18 Episode results for "Department Of Elementary And Secondary Education"

State Education Leaders Issue Guidance On How Schools Could Reopen This Fall

Radio Boston

19:11 min | 1 year ago

State Education Leaders Issue Guidance On How Schools Could Reopen This Fall

"The State's Department of Elementary and Secondary Education released guidance today on how schools could reopen this fall, and it includes a lot of things you might expect having teachers and students where facemask spacing desks at least three feet apart and keeping students in the same group throughout the school day. But there are still some unanswered questions joining us now to help answer. Some of those questions is Jeff Riley who's the commissioner of the Education Department. Commissioner Riley thanks so much for joining us today. So I want to start by acknowledging. You had a pretty tough balancing act here. You're trying to weigh public health and safety concerns with concerns about students, academic and emotional wellbeing Some curious as you were forming this plan. What are some of the most important factors you were thinking about? You know for us. The key I think was the safety of our students and teachers as we saw to go back, and we kind of researched and really enlisted the best medical people we can find to help us think through what are the best actions we can take to make school safe when we do return. So speaking of medical experts I know you got a letter from the Massachusetts chapter of the American. Academy of Pediatrics, really encouraging students to go back to in classroom learning in the fall they're especially concerned with children who rely on additional services, school supplies like counseling services or food supplements, things like that and they're also concerned that remote learning kind of exacerbates the achievement disparities across income levels racial groups did you? What did you make of that letter? Jeff response to some of those concerns. Yeah I. Think we were grateful for the endorsement from the incoming president of the Pediatric Association in Massachusetts They believe he believes, and their association believes that kids should go back to school. There are costs associated with kids being out of school and we've seen some of those. We understand this food. Insecurity is trauma mental health issues. There's all the racial issues. Issues that have come up that school would be a good place for teachers to kind of work on helping students process that information. So they're you know they're? They're certainly on a lot of reasons to go back to school and at the same time. We recognize that we want to do so in a way. That's you know as safe as completely pulsing. So. There are concerns that just being closed for the the few months that schools were closed this past term that basically some students could be up to a year behind in terms of of where they would be education wise that study that was published by The New York Times. Do you have any specific approaches to catching those students up that that might have fallen behind during this period of closure? Yes, we do I mean what I would say is first and foremost. I don't think anyone believes that. Any type of remote learning can ever replace What happens an in person instruction We just don't think it's comparable with that, said We're not exactly sure what the gaps will be. We do think that there will be learning loss, and we do need to kind of a sort that out and assess that in our students. There have been some who have said that. We need to go to assessment in the first week of school and I've said no I think we need to get our kids back into the routine of learning and focus on their social emotional health in the beginning. But there will be a time and district's always do this in the first month. Where they kind of assess where students are functioning, and at that point will really have a better idea of what the learning losses and where it is, and then when we talk about how to remediate that we've put out a multi-million dollar grant program for districts that are interested both in the summer, and over the vacations to work with students who have fallen behind. So. You talk about concerns. Bringing kids back to the classroom MASSINC. Polling group recently did a poll kind of looking at different groups of parents, and how they are thinking about returning to school in the fall. And there was some pretty staggering numbers in terms of black and Latino. Parents of K. Twelve K through twelve students Basically sixty nine percents of white parents, either felt very or somewhat confident in sending their kids back to school, but just forty eight percent of black parents, forty four percent of Latino. Parents feel the same way. I am struck by the fact that those are the same racial groups that have been hit. Disproportionately by the pandemic. What would you say to? Some of those parents who are feeling those concerns right now? Well. I mean look. I WanNa be clear our parents. We respect their decisions and their choices on their children schooling, and so we understand there are concerns, and we're going to be sympathetic to those and work with parents as schools open on what they choose to do. I. DO think that we have seen variation across the state in communities. They met hit hard and some others that haven't and so the question for me is. How do we provide additional supports to those districts that have been hit the hardest and or those districts that have been historically changed? To make sure that they get the. Resources that they need a technical financial. Computer devices such so that we can get out so we can make it as fair as possible and at the same time you know today. I, think was the first day we saw the medical community. Stand up and say we do think going back to school as the way to go, and so you know we're going to let parents make their decisions on. What they think is best for their children. We're going to try to do is make sure that the sense of equity and fairness. Across our communities. You mentioned financial is one of the concerns obviously anytime. You're talking about schools that are often asked to do a lot on a shoestring budget We actually spoke with Joseph Sawyer Superintendent of Shrewsbury public schools. And he said he's confident. In in the research that the state has done in consulting with public health experts, but basically the challenge is figuring out how to afford everything on this pretty condensed time