this show info at aarp dot org or cdc dot gov slash ca virus native won the native american radio network. This is native america calling monica brain. Today is a monthly news. Roundup we're gonna talk about a recent supreme court ruling that will give cares act funding to alaska. Native corporations also check in with ending country. Today's marionette member about a piece. She did at mount in ohio. But first native american boarding schools have been in the news. Recently i the grim discovery of unmarked graves of children in residential schools in canada. Then the us department of interior announced efforts to identify children. Who were sent to boarding schools here in the us and did not return home. If this is the first time you're listening to the show one of the major acts of the assimilation era of the united states. Federal government was to force either through coercion or other means native children to attend boarding schools. Sometimes thousands of miles away from their homelands. They were stripped of their traditional dress. They had their haircut and they were often punished for speaking their own languages. In this country we never really had a government response to these past atrocities joining us now to talk more about this is christine din. D.c mc leave. She is the ceo of the national native american boarding school healing coalition and she is turtle mountain not way welcome. Back to native america calling christine. Thank you for having me so since we last talked to you. Another group of unmarked graves of native children in canada was found Is there anything that you'd like to say about that ch- it's been Very difficult time for a lot of us this discovery even though we knew that there were unmarked graves in the us and canada Finding these children really just kinda reopened that wound that that was never fully healed and just brings up a lot of that unresolved grief for our families and relatives. Yeah definitely does. And but also with that is you know bringing some hard questions that are being and Holding a government officials accountable both in canada and in here tell us a little bit about the initiative to help identify native children here in the us. Yeah you're you're absolutely right Though it's opening that wound it's definitely bring light to an issue that that needs addressing Here in the us. We've never had a federal acknowledgment of this policy and so the initiative announced by the secretary of the interior deb. Jalen's is just it's it's historic and and it's long overdue that that the federal government look into the boarding schools in this country in two thousand sixteen the boarding school healing polish and did a foia request asking the i a for this information. How many schools did we have. How many children went to those schools. And how many children died or went missing. And they said they couldn't answer the question because they couldn't do research because the records were scattered all over so this initiative is very important as the investigation into the government's about these boarding schools is is much needed. It's our monthly news roundup and we are talking first about boarding schools and the legacy of them in the us as well as Some efforts to help identify a native children who were sent away to boarding school and went missing and didn't return home If you wanna weigh in on this if you want to share something give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine six. Two eight four eight. What do you think about the news in canada of finding these sort of unmarked graves or The poor record keeping and These reserves really you know in mourning for the children that they lost. We want to hear from you. Give us a call. Don't wait the number. Is one eight hundred nine. Six two eight four eight and so I'm just curious christine. You foia requested with federal asking for federal information from the freedom of information. Act so you asked for this information and their their response was it's too It's too Difficult to gather all the information together just can explain that a little bit more because it kind of sounds like passing the buck. I know and it was really. That was their off the record response. I mean essentially when we did the foia request. They responded and said you know that that's too broad of a request. Can you narrow the scope and so we replied and said okay you know specifically this information these records and then we never heard back from them and it was a year later in two thousand seventeen. I got a call from a reporter who said You know we heard you're doing this work in. And i mentioned the foia requests and then they followed up on it for us The reporter actually called and said you know. I'm checking up on a request number whatever and it was the person who on the other line said. Oh yeah we close that because we don't do research can't there's no way we can find that information it's spread out all over the place and so she did publish that in her article and We've then here from back on our foia request until just last year After we went to the united nations and submitted a filing to the human rights council on children who went missing whose whereabouts were still unknown and we sided the foia request and how we had asked the government for this information and and they couldn't respond and so again you know we applaud secretary helen. This initiative is huge. Because it's the government is finally going to put resources into locating these records. We've been trying to find the records for years. We've only found Forty percent of the school's record so there's three hundred and sixty seven boarding schools that we know of in the us and we found Records for about forty percent of those schools sixty percent of those schools. We don't know where the records are. So we're hoping the federal government's initiative will locate the records for those schools holy cow forty percent. That's not a lot and I remember because i have family. That was sent to carlisle. And i remember going to The historical society there who who owned a lot of the records. They were in private they. They own them privately and like having to pay for pictures of my relatives. You know copies of pictures of my relatives we have. You encountered some of that some of those issues as well. Absolutely and yeah. That's that's a terrible feeling right. It just kind of triggers that that trauma of you know they were taken by the federal government and so we know that the federal archives only hold twenty percents of the boarding schools that we know of their records and the other twenty percent that we've located are like you said in these private collections. Either universities churches museums They're spread out all over the place the announcement from the interior The press release says that they will work with these non governmental agencies to get access to those records interesting and so Is there is that the reason that we don't have accurate numbers on You know all of this is because there's a federal agencies as well as you know like the churches and things like that. Were running these boarding schools. Absolutely one hundred percent. That's why we don't know. Canada had a federal commission that Looked at the records from their federal run schools as well as their church run schools. And that's how they were able to say you know. We had one hundred and thirty nine schools. One hundred and fifty thousand children went to those schools and approximately four thousand died or went missing. And we don't have those definitive numbers in the us Boarding school healing coalition with the help of a lot of independent researchers has found the three hundred sixty seven schools that we had in the us. But we can't say how many children went to those schools let alone how many died or went missing because we haven't been able to fully examined the records Well we're talking about boarding schools It's our monthly news roundup and Christine in d.c. Mc leave is with us from the boarding national boarding school healing coalition and Let's let's take a quick call before the break. Let's go to fred in anchorage. Alaska tuned in on k. nba share. I have With like try to start something. I mean personally. Sixty six years old I'm doing good. But i'm still suffering from What happened in the past. I don't know. I would like to start something for not reparations but accountability is not you know Let's do this. Let's do that and not get nothing done but bedroom accountability. But what we have. God's through in the past There are some kind of avenue we can do or what i would like to. You know because it's not something you know it's not fake. It's it's still with me. I cannot. I can't even without the later on. I'm sixty six years old. You know I would like to try to start instead. A uh oh we like. I said we need to do something rather than I'm here yes. I am but i'm still suffering. Yeah i wish. I knew how to get you know. Let it go. I do let it go but like a hunting. You know whatever it is it just attacks me again the past what we went through. I still have physical on my buddy physical Remembrance of what they did that then. Okay well fred. I'm so sorry that you've experienced this. And i'm a holidays. We're going to go to a break. I'm gonna let you finish after the break And we're talking about boarding. Schools will be right back in just a few minutes Ooh over Pre writer clayton. Thomas mueller sharing his life story in his new book life in the city of dirty water. This memoir gives readers a clear view into his journey as a young man living tough life on the streets of winnipeg manitoba to his activists work. Today he'll be with us on our june book of the month. We hope you can join us. On the next native. America calling support by roswell park who tribal communities face persistent challenges in health equity such as cancer and higher death rates the centre for indigenous cancer research at roswell park. Comprehensive cancer center is dedicated to advancing cancer research that will lead to translatable science medicine and cancer care for indigenous populations worldwide. Are you at high risk for cancer. A no charge online assessment tool is available at swell park dot org slash. Assess me like zik we are. You are listening to you. Native america calling. I'm monica brain. And it's our monthly news roundup before the break. We were talking about boarding schools. We're talking the boarding schools healing coalition national native american boarding school. Healing coalition christine. D.c mc livas with us and we were hearing from caller fred In alaska i want to give you a moment You were asking for you. Were talking about your personal experience with boarding schools and the impact. It's had on you. You're also asking for some accountability and Go ahead and finish what you were saying. Okay some kind of accountability. That's not going to repair whatever any of us are going. I'm sure there's a lot of other individuals out. There was good spirits but still in. That's not going to help you but something other than just you know. Words and No actions because some people are hurting. You know i can she some of the most. They're still there homeless hopeless. You know something you know. Get them going if i for me. You know i'd like to see something actually done to heal more and more and more people That's what i would like to see Somehow i had to heal myself. I don't know how i did it. Maybe the pair of god a lot. I do that a lot. But i see within the chris. I've been there myself. you know. Listen but and fortunate enough to not. That's my show. Get so full of anger that go to prison system Risk a lot of them are like that too because they've been some of them has been abused in the past. I don't know but i'm been fortunate enough to work with myself. Somehow not to get so much anger in me. You know that. I have to go commit crimes. Just let defense. Fred thank you. I don't know. But i know it's i know just monetary thing. It's not gonna help but it might that some I don't know i'd like to try. Start something or just monitor. Think open up new Like who knows. It may open up building sports such people that are going through problems that you know that we can come in. Oregon asked to the put ourselves in the past. You know yeah. Thank you so much. Thanks so much for sharing a really appreciate your thoughts and your comments On that and christine. I want to give you a moment to respond to fred's fred's Fred's call but also to talk a little bit about Accountability and what the what you organization is doing to ask for accountability. Yeah thank you for calling in fred. that was really powerful to hear your experience and And wish you all the the healing in peace that the That you need what we know is that it's a healing can take place when we restore what was broken. So you know returning to our our language and our culture and and reconnecting with our community in those ways that was broken before We also know that Healing takes place when we speak for the truth. Sorry we we know that understanding the the pain will help us to move forward so Examining the the things happened and Really understanding how they impacted us and our families and our lives and then in terms of accountability. is a beginning but the report is due to secretary jalan in april of twenty twenty two. And we know that's not nearly enough time to fully examine the scope of this federal policy and its impacts show Are still calling for a federal truth commission which Like the canadian. Trc's truth and reconciliation commission that happened. would carry out for a number of years and not only examined the records from the federal government and the churches who ran the schools but would collect testimony from the survivors while Taking care of them taking care of their mental spiritual and emotional state When they come to share those stories and what we've seen is that That type of accountability than can can move forward with these healing movement Well i know you've got to get going to your next meeting. Thank you so much for joining us today Christine where can folks learn more about your organization boarding schools dealing dot org all right. Thank you so much. I really appreciate it and if you want to join the conversation give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native. And i wanna thank fred again for giving us a call and sharing his experience if you want to call in and share your experience. I'm sure that we will be talking about boarding schools again in the future. It's a topic that we are often Covering on the show. And i just know that that folks are really struggling with this. I just want to give out a hotline to the national suicide prevention lifeline. If if this is something that you're struggling with the effects of boarding schools and things like that you can give them a call at one. Eight hundred two seven three eight two five five and thank you again. Now we're gonna move onto another topic joining us. Now is matthew fletcher. He's a law professor at michigan state. University's college of law and author of the turtle talk blog and he's from the grand traverse band of ottawa. And chippewa indians matthew. Thank you for joining us for another native america calling absolutely. It's good to be here. Thank you hate before we get started on this Supreme court situation. I'm curious if you've if you ever see you know some sort of truth and reconciliation type commission here in the us over boarding schools. I think it's very possible. I think that Secretary to your deb. Holland's move in opening the door to some research and uncovering a lot of the the old historical evidence on that is really important for step. There have been a miniature truth and reconciliation commissions Under the indian child welfare. Act for example. The state of maine. I think it's very possible. Yeah well you know i. I was very excited to hear about what happened in maine. And um to see that and it almost seems like in maine. There's a change in terms of what is you know like it was not that long ago. That the governor was saying he wasn't even going to consult with tribes. And now there's a discussion about gaming and And they had a reconciliation commission. So it's it's nice to see things sort of shifting when it comes to like state and tribal relations there. Yeah i think you're very right with about how about nine. I hadn't thought about that. But yes. they're talking about Relinquishing state control over the reservations. There and moving forward on gaming. So yeah i think that's a really interesting connection. Okay so let's talk. Let's talk a alaskan native corporations and the supreme court and cares act funding so for our listeners. Don't know about this There was a story in the news about it. But can you give us an overview of this case. Sure so and twenty twenty. Congress passed the cares act and as many of your listeners. Probably know about eight billion dollars was appropriated twenty in country and how that money was going to be divided up among the indian tribes was really set by the department of the interior and department of the treasury So what they said was a tribal. Governments is eligible to receive money under the cares act and tribal government was defined by the cares act to be with reference to the indian self determination and education assistance at so that opened up the possibility for Several hundred alaskan native corporations Many of which are pro four prophet and many of which are nonprofit corporations to receive money for from a under the cares act and the department of treasury set aside about a half a billion dollars for these anc and several dozen a few dozen tribes brought a claim against the united states to say that no those are not indian tribes. They're not tribal governments as understood by congress in the cares act and the supreme court last week determined that no in fact these amc's for purposes of this particular law actually are tribal governments and they're eligible to receive The cares act. Yeah so it was a six to three vote and did it. Go down the lines that you expected. Well this was a really a difficult case to project a winner There really is a serious ambiguity in the statute It's unclear if anybody seriously takes the for profit and sees as a tribal governments. I mean they're literally not governments their corporate entities out to make a cash profit. That's the whole point so But the statute the law actually included nca in its definition. So the the majority was. Joe was written by justice. Sotomayor who is i. Think one of the two justices along with justice. Gorsuch who i think He's more careful. Attention to indian law. Then perhaps the other members of the court and she wrote the majority and she said I she adopted the the interpretation of statute that would allow for the receive the money And then the in dissent justice score six said no. I totally disagree. You know. it's pretty apparent that and they're not governmental entities and But he also sort of said in dissent. I you know this is a one time. Only thing It's unlikely congress is gonna do this kind of thing again anytime soon And you know this isn't a case. I don't really care and it's done and some no i mean you you. You would imagine these sort of lions of tribal sovereignty on the supreme court to be on the same side and the the the roster justices that Signed on with each is Opinions is all over. The place in terms of ideology was kind of funny. I mean does this. Come down to like congress kinda messed when they wrote the the law you know. That's a really good question. I would say that. This is a weird circum- circumference Are nassar companies whereas we're confluence of events based on the pandemic based who happened to be the president. And who happened to be in control of congress who happened to be the assistant secretary for indian affairs you know the twenty twenty Blessed ministration was very much in favor of In support of natural resources extraction oil and gas coal mining all that good stuff and a lot of anc's involved in that. I mean that's what a lot of a lot of economic activity in alaska's all about so the answer is many of them are really strongly. Supportive of the prior administration and in response. They got a lot of support for the fires ministration. So i suspect that if you take the words of the statute and throw it out the window. This really was intended by congress and the executive branch you know twenty twenty to include and sees. There's no doubt in my mind that they would have. Also those. Those groups would have supported that On the other hand this is a really weird fit You know really. As far as i can tell. That could be totally wrong. My understanding is out of all those. Anc the only one that really provides anything governmental services that was expected to be provided under the cares act is the cook. Inlet regional inc region corporation which handles basically urban indian health and the anchorage area The anc sort of lined up behind cook inland said. We're just like them to our money and so from the tribes who objected to the disintermediation perspective. It was a sort of cash. Grab a windfall from these fees and on the other side effective from anc's perspective. I mean they were hit hard by the pandemic and they should have been entitled to pandemic relief under the cares act. I mean could. They have gotten couldn't they have gotten pandemic relief under the cares act under other portions of the cares act to that are were available for companies. A really good question and i know the answer. That's fine it's possible. They didn't i really don't know. I imagine that you know. The prior administration and power powerful people in congress would have done a lot to support Companies that were impacted that do natural resources extraction. But it's hard for me to say. I think that the most interesting thing about this is that what sorta more justice sotomayor may or wrote comparing it to severe j. Right so i took this from the scotus blog greg alaska's a piece on this and She wrote fifty percent. It's like if fifty percent off any meat vegetable or seafood dish including vj which is cooked so to my suggests that the customer would correctly interpret this discount to encompass severe jay even though the dishes made from raw fish or self shellfish like applying a cooked requirement to severe jay. She continued applying a federally recognized requirement to. Amc's is implausible in context. And i just want to give you a moment to to weigh in on that. Yeah i have a couple of points on that. I is sort of philly. I think she's probably wrong. Vj analogy doesn't work because if you put vj in mind jus the cook will will argue as have argued to me in the last week and i'm not going to disagree with them. Each actually is good but would also also add that she used the different Hypothetical and analogy in an earlier portion of your opinion about diabetes With a category of people three different categories of people who should be Giving services for diabetes if they meet certain criteria In a different part of the opinion. I think that shows the core when it is confronted with textual ambiguity. Spends a lot of time coming up with these hypotheticals. And i'm not entirely sure. Why that is. They seem to almost fetishizes these Hypotheticals chore to try to understand or try to persuade people as to their their textual Interpretation of the law. And i don't think any of it is particularly persuasive. And you know there's a little bit of a concern that comparing you know the issues related to the pandemic funding for pandemic relief and the the for healthcare to cooking or not cooking each or whether it's cooked in a little bit of a There's a little bit disrespectful. But you know i i just. It's so hard for me to care what these little analogy there we nobody litigation these these are these cases by coming up with this crazy hypothetical. Yeah i wanna talk more about that and like How the supreme court. I think it's called. Like i don't know textual i can't remember the word matthew. We'll talk about it after the break but basically the idea is like reading. The constitution is the word of god right and so What is written is written. And you can't in for anything in that. So i want to talk more about that after the break. If you wanna join us one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight looking to get your high school diploma. Southwestern indian polytechnic institute offers native americans ages eighteen or older training and preparation courses for the high school equivalency diplomas in person and online beginning september. Sixth this no charge program includes testing fees and other resources will be available to help with supplies and living expenses. Space is limited. Application deadline is august. Six more by calling five zero five three eight two four two eight seven or at sl dot. Edu who support this show. You're listening to native america calling monica brain. And it's a monthly news round up before the break. We're talking to matthew fletcher. He's law professor at the michigan state. University's college of law and author of the turtles blog. He's also from the grand traverse band of ottawa. And chippewa indians matthew Okay so i think the word i was looking for was originalism which means In my interpretation or my understanding is that there are some folks on the supreme court who read the constitution as right and there's not a as it was meant to be at the time or things like that. Do we see any of that in this opinion. Well that's a really good question You know the doctrines textual ism or the methodology. I guess you'd say a textual them Originalism is a part of that sort of the the view of the con- the interpretation of the constitution. But it's the same as textual them. The idea is that you just as a judge You look at the text of statue itself and whatever it says it says you don't you don't ask go back and look at what congress talking about you. Don't go look back at. Maybe what it means. Because i want it to mean this way It's a game that judges play to pretend that they're totally neutral impartial and the vast majority of the time it's not that big of a deal But when you talk about originalism in the constitution that everything in the constitution almost everything in it is and big. us and so textual isn't as a bit of a lie. The only thing in the text of the constitution that is clear. Are things like the president must be at least thirty five years old but nobody knows what due process of war means or equal protection means so what they do is the exact opposite of textual ism they go back and find out what wealthy elite white man. We're writing in the newspapers at that time. When they debated the the the proposed amendment to the constitution or the proposed draft of the constitution. And they they finish that area only so we only really pay attention to in the original version of the constitution. What rich white guys. Many most of whom were slave owners what they thought the constitution. And it's a bit of a trick. I mean that's not. There's nothing neutral or impartial about that evidence. Now in this case this we don't we don't do any of that stuff. The court just looks at this tax. It doesn't really care about the context because it's it's unclear We don't really know what happened. I told you before the break about. Why thought this being included if they were included i mostly learned from social media because of various lobbyist from indian country acclaimed credit for getting this language included in there. I really don't know there's no legislative on it so we we have to play this game. Where we're we pretend to be textual but we do devote the court does divorce. Its analysis from any re- real context or historical background. They did it. Include some stuff in there right about how you know. The alaska native claims settlement act where these antsy come from with designed to help indian people the sort of a weird social engineering experiment to try to turn indian tribes into corporate entities that i think the vast majority of people in alaska who are native would say on the travel governmental level disaster on four profit corporation level was probably incredible success for a lot of people but You know all that stuff is left out of a textual analysis so you know they'll be law professors and other people who are interested in the sort of thing we'll delve into that over time And that will be interesting in your calm. There is some conjecture. There is some conjecture beforehand before the ruling that this would change the way that tribes are viewed or like changed the definition of of what makes an indian tribe this ruling and Based on how the materials came out how though the ruling came out is that is that the case the potential is there. I i would say yes The way the indian self determination and education assistance act or public law. Six thirty eight is now defined forever. Is that anc's basically are entities that are eligible to Contract with the with the united states government Because they're eligible to do so doesn't mean they have to own that they even want to and i think this is actually been the law and in alaska and since nineteen eighty seven because there was a ninth circuit lower appellate court decision about cook inlet specifically. And saying yeah. There's eligible the be treated them as eligible and ninety seven so they are eligible to do six thirty eight contracting even though they were for profit and see and if that was the case then all the nc's could have been doing it ever since that. But as i said it's my understanding that cook inlet is probably the only one that does any real six thirty at contracting. So if it's been the law since nineteen eighty seven In in the sky didn't fall in the world didn't shake apart on thinking it probably won't now but who knows i mean that potential has always been there. I mean the thing is is that it just because the the corporation can do six thirty eight contract with the government that doesn't make it all encompassing to consider to make it of a an indian tribe like when the federal register lists off the five hundred and seventy four tribes. They don't miss the corporations in the register right. that's correct although for a very brief period of time they did. We're back in the eighties and that quick realize that was insane and they stopped doing it. Oh man this is complex. Well matthew or any other cases that you're you're watching closely at your you know excited to talk about on turn talk. Oh yeah we're following the the brechin versus holland. How case which is the big indian child welfare challenge a few months back the fifth circuit judges and their sixteen of them. Issued about six or eight opinions totaling. Three hundred and twenty five pages of what i will say in a as a term of art as a lawyer was complete. Gibberish and We're they struck some parts of equa down. They kept some parts of equa. They wrote hundreds of pages of opinions arguing with each other in a form of political theater. That kind of went nowhere and the smartest judge amongst them actually wrote a short opinion. Saying none of this matters. Because the adoptions that were challenged has already gone through years ago. They're done adoption. Nope child is impacted by this case which normally means the case gets dismissed but this for whatever reason this one did supreme court. Yeah yeah we're gonna keep an eye on that one as well matthew. Thanks for for joining us. We'd love to have you on again in the future. I always great to talk with you. All right thanks you too all right and if you want to join our conversation still time. It's one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight now. Let's talk with marian that pembroke. She's national correspondent for indian country. Today and she's a citizen of the redcliffe ojibway tribe. Welcome back marionnette. How's it going monica. It's going pretty good. It's pretty good. Hey i wanted to give you a moment. Because i know that the In addition to the article. We're gonna talk about today. You've done quite a bit on boarding schools if there is anything that you wanted to share about the news out of canada or what secretary holland is has initiated While i have a new article coming out that's going to include some information Regarding some of the denominational schools the christian schools As you may know that catholic church is not fun super cooperative in in allowing candidate to access their records and They actually What the highest you know catholic organization in the us the us Council and bishops did actually respond to me but said that they would quote unquote work with With secretary holland in Help in ways that they could of course it's no Guaranteed is going to release records. But i mean it's something that they're acutely aware of which is kind of a big deal people can check that out more The my piece should be posting this afternoon. Great link to it on our website. Native america calling dot com if you want to Check that out okay. So you wrote a piece for So the i wanna talk about This piece that you wrote about the the serpent mound in ohio. How did you. How did you come upon this. Well i actually live not far from it. i relocated to cincinnati for work some years ago so on like here and It's not far from me and it's a this really incredible sites. You know this enormous Serpent shaped mound and Have you know. In the course of looming here have learned more about it and then learn more about how you know The tribes who were removed From ohio during indian removal act of eighteen. Thirty how they feel like a real connection to this is their homeland essentially and have really been Working to reestablish connection here yeah. I remember visiting there When i was in high school and and thinking this is definitely devoid of any kind of native voice. you know in this area i think like maybe reading a placard. That didn't really explain a lot. And i was just. I was kinda confused by the situation. So it's also kind of like a gathering place for new agers in hippies and things like that but in your article you follow To shana chiefs. Who come on the solstice and and give a talk. So what did they talk about. Well they talked about you. Know their history and with with ohio and the history of removal. And you know there was a time when i think one of the Tribes three different bands. I think shawny Ended up settling in and they went to some other places the dragged those poor people all over to various locations and finally they did settle in oklahoma but Glenna wallace cheap cornwallis at that. Her folks her Tried they were like a down to something like sixty nine people around the turn of the century so people working kind of distant barebones survival and have done better in recent years and really wanted to reconnect to their home and we're concerned about a lot of the appropriation that they saw going on at sites like serpent and decided to reach out to the ohio. History connection which is the organization. It's like it's the sort of subcontract state does with this other organization that manages A lot of the park sites here in the state and the she she and others they were they built a relationship and finally This past couple of weeks ago. They actually came and talked about who they aren't know. This is our homeland. And this is um what this means to us You know the symbol actually features and our cosmology and in our our ways and You know that we would prefer that you'd be More respectful of it and because people have years all kinds of unusual activities that have gone on there at serpent. Mound people have Buried stuff in it And it's a you know it's a national historic site and they're trying to get world heritage site status for it it's like the largest effigy mound Of its kind in the whole world. So it's kind of a big deal So you know they were really my impression. Is that Chief ben barnes and cheaper on wall street really working to you know. Elevate some of the activities that go on around the mound. And i just can't imagine burying something in in that and thinking that that would be okay. You know who were the folks when you went there. Who are the folks that came to see them and you know. What kind of response did they get. Well they had you know the people who for years There have been some people who have gathered there and they have kind of a false to call. It feels to celebration. And there's a number of New age Kind of celebrants. That are there and then also people that forward a lot of i you know i can just say that they are outlandish theories about how the serpent man serpent mound. You know how it came to be and Typically on the solstice and equinox They would have a festival and it really would draw quite a few people own. You could go and get crystals and you could have your own read in all any kind of new age related activities. You could engage in there and then also hear stories that the mound was built by aliens from outer space or by prehistoric giants There's people who have dedicated their lives to these. You know what we're getting these kinds of theories So those people still had their events but they had at Location some land. They own next door to surface council. Those folks over there and they did some them did come over and Listen to you chief. Barnes and she wallis so it was pretty. Well attended and The chiefs presented you know their talks under this covered like picnic shelter. That's there on the ground for and they did several of them like friday saturday sunday. Like i think like four per day and they were pretty well attended. Did you try to get into a discussion with any of them or did you. Did you fight with them about the aliens. And the giants. I've already fought with him over the years ago so i'm already on their list all tapped out. I'm already on their list and they're already mad at me so i think maybe they found new people to be mad at that. Have criticized them So you know. I did a couple that walked over dressed in kind of native inspired regale yon. And they were kind of confrontational to chief barnes and he and glenn we're in the middle of their presentation and it was like there about like sixty people seated there listening and they tried to interrupt and give him tobacco in the middle of it and he just said well. You know we're right in the of presentation. I'll be happy to take later But i guess they got really angry. Income stormed off. but i talk to them and They said they were a member of a tribe. It was interesting. They couldn't pronounce it nor could they spell it. Finally did i think it was At some some cherokee but then a band of cherokee chicken maga was the closest thing they said they were from kentucky and they said they were they were state recognized but actually kentucky has no process for housing tribes. So anyway they'll see. That was really the only kind of see anything that could remotely approach a confrontation that i saw people were pretty good. I mean people did wander over and they were wearing some From the alternative site there and they were wearing some really interesting close customs. I just i just enjoyed reading this and learning more about the serpent mound and also to hear about this shawnee chiefs who are really trying to educate folks about the significance of the area. I'm gonna put a link to that on our website as well as her new piece. That's coming out about the boarding schools later today. Marionette pembroke thank you so much for joining us as always great to hear from you. Thanks for having me monica. And that'll do it for today. Also thanks to christine mc leave and a matthew fletcher. We're back tomorrow with our book of the month. Show clayton thomas. Mueller is on and we'll see you tomorrow. The association of american indian physicians and the centers for disease control and prevention remind you receiving the covid nineteen vaccination protect you your family and your community and urge you. Please contact your tribal or urban clinic to get your covid. Nineteen vaccination if you haven't already more information at a p dot org or cdc dot gov slash corona virus who support this show up. More churning ammo high eq obama mama mobile. I'm bouquets mushrooms from white hutch health. Fair about all boy go. But i'm nick. White comical cheeks talks with his homework on the amok former medicare medicaid. Native america calling is produced in the annenberg national native voice studios in albuquerque new mexico by kwon broadcast corporation. A native nonprofit media organization funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting with support from the public radio satellite servants. Music is by brent. Michael davids native voice. One the native american radio network.

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Scott Angelle, Balancing Louisianas Three Es: Environment, Energy and Economy

Discover Lafayette

1:04:30 hr | 3 months ago

Scott Angelle, Balancing Louisianas Three Es: Environment, Energy and Economy

"This is john swerved and you're listening to discover lafayette a podcast dedicated to the people and rich culture of lafayette the gateway to south louisiana. I'd like to thank our sponsors. Who make our podcast possible. We take our podcast with ongoing support of raider and jason sikora sound engineer. Reiter is a hands on. It service provider that integrates. All of your needs for advanced technical support. Effective communication options in cybersecurity. Writers motto is. You just wanted to work we understand. Please visit reiter solutions dot com for more information iberia bank and first horizon. Who are now one bank to relationship driven banks. Both leaders in the industry have officially joined forces. The combination of iberia bank and first horizon creates a leading financial services company dedicated to enriching the lives of their clients associates in their communities. I'd also like to thank lafayette general health who has joined the author health family and is now off schnur. Lafayette general as one health system. Oftener lafayette general will provide expanded services in enhanced care from the familiar faces. You already trust oftener. General means more resources to help solve healthcare's toughest problems reinvesting in our communities being further committed to health and wellness. Lafayette general together. Means more learn more today at together means more dot. Our guest today is scott on shell. The nation's longest serving director of the us bureau of safety and environmental enforcement from twenty seventeen through twenty twenty scott also help -sition louisiana including secretary of the department of natural resources from two thousand four. Two thousand twelve and lieutenant governor and twenty ten. He served as an elected member from district to on the public service commission. He's been a member of lsu board of supervisors and chaired louisiana's water resources commission. Scott got his start early in politics as a police jury member and saint martin parish any also served as their first parish president. We're here today to discuss. Scott's current focus which is balancing the three es environment energy and economy and i've learned were also celebrating national fishing day. So scott can talk to us both about offshore fishing offshore energy. Scott shallots a pleasure to welcome you to discover lafayette. What thank you so much jan good to see you and thank you for the mazing things that you are doing speaking truth to power and sending the message out we matt when i was working with lafayette economic development and some of my most favorite memories were when you came and spoke to us. You've always brought up a passion. And i hate to say energy. That sounds like a pond but you bring this bigger than life energy to what you do. And you've been a proponent of what makes state so special very look at the end of the day. I think there's two things that wake us up in the morning. One of them is a cup of coffee in other one is hope right and i just choose to be a person grazing. An amazing family of high-spirited always feeling the glass was half full rather than half empty and so excited about being with people getting my energy from people as opposed to getting my energy from paper sometimes to be smart. You gotta use the paper to get to the people right but it's always great to be around people and share stories. Yeah so family is important you before we get started on your current Adventure when you spoke to our group before you'd always talk about family. And i felt bad for your wife because she's like a part of a lot of your details that you share but family is important you you come from a large family. Your dad was well known. If you want just tell people that may not know your whole story about growing up when south louisiana right just families everything and and you know. We were lucky in our family to have a great set of parents. You know i my children that the number one thing that impacts your life is to set a parent you born to and yet you have no choice in that matt right and so To those who have a really great opportunity de comes great responsibility to help improve the world right and we always taught that our community was a reflection of our own individual efforts so five sisters three brothers. A lot of dysfunction. All eleven of mom and dad in nine kids table. That's twenty two feet under the kitchen table. So you got there early. So you'd learn a learned would get there. Early was checking lack after a sense of urgency about everything and we'll pretty cool is even back. Then you know today. Look i understand norms to change in or views a change in but back then a mafia sisters would give an opportunity to do whatever they wanted whenever careers they wanted. They will encourage you know they were. They were not told that they had to go into those careers that wartime asking xactly anything. You need professionals and educated and mom and dad again this way back before some of the more modern thinking and then of course mom and dad owned a ford dealership in a small town and when you own a business or retail business in a small town. Everybody that comes through. The showroom door is important. You don't have the luxury of saying. Well we don't like those people. Are we treat those people with disrespect. And i think some of those lessons and you notice roman government in government as you know for those virtues to be to be live so was lucky. I got a good opportunity so thanks ask. Were you always vivacious. Where you're going. You didn't eat in. Just come up with this as you got out of high school and you raise around ago fred meals you better you better find some something or otherwise you get left behind and so yeah me. Probably i would say My wife would say rather than in vivacious you would probably say he's more loud than anything. Yeah right and where you are in exactly exactly so so but yeah. It was fun short child. Let's jump into what you're doing. I love this. The purpose of threes environment energy economy. So here we are in louisiana. Obviously the environment is a real concern. Losing our coast whether or not you believe in global warming we're experiencing all kinds of issues. The energy industry is in an upheaval. And then the economy. We've got we've got challenges here but this is also our future alu the environment energy and the economy. So when i come to think of it in in look at history. I think it's important to see where we are in that. One of the are call these things that threes energy environment and economy here to before energy has kind of been thought of as a red state issue environment has been stopped thought of as a blue state issue and the third e had kinda introduced into this conversation is purple issue and that is the economy that affects everybody right and i believe i happen to believe that i'll