line. Here's a little bit of what he said. If you've had a lot of experience with it. If you've seen your family members, your neighbor, neighbors go through the symptoms actually speed. Of Mass Massinc polling group, looking for Joseph Sawyer four forget who four from controlling challenges remote broadcasts bear with its both trying to plan for doing school a away that we've never done before at the same time with huge question marks about the amount of funding that will have not knowing the level of staffing will have to be able to execute on the kind of planning and. Work that will need to happen to come back to school in the fall, is it the most complex worked at school administered dot in their career. So I understand commissioner that you wanted to leave things open so that districts would have flexibility to do what they feel is right for their district but in terms of funding What can you tell schools who are looking at hey? The state has a potentially four billion dollar shortfall in the budget We know that Gateway Community for example get an extra two hundred seventeen million dollars this year alone. What are you? Worried that the funding to establish these new protocols just isn't going to be there. Well. It's certainly something that we have to kind of pressure test. What I would say is what we know is this. The Department of Education applied for and received a federal money almost two hundred million dollars that we sent out. To districts are they're eligible to apply for those dollars, and it's based on a title one formula so essentially the poor communities get more money today. In addition to that the governor announced an additional two hundred million dollars are for districts to get even more money. Because I think, there is a recognition that to. Bring School's back under the new medical kind of editions or parameters. Cost money now the heart and what we don't know right now is will there be a four stimulus package from the federal government, and what will the funding look like in Massachusetts and because we don't know, and and because we probably won't know until. July or August Steven and maybe even beyond that what we've done at the department has said be prepared for all contingencies be prepared for a remote learning, be prepared for a hybrid model and be prepared for an in person model with these medical grammars. But what I think is an advocate for the educational community We need to kind of really stand tall and say that there are funds that are going to be needed. To do this safely and to do it well. Yeah I think I. I know some activists in the state of asked if if you're willing to dip into the about three and a half billion dollar rainy day fund. Is that something the state's thinking about? If the federal government doesn't come through, so you know I don't want to speak for the administration. On the Department of Education, but I think they'll look at everything. Given the financial situation and I, think a lot of people now are waiting to see what the federal government is going to do with this fourth stimulus package or not, so I think that will be kind of a tipping point until then you know the best we can do as you know. We've been able to get additional dollars for the schools, and we can plan for a variety of contingencies so that we can get the best possible outcome. So I want to come back to something you said about preparing. Basically all contingencies understand. We don't know what things are going to look like in the fall but from a teacher's perspective, that obviously presents a pretty big challenge I wanNA play a little bit of sound here from Jo Ellen. PERSAD include an inclusion in moderate disabilities. Physics teacher at Park Technical Vocational High School talking about kind of what that means for teachers on the ground. That is so much work to now have to plan for online learning as well as in person learning. The idea, these two things like. Oh, just record your lessons oh just. That that is indicative that you are not a teacher. That's not what you really need to do to engage students online. So. I, actually a former high school teacher myself and I totally can understand where Joanna's coming from there. You would present a lesson plan totally differently if you're connecting remotely versus if you're in the classroom. So what do you make of the fact that you're asking teachers to basically prepare to lesson plans as a coach the fall? So I. Don't think that's exactly what's happening. What we're what we're looking to do right now is to say. We don't have control over the trajectory of the virus. We're not exactly sure. If, we're going to have a second spike or not in the fall, and so at the end of the day we have to be ready for all contingencies now what I think the teacher is speaking to and as a former employee at Madison Park when I would say as you know, we have to be smart about how we figure this out and in person, learning is obviously probably the most desirable possibility, but if you do hybrid learning. What we need to do is minimize the extra. Effort could on teachers by doing that now. You could do that in several ways you could use teachers that have underlying medical conditions were over a certain age who may not be? Able to come back into the classroom and put them on the online version of that. You we we are in the process of looking at learning management platform, which is a computer based program, which is more student self directed and so there's just different opportunities to look at it now. The live streaming option is also a possibility right if you're teaching a class of fifteen kids, this fifteen of your other kids sitting at home, watching the lesson online. That's a possibility that some districts have done There are some complications that come with that, but I think there's. Ways to sort out the issues and we just have to be very thoughtful about how we do it. Again I understand the leaving options open to districts is done out of a sense of letting them kind of control. What's best for their situation? I am wondering if you have any concerns that some districts either won't fall. The guidelines don't have the resources to follow the guidelines and therefore are putting their staff and students more at risk than others. Well what we're. What we're saying right now is we have turned out. Guidance has specific. Medical parameters done by experts in the medical field. In Boston, which is you know Boston University Guard Massachusetts