children will have energy from a variety of different sources that press. We didn't have to think that's good. I think it's okay. I think however that and i do i do subscribe to the to the read that we need to take care of our planet. I think that those things are not incompatible with one another and so. That's why i've introduced. I think a new umbrella message and that umbrella message is the balance of the three each. The word ballot is perhaps one of the most positive words in the dictionary. You've never used the word balance in a negative way you balance your checkbook. You work life balance. If people who know nobody goes around and says that person is. He's too well balanced. You know maybe the other way right by so it's one of the most positive word in. It's something that we can all. I think a spar to and the reason that the economy is important in this conversation jan is to recognize that from nine hundred. Seventy three to twenty nine thousand nine hundred. We've had six recessions in this country. In each one of those recessions were preceded by a spike in energy prices. Ads goals america's best to affordable not cheap but affordable energy so goals america's economic performance. I've done research. We sell more cars in america when we have flat energy prices. We build more homes in america. We have flat energy prices. Our economy konami performs better. We have flat interview prices in order to be able to to make sure that we have affordable energy we have to have access to the resource right and of course the gulf of mexico where i was chief regulator for the country for the last four years is an incredible province. And when you take a look at the metrics the metrics actually a so impressive. We cut trees down when we when we drove all in for twenty seventeen. We haven't had a single see marine mammal or she told fatality from expiration of emp. We respect marine life and the carbon intensity of the production that comes out of the gulf of mexico is this second most only only only a perhaps exceeded by a saudi arabia the carbon the gorman intensity of the barrels of production that come to the gulf of mexico. What does that mean. Well when you take a look at the impacts of drilling production and you put all it altogether the every province is going to have a carbon intensity reading okay and the gulf of mexico is really really good so a lot of ways in a lot of ways and this is an incredible observation that we could use more not less gulf of mexico oil and we always knew that would be good foul economy right for the jobs here but we got a new proposition. That new proposition is more not less gulf of mexico. Oil is actually better for mother earth so at the same time we're working on our economy by create jobs here domestic access the domestic resource night at the same time we can improve the quality of the planet by substituting foreign source to oil that has a higher intensity carbon intensity for more gulf of mexico oil and remain independent. Laurie chicken every box. It's not yet so so rather than it be venezuela rather than rush on whether it'd be canada whether it'd be medical whatever it is we have the ability to create jobs here with would fox from sound like me and i realized that a pretty thick alien action told by gets them is raise when you in washington dc accident. Yeah say you know first meeting. He would adhere. I'm talking on the horse like man i. I don't really understand that thing. He said in a meeting. But i like his passion so anyway up so there's a new proposition here. That proposition is that america is putting value on environmental metrics and and you know every generation has the right to do. Would it needs to do and and respect that. Every generation has heavy share of challenges whether it's world war two whether it's disaster recovery whether it's Recessions depressions every every generation has challenges. I think a challenge. This generation is how to manage the issues of climate change and again. I'm not here to convince people one way or the other because it scientific and that's not my area of expertise. I am not to tell you. Though that all the polling data that i've view indicates that young conservative cash young conservatives concern about the planet that the health of the planet. And if they're not making any more older conservatives then young conservatives are going to be perhaps in a position to help shape the policy. Any they'll concern about it. Okay then that's going to start showing up in public policy policymaking right in estoril shoot. The point is is that often. The whole cliche applies here. When you get women's you gotta make lemonade in here. We are in the gulf of mexico ten years after eleven years after the worst environmental disaster deepwater horizon that if the environment is going to be metric that america's going to measure for its energy. We can be big winners in the gulf of mexico because not all barroso created equal when we start carrying apart and when you look at it again the intensity of the carbon intensity of those barrels in the gulf of mexico or superior and then you add the other thing that that has an impact on climate change the experts say is the methane that is flared vented into that must be in the gulf of mexico we only flare about one point two five percent of our produce gas making it the best producing province in united states of america so as opposed that matter and things that matter we would. We really scorn pretty good. I mean you know even at brokerage high whether it was. We knew that english mathematics right and so we make an agent no subjects. Now you know there are other issues that we have to be concerned about but we have these vast pipeline system so we don't have to flare invent. That's one of our advantage is in on the safety issue. No doubt we have bad days. Every industry has bad age. Every organization has bad days but bad days. Don't make a bad life on this whole deal and bureau of labor statistics not not marginalization but the bureau of labor statistics puts out annual report in based on a number of injuries and accidents per man hour manhours. Offshore the offshore sector owning gas industry is the second safest high hazard industry in america. Second only to the nuclear power generation industry. So you know again when we think of things that a in You recall i guess. Maybe i guess it's probably going back. Maybe thirty years ago the spaceship challenging. Khanna imploding right for a lot of us. The baseline for space exploration was neil armstrong walking on the mugging on the man and then change into became. Oh we came we will. We will leading as a country. We were doing things and then we had that event a terrible bill up industry so we paused president. Reagan paused it and figured some things out and you know we we back in space and we don't some incredible things so odd. Believe that america has this this entrepreneur spirit of facing issues head on deepwater horizon was very very tough issue. I mean we you know we live here. I mean eighty seven days of that event but there are so many things that have happened since then that puts us in a position. And we haven't had that kind of nearly kind of. I've got a couple of questions and also i wanna thank you for clarifying the carbon intensity i. I didn't really understand what you were talking about. And how that goes with global warming. I mean i'm thinking about cows. I started thinking when you said methane probably more methane released on a form when they mentioned won't be but but it just it's you don't think about it as the average person that just wants to be able to fill up a tank you know wherever you are want. It's a commodity you want. You wanted as cheap as you possibly can get it real. Yeah except unless maybe you live in lafayette where you want oil and gas when you when you when you position of a consumer position of a producer and yeah this is this is the deal we have. We have a relatively few producing state and we every state. A consumer state of louisiana and itself is one of the biggest consumption states have energy because of the industrial mississippi and the couch rivers. So we have to be concerned about both sides and again when we recognize. We've had six recessions from nine hundred seventy three to two thousand nineteen. We were negatively impacted by those recessions as well right so know. Government doesn't set the price and it shouldn't the market should but more government can can impact and influence the opportunity to access the resources. And of course you know. Many of us are concerned because the incoming administration current manifestation is kind of. I think looking at a hundred percent of oil production as bat. I think that's a mistake. I don't think one size fits all in anything. Okay and again. What i do believe is that there's some facts about the production that comes from the gulf of mexico when you when you look at the carbon intensity when you look at the volume of methane produced when you look at the the no trees being being destroyed to get to the resource when you look at no marine mammals and sea turtle fatality since two thousand seventeen not all barrels created equal rights. And if we want to improve the quality of the planet which. I do believe we do then. We need to look at the facts. 'cause sciences is is nonpartisan right in the sciences saying that the gulf of mexico has incr- animal high valued not for the economy but for the environment. Yes always for the economy. Let me restate it. Yes always for the economy has been good here but the big issue in america right now is one of the big issues is making sure we are responding to the climate change challenges in this incredible. When you take a look and don't take my word for it. I went back. And i found a two thousand sixteen report that was produced by the obama biden administration. And it's specifically said that if we do not have regular scheduled lee sales in the gulf of mexico that it would force greenhouse gas emissions to go up in america because we'd have to get oil from higher carbon intensity provinces. Okay so why. Are we working on the solutions and we working on technologies. I'm all for am absolute have always been an all of the above approach and we work in on him and things again better and you're seeing different forms of energy become a more competitive great but we also recognize that if we if we don't do that in his systematic a plan way then we go wreck our economy and we see that i was just thinking. It's been all or nothing you were talking about the environment. It's typically blue people and read for energy purple economy but with trump. I know he was very friendly and open to the oil and gas industry because he was a businessman and not that he didn't care about the environment some people think that but he was really pro energy pro. us energy so we could remain independent and now with biden. It's hundred dear friend but didn't a judge just roll yes. Could you explain that. We're not being allowed right. Offshore like it was just shut down for new production a couple of things. I try to avoid a political comment. Let me just say that. I think that the previous president in the current president us view the world differently in that area. Okay and no folks have the right to view things and he shaped by their own experiences. I think i think president trump recognized that strom domestic energy policy was good file national security our economic security was good for our manufacturing would never gonna have the cheapest labor in america. That's not who we are but one thing we can do is have incredibly competitive energy prices that help overcome some of the things that we we have a high standard of living. Here we we. We don't allow people To to to work in sweatshops. We have all show we have. Epa we have a lot of different things in a competitive advantage. America is that we have really have had good and affordable predictable. Energy prices right. Well that doesn't happen because a good luck it happens because people making good decisions right. I remember being in tenth grade and waiting in line. Like you couldn't get gas one of my friends. We'd all commute to school. The time and i mean she drove this little bug beetle bug and there was just no gas. We were totally dependent. Eighteen seventy three or over. Shut off did you it right so what happened here happen years from one thousand nine hundred ninety three after we had a golden america that energy independence right. And we've been walking. We did it. We responded we responded by you know first things we did is we said. We're going to meet the speed limit. Fifty five we not gonna export on. Oil is going to be against all but in rare situations to export arm. We started changing image energy building codes and different things so we were trying to conserve. Be smart on demand but then the same time. The american entrepreneur spirit went to work and we found more and more production. He was like. Oh we're not gonna have any no. We're not going to have enough was doomsday. We reached peak oil. No it american spirit went to work techno intro a typical and jeremy and went to work and it's just amazing right and so is it really is and and and so that's what we do right and so the idea that we would put ourselves in a position to count on countries to provide energy to us countries that don't share our values often don't share values don't license sivy make. Maybe some countries don't value human life as we do democracy freedom of religion. Winter rate is and yet history tells us that if we put ourselves in that position and we do have an incredible rise in energy prices. Because perhaps we'd be leverage. Then we're gonna go into a recession and that means people get people get laid off incb core manufacturers struggle in a really big way what we do here in louisiana and certainly in the gulf of mexico we connected to every american because one in every six barrels of audit producing miracle come from the gulf of mexico so represent about sixteen percent of the total energy portfolio will do country or oil is so sometimes we think that we all kind of go in two thousand zip code own homes and do our thing but the union auto man auto worker in michigan is connected to the oil work in the gulf of mexico. Depend we it really really is and you know we. We have some expertise in the gulf and we wanted continue to do that for for the country and the metrics of the environmental metrics are soil. Strong that if policymakers look at it not as a one size fits all but look at our portfolio day too will come to the conclusion that we need more of less of and when we get more of it again that's good foul economy and yet get back into the court case. So what the federal judge. The administration put a hold on pause on what is called regularly scheduled lee sales so typically to lee sales a year. I think is maybe say morgan. August maybe more november every year and that's done pursuant to a five year plan. So what happens. Is that the department of interior promulgates. A five year lease and plan real. Big studied takes a long time to put that together. And then they execute these to lee sales a year right in the gulf of mexico and there are others perhaps in alaska as well but the the president put put all that on pause and a group of of a group a group had i think several several different states filed litigation and that case was heard here in the middle district here in vienna and judge. No you the executive branch do not have the authority under which you cited as you reasons to do it. And of course the response was from department of interior was well. We certainly going to follow the judge's audit that's what it takes. So we are hopeful of jan at that those li sales will start a new. Now we have twenty two hundred existing leases in the gulf of mexico. Where folks have access to. But i think the example to show lies important that you continue to have newly sales is. What's going on today in america's automobile industry with your so-called chip shortage right. So if you take an opportunity maybe ride this weekend by automobile dealer. Absolutely shaw. on. How few automobiles they have had to pull their advertising sales because they don't have any all right now and so it's so backward and so we need inventory to continue inventory of automobiles we need inventory of. Lisa's tabatabai be constantly available for companies to continue to look at it. Because you know at the end if you don't have new opportunities coming in then that ends up hurting the long term process. let's. I'd like to pause for a moment. There's so much more. I want you to talk about. But i'd like to look back at one of my favorite guests. We've had on the podcast and it's your close friend. Senator fred mills. Fred was a guest on a couple of years ago and we talked about the healthcare industry. In the herculean efforts it took to get medical. Marijuana legalized in louisiana. You can hear senator mills interview along with many others over two hundred twenty others at discover. Lafayette dot net. Let's take a listen so many amazing stories that have come across my desk. I mean i had a lady her. Name's miss ms hall. She brought in her daughter elegance hall. They testifying committee. It's all on tape. You can see. They moved to colorado because they couldn't get in louisiana. She's on charlotte's web. It's it's a mixture in in colorado. She's no longer taking. The seventeen prescription drugs prescribed in louisiana. When she was in office jan she must have had in the santa fifteen. She must have ten fifteen seizures. The sent me three weeks later. A bicycle a five year old chow said they said the seizures are very sporadic and they said their their quality of life is so much better so they moved they loved. Oh the families that have moved out of state because that they've basically said please let us know the minutes available. We'll move back to louisiana and that's the problem there's not consistency state to state has different laws and you can't transported across state lines right so there's thirty one states where it's legal to have medicinal ryan marijuana only nine where it's legal to have any. I guess any tie rods regulated by the state but who it is amazing the underground community that is growing it and using it for medicinal purposes lady. Call me up. She said please let me know available. I said you're using it. She said i grow it in the back. Miles oppressed the oil and she said my son has to read syndrome and he barely gets any more seizures she said but the problem is he can't get a job because he can't pass a drug test. Oh it stays in his blood. So it's it's a sudden. Think about that so if we're does that lead employers. Well that's a good question. That's a good question. And i've made speeches in front of insurance groups and i think they'll have to make individual decisions. I think it's going to really be almost as though you're on a prescription medication. And you ever prescriptive let me let me. Here's what i have. And here's what i'm taking. The decision will be made if you drive in a forklift and using medical marijuana and there is some thc. I think there's going to be a discussion. You know that if you have some of these helped symptoms anyway. You may not want to be on left. Welcome back to discover. Lafayette was scott on shell. And we're talking about the threes has current focus environment energy economy and scott. Let's get some on the I guess on the environmental issues. I know that. You're a proponent of today and i didn't know this will i've got you on this show. It's national fishing day. So we're the up to two and a half million anglers read Go out to the gulf of mexico and they they look really for the rigs to reef program they look for oil and gas platforms for great fishing. And i guess a lot of it may be listening to this or no. Our state know that the rigs to reef program has really been good for the environment. It helps take care of abandoned hobson platforms in all. But it's it. It helps the environment and helps. Our fishermen is one of those really like i think. Commercials if you would follow state you know as a kid. I remember the license plates. The having sportsman's paradise what happened here is really amazing. We not either or state we not a either or people we believe that we have an abundance of natural resources in that al qaeda has endowed with those natural resources and gives us an opportunity to join them all at the same time and the gulf of mexico. And i'll take a look at the gulf of mexico as an energy producer. And i'll take a look at the fishing opportunities. that's a real good example of it's not or is an you either this or that. No that's not who we are. Is there some states that are not either or states. I get it but that's not who we are. We need america to understand that we believe that the same time that we can produce a one in every six barrels of oil in the country we can also provide one of the most amazing fisheries catches in the country. It's nowhere more descriptive than in morgan city. Where they have a festival. Maybe the only festival in america is not. It's called a shrimp and petroleum festival. That's the name of it. Can you imagine that we have a festival here in the heart of acadian. Ah that celebrates a few and same time seafood right all coming from the same place and so you know national go. Fishing day Is is this kind of promotion to maybe bring a kid fishing. Maybe bring a neighbor vision. You know maybe bring elderly parents who had some great moments that brought you fish and maybe get dad and i know in may be tough to get an eighty year old guy in boat or eight year. Old mom in the boat remotes. Those miles will be amazing right to smile. Be amazing and fishing. Is this incredible opportunity. And and so what we have. Is we have this big ocean. There's no really no structure in the gulf of mexico right. He just got these these bottoms and of course when you go out to lake henderson or wherever you go drop. Hoop next lull. Because his truck their structure tracks small more organisms small organisms attract small fish. Small fish attract big fish and so in the gulf of mexico. If you don't have structures you got fish maybe you gotta find shipwreck somewhere but not a whole lot of shipwrecks so what ends up happening is when we talk about shipwrecks when you if you find one is usually gonna be twenty people there fishing because not a whole bunch but when the platforms have done is is again. In addition to fueling country and helping the economy here they provide a basis by which organisms can attach. And you begin a whole food chain and i remember secretary natural resources. Some of the most irene calls got is when we would take instructors out. You know you would be like wait. What are you doing. Thinking to struck out. Fishing wasn't from anybody other than was somebody's haunting whole they were going here. Every saturday morning they will tearing it up. And we're gonna take this away from us. You know honey honey flip up for the for the for the american miracle we have about two and a half million anglers that that you know. The honey hole is the gulf of mexico and you take a look at a coastal conservation association. Here she amazing organization david croissant is executive director of the weekend and does an amazing job and i visit with him a lot. He knew what share with me recently. That the number one issue that cca members tell him about is there concern for the loss of those structures right so here are a group that is focused on fisheries is saying that the number one issue that they have is that the removal of those energy platforms of making more difficult for them. So again a really good example. And i'm trying to you. We'll be sending up some paperwork here in the next week or so to let folks know again here in america here in louisiana that we think those things can exist and it must be really hard to move platform. That can't be an easy task. What's expensive riots. Expensive and we your obligations and companies have a duty to remove them when they get to end of life but the rigs to reprogram steps in there and says. Hey wait a minute maybe you have. You had the end of life with this platform and it needs to come up. Maybe we can do something would rich to read so it can continue to provide that that additional right of collateral benefit. What's being done or what can be done to sustain that relationship between the coastal conservation types and the oil and gas industry like is your messaging of that relationship so there's really good relationships jag model ceo louisiana moment while visually does a great job and she ca is is you know obviously always visiting with them. I know when we were at When i was in washington sometimes in probably around january of this year we put on internet our website of prob. Guess w w dot. Bessie dot gov incredible. Interactive maps allow people to see where the structures are so that. So we don't miss. They're not miss an opportunity to get something wreath sort of really good relationship but what we got to be able to do to make sure that the relationship continues we gotta make sure we have new leases and you allow you knew trump just to go because you know we gotta have that inventory going back through the chip shore allen net focus. It has mentioned that we have to get new lease we have to get new leases right and so we're hopeful that the court decision and some of the things that you're reading about enough kind of taken hold and becomes the policy of the country again and let me say before we move on is that this is not radical policy since we passed our continental shelf lands act in this country. And i think i'm gonna say fifty eight. We've had presidents of different parties in a bipartisan. Approach recognize that. Those li sales will good for two things to reverse to generate energy for the country in generate royalty income. And you might be interested in knowing that many believe that the royalty income that comes federal treasury from offshore is the second largest source of revenue to the federal treasury behind income taxes. I think in twenty one thousand nine hundred like five billion dollars and jam one of the things that happened. i think it was in twenty one thousand nine hundred. Congress passed a great american outdoors. Act and would that. Does it. Takes off your revenue and it sets it aside to fun incredible -tunities when our national porch and a lower refuges. And i'll forestry programs says again just like you louisiana. We take some of our money from offshore royalties and we invested in coastal restoration. That will make some sense right so anyways us again. I said earlier today that you know. The auto worker in michigan is connected to the oil worker louisiana. That's true but also the folks who visit our national parks connected to the auto worker in a too because now through public policy money's a corn from one to the other and it makes more good fan nights well to budgets your point before we move onto another Few questions i had this from some of the materials you provided me. I read that the government watchdog. The gao dropped offshore energy oversight from its series of high risk area. So this kind of buttresses. What you're talking about about it being lower carbon intensity what happened like what. How did that come about. Is that a long time in coming. Yeah so what happened was in twenty seventeen actually about a sixty days before my first day in washington. The government accountability office recognized as a nonpartisan fact based agency every two years they issue what is called a high risk and that high list conveys the congress everything that they have looked at they determine we need to keep an extra eye on this and you know in some cases in my be cyber security in some cases in might be enforcement of a particular area off in some cases it might be recall several years ago we had major problems in this country on how we were treating veterans and their access to healthcare. So it's really more about the programs than it is about the agency. And so i got there and twenty seventeen in what i inherited was government accountability office report that placed oversight of offshore oil and gas program on the high richness. Not an issue. One of wake up to every motorcycling like a slippery floor you just you know not good. Yeah good in in support of a key entity would call the high list another kind of list and you can figure out what i'm talking about but but anyway so so. I woke up every day. I woke up every day to that. Welcome to washington. You're welcome welcome. Somebody told me this before on inherited this problem right so you know at the end. The baseline is this. What we inherited now need to work very hard to get off of it because it would be weaponized against the industry if we went through a period of three and a half four years of service and could work out sales often and i knew would be weaponized against us and so i was. You know what. I think folks would probably say of pretty focused public servant during my time there to make certain that we were those things that we needed to introduce. A change. management program introduced a vital statistics program. Priorities follow follow. Follow up and then. Gao comes back and takes a look at all. That in jail sided the things that we able to get done during that period and say okay now based on that they report it to the congress in march of this year. So maybe what one hundred twenty days or so ago that we taking federal offshore oil and gas oversight often after a really great guy a great gift to america because it's not only to the industry but the offshore sector is more important to juice. This zip code is implanted the whole country right and so it was a great gift of the country and it will we get paid for should work to make sure those things happen always inside leagues are so i have a couple of questions that we will move on so you were under the trump administration. Did you get to know him. Did you interact with my level. You normally have facetime with the president you you miss. Your office off was actually a about four blocks from the white house. Did you see all the generous. I was not i was not there was actually in louisiana. Talk thank goodness. That was very sad. Very very disappointing. Finish country i. I live about four blocks from the white house and in my office was an additional four blocks on the other side of white house. So i don't have a vehicle. They're okay walk. How a walked in front of the white house twice a day and special privilege to be able to be walking there no matter whether or not you politically agree or disagree with the occupant. Is it right exactly. You appreciate this. Also i was up in. Dc maybe maybe four or five months before i had opportunity maybe come back and now it's really difficult but so what driving. I was just walking from apartment. You know to work and just whatever in a metro there if you wanted to do something for it pretty much at seven days a week after church on sunday. I'll just go there. We'll look at saint patrick's church right around the corner. But i remember. I flew into new orleans and it had been like four five months as i drove in a cold. One of my buddies crip crip share actually in a while. I'm on the new orleans airport to compete. You're i said no. I need to know. Is the gas pedal on the on eastern explain read i would just actually can't i've got i've got the cajun version of how to move forward but thanks for getting that in. Thank you for your service so the last segment is rewinding this down love for you to talk about where we are in the acadian region How do we move forward with the strong. Us offshore energy program. And if you also touch on the emerging you know when you're program and what are we going to do i mean. There's i had an economist on stephen barn. He has and he talked about this district. Podcast and i didn't realize that the current people we have on the coast. I mean we're not only well situated for the wind industry but we have you know the people there. The technology manufacturing fabrication did they can organize things just as they did for oil and gas. But maybe give us some hope for where we are and where we can move as well again. The region is this incredible region of people. Who just know how to get things new entrepreneurs down you know whether it's a hurricane or a recession or energy prices i mean. How many times has this town year. Lafayette and his whole a region. Been up and down on the pick ourselves out. Keep find a win win right. So so i don't have any doubt about the the quality and the fabric of the effort in the enthusiasm and the spirit in the entrepreneurial. Talent here again. I'll take a look at energy. I don't have as much of hope. For onshore as a half offshore thank things onshore have changed a lot of companies are more and more favourable. Favoring the shale plays the shell we don't we don't have a bunch of shale opportunities here in the other than north west louisianan and angel which is really doing remarkable gas play natural gas. We have so much natural gas in america. Right now natural. Gas prices have been depressed because the supply is so is so strong. We cannot have been a victim of our own success at case natural gas trading at thirteen dollars. Mcs in two thousand and eight probably had looked at lady. But it's probably three hundred three dollars three fifty rain right now so you go from thirteen to three hours and i get phone period of time former have to get a decent price for their commodities. So do all the gas people right so but offshore. I'm very very bullish on. And we basically have what we call three planning areas in the gulf. The west planning area. The central and eastern the central gulf of mexico is lloyd. It loaded with hydrocare inch. Gay is incredible when you take a look at the vast gulf of mexico and you compare what happens to texas to louisiana is. It's not even our friends in texas needed needed. Need to get the the number two spot on now. We are number one when it comes to that in a lot of the activity in the central gulf of mexico is going to be serviced by louisiana folks right and of those opportunities here in a half yet. Many of them in you iberia. Many of them in abigail many of them in morgan city right. But it's more than just that you know. We got a really great university here. That is amazing in technology and we got a really strong south. Louisiana community college has campuses everywhere. How port system is unbelievable. And again whether you're going to deport of abbeville or are you going to the port of iberia morgan city west. Mary is just amazing. So i'm confident that for the offshore sector if we can convince the policymakers that not all created equal that we have superior barrels here. We have environmentally superior barrels. Are we use those barrels to fund the government second largest source of revenue to the federal trade. Some of it is put aside to take care of green actions like the our national parks. We have a really great story detail. So i'm very bullish on the gulf of mexico now commodity prices obviously impact those things. You are really great pipeline system in the gulf. We got the talent here. We made so many on the safety. As i said earlier. Second highest check and safest high has an industry in america doesn't mean we don't have bad days. I want to be respectful. We do have bad days of but pass that there's another opportunity and i think we'll see that. I was pleased when i was at bessie to set up. A renewable energy portfolio because bessie had jurisdiction over traditional oil and gas but also has jurisdiction over the renewable side. It bought by law. It is to be regulated or managed by osha the workplace safety a went to osha and i asked to delegate that review the workplace safety jeff tebessie and they agreed so we got that from from osha and We have some decent win. Who gay i. I don't know if they win. Opportunities we have to harvest. And i don't know if that's what you do would win but it seemed like homeless is a is a is an appropriate word. We know that they're superior wind fields in the northeast. Okay and when i mean. They're in the new york in new england area. There's a lot of capital being being put in line to be. Spent their to acquire leases. There we do have win opportunities here in the gulf of mexico and what i mean when opportunities wind doesn't blow the same way all the time across every square inch of america so companies are going to do just like oil companies going to go where the oil corp already going to go where the wind is superior and in addition to that. There's a there's an opportunity for follow up on that wind side. Even though the wind may not be one hundred percent harvested here because the structures are going to need to be fabricated. They're gonna need to be vessels and bolton suppliers. There's going to need to be certain skills those skills in a lot of ways transferable by the people who worked in offshore energy industry to work in that industry. So i have a lot of hope that there's gonna be some french going to be spoken on some of these facilities in the north northeast. There's some katie. They'll do go see their cousins in manson. But but but again i think you're going to see opportunities there and it's not going to be just an opportunity they are going to be. I think welcomed and encourage because they're going to add some value just like you know they are as you know. There are occasions that will work in on the north slope in alaska cajun's working on an artsy in europe. So just just real smart people that know how to bring solutions. What i do see on the wind side is we're going to have opportunities in the gulf. We set up the regulatory aspect to be able to handle it. One of the advantages and the northeast hands is. It has a lot of dense population. So we generate electricity through wind meal. And then you have to bring that electricity in onshore. Aw and you'll do that with subsea cables and then you have to put it on the grid. And so in that area you got new york. Got new jersey got philadelphia. You got a lot of the major metropolitan church. We don't have that on the of course you got houston and you got a law. And but in your usage huge. I think the next census houston will be the third largest country in a city in the country eclipse in chicago. Innocent great city. I love it. But that's an advantage. They have so they generate the electricity and and and apple vast distribution center. We have is an incredible industrial sector on the mississippi river and on a calculator that are always looking to green up their portfolio. So i see some really incredible opportunities on a winter. I it's not to be more. But again i think we better take advantage of it. He'll be one more thing that will say in the energy sector that we making those contributions to the country. It's such a beautiful side of. I'll be driving out west again this summer but my last trip i drove out new mexico and seeing those i guess they call turbines. It's beautiful but it's it's hard to imagine it here like you said we just don't have the wind that they might have out on these plains. Yeah so i might to get your thoughts in. This probably will be my last question but with the rise in electric cars. From what the economist against steven barnes was telling me. It's such a low percentage right now. Maybe two percent of the population at the most would have an electric car. But he's thinking in the next five years or so it's gonna be a different landscape. What are your thoughts about that. Our state is set up. You know to to pay for our roads. Let's say taxing gasoline. I mean if you don't if you don't need gasoline you're not paying for the wear and tear on the roads. I know that's not really your rotate. We are going to have to figure a way we're gonna have to or it's banned its use. Tach is what is used to act so the idea. Is that the more gasoline you assume the more wear and tear. You're putting on the roads as the fairway so for the you know the elderly. That may not use a lot of gas. They pay less. Somebody like me running around. I pay more and that's fair right and so we're going to recognize as how in this is important because actually this is something that i kind of stumbled on a back. When energy prices went really hot so an end you prices go really high so we go back to two thousand and eight. I think two thousand eight we were looking at before. Now agaza me okay. Well when you get a certain point you start experiencing what is called demand destruction. I have people. Don't wanna start the engine so so would hands up. Happening in two things are going on right now. Okay and that's just. We just got understand that that we went through some demand disruption but even if you take the electric vehicle side and you look only at the regular traditional vehicles the efficiency s so much more. So you know. My dad drove a truck that got twelve miles per gallon. And maybe driving twenty four. So i'm putting the same wear and tear on the roads. But i'm contributing half right and so when you understand if you if you take a look at the transportation trust one dollars that go into the state run now i. I'm willing to to to forecast. Bet that those numbers of flat or even going down because of deficiencies. And that's good. That's good but has policymakers folks understand that we still gotta find ways efficiencies to be able to build bridges. You know one of the things that are our number comment on is that we have these great advantage because of a navigation system we got we blessed with these rivers and but but that gives us a navigation advantage in this country but one of the disadvantages of a of rivers. You gotta have a lot of bridges right and they're crumbling and you know they have capacity problems. I mean you know. You've been across the the mississippi river bridge you've been across the county. She river breath. You know sooner or later and can't take it anymore right so every generation kind of new bridge over the mississippi river challenges will this generation. Bill one right. I was telling someone not too long ago. Who had a daughter that went to lsu and so that's real interesting lived in lafayette. And i'm like what is it about. She just really liked the campus. It's really good. I said but she lives in that yet said that she attacked yet. Issue commute every day. I said so. That rivers pretty. That bridge is pretty important. And so those things are challenges and when you take a look at the fact that we have hooked al lag as i think maybe forty five. The fifty states have booked their wagon to gasoline sales being the funding source. That's what we do but we also do that in the country. We don't just do it in the states. So right now in louisiana you buy a gallon of gas as thirty eight cents per gallon tax. It's a high tech twenty sands goals a state government and share and eighteen cents goes to the federal government. Take get out federal interstate system and god. We seen some of it here on interstate ten right as being added on maintenance but the no doubt that as you know things are changing we have to figure out as electric vehicles come into play is gonna offer some opportunities and advantages. That's one of the things that we have to deal with but get off. Yeah we'll figure it out and do a do think that that's going to be a growth area. And i don't think that that's bad of a deal. I really don't because i think it represents a balance of the threes. And and i think probably that we in louisiana if we can make the argument in the facts a not so much make ornament argument. But if policymakers in washington viewed the facts and do not view that all off gases. Bad that we absolutely incredible positive environmental metrics. And we've never talked about that. We never you know there was never a conversation that happened anywhere here in vienna petroleum club or over lunch or breakfast over coffee where somebody would say you know what we got. Some low carbon intensity barrels production. We've never said that why we never had to. It wasn't a metric that was important. That wasn't even on my radar. And so when you think of that wait a minute that's important and we got some really good and how much here. Well maybe we can separate ourselves from the pack and become a that beacon here in the gulf goals that helps to get investment and help stimulate drill. Bit dollars puts out people to work. We build more homes here. We sell more cars. We sell more groceries. We improve our schools. We improve our roads and we mother earth. What an incredible opportunity that we have right. So we'll see what an incredible spokesperson so if people want to know more about this. Is this a new company that you have a lot of folks kind of reached out to me. So i'm helping people find out. No that's that's a really great question. I don't even know the man share your email. Yeah i'll i'll. I'll tell you what i think we get something to you on that you know but absolutely linked in and all that stuff. Maybe i'll get something to you and you can you. Can you can add to the conversation. I mean just back like really. Yeah yeah yeah. I was like reintroduce myself off my children odd. I'm your father. You know 'cause i didn't have the luxury of being back. Your bunch okay. I really didn't. That's a long time. Yeah you know it was it was. It was a sacrifice. I mean diana's incredible wife. America my best friend just an incredible partner could never look the whole world. Never find anybody. That's more perfect for me and we got five children and of course they get older and they don't own thing and having kids we got seven grandkids and and so we got a full play. And it's amazing but when you away for so long and you come back you got some catching up to do and you know you earlier segment. Do i occasionally run into my good friend. Fred meals and and and i don't. I don't see as much. I got i got. I got to fix that because we only live a mile down the road. And you're such a funny. do unbelievable. Well fred makes everybody. Does everybody about so. Somebody said. I think nancy landry said it. Best state representative nancy landry former state rep. She said he is no way. Somebody can be always that happy. He must be chemically happy. And i'm like well. I know he beuys drugs. If you know she said i think is he has whole whatever whatever brain serotonin whatever's coming out just is better than ours so anyway but good more spending more time on trade than he did on me and very fortunate to have him as my friends but yeah. I have some catching up to do. Yeah well scott on shell thank you for taking time today to explain really what some things most of us don't know much about but i'm assuming we'll be hearing more and more about this so i want to encourage people to to think about this. Three s environment energy economy and halloween. Ziana can play a very large role in our nation's absolutely true. I just think that this is one of those that in a very divided country. If we look at the facts. I think we can come together and say the facts. Say not muffak not anybody else's thanks but just those that are generally accepted as the facts put out by the government. The gulf of mexico is incredible profits for this country. We need more gulf of mexico oil. Not less wow. We are looking for renewables and alternatives To be a big part of the portfolio. It's a great opportunity and it's a great some of our interview thank you. I'm going to thank our sponsors before we close out. First of all iberia bank now a division of first horizon. Thank you for your generosity and supporting our show as well as lafayette general. And of course. Raider and jason sikora who mix tape. Thank you all for making this show. Go one on behalf of discovery lafayette. I'm jan swift. Thank you so much for listening.