as you know. a leading medical of place in the in the world, and we're asking people to kind of feasability test. What in-person learning could look like and so? We're GONNA get more of that information in the next several weeks to see you know. Can districts do this or not? What does it look like some districts might be able. Able to do it without making any changes to their schedules, some districts might need to stand up a few extra classrooms to reduce class size, and then some districts that might have to do something different because Maybe the class sizes are large, or what have you and so what we need to do is have schools and districts do this feasibility testing given these new medical grandmothers, and then we'll really have a better sense of one as possible. I'm glad you mentioned class size because I think that's something. Obviously, some district's had expressed concern over. But also something that that summer surprised. There wasn't some sort of guidance in terms of of class sizes Why did you guys decide not to include that in the plan? Just done differently right? It's it's not done by specific number. It's done by specific distance so what we said was. We want our districts and schools to aim for six feet of distancing, but no less than three feet. And so it's that three foot number which will determine what class sizes can be, and it'll be based on the size of the classroom so obviously larger classrooms get old more students than smaller ones won't fewer, but that is kind of the individual. School district work that needs to take place so that disres- in schools can understand what is feasible or not. Are. You concerned at all about the timeline in doing so I mean. We're looking in only a few months before September. It's pretty tight to get ready for the school year anyway and now we have all these additional challenges. Now I think you know the superintendents and principals really kind of risen to the challenge around this feasibility study and And I think that they're going to be able to turn that around relatively quickly. and with that said you know the summer is approaching. I know it seems like the school year has just ended, but the the new school year starts quickly and so there is work to be done and. You know we're going to endeavor to do it. I'm curious in terms of input. How much you've heard from parents as you've been formulating this plan. the MASSINC. Polling Group survey that I mentioned found that almost seventy percent of parents say they haven't been asked for input on on reopening. Do you wish that there had been more parental involvement, and and is there a way that could have been done or do you feel that that you've adequately heard from the population? So we at the state of heard a lot from parents. On a variety of issues, perhaps the one that's we've heard most often is about complex special needs. Parents who want their kids back in school because their kids have been regressing significantly by not having the services they get at the school. with that said we've put in our guidance. Kind of a requirement that that districts in schools reach out multiple times to families over the summer to get a sense of where they're at. And and connect with them. Make sure they have updated information from families and really make sure that they are staying in touch with them. Because there is, there was some concern that not every district has been staying robustly in touch with their families throughout the the outbreak. Yeah Commissioner Rally as as were wanting to close here. I want to ask you as we've been having lots of conversations over the last few weeks. Something that that is kind of been present through. All of them is our national reckoning with racial inequity. And I'm wondering if you see this as a moment to potentially make major changes or reforms to either curriculum, or what schooling looks like. How are you thinking about that in this moment? So, equity has been a has been one of the top priority of the department since I took over a couple of years ago. We have a real focus inside of the department on improving the diversity amongst our teachers and principals and superintendents right now we know. Forty, percent of our students are students of color, but only eight percent of our teachers are, and we knew we need to do better. The research is clear that students who see someone that looks like them are more likely to do better academically in high school and more likely have better life outcomes, and yet we are behind on really diversifying our workforce at the same time we recognize that kids have a lot of questions right and there's been. Heightened anxiety amongst everyone in the country, and we think that schools are the place where I mean I think in Massachusetts. We have the best teachers in the country and I think that our kids would benefit by having them at the head of the glass, leading some of these discussions, some of which may involve by the way. How are we reflecting? Offices in our curriculum. So that disparity that you outlined is pretty staggering Do you have any specific steps I? mean I understand everybody's thinking and talking about how to increase diversity, but do you have specific steps that that You'd like to see or that. You recommend for districts across the state so. You know I did some of this work in my previous role and Lawrence, where we were able to triple the number of Latino teachers and a five year period and we were able to do that because we're able to. Kind of track are high school graduates who went to college ring them back offer them things like signing bonuses tuition reimbursement. We put them in. Something called the nocco program, which is amazing mortgage program where no points, no closing costs, and if your average person. Person has getting a mortgage rate for four percent today we were getting our young teachers mortgage rate for like one or two percent and so we were able to kind of rebuild our middle class and Lawrence by bringing our students back, and they were getting mortgages that were significantly cheaper than what they had to pay Lawrence for rent, and so I think there are suite of services and doucments that we can make to try to improve the diversity our teacher corps. That's. Commissioner marched. No. That's okay I appreciate it. I think something to chew on there. That's Jeff Riley Commissioner of early and Secondary Education Commissioner Rally. Thanks so much for the time today. Thanks for having me.