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Episode 211 "America. The Quintessential Lie"

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

2:47:42 hr | 1 year ago

Episode 211 "America. The Quintessential Lie"

"Expense was going. You've reached native opinion. We are an indigenous information and education radio show and podcast every week. We talk about current affairs related to and from our own native American perspectives. My name is Michael kicking the guy doing me as always everything. We my good friend from Florida he is David Greenhouse. Good Morning. Brother how are you doing in there about yourself but yourself good good good thing you waiting on this rain that we're supposed to be getting? It actually attempted attempted to snow last night. We we've got what we commonly refer to here in New England as dusting dusting of snow against the the term comes from feather duster with dust on any fewer tap. It on a table. Elise residue lose white residue that hit the grass and then Really Eight o'clock. This morning was disappeared so say gone by morning so it was the point. Rageh Chat Chat Room. Open with anybody out there listening to live. And you want to join us in chat. Just go to our website. At Native Opinion Dot Com. Instructions are there. You can do a cliff. Just did join us. Join US here in Chad. Or or on praising the spreaker mobile APP you can join us in chat that way as well so you can reach the show. Of course you can email. Us hosts with an hosts at NATIVE OPINION DOT COM. We're also available out on twitter at native opinion over their facebook page. Of course it's facebook dot com forward slash native opinion podcast our website native opinion dot com. You can also leave us a voicemail. It's eight six zero eight hundred five five nine five let number eight six zero eight hundred five five nine five. That number is good for voice as well as text messages. So feel free to use any of those methods. Thank you absolutely thank you. Well you've reached here a native opinion. This is episode eleven America. The quintessential lie and that is America. Talking tough title is but to the point to the point and please come a- supporter by becoming a patron. And you can do that by. Visiting Patriots cited Patriot Dot com forward slash native opinion and on our facebook page by clicking on the learn more button. We would love it if you came a patron and we thank you offer listening and sharing. They show it truly does help. It's where does we have other options as well if you've made her opinion that conflict for slash support in awe any always are appreciated for sure on welcome to see how joins us and chat and yet for those of you starting the tune in live or whatever and you just happen to see the social media method. Yeah we're about an hour late. Getting the live broadcast started so our apologies to everybody could not be avoided so but we're here now. I WANNA point out to everybody from a technical level of the show. We tell everybody that Normally twenty four forty eight hour delay before the audio post to our our podcast feed. That is no longer the case Everybody gets the show at exactly the same time now so I just want to be aware of that. The audio in the past has always been available on our website immediately just just a function of our broadcast provider. Spreaker but But we used to have a built in delay but that is now no longer the case so everybody gets it at the same time so so we appreciate your patience as we've worked through some Some technical stuff on our end but all right we heard from Badger. I'm going to play his voice mail here. So here's what he had to say low. My brother's hey. I don't have a lot to say today but I thought I'd better call in because you guys spend a worry about me. Well don't call in for a while and and there have been some bad wrecks out here on the West and luckily I've been Not Anywhere near them. Back and forth from Idaho to southern Nevada and good roads the last couple of weeks anyway. There is quite a bit of dark stuff in the news so between the Parana virus flew a tornado and the accident in Wyoming. I mean it's just been pretty rough. It's really made me think that I really have to appreciate all my loved ones and and all the gifts that have and and just be thankful for every breath that I have. Because it's a it's a real gift and I appreciate you guys. Just keep doing what you're doing signing the like truth and love my brothers badges for that and yes. We do get concerned when we haven't heard from me on a while ago. Yes Oh thank you for touching base and calling in and sharing your words with us absolutely and I mean you guys on the road for sure I mean. I think this is a good amount of people that listen to this show other other driving either be professionally such as Badger and also who's in chat right now but you know but I think there's others out there too that that Do the same. So there's a lot of stuff going on as Badger said in trying to trying to parse through it is Is really been a challenge. I think in in some regards Be Politically healthwise with corona. That's that's a mess right now. I won't politicize it but But you guys if you're paying attention to it You kind of know what I'm talking about. You know. The main thing is to stay safe and honestly through all all the media attention to the krona thing I'm not I'm not making later this whatsoever. Honestly guys wash your hands. Wash your hands a lot. Wash your hands for at least twenty seconds because that seems to be the best advice that people are giving at this point You sort of stave that off. Yeah you know what that should be the case anyway when you watch your hands my grandkids and some of the other children that I I know that are related to me. One way or the other or children friends. Their parents teach them to seem the. Abc Song Yeah. You sent me in a way. Back machine so You know even if they around a virus had not neared its rear its head handwashing. Should be part of the process anyway especially during flu season a number of years ago when I was in the Saatchi school something had there was a really bad flu epidemic. That you and I was trying to provide some information to the class that I was sitting in about you know areas that the flu virus can survive on and can actually survive on money for the seventeen days so yes watch watch watch often take thirty seconds to watch your hands. Seconds is nothing yet and especially with the corona virus around which is which is not. It's not a new virus by bet around for decades but now it's according to medical medical reports it's now mutating viruses do. That's normal process for virus. So use precautions. Wash your hands wash them often. It's my brother said at least for twenty seconds. Wash your hands. That's your best. That's your best your best defenses against a contracting virus spreading it and hydrate. Drink plenty of water viruses. Germs in general have a tough time surviving in a wet environment. They can't they can't survive more hydrated. You stay the less chance. You have a becoming Inoculated with lij amounts of viruses. And of course in case you're just you know immersed in a virus exposure with somebody coughing on your sneezing on you then. All bets are off the air but stay hydrated. You'll stay healthier medical. Absolutely the only thing I'll add to that is Somebody pointed this out of the new shows that are watch. The person said one of the things that people tend to miss his is when they're washing their hands might sound strange that we're focused so heavily but it's more than just rubbing their palms together. You say exactly what he said. You gotta get between the fingers okay. Because he said many times that's we're discussing the fungus can grow is is between the fingers so by all means That thirty seconds doing it that way. I guess really does help. So so there you go. That's against everybody else again. Be Safe on the roads too because you know what I tend to see in my fifty six years of existence part of that of course from sixteen years old on to be able to drive is what I have noticed. When when there's a lot of drama going on people's lives people drive worse. Yes and their mind is not on the action of driving and so those of us that are not in those particular vehicles. We have to be even more alert and and In the in the months that are nice enough to ride motorcycles. You sort of have to take that approach when you're when you when you're riding on a bike it's a whole different world running when you're writing on the road than it is in a car. You're just over time. You learn to be a lot more alert on a road and especially when people are distracted and God knows there's so many things between phones and everything else that people are doing. That shouldn't be done on a driving. And so as as a Badger pointed out one. There's a lot of wrecks on the road. You sort of go through. What actually happened nine out of ten times? You're finding that something was related through distraction. So just be careful you guys wherever you're going even if it's for a short trip just kind of kind of keep an extra eye on the road and not so much listen to what guides talking about native issues talking about and rather than rather you be safe so when you're out driving think of it as being in a bullfight and you're a big red flag and the Bulls are trying to get you. That's a good analogy to its own a sound paranoid but there have been days mandates where it felt like people are after me with their vehicles but But yeah so all right. Why don't we get into native news? That sounds like a good idea. This next article we've been following for. I would say pretty close to a couple of years now and as promised we are continuing to follow it and Mike Hopes and I'm sure my brother's hopes to where you know the outcome of this Procedure would be positive but sadly it wasn't and what I'm speaking about us. The mashpee tribe loses an appeals court and they lost their appeal to keep their land into trust and the chairman says fight continued in DC court case and this was brought to us by made him US online staff for native news online dot net. And it's this article plus a bunch of other things that I read throughout the past week and a half brought me to the title of this episode. America is a quick quintessential why now everything that's promised to indigenous people or other marginalized people in this country. Turns OUT TO BE A lie. We are never dealt with honestly there is never a forthcoming of generosity fairness well. I'm sorry I just got chills links laying. Why because later we're GONNA be talking other ways and just the things you have said are things that I think the reason Chevron. You guys is because we often don't like like day produces a rundown for their show every single week without fail. I thank you brother even busy going on and we got a little behind this week. There's very good reasons for that which I don't need to get into but and so I I didn't I didn't know what some of the content we wouldn't be talking about until late last night and so I had started putting together some some other content and so when when David said that it just clicked in my head like Oh my God because we didn't speak about it right and it. Just it just connects you guys will see exactly what I'm talking about to the title of this episode and what Davis said So. I apologize for interrupting but no no. That's okay I apologize for late submission but I totally understand so you know again. There's never been fairness there's never been transparency. There's never been anything that people Kellyanne people observing anyway can call equality of any type I discovered this past week that I also have choctaw ancestry and I've been reading about some of my choctaw ancestry. I'm aware of my Cherokee ancestry. But I knew nothing about my choctaw ancestry and and I'm appalled at what has happened to the Choctaw people even even more so than. I'm appalled at the treatment of other native cultures. I just had no idea so. Let me get into this article the First Circuit Court in Boston who ruled against the Mashpee tribe on Thursday and the cycle is produced on much. I in its battle to land. The tribe owns back in trust the decision oppose a lower federal court decision that the US Department of Interior made a mistake. They call it by putting the land into trust during the Obama Administration. Yeah there is no mistake by the way. No there is. No mistake at issue is land issue. They say is land the tribe designated to build a casino therein? Lies THE RUB RIGHT THERE? That Word Casino. The land was once held in trust by us. Department of Interior in September two thousand fifteen but revised by the fool in the White House my words administration and September twenty eighteen in a statement sent to native news online mashpee while try tribe chairman. Cedric Cromwell expressed his disappointment in the appeals court. Decision but vowed the fight is not over and the Boston case will not impact the tribes pending litigation in Washington. Dc and I quote. There is no question that this is a grave injustice and quote said Chairman Cromwell. Quoting again much of this case a ball around the end. But you andy of the word. Such we will continue to fight as our ancestors did to preserve our land base. A culture in our spiritual connection to our homelands into quote the tribe also working with the Massachusetts Congressional delegation last year House of Representatives overwhelmingly and bipartisan fashion past two legislative proposals to correct this injustice to the match mashpee weapon. Oh Heck people and all tribes by the time the trump administration reversed its decision. The tribe had already begun construction on its plan to build the proposed first light resort and Casino in Taunton Mass. A sub- suburb of Boston again. That wasn't gonNA stake by the Obama Administration. Correct you know this. This government puts out laws and regulations. That are supposed to protect the native people. Putting land into trust was one of those things but they want to cherry pick when it comes to certain tribes what is applicable in. What is it? And as Chairman Cromwell stated this is all centered around one word. Such you know. How easy was it for them to redefine the timeframe to make it easier for for land to be placed into trust? Some of these things are easy fixes but once again America lies to native inhabitants to justify means and to keep native native cultures from progressing whether economically in any way shape form fashion. The government does everything in its power to get in the way so I have no trust in this. Government had no trust in this country. Basically and that's sad that it's come to that point. You have anything you want to have. I'm trying to think of the way to condense my thoughts but I wanNA give a couple more examples of these struggles that were referring to but before I do that. I WANNA give some Kudos to John Kane John. Cain largely talks often about the falsities of recognition in the United States and also a to to some degree the connections inside of Canada. That worked that way as well. David spoken often about federal recognition. And the reasons to be against it you know. I'm I'm torn on. The subject of coming from a tribe is federally recognized. But I also using the word again. Recognize these challenges and they are real and the justifications against federal recognition are just as valid. And maybe more so because what because opponents do federal recognition recognized the fact that these types of issues which are really problems I had to. It creates problems and the problems one of which is exactly what day just read this particular article in the behavior of the federal government against the people at the heart here. The first and foremost is the land and that is not as the To use the word in the title. The quintessential And also the foundation of the United States was about the acquisition of land that and and what to be done with that land and to push any inhabitants of that land off in a way From their their traditional homelands and this is GonNa be a reoccurring theme that you're going to be hearing in this episode now. I'm going to give two more examples. These aren't in the rundown by the way brother of challenges that native people are having in and around to some degree it relates to federal recognition. It relates to gaming. And the I I'm going to play is my own tribal chairman who made an appearance on our local television. He's GonNa talk about a number of different things but then it's going to transition into another area gaming that is becoming. I think of contention and certainly here in Connecticut. But this is my travel chairman Rodney Butler who spoke out. Wsb OUR LOCAL CBS affiliate. I believe this was last Sunday. So this is about eight minutes long so it's got some distance on it but I did commercials out of course so his appearance on network sports betting bridgeport casino. What does the future hold for Connecticut? Now is Ronnie Butler. He is the chairman of the Mashantucket Pequot tribe and Mr Butler. Good to see you back here in the program. You've had guests over the years so while I have you here because we're talking about the corona virus. Any Word is to let the casino resort to actually incredibly proactive about it right because safety is one or number one guests responses when we do surveys and hear from them what they appreciate most foxwoods and today to be experienced itself and so we want to get ahead of it because the high likelihood that is when I get to the United States right now embroider stored and being a location where there's a lot of people congregating responsible that we want to protect people and so Just this week we we up the level of hand sanitizer locations we have about the property. Receive constant communication to our employees look for within themselves and within patrons and just the building on it. So we're getting trying to so many people in there and they come from all over the world so people walking through like a weapon on the machines and things always always I mean. That's we've been doing that prior to making sure now we're double checking to make sure machine is white and white and moving forward. Let's talk a little bit about some of the gambling issues. Coming up positive. Just quick. Second so you know obviously. He addressed a corona proactive. That my tribe is taking in our own Gaming enterprise but also bring in cliff in chat who wrote something regarding coronas. Well brother and I was going to mention your two spots. No problem was agreeing with Dave earlier. He said a woman was freaked out on the other day. And telling my wife all these conspiracy theories The the the virus was manufactured in a in China Thanks to Tom. Cotton and may have quote escaped also since Lysol and clorox lists grown virus. On their labels this pro approves that it is not new as they've said earlier right on I had to print out a showing that There are at least six other variants of the corona virus and explained. This is a new mutation. Sars and murders fall under a corona virus. He wrote and so. Thank you for that cliff because that led to that is the case. But of course you. Have you have a mainstream news? Media that is corporate funded right that chooses to you know hype up the news. Why because they want eyeballs because eyeballs means. I've also advertisers simple as that. And it's responsible in large amount of ways so So anyway that that was worth addressing so now as I said earlier In this news program with mitral chairman they transition into some aspects of of Benin gaming. So here we go the state this year one is sports. Betting had couple of weeks ago. They believe that he should have some sort of a potential stake in sports betting in the state there's an argument that the tribes on the we'll have the rights to that which you believe it. Well I believe what it's been for the last thirty years. The reality is we have an agreement with the state of contracts state for the last thirty years for exclusively on on gaming and that has included games Slot machines but also games bingo everything and so this has been sports itself has actually been identified as a casino game by many jurisdictions in fact just last month the national ending gaming commission which regulates all traveling throughout the country said sports. Betting clearly is a class three game. Which means game and so for me. There's really no discussion around that. Discussion is how do we get this done? Get done quickly and start generating revenue for the city Connecticut. It's how do you think it should get done so we have a bill that we've been working on to actually. The bills started with the governor last session and then it morphed into conversations with the speaker in the minority leader of the House and we were up against a midnight deadline last year. Which is it's difficult when you're doing that. But it really set the framework for this year session. And so since then we've been working with some legislative leadership and Kathy Austin in particular put flesh on the bones of the bill and so the bill is actually out there to SP twenty one. I'll be in front of the Public Safety Committee this coming Tuesday to To discuss it and talk about the framework of it but it's very very simple. Just simply says that were were expanding on the current arrangements between the tribes and the States. So much like we've already done. Makino which is incredibly successful for the state and we're going to layer in sports betting online sports betting online gaming in the likes throughout the state and it was interesting listening to my good friend Senator on your prior conversation. And he spoke about you know we need to stay competitive with states around us and so when you see the success at sports betting having in Rhode Island we see having in in New York and New Jersey and Pennsylvania and New Hampshire. It's you know it's time for Connecticut. Beginning game now. So what is the dispute about? Of course it's about money right so the state here is trying to reinterpret the gaming and saying that Oh well sports is included in the exclusivity but as my chairman just pointed out. It is but you have these states. That are in fact trying to reinterpret this. I had another article here. The pull it up on my phone. I'm sorry brother that that speaks to this as well This is by an attorney. was also used to be the president. Seneca nation also are into Indian gaming the title of this nation fighting against economic persecution clue right by Robert over to Wadi Porter who wrote the second nation is right to exhaust its legal remedies against the state and federal governments to avoid another sad chapter in the endless economic war against Seneca people. The legal issues of their current gaming dispute are straightforward the two thousand and two compact had fourteen year term and required the nation to pay between eighteen percent and twenty five percent of its lot revenue through the state during this term. The Nation honored this obligation and the state and local governments received one point four billion the compact also provided for set for a seven year automatic renewal period if no party objected and so the Compact was extended to twenty twenty three. It makes no mention of payments by the nation to the state during the renewal period an arbitration panel ruled in favor of the state conceding. That the Compact was silent on the renewal payment terms but said that the nation should still make payments rather than let the compact speaks for itself the arbitrators interpreted the Compact to imply payment during the renewal period. This was wrong for at least three reasons. I the arbitrator's ignored the compacts plain language. Read literally the nation and state agreed that the nation would have twenty one years of classroom gaming exclusivity in exchange for fourteen years payments. The one point four billion to the state received translates into sixty seven million dollars per year. With seventeen million per year going to local governments to for example one of the properties that Seneca Niagara Falls New York and and the city of Niagara is often talked about the fact that hey state of New York. Where's our money and nobody seems to be speaking on behalf of Niagara Falls? So what are they do? They turn their anger toward the tribe had similar experiences here. In Connecticut with some of our more vocals Town town representatives for the same exact reason the state failing to put the money back into the surrounding towns that are directly affected right so second by federal law all Indian gaming compacts. I'm reading back on the situation by federal all Indian Gaming compacts and amendments must be approved by the United States Department of Interior in two thousand and two. The Interior Secretary approved the Compact for years. One to put us one to fourteen but did not approve any amendment for Twenty fifteen through twenty twenty three federal gaming law exists to protect tribal interests against St. Overreach. Let me stop right there. So it's the Federal Gaming Law. Yes that exists okay. But it's the federal government being proactive and defending our rights. Very questionable right. So this goes back again to some of like John. Keane's argument relevant to federal recognition. Does you have to have the recognition before you can be protected by inning gaming laws as he tried. Okay all right so so. There's an example strife against Seneca nation. Turn our attention to Oklahoma Okay. I'm not done. Here's an article that was sent to us from a listener so stitz tribal fight raises ancestry. Questions brother Oh okay. So when Republicans Marine from the article is an Associated Press Article One Republican Kevin State was elected Oklahoma governor in two thousand eighteen many. Cherokee nation members felt proud that one of their own accomplished such a feat even if their politics didn't necessarily align with his again Republican but in less than a year in office began facing fierce blowback particularly from fellow tribal citizens for engaging in battle with the Cherokee nation and other Oklahoma Base Native American tribes the amount of casino gambling revenue. They were giving to the state. Many of the Thirty Nine federally recognized tribes in the state quickly united and launched a slick multi billion dollar ad campaign touting the benefits of tribes that tribes bring to the state one fellow. Cherokee nation member launched an online petition that labeled stint as a traitor and sought to have his tribal citizenship revoked. So that gets that gets dicey of course right there but the point here is and again. We'll have links to all this show but the point here again is suddenly. They want to renegotiate because Indian people. Oh too damn successful. Apparently right so and and so all these attacks come from all these different angles from a reversing decisions on land claims in the case of they want people to tacking gaming compacts to the cat into attacking a trees which forces tribes to have to pay attorneys to wade through a system. We did not create absolutely so it's inexcusable and it plays directly to the title of this episode either concrete examples. And there's more to come trust me of what nations in this country. Also in Canada have to deal with when an oppressive government. I'll leave it there but it's but you see my point you know that that lost my place here but anyway like I said earlier there because we've got we've got more to get to here here in the episode. You WanNa comment on anything their brother. Yeah it's a policy that or policies that that continue and the policies that that don't have any standing or or I'd based in anything but greed correct that's all it's based in the well greed and racism basically Y- it's it's just it's just amazing to me. The reason I I make that particular point about policies that are rooted in anything but greed and racism. I learn something that I suspected but found out for sure and I'll I'll use the civil rights. Voting Act of Nineteen Sixty. Five is an example. People believe that that policy is or that act. That law was a permanent. No it's up for renewal every so many years ever so many years it was just renewed the last time in two thousand nine for twenty five years from two thousand nine forward so it's things like that that should not have to exist. We have made a people shouldn't have to jump through hoops just to have you know just basic civil liberties. We shouldn't have to jump through hoops to have our rights protected. That should be something. That's granted the same. You know there should be nobody trying to stop those rights. Those rights were granted to us from the Creator. They're not man made for us to be able to to live as people to practice our cultures to practice our religion to practice to develop economies for us to survive. We shouldn't have to jump through hoops. We shouldn't have to take you know. Entities to court to protect our our our civil rights. Those things shouldn't have to happen but here we are in twenty twenty having to do these things and be again it. Because it's it's an I'll be I'll be very blunt me and I hope everybody understands where I'm coming from this. The reason why they continued because it's white people with guns a lot. A military force include that in a minute one adamant about a little bit later in the show really when we start talking about. What's going on across the border and Canada? Talk to the next article which also spells out again But none of gaming Indian health service nominee in limbo amid another high profile crisis This is an article written by help pronouncing this person's name correctly Diet for Indians DOT COM on. Hbo Cool Writes Coming. Out of Washington D. C. when highest ranking official at the Indian Health Service address tribal leaders? Here last month he opened with what could be best described as he dad joke quoting so when they tell us that you wear this blue outfit you're immune to crow virus close quote Michael Wiki. That's pronounce right the principal deputy director at Ihs or the Indian Health Service said at the National Congress of American Indians Winter Session on February eleventh. Wiki a citizen of the Pueblo of Zuni was wearing the operational dress uniform. The United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corpse. On the afternoon of his address. He also sported sported a sweater today prior. Excuse me when he attended the state of Indian nations which was delivered by Fawn John. Sharp and she is new president which we played for you weeks ago. United but as the trump administration rushes to respond to the spread of the novel Of the of the novel Corona Vires Kovin Dash Nineteen Agency charged with providing health. Two point six million American Indians and Alaskan natives once again finds itself in a familiar state. The Spike's appearance of being ready for doing it was. He has yet to be confirmed as permanent director of IHS so full. Stop right there so once again you have any full-fledged Chug chug the can't talk today trump administration full of temporary people. You have all these intern directors. You can almost go through a higher hierarchy chart at the top you'll find interim such and such and so-and-so Ocean Energy Management for example as an interim director in your crew Shank as an example. Okay but it's all over. It's rampant you. You can't communicate permanency or stability. Actually maybe that's a better word with temporary leadership now. The argument to that is oh well. don't ministrations coming go. Well that's true okay. But that doesn't necessarily mean that. Okay let's say Democrats are you get the lighthouse and maybe even the Senate right. I'm not going to happen. Applicable Tangent. Promise who's to say that Mr Wiki. What retain his chair Democrat Administration See? The trump administration has chosen. Because what are they understand? Understand CORPORATE AMERICA AND CORPORATE AMERICA WITH SOON IF SOMEBODY'S UNDERPERFORMING. They cut them instantly. And you've seen this behavior since he took office and that does not that does not generate stability in any way shape or form and so here it is as the article points out affecting two point six million American Indians and Alaska natives. Why confirm this guy going on here? In the articles of quote what happened one tribal leader of Indians DOT COM as as big week was winding down. The same tribal leader pointed out that the trump administration just a couple of months ago presented Wiki nomination as director of the IHS. As an urgent matter. The agency has gone without a permanent leader through five years. So so you know. Here on a broaden the conversation a bit and say that there's an example right. There were a crosses administrations. This is about being responsible. An important part of your constituency whether you want to count for five million or more. I don't care you have responsibility so that transcends into the Obama administration if we're talking five years back to Dave's title quintessential lie agency has gone without a permanently for five years all while dealing with high profile crisis like the virus and predatory physician who was found guilty for abusing young patients onto reservations. Indian country took the White House's as sincere and responded in kind the national Indian Health Board the Association of American Physicians. The united southeastern tribes. Or what we a call you set and dozens of tribal nations kyle. Organizations and Indian health entities flooded Congress with declarations of support for Wiki in hopes of ending the long-running leadership void at IHS quote. We rushed to send letters path resolutions. We all did our part to get him. Confirmed close quote recalled the tribal leader. Who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive dealings with the trump administration quote? And now what close quote but as with most situations in the trump pair finding out what has happened with the Rear Admiral. Wiki and his nomination has been an exercise in near futility. It seems that official wash. It seems that official Washington does not warrant Indian country to know what is going on with the. Ihs are maybe official. Washington doesn't know either. When asked about the status of the nomination a week before. Nci IHS had a short response quote for questions regarding our adm. We wiki confirmation. Please contact the Senate of Indian Affairs Committee close quote. The implication was that the process was out of the executive branches hand. Well isn't that special? Don't don't WanNa know. Go Talk to them over there more here with the Russell being legislative branch however into indicated otherwise according to the Republican majority staff on the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs is yet to respond to all the enquiries posed to him following his nomination hearings in early December quote. The committee's waiting on follow what material from the nominee in order to finalize the record close quote a spokesperson for the Republican leadership on the panel told Indians Dot Com. According again once all information is received a business meeting will be scheduled to vote Ram Our WIKI through the committee into Oscar me onto the Senate floor consideration. Close quote senator. Tom Udall a Democrat on other New Mexico. The Democratic Vice Chairman of the committee has has voiced support. Aliki will also hails from New Mexico during the confirmation hearing on December eleventh. But he too wasn't entirely sure what was going on when asked about the timeline by Indians dot com quote it's unclear close quote in an interview during NCI where he received a special recognition for his decades of service to the to the public empty ending. Country this is very true. By the way quote is running the Indian Health Service Right now close Utah set of wiki. Who is indeed the highest ranking official in the agency quoting again? It's important that we get him in but we need to do the paperwork. The vetting close quote you all added. That's like closing the Bindu after the horse has already out of out of the barn. You know the guys doing the job and and but you're paperwork so we can bed for quite. Yeah exactly at this point. What are you gonNA bet him for? Yeah I mean look at this way guys. It's not like okay. If you're if you're applying for a job right name need one job that you've had that you or job interview they said Hey. Can you go and do the job for six months? And then come back and we'll We'll make our final decision. That's basically what it boils down to how what realm of reality have any of US experience that out so anyway as I said the rest of it will be in the show notes. Good Article But again it just. It just drips with once again regardless regardless of. Who's at fault so to speak? The man is trying to do the job right. But under what authority and by when we say authority some point chance has to put together a budget which which means when they submit budget to Congress. They go well. Who's in charge? You know you see thirty head looking at each other like what the hell right so there there. There is a good example of part of that problem because they need someone. That's head of the agency to sign off on the budget that he's submitting. So is he going to submit a budget as an unqualified person in leadership role? He's not the head of the Jess officially correct officially correct. Basically you know. He's saying they want to help you. Guys out let's let's start getting the ball rolling. Let's put together okay. What are the needs? What are the problems? Let's let's address those. You know what I mean but you know like we said the problem is the money he goes to submit anything you know for for approval to be funded to whatever the case may be like. Where are you exactly exactly perfect? Excuse and who gets her US US absolutely so time for me to break. GotTa try here from a tribe called red. It's brand new That has been donated by by the band. Just one reason why we play it on. But but with the caveat which is that we have responsibility To communicate some things so. I thought this would be a perfect segue to talk about. What's going on across the border and I'll get to that in just a moment but again this track is called land back by a tribe called red and here is how that goes out or maybe not stanton right. Why is there such a leader on this? Oh I know I won't even tell you what I did wrong. Edit point. Yeah sure like I said everything goes out live now anyway once again. Let's reset this up. Let's be serious. Here's the tribe called red again. Track is called land back could Writing first. Go Try and forgot that. I track with you and a half minutes breath because I had to walk. Upstairs just made it back in time. High knew it was going to be short all right. Well I'm GonNa give you a minute to catch your breath. Okay thank you no problem. I read something someone posted on face bag some morning and I stopped and thought about it and I was dumbstruck. Because it made so much sense if somebody that's extremely wealthy that was running for president. Wanted to do something. Really grand magnanimous for this country. They could have ended homelessness. They could've ended poverty in one fell swoop by doing this one thing how many people are listed as as ghetto inhabitants of this country. There's about three hundred and twenty seven million people in this country. Bloomberg spent five hundred million dollars on ADS. Half a million five hundred patrolling dollars on ads but look at the source. I'm sorry led to the source. What do you mean at the? I've never I guess I can't go ahead. I'm sorry but my point is kids. If he had taken three hundred and twenty seven million dollars of that five hundred million that he spent he could have ended homelessness and poverty in this country in one fell swoop by giving each person a million bucks and he still would have had plenty of money leftover for his ad campaign. I hear that believe them in here. Here here it is not show okay. I'm just I'm just making A. That's very true Rachel but let's define who aren't buying large are those impoverished people that were referring to. They're not white people. I'm just being real with you guys. I'm not saying that there aren't white people that are homeless. They certainly are. But Dave talking about in the broader context of that is all of it would be over at absolute in one fell swoop. But what I'm saying is if he cared or others that are in that position can do that. Look at the motivation as to why they're not absolute why. I made my comment about Bloomberg absolutely now. It's ending Bloomberg by any stretch of the imagination. But I'm saying any wealthy person that's got as much money as they've got if they wanted to make. That's why I say that. They wanted to make a difference. I don't know how many people miss that but I said if they wanted to make a difference they could've ended homelessness and poverty in one fell swoop. Absolutely so if you want to Say Bad things about my comments. Let's whether that's host that negative opinion dot com. No there's no there's no need to you know. Throw any any. Stones or daggers dodger. Anything your way because of your your your statement. There's there's no need but I'm just you know there's there's no to your point. There's no motivation to end. These things. No motivation there isn't just think of how far this economy would leap forward. If that were to happen. Bloomberg would lose anything or gates or or or or mosque. These GUYS LOSE MONEY. They write it off on the taxes. They'd write it off on their taxes. So you know it's it's it's so simple. It's profound that a nation that's got the number of wealthy individuals billionaires that this country has the most bay nurse in the world by the way that they could not contribute even if one billionaire contributed contributed a corner of that million dollars. If they're going to give to each person in the United States. I'll say this much. If you guys have been listening Bernie's message and it's not. It's not about taking taking from the wealthy to get to the poor and a negative. Stanford's not about that at all. It's about humanity unlike Robin Hood to go through all right right exactly we're talking about Robertson that that type of behavior it's about humanity. I mean how much would it take for? I'M GONNA. I'M GONNA pick a number ten billionaires in this country for ten billion years to split up that one million dollar gift to each person in the United States Ed. That's pocket change today pocket change. They're GONNA get the money they're going to get the money back as a tax write off. So what's lost to then nothing? What does it do for their their their public image coats? That's what they're concerned with public. Image it just polishes their public image to make them squeaky clean shiny. They done something for the country. They've also done something for the world because that money concern that money flows throughout the the world economy. No matter what anybody says if flows throughout the world economy so all of that money that they gave to one person. Each person in the United States goes back into the economy. I'm trying to use some military jargon here by the way commented on these you. Hey Robin Hood was a good guy. He was absolutely broke the law. I want you to know that too long. Robyn risks for because who make the laws rich people? Anyway go ahead. I'm sorry but you know that the solution was so sample it was so promptly made it profound and it's like really and even even that there's a lot of people that don't need the one million dollars because there are already wealthy. Do the right thing that's it. That's all I got no problem. I need to go back in In fulfilling responsibility so hard to track called land back by a tribe called red and so i WanNa read this. It's a call to action by the band. And they write the whole nation. Dedicate this song in support of the witten. Sutin nation and to the indigenous lead movements across Turtle Island and beyond we oppose the invasion the invasion of sovereign indigenous lands by the RCMP or the Royal Canadian Monte police and coastal gasoline pipeline. We stand with certain people and their hereditary chiefs. We stand with all the people working to support their fight. We will be making the song available for download for three and three to be used for anyone working to defend the witten. Sutin territories an all action that defend the right of indigenous land sovereignty and to promote a true nation to nation discussion between the indigenous nations of Turtle Island and our Canadian settlers in right until our Canadians are willing to treat the indigenous nations of this land with respect. Do a sovereign peoples reconciliation will remain an empty gesture. It was the work of our good friends. West Hartmann that inspired us to give the song away to the movement not only because of their work in the frontier in the front lines of resistance in Vancouver but also because they're using their art for the Movement. West designed the quote land back patch that is featured in our cover art and has been selling them to raise money for the onus Dalton Camp Legal Fund we will be making a donation to the same fund for our use of of his art. We encourage you to donate to the legal fund as well by following this link which is action network dot org slash fundraising the whole Lusa. Nation would like to thank our friends and collaborators. Who have helped make this possible without our community we are nothing beat northern voice West Hartman and allow arts management close quote so The link to that song on a tribe called reds a youtube channel. We'll be in our show notes as well as the link that we just spoke of the Action Network Dot Org. We thank you ever so much for creating that track and making it available for use To go into into to bring attention to what I WANNA talk about now which is to talk more about the situation with the witness and people There's been a few questions. I think In this as I mentioned earlier kind of put Chil- chills down my spine. When on day was talking earlier because of how how much does just fits under the show title on without knowing in advance of that show title and or the content? We would be talking today so As an extra note from us here in the show we as indigenous people. Well first and foremost where in support of the Wettin soon people and what is transpiring there which I'm now going to go into so that everybody is on the same page I hope but again we as indigenous people did not ask to be invaded. We did not ask for her quote. New Rules imposed upon us by people who who themselves decided to leave their homelands. Come here and decide that the already occupied lands here and in Canada just arbitrarily became theirs for the taking the laws today that we are all forced to live by our collective result of this forced occupation by settler colonialist it's important that today's descendants of the original settler colonial colonizers that they Understand the sacrifices that our people continue to make so that they may simply have a place to live our home forcibly became your home now we denounce the actions of the Canadian Royal Mounted Police and the actions also by the Antero Canadian police or excuse me the Ontario Provincial Police Yo. Pp their actions directed by Prime Minister. Justin Trudeau continues to make false public speeches of reconciliation with the first nations people of Canada but he demonstrated by directing the RCMP. Defend oil interests. Speak Clear about that. That's why if you've been following our facebook page and the articles that we've been sharing about the railroad blockade by the mohawks. You'll also see a police presence in those videos but it's more importantly it's more important than that. Even they've also been sent to the camp considered the gateway to the wet and Suden People's traditional territory they have torn down barriers erected at a bridge gutters the entrance way to the camp and the untouched land. Beyond make no mistake there presences not there to protect first nations people or to keep the peace there there again to get venture does action of putting oil interests over the will of the Wettin. Sutin people interrupt today for many brother what we see going on right now across the country and across the border the Canadian border where native lands are being desecrated and stolen and and people are being injured in some cases. Killed is the modern day version of what colonizers when they first came here. It's in the same context you're just looking at a modern day version of it. Yes they're already here but they're now starting to encroach on lands that they have no right to correct just like the head no right to the lands that were already occupied when they first set foot on the shores hundreds of years ago. So you're looking at a modern day version of what transpired. Four to five hundred years ago so in case people are wondering well you know this is new. This is only being going on for so many so many years. No it's not new. This is a continuation in a modern setting and later time of what transpired off land's hundreds of years ago so maybe that puts things in a context for little people for people a little bit more. Who might not have really understood what happened for five hundred years ago. Just look at what's happening now and you'll have a good idea the game. The game is the game the same. It's all about profit and land acquisition. Still but I want you guys understand something. Further earlier. I said quote the first nations people candidate close quote. I place ownership on the indigenous people. I in that sentence now. What you often hear is reverse. You normally hear candidates first nations and that's wrong an a point to this distinction because it's important and the mistake is often perpetuated by the mainstream media their peers well but on speaking mostly there because the influence millions of Canadians by incorrectly putting the emphasis on the country I then. Non Indigenous Peoples Second and indigenous people a distant third. There is a reason. The indigenous people farther north of us have chosen to by and large be referred to as first nations is because they like us here in the south where here I and have always been there. So what is the actual dispute over the Whitton suit and people's traditional territory? That's subjects was discussed last month on a Canadian. Television Program called the agenda with host Steve Pagan. The host helped the panel who he will introduce in this so with broken down into two segments for you K. Their bit long but if frames are dispute clear enough that I think that those of us outside of Canada can better understand. So here's part one until very recently many Canadians had never even heard of the whatsoever in traditional territory. Now suddenly talk of it is everywhere and the issues are many and complex particularly in legal terms as the conflict raises constitutional questions contractual problems even matters of criminal law here to help us. Untangle we welcome Michael Bryant Executive Director and General Counsel for the Canadian Civil Liberties Association is a former minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Attorney General of Ontario Ceremony and PHIL PARTNER AT O. K. T. law in Toronto and former chief of the Kuching first nation in northwestern Ontario Deborah McGregor Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Environmental Justice and associate professor at the whole law school and Tasha Kerrigan political commentator and CEO of a lipson public affairs. And we're very happy to have everybody alongside tonight for a very timely conversation about something we need to know a lot more about and to that end since we're we're talking about is a long way from the province of Ontario Sheldon. Can you help us out here by bringing up this information and we'll show everybody that the nation covers twenty two thousand square kilometers of land? This is in northwestern British Columbia Long Way away from where we are right now. The coastal gasoline pipeline path is. What's so controversial here? The project as its planned runs through about one hundred and ninety kilometres this land which the whatsoever and consider their own land the pipeline would run from Dawson Creek in the northeast corner down towards Prince George across to a planned. Lng liquefied natural gas export planned Kitimat. The start in camp has been the site of what Sautin resistance and we see all that. I hope I've described it. Well enough for people listening on podcast but if you are watching on television you see the map there of where we're at okay right back to first principles here. Deborah want to start with you. What is this dispute? Really all about to me. It's about a history of colonialism and the position and number of colonial upon indigenous peoples in Canada. We see playing out in this particular case and people trying to understand the like. I'm reluctant to call it. Division division between the elected leadership under the Indian act system versus the hereditary system of ten people and other indigenous peoples of course have their Attari systems also intact in Canada. So it's got a long historical background. None of which is top secret. A lot of it in the Royal Commission on Aboriginal People Truth and Reconciliation Commission Word Missing Promotion Cree so a lot of this already kind of understood in a lot of circles back. Maybe not emerging that way and in trying to understand like the deep seated roots of this particular conflict. I want to get everybody on this. Because I suspect they're very different interpretations about what this story is truly at. Its root all about Sarah. Want to pick up the story from there for you. What's this about. Well I mean we know that section thirty five is more than thirty five years old now and this is the recognition affirmation of operational treaty rights. And unfortunately it hasn't done the hard work that it's been promised to do for first nations inuit mateen and we are now seeing the impatience related to that. And I think that's but the mentally what's happening in Tainan Eggen and then the other protests that are coming into port waiting and I think that I mean I think we've been too comfortable thinking that there's patients here. I think that there's an impatience that we really. The Nation has to be mindful of going to feature in. If like nothing happens to actually sort out that you have to be complicated situation there will be less than that's patients. Michael Bryant a little over a decade ago. This responsibility right some time. How do you see the story? It's about relationships now as it was then when when this happened in Caledonia version of this happening or six nations professor Douglas Anderson. From University of Toronto was working with me. And now he he I any ideas I have that are are good are his and he and this is like a reverse caledonia so in that in six nations the the the actual fight was over lan between the federal government and and the First Nation. And in this case it's between the provincial crown and the first nation in Caledonia McCain. He wore it because the EP were involved in this case the P. R. involved. Another actually acting as provincial police. But the prime minister is wearing. But it ends up. But it's still about relationships in relationship so this reconciliation failures and and obviously a complete breakdown of relationships within the first within the first nations. And I it's right. I I understand why you're reluctant to say division because in fact it's about assumes like duality to it. I mean there are it is complicated and you know the the hereditary chiefs in the delegate Luke case they were the party and they were recognized as the party and so to suggest that they're not legitimate is wrong to suggest that the band council. It's not a legitimate is wrong to suggest that this is just a federal or provincial. Problem is wrong too so really. The biggest problem I think is that we don't have a place to take these. We don't have a place to take care of her comeback. Can you wear the attorney? General used to work in the attorney general toning pointless. It was posted for wash wash. It happened in the attorney. General's office was dealing with it in Ontario Attorney. General Yeah all right. Where do you come at the store? Some deprives you. I don't think we have that different perspective. On what fundamentally is at stake here. I totally agree it. As a governance issue is a relationship issue a governance issue in the sense of a larger picture to how private companies not just the crown deal with first nations and indigenous peoples because coastal gas will say look we got approval of twenty bad councils. Elected Councils We did consult and the register chiefs of a different perspective and say no. We were not consulted. We also have to give our stamp approval so it is at root of governance issue and to decide not only who represents interests of first nations indigenous peoples but the crown also settling these longstanding disputes because Dell did not establish title one of the failures of that decision or I. Guess maybe it was not within the purview. That decision was to say. Look you can admit oral evidence. You can seek formal title through negotiation with government or through subsequent court case. That didn't happen. And as a result there is no and you might disagree but the to recognize in launching the this is a specific titled because there's no treaties ABC over few That is one of the issues that is at stake here. That coastal gasket invoke. And say. Look you don't title. We don't have to talk to you. I lead the bigger picture votes to add. One element here is that it's also a question of where we take going forward because research development is something that some parts of indigenous society reject others embrace and that is the division you know. You don't want to necessarily focused on but even that's new has come out of this conversation then so I think that people have been mischaracterizing for four because this is what twenty two twenty three years ago by the Supreme Court cases. One Thousand Nine Hundred. Seventy Child Decision Nineteen Ninety One. And then there's a great quarterback he'll analysis that happens in ninety five. I believe so the interesting thing is the PC court of appeal learn judgements that are dealing with all the section thirty five issues. At first instance to two of the judges actually wanted to make because the fact that there was in fact aboriginal title wasn't affected right to self-government my advice. If I was ever Minister Benetton's once called me would be stuck from that. Start from there. The Court of Appeal went through the mountain of evidence through Delta Milk. Embiid make those findings so let me start that you help us with this though. There are clearly people who are confused is not the right word that they are looking for a greater understanding of how on the one hand the elected ban chiefs have one view on this which you know. In white slash settler culture would be considered the last word on things. Those who are elected get to decide and hereditary chiefs who are not elected but who also have a role to play and who are also considered among the deciders what their role is. Can we help us figure all that out? While the problem is the possession of the INDIANAP- for a community in a nation that has has kept their despite laws and and the Feast House. Which is where they make their decisions. Seeing legal in the nineteen fifties that those that nation has kept off independent both separate structures independent. I is an elected. Chief was also traditionally accepted into my community is also the voice of the traditional sort of consensus builder. As soon as I was. There's an inauguration ceremony so we had emerged in my community both sort of traditional structure council. So that's different so corporate cabinet. That doesn't know these things. Well that's it now Michael. When you had the job as it was then called Aboriginal Affairs Minister. Did you understand the a distinction? Between elected first nations chiefs that to happen to go share it with and also hereditary chiefs which was a separate thing entirely but were who who were equally legitimate or somewhat legitimate. I don't end depending on the community. At a given time one can be more legitimate than the other. So in six nations actually for a period of time the schone hereditary chiefs were seen as the voice on this and Alabama Council was administering basically decisions made by the wholeness schone chiefs but then today I think the band council would say the opposite is the case that they are in fact representing the community. And you'RE NOT GONNA get consensus on that you sometimes have hereditary chief sitting on band councils counselors so you know it's the point I guess. Is You know non-indigenous context. Sometimes you need to line up the regional government municipal government in the provincial governments. And what needs that here? Too One needs to try to get past to get consensus from all the assumption somehow. Is that if you don't get consensus from all well. Then the company has to do with their way or the government gets to do it their way and the only way to stop that from happening. What we're seeing right now. Some some version of a protest. Because that's the only way to exert the power right now that doesn't exist yet arguably legally so that's that's why we're at where we're at okay. So that last part is what is honestly key. Which is what we've kind of been talking about all along but on what we're GonNa talk more broadly about that relevant to a formation of a country. You just heard the gentleman say well. We can't seem to get consensus from everybody so we're GonNa do it our way. Ladies and gentlemen every major country that's been formed over time has done so at the expense of indigenous people because of that exact attitude the country. I then came business and corporate second so when he says and also the former chairwoman said the same thing when businesses just assume in looking at things in the context of modern times that they can just do something because they can't seem to get consensus from everybody that's inherently wrong because what they're doing is putting their interests ahead of what anybody thinks and so they can't get consensus which is not everybody agrees. They think they get to just say we're GONNA do it anyway. And this particular cases put a pipeline through UNSEE territory. It's never been touched. Never been developed. But the exclusionary exceptional witnessing people for homes by large. We'RE TALKING ABOUT LANDS. And if you've seen any videos you know how beautiful it is untouched. Never Been Atta shovel put to the ground or anything these Jag offs are like Damn tribes. They can't they can't seem to agree and we've got the backing of at least some of them in and the government so FM. The yeah brother Friday on the next one well they know the right thing to do to not run the pipeline through the territory that they know. That's the right thing to do but again. Greed and racism are the motivators here after the Indian people are GonNa put it through there and make our billions. Anyway that is the basic motivation for the pipelines actions. There's nothing there's nothing else to explain it. You know they can call it progress. They can call it. You know future development. They can call it. Whatever it was. You can put lipstick on a pig but it's still located so all right. Well let's drill down a little further into the extra legal dispute itself and also this discussion will transition into a bit about government to government consultation between first nations and the Canadian government specific to the wedding suit and people. So here's there's this part of it. How COMMON YOU DECIDE? Who GETS THIS QUESTION? How common is what we have just seen. Mainly a court ordered injunction which is not being adhered to and then essentially now all hell breaks loose may be a bit strong putting it but essentially. No one knows WHO's in charge. No one can decide who want to start off. You WanNA speak to the report on injunctions. Yeah we talk about the report. Okay so I think that one of the things that we forget about with. Haida nation is the reason not the duty to consult. Came out of Canadian. Law was because Canadian law was not serving folks who had strong claims so they had for example Sweden they. They're not jest. A property owner in the area there. The governor that's their claim self-government the entire twenty two thousand square kilometers. There the government. There let me just interject so ten to build onto that further. We're talking about people that have always been there meaning predating Canada. So they are the government period. GonNa make sure people understand that contact in the same is true here in the United States. They're saying they don't recognize the province of the federal government jurisdiction. They want to meet with the Prime Minister Connection Right. So I think that injunctions don't work in those situations because you have to feel like you're tourney to a separate jurisdiction so it's very difficult for the timing of the world to do that. Because they strongly believe in this idea of the relationship. Being strictly nation-to-nation using domestic courts of Canada is basically. You know it's like when I used to play checkers with my daughter. She makes all the rules. So we don't WanNa be in that situation and so I think that we're looking for an independent tribunal to deal with these things on that sovereign to sovereign basis but injunctions. We gotta remember that passed. Michael you know the tests for junctions if favors it does favor economic losses over war things. That are so complicated about ten years to resolve those who haven't seen that. This is what it looked like Sheldon Adelson. Some video here the ski. Rcmp arrest of a wetsuit matriarch. An attempt to as we say enforcing Johnson in your view what rule it seems like that. Play in the subsequent and I'm GonNA use language carefully here because some people have called them protesters and some people have called them land protectors however you want to characterize it. How much of that stems from that? When I when I see something like that yes really emotional too to see that are upholding their own laws. And that's what she's she's doing. Those laws have been there for thousands of years like they literally come from the From the land in a spirit of the land itself including the the non human world and and that obligation is so strong that it doesn't even really matter what anybody else is doing. They have to they. Have they have to do that? They have to? You can just protect him to land because the land is yourself. It's SORTA upholding who you are as a people expression of your identity and obligations to future generations into the land itself. So it's like there's actually it's probably too strong of a word to use like in their own laws and language expressing this. You don't have a choice. It's an obligation that you have to act on that. So that's when I see that that's what I see. She's she has that song because that's partly how long expressed and cheese and I cannot. Can I get you too? Can I get you to speak to the other view in this country? Which is a court made a decision in Canadian law illegitimate decision that can be enforced by local law enforcement earth before continuing. I understand what that the host San about a legitimate thing? Okay but I argue. It's not because the law of those lands pre date Canada and throwing this question to someone who used to work in the court system in in the in the in the government of Canada which is about the respond is it relevant to me because injunction was imposed based solely on Canadian law and not a hybrid of indigenous law. If you will okay it it. It's so early. Colonial based period and to not have a viewpoint expressed and as part of a decision made that did not include there was something people is not government to government by any stretch of the imagination. And that is why in my view that injunction is completely irrelevant and has no basis of enforcement. But yet you just heard them carry off matriarch. Here's a guest. Response Somewhat Defending Canada and their action in the sense end of story. Yeah it's not as black and white as that but I will speak to that because I think It is painful to watch because I believe the sincerity. Obviously this elder of this woman. Who believes that? She is defending win to analogize. Though I it's similar to either situations we've seen in Canada as well. I will say. For example. Are People strong religious base Jewish courts there are independent Jewish courts. People believe were Muslim belief. That law comes from God. Sharia will command them to do certain things. There are people who believe that they that there's a higher law than any country any land and it's it's diviner it's fumble and or whatnot We also seen in Quebec for example. The Quebecois Talk. Very frankly about the conquest of the English to the Quebecers even today. There's the dispute sometimes when the Quebec Charter of rights versus the Canadian Charter. Right you will find people in Quebec who don't accept the existence of Canada. They say you know we will continue to fight that within the sovereigntist movement and has been taken to political extremes. You will say of the Referendum in Quebec so it is not just first nations or indigenous people who feel that respect. Canada is not in some cases a legitimate entity and that is an opinion with the term. Saying they've been asking to me with the prime minister but in terms of time. I don't mean in terms of dealing with the engines of for example Quebec will say assault district separatist. Quebecer may say I don't accept that auto I tell about what to do. I'll meet with Ottawa. But we have our own sovereignty within our. I'm saying this simply because you want me to explain inside of you. View is that we have a territory. Canada you may disagree or not with your relationship with that but we have to live under one set of laws or we will not be able to move forward as a society with development with industry with infrastructure project. You and a lot of Canadians. I do believe you can fit self-government of first nations within that context. I believe Quebec can advance with that. But at a certain point one has to accept a basic premise of these laws apply equally and then we will discuss from there. No no janitor via large the very existence of that word and of the territory she spoke is illegal in and of itself as the United States. So so we're not arguing over semantics here. I don't know if you're still having brother but just so you know that's and when we talk about ending being pushed around by by federal power. How shall we say this is another power play by an entity that buying itself is illegal in many respects? You See I. I said this earlier white men with guns is the only reason there's compliance or die and we can. We can choose the sugar this or put lipstick on a pig tapes that but we just played an example. Rcmp shows up. They have guns they have. Kevlar vests on. They lady singing tribal elder offer land. We say no no more. The traditional carry the wet and certain people will remain intact by their standards. This will be bigger than standing rock if you follow that. Because at some point there will be bloodshed. Sadly and people are pointing back to comparing this to the crisis in Canada. Which was was which was off of job. The expansion of a fricking golf course. Ann cates not not white men with gun but white men would clubs and to pull up that expansion it required taking. Mohawk land to the question remains one. Does it end with us? It ends where there's no more and then they'll move on to another group within there is no end earlier and I'm sorry for these clips along but it's it's important for a point of context right along. I want you to hear from Justin Trudeau and his framing of that situation. Okay now what you this audio. You're about to hear from a town hall that he held more than a year ago. January two thousand nineteen and he responded to a nonindigenous woman who is voicing her support a witness suit and people at that time and called Trudeau out on his handling of that situation. So here's some of that exchange. It won't be necessary for me to play the whole thing but I just want you to get a sense of this. I don't have a question for you. Oh sorry because I don't think there's anything you can say at this point. I believe that the wetsuit and have tabled to their land. I believe that they've gone to delegate to demonstrate their inherent rights in title. I believe that the conflict that you're making it didn't at West helicopters flying overhead and paramilitary showing up with assault. Rifles is appalling. And so I'm more or less here to tell you that that shameful and you can't pretend that this is about rule of law oh by you know supporters. That's great but it's not about the rule of law because it's already been found in Delta. It's already been pretty clear. You say you're about communities and supporting their development and their investments. But how much money does it take for indigenous communities? Take this these colonial governments to court every time just to prove they already know. Which is the Canadian government. The provincial governments have no right to be doing what they're doing. Perhaps two generations of your sons will be apologizing later for what's happening today. I just wanted to consider that and that I. I don't believe that you're this sort of sunny ways prime minister when you legislated the post these back to work on your other violating indigenous peoples rights. You're you know you can put on a great facade here. I've heard more enough. People say entered the questioning. You're talking in circles. The discerning of the viewers argue are aware of this solidarity. Was Let certain thank you. I'm going to pause there. So you're clearly in support of indigenous people right. She also said because prior to this particular video and the audio he apparently was doing circle. Talk which is what politicians do right. Okay so here is how he chose to respond and you tell me if she's right or wrong. Thank you thank you for coming. Thank you for sharing perspective. And it's an extremely important point to that. Okay so this is townhall somewhere and you know so. We have a mixed audience right. We have some images people in the audience but by and large it is nine people that he's dressing. Stick around for my response. Okay thank you could be a snarky ass right okay. Because she chose to leave the room. Whatever generations and centuries Canada has failed in respecting the spirit and intent of the original treaties of the relationship that we were supposed to have with the original inhabitants of this land. It was supposed to be about partnership was supposed to be about shared stewardship. It was supposed to be about how we move forward. Together and generation after generation of Canadian leadership did not live up to that. And that's why over the past three years. We have made it a priority to repair that broken relationship or to begin the work of repairing that relationship in respect in partnership and on two levels first of all the level of the crown indigenous relationship which means empowering communities to be in control of their own destiny their own their own land to be able to way to be able to develop self-governing models a couple days ago auto is the opportunity to sit down with the self-governing nations in Canada. And we had an excellent conversation about the challenges. They're facing but also how successful they've been getting out from under the colonial relic. That is the Indian fact. We need to move beyond the ask. We need to make sure that people have opportunities to control their own destiny and build their future and that is what we're doing now the other right there. That is what we're doing. He said where how he tried to spend that to showing with no specifically presumably economic successes of he called himself governing groups really talking about tribes within the borders of Canada. I said that way. Kinda but doesn't give a largely. Non Indigenous audience specified. Thanks what successes. What are you talking about? 'cause you're using that as a basis for showing that. Canada is going in the direction of trying to fulfill. Its obligation under reconciliation right. Yeah there's there's an important thing that that people keep missing and he said it. It came out of the courses mouth in this case. The horses he mentioned you know. Efforts to I'm paraphrasing efforts to move together for a torch stewardship to move in a direction of joint blah blah blah. What he meant his. We're GONNA do it this way whether you want to do it or not. We'd like to do it without with or without you you know. That's that's what people keep missing. They he keeps throwing it out there and other leaders and other especially in this country do it too. They throw it out there and the light of we are you know trying to. We're doing this together now. I can guarantee if you go back and look at the history that he spoke of that. The nations have always been against the F- always momentum of the colonial colonizers. Excuse me I can guarantee. It hasn't been a hand in hand. Walking down on a sunny lane. Partnership could guarantee it no leader from Canada and no leader from this country. It's going to ever convince me that. The forward momentum that this government and the government and government Canada have have done was anything any nation has been okay with. You're not gonNA convince me of that. Their behaviors prove different words. Ring hollow their lives are louder than their behaviors and their smiles or crooked. And I would say this would yet somewhat of the joke but also to make a point. How do you talk both sides of the thing? It's like physically not possible but even on one side of your mouth. How do you possibly communicate effectively? It's much practice. I do. I get your point totally so and I'll just add this little caveat as well all right. Let's take the situation in standing rock for a moment okay and talking about pipeline route All right so pipeline comes in and it was originally scheduled to go into a close by Bismarck. North Dakota and Bismarck Resin has got open in my backyard and so and so go to access the bands and they look at their maps. And they rewrote the pipeline. Now here's Iran apart. No I'm sorry I let me let me let me let me finish my thought. They reroute the pipeline and they go approximately. I think boiled down to five hundred feet past the standing rock Sioux reservation and sending rocks to of course objected to that as well in made it very very clear that all of North Dakota they consider their traditional territory and trump backing and everything else the pipeline company said it will too bad so sad were putting it in any way the arguments also that La- standing rock made or that part of the pipeline route. Put it underneath. Lake ally the only water source and we know because the earth shifts in this is what causes These natural disasters such as earthquakes. The earth chefs and what always inevitably happens. Are One of two things. There are shifts. Pipes break they leak or they just get old and they leak. Okay the bottom line. Is They leak right? And so the argument of course was that you're going to affect the only water source that we have in the area again. The answer too bad so sad would did it anyway and drill horizontally underneath the lake. Now let's go back over the last point now. Let's go back to the original reason. Bismarck North Dakota didn't want the pipeline near their town why like our water source it's documented. But that was response and absolutely okay so we turn our attention over to the Whitney suit and people and this particular pipeline now if look at the map where their territory is on the map okay. This damn thing goes slammed through the middle of the territory. And today I have not seen any projection whatsoever from coastal link of trying to reroute it. And you know why they don't WanNa rerouted cost affect my pocketbook. I only want to spend the money when I need spend it the way I wanNA spend it. And that's that that's their attitude. Screw it if it's going to affect the water source skirt if it's going to go through Indian territory land. Screw it if it's GONNA go buy somebody's town in you know. The town is up in arms about it they close. We need progress in this country. We are going to get our way. That is their attitude. And until people I guess at this point the way I see it not that I want advocate this but until people put their lives on the line and some have by the way the called land vendors the call water protectors and abandoned large but not but not exclusively so indigenous people until more people put their lives on the line. He's governments are gonNA continue to say okay so let me quickly conclude brother. I will turn the MIC over to you. Okay promise so again. This is about power money. And here's the thing to keep in mind more specifically to our Canadian listeners. Right the pipeline that we're talking about there with transport fraught natural gas from northern bidder. British Columbia approximately six hundred and seventy kilometers to the coastline. Or A FORTY BILLION DOLLAR PRIVATE ELLEN G facility which is also apparently been said that is going to be the largest private sector investment in the country's history is planned to be constructed there and coastal blink gas pipeline is going to carry product tha that facility process it and send it out of your country. Canadians are not going to benefit. Whatsoever by this pipeline. Outside of temporary jobs which will eventually end. It is true of most pipeline projects folks and they plan to do this which is complete support which is why he and the Canadian government's talk of reconciliation is truly empty and meaningless. Because Bama that's behavior I avoided using the words that I really wanNA use again whether it be in and with an S. bull hockey. Yes or I think. What are those flowers and chat horse horses so listening getting back to the code? The the Mucketty mucks in that area complained that they did want the pipeline running through their their their fair sittings had a fear that it was going to contaminate their water. What do they think do they believe? Or and where do they believe their water comes from in the first place comes from the same aquifer that the standing rock Sioux are fighting to protect comes from the very same aquifer. Do they believe that? There's a sheet of metal that runs right now through the earth and the divides the water to that. Says Mucketty mucks water from North Dakota and other people's Water? Now that's not what happens. They get their water from the same offer. So in fact they're they're complaints rang hollow. They won't even valid complaints. So you see running through Indian territory or Indian territory had nothing to do with protecting the monkey much water supply and I had everything to do with an element of racism through the Indian territory. We don't care that's basically what that was about. Here's something that people aware of with with the natural gas that whole natural gas thing. It's all about money period. I follow the stock market and the shakers and movers within comedies. And the big push right now is in the shipping industry to build storage containers ships to hold natural gas right now. They're literally hundreds of ships sitting in the Persian Gulf full of natural gas hundreds. There's a big push right now of stocks. These these facilities are shipping. Shipping is to build these storage containers. The stocks are way up way up. So here's the push. Natural gas is going to become the next big commodities boom as far as energy is concerned because oil is going to run out at some point. It's a matter of fact it's already starting to do that. So when oil goes kaput you've got literally trillions of gallons of natural gas sitting offshore to be ready for distribution so all of this gas going out of the country. It's true it's going out of the country to be held at storage facilities to be come the next energy boom. That's what people need to understand that. That's the reason behind some of this in it's all about it's all about money. It's all about money. Come Hell and high water no matter who they're gonNA try to get this natural gas out to the storage facilities. We did a breakdown and I. It was episode. Nine Zinke was still in office. We played some audio from the quote Unquote Tribal Energy Summit. May of that year And they were talking about how important China is to the energy market and that for tribes that WANNA get into development of fossil fuel based energy. Now's the time made a big push about it. Big Republican backing and some of the tribes in. We're interested and that's their decision. I'm not faulting them if they want to go into or continue to be in that business. That's that's that's completely you know their decision but the country has a whole new understand that much of the and that energy development doesn't benefit the country as debut solid out now if it's true that these containers are being held offshore and some call it neutral location which they find laughable too with the intent to sell it back to these countries. Well think about how that sounds so if it was if it was in essence extracted from within a particular country it shipped out out to some neutral point and then sold back to place of origin. What what sense does that make? Sound familiar soundlessly Mesler. Water thing does so. Yeah keep that in mind all right brother so now you know what time it is right I do. I do back and with Anna. Proudly my coffee brother and I had to step away from the microphone for a few. Thank you thank you I tell you it was. There was so much so much to choose from in this. This cat this segment I. I was just inundated with what stuff that had to do with racism in this day and age. Still as I've said and belabored so many times over so many episodes it's simple just stop. Is it an addiction now? It's not an addiction. It's a way of life. Racism is a way of life for a lot of people just stop. This one was particularly interesting because of its content and the headline reads College Recruiter. Fired for lining students up by skin. Color and nappy hair. This is a quote from one of the students. He told US TO LINE UP. Nappy hair on the back. Said one of the witnesses. This comes to us from John Harwood Hayward I'm sorry for believe it or not. Abc News Dot go dot Com and it reads college. Recruiter hasn't been fired after controversial visit to a prestigious high school after he asked students to lineup based on the color of their skin complexion and by who had the and quotes nattiest hair. The incident occurred when a college recruiter. From Oklahoma Erie comes Christian University visited Harding Charter Preparatory School in Oklahoma City Oklahoma and allegedly told that students it was time to play in quotes a little game according to ABC News is rally station. Deputy the quoting he barely talked about the school itself and quote said Real Brown student. Who was part of the exercise quoting once again I could hardly could already see through his BS. Basically he wasn't really knowledgeable about how to speak to people even in a diverse school in quote the recruiter. Who is white? Then ask behind school juniors and attendance to self organize into a lineup from dark skin complexion to the lightest skin complexion complexion. Excuse me it didn't stop there quoting. He told US TO LINE UP N- happiest hair in the back and the straightest hair in the front end quote said Corey. Todd another student who was also at the assembly quoting again. This is when I felt uncomfortable. I was like okay. This isn't right. In quote Brown continued. The students weren't the only ones who were offended. Coating teachers let said Todd quoting again. They were crying and they were offended. Their faces just disgusted. I know they had a talk with him after like quoting again. That's not okay. Oklahoma Christian University took swift action against the recruiter. Once they learned of the incident according to a statement released by the school okay. Here's here's the old. We don't condone this Blah Blah Blah quoting the OC administration's Council. Who visited hiding charter? Preparatory Academy on Monday is no longer and Oklahoma Christian University employees in quote the statement. Read quoting again also. The admissions leadership did not approve of the inappropriate activity in advance and has communicated closely with hiding administration since the visit Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah. They recruiter has not been identified by either harding charter preparatory school or Oklahoma Christian University. Why not put his name out there? Harding's charter president principle. Excuse me Stephen Stefanik also released a statement saying the school condemns their recruiters behavior. Why didn't you vet fool before he came to the school? Because that's work. Yeah quoting our community from its inception has valued diversity inclusion and a safe and supportive learning environment that we will continue to do so and quote the statement read and another quote. This is just horrible. Said Todd quoting again. I hope it's a wake up call because many people at the school need to hear how we feel and quote and I agree wholeheartedly. It just doesn't it just doesn't end. It's like a bad case of diarrhea. It just doesn't end from our next article like I said there were so many. I I had a flip a coin on some of these. Truly the flip. A coin on some of these black owned businesses featured entirely at inundated with racist reviews trust pilot website where consumer reviews are posted said Monday. It was suspending reviews on the page. Where the honeypot? While it investigates comes to us by way of Doha Mandani Might Man Donny for NBC NBC. News Dot Com. A black owned business was subjected to a wave of negative reviews after the community's founder was featured in an ad for target where she said she hoped hurt success paved the way for black girls thing. Wrong that statement. I have airtight. Queued up our go ahead. Please okay so hopefully it should come through so here is the ABC by targeting sewing preface. That so is an ad. But it's the focus of the article. My name is Dixon the founder of honey in the beginning. It wasn't easy to start his company and there was a lot of times that it almost didn't happen. If target didn't take a chance on us we wouldn't be in other retailers. That were intimate. But what's really dope is. They helped us the product line. The packaging really changed my life. The reason why so important for honey pot to do well if so the next black there that comes up with a great idea. She could have a better opportunity. That means a lot to me. That's the ad there wasn't anything racist in that AD at all. Or in my opinion exclusionary nothing anything was inclusionary. The article goes on to read. Although the AD was originally released in early February of Swarm of people let negative reviews for the company on Monday. Morning I'm sorry. Who are the people? Yeah I wish I wish. Many of the one-star reviews left on customer. I'm sorry consumer review website. Trust pilot accused Dixon anti of discriminating. We go discriminating against white people. I I WANNA hear I wanNA HEAR. I WanNa hear the argument okay. Are White people disenfranchised by what you just heard exactly? Here's one comment quoting boycott the honeypot company and Target Racist White People. Hating comments are not going to be tolerated and quote one reviewer wrote. Did anyone hear anything about lately? Saying anything about hating white people. Should I play it again? Please okay well. My name is Dickson founder pop in the beginning. It wasn't easy to start this company and there was a lot of times that it almost didn't happen. If target didn't take the chance on us we wouldn't be all the retailers that we're in today but what's really helped us with the product line the packaging. They really changed my life. The reason why it's so important for honey. It's so the next black girl that comes up with the idea. She could have a better opportunity. That means a lot to me. I just realized why they think it's racist one. They think it's racist because there's so many black people at it. Oh God lab and then and then I guess this is the bad things. There's actually one white girl racist or here's here's here's the common fallacy as well reverse reverse racism that cracks me up. The article goes on said. Another reveal accused Dixon of fueling racism and wrote that. And I quote she she make the statement for the next black girl. Why should the color of the skin matter totally racist and inappropriate in quote so by the way? Because I know you guys. It's a podcast right and you can't hear the you can't see the the visuals right. It's showing her walking with family members. Or maybe maybe just men Other employees of her company to be exact walking up to a single end cap in Cap. Looks like all right. It's just you come to the end of an aisle right and they have products on the very end of it and that's her hunting pot this one tap and they're losing their frigging minds over that because there's three black people standing in front of an accomplishment. That's why I'm upset. And that's what it's all about. It's all about accomplishment haters. Don't want to see people of color accomplish anything. They don't want to see success now. Let me kick their ass a little bit more. If that's racist you guys need to me. I want you to turn that vented anger a NBC and Tell Them Shutdown. Shark tank the television show because apparently that's racist to. Oh my goodness they actually elevate. Black Company on companies owned by black people white people agent people through but now. Where are you know you get upset at target because they highlighted who a successful black entrepreneur? Get over yourselves. That's Beth wrote the. Omg people need to get themselves that it's not just one. It's not racist to be want to what could be a role model for young black girls right. Bet That's not racist not at all not in the least so the rest of this short piece. What some some comments will be in the show notes. It's just amazing at the level of racism that continues and just just stop. There's no need for it. There's no need for it. No Hey white. Commoners took appropriate. Okay we need to send Kudos along companies to thank you target. Absolutely thank you very much for making making that late. Ladies Dream Reality Thank you very much targeting yes. I use the company's name target accusers of looking for sponsorship. By if it helps all right in other news on this one kind of touched a with me times to yes one. Because I'm a veteran and not necessarily in this order in too because I'm a native native I and bedroom second but again this touched a nerve with me too. I'm just GONNA go into the article and it's a lengthy article but we'll talk about it as we as we go through. The article reads graves of. Us Veterans to be dug up for fool in the White House. My words border wall and this comes to us by way of Jack Thompson Thomas. Excuse me Jake Thomas. J Thomas for Indian country today and the article is from the intellectual. The intellectual EST veterans of World War One World War Two and the Korean War war or buried envy. Eli Jackson Cemetery in Texas. Now we've reported on this the cemetery before I think a couple of years ago. If I'm not mistaken now is it was. It was sooner than that. This was by. Trump will go ahead as you were we. We provided a little bit of history on the Jackson Cemetery. Yup Right and dog Oh county. Texas residents are fighting to protect the graves of veterans under threat by the fool in the White House. My words border wall according to Local News Station K. The TV the Jackson cemeteries the First Resting Place of veterans of both world wars as well as the Korean War but the fool in the White House. It's my words administration wants to have those graves moved in order to make way for the proposed area along the southern. Us border others buried than cemetery which is considered sacred by local natives include Fritz freed slaves and native ancestors what are the individuals opposing. The government's planned intrusion part of a local labor band could tribe tocade. Ltv quoting when you take people out of the ground. You're killing them again in court quoting once again. We're going to protect this land. We're going to protect this sacred site and quote. He said according to the news report. Us Customs and Border Protection amounts earlier. This that buzz. It was awarded three hundred and four million three hundred and four million six hundred thousand contract to build eleven miles of border wall in the dog. Hit it all go. County but Democratic leaders are determined to protect the grades from exclamation. Cbcp said in a statement that it would avoid the cemetery but cave eeo TV doubted that no legal protections have been passed the Department of Homeland Security has waived here comes twenty eight federal laws including the native American Graves. Act in order to make the full in the White House. It's border my word. Border Wall happen quoting. You're supposed to respect people. Even after death and quote the tribesmen said so. They made sure that they waived twenty eight important. Federal laws to make this piece of crap a reality radio report. We reported on on that. You know they had the did they dug deep to look at the real act To to to so call justify this okay used it more than once. Let me let me give you another one here. This was through. Nbc News Make sure I've got the date right. Well yeah this is very recent how `bout February twelfth here ancient native American burial site blasted for trump border wall. Construction crews have been blasting the hillside at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument in Arizona for sections of the federal government's barrier and of course we're talking about The HANO automation. This article was by Eric. Ortiz that says red lettered signs warning of blasting began appearing all over the past week at organ pipe. Cactus national monument a remote desert region and southwestern Arizona bordered by Mexico to the south and a native American reservation to the East crews have been blasting the hillside while estimators and backhoes clear a path for the towering sections of border wall fast tracked by the trump administration pace that pace that has environmental groups. Worried that sacred burial sites and in central land are at risk of being irreversibly harmed since nineteen seventy six hundred sixteen square mile park home to more than two dozen unique species of cactus and countless rides wildlife. I've been recognized as a on Second. Ill Ecological preserve on. Seco- stands war. You guys really quick. I know it's tied to title. Un resolution. I'm sorry I don't have it in front of me but let's see it. Looks like there's tons of videos on his article which can try to queue up. That's the that's the article where they bulldoze the Swirl or Cactus Cactus yes which are protected under federal law correct but it but it's but it's also as parts of it that are tied to two hundred hundred nations. Burial site includes okay and so Let me see here some video if I can get this to play. I said it before and I'll say it again. Walls work a milestone for the trump administration. One hundred miles of new walls built on the southwest border but not without protests focus now the Oregon Pike Cactus National Monument West of the border-crossing Louisville explosives are reportedly used to clear the way for a border wall through Monument Hill. We verified that the wall builder is blowing up the mountain. Us Customs and Border Protection Confirms Construction. Contractors have begun controlled blasting in preparation for new Border Wall System. Construction the control blasting is targeted and we'll continue intermittently for the rest of the month but sacred tribal burial sites libere wreck in the walls path. The ultimate nation as opposed president. Trump's wall from the start chairman. Ned Norris Jr. says the feds are ignoring his tribe federal agencies have very clear tribal policies mandating that they engage in meaningful consultations whenever action significantly affects. Indian lands before taking such an action meaningful consultations have not been held. We verified that the trump administration can bulldoze most objections. Thanks to an obscure law. It's the fifteen year old real idea. Act The homeland. Security secretary can waive all laws including travel consultation that get in the way of building a border wall. The trump administration has waived up to three dozen laws to build the wall. So there you go. And that's what we've reported on at least two other on two other occasions relooked itself. Yeah the real idea and We gave you guys specifically in that. Act where it's literally less than a paragraph literally less than a paragraph that says that they can waive any objection power Talk about the lie. That is America Central. Are there for that now. Let's talk about the the walls work statement. They don't work very well in the window. The more they don't work very well when you can take a five dollar ladder. That's recently smugglers. Did and scale them. So we'll good. Are they rhetorical question? But you still have to ask yourself because of the amount of money your money folks those taxes. Which are your money. That's being spent? That isn't going to other programs. Need even the military of false protection. Because what you haven't heard is how much money is being spent on beacon up border patrol. It is being if if there is an increase. Assure isn't being emphasized in any way shape or form a dig. I'm sure I can find real figures but it should be front and center but it's not you here is ignore. The wailing in ignore ladders said a bad word. You guys get we. We assume you get to make a change in government in November. But that's also good transition. I think brother to talk about another post that you made on facebook which I need to get to really quick. They've been quite controversial this week. You've been busy boy as I'm waiting for face bag to lowered. Say Pick One. There's there's a number a number of them related to the border. South posted a video of the border patrol from two years ago. Mowing down at the hotel on tribal citizen never saw that one had wanted you guys to see. I let it go. Yeah we're always prepared. Are you looking for the video? No here it is all right but in the interests of public as a public service. We've alluded to this on several occasions and gave dug up more actual proof and we talked about the Democratic National Committee. Some call it corporation as well and we played some examples of common. Refrigerators here if you're Progressive Democrat. What we call either elite Democrats Corporate Democrats or establishment Democrats. Okay and we'd play clips her. We provided you some deconstruction from the Young Turks leading progressive movement in this country and we've continued to tell you that the DNC and the RNC are private organizations with no connection whatsoever to the United States federal government or the election of which okay and so on May second of two thousand seventeen independent voter newest published an article entitled DNC to court. We are a private corporation with no obligation to follow our rules. Article here goes on to say a federal judge dismissed the DNC lawsuit on on August. Twenty eighth the court recognized that the DNC treated voters unfairly. This is referring to their behavior in two thousand sixteen but they also ruled that the DNC has the private corporation. Therefore voters cannot protect their rights by turning to the courts So you see this was a prelude to two thousand. Twenty voters chose to wage lawsuits contesting election results. So part of the determination read as follows to the extent plaintiffs wish to air their general grievances with the DNC or its candidate selection process. There redress is through the ballot box. The DNC's is internal workings or their right of free speech. Not Through Judiciary close quote gentlemen. This is as bad as the other case that empowered corporations calling them equal to the general public citizens united case. It's called. The article goes on here to say rather than reflecting on the consternation every day voters are having over. The conduct of the Democratic presidential primary. The Democratic National Committee is doubling down on the assertion that the primary election belongs to the people who control the party. I AKA letter elite Democrats Corporate Democrats and the list goes on and here you. You forgot to important words there. We read that sense again please. Rather than reflecting on the consternation everyday voters are having over the conduct of the Democratic presidential primary. The Democratic National Committee is doubling down on the question that the primary election belongs to the people who control the party. And here's the rest of it to words. Not Voters the habit so for those of us that are backing Bernie Sanders. Your radar should be way up right now because we just completed the first Super Tuesday. And what did we see transpire? People gets out of the race. Amy clubbed jar gets out of the race later. Elizabeth Warren got out of the race Bloomberg Bloomberg got out of the race blew me Char. Budi have all endorsed Joe Biden also better. If it is backed Biden all Polish moment Democrats laden jobs all trying to get you to believe that they are moderate Democrats and that they will put things back to normal now. Let's define no