Massachusetts Commissioner commissioner Jeff Riley federal government Department of Elementary and S Lawrence Joseph Sawyer Department of Education Education Department Academy of Pediatrics Park Technical Vocational High school teacher Shrewsbury public schools president Boston Pediatric Association dot
How We Teach US History

Radio Boston

19:19 min | 9 months ago

How We Teach US History

"President trump recently pledged to sign an executive order creating quote the seventeen, seventy, six commission and quote which he says will promote more patriotic education. He also announced at the National Endowment for the humanities has awarded a grant to fund the creation of a pro. American curriculum here he is explaining that decision at excuse me a constitution day event last month critical race theory. To Sixteen nineteen project. And the crusade against American history is toxic propaganda. Ideological poison. that. If Not removed will dissolve the civic bonds that tie us together. Will destroy our country. Now, the federal government cannot mandate local curriculum, but it does US funding to encourage or discourage certain content or approaches. So we've ourselves asking, what do we teach in the Commonwealth? Who decides how is that negotiated between teachers, districts, the state historians, and so today we're going to get a peek behind the curtain at that process of deciding what we teach, how we teach it joining us as DEA Riegler. And Social Studies teacher at the Elliott K. through eight school part of the Boston Public School district. Also, the Massachusetts history teacher of the year do welcome to Radio Boston and congratulations. Thank you very much happy to be here. Also. Joining Catherine Targa director of literacy and humanities for the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Catherine. Welcome. Thank you for having me. And Khalil Gibran Muhammed, professor of history race in public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School and a contributor to the New York Times Sixteen Nineteen Project Khalil welcome back to the show. Thanks for having the. Listeners do you have questions about what we teach and how we decide or opinions and how we teach US history in our schools she feel like we receive an honest. You feel like you receive an honest representation of our nation's history in school or your kids call us eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five that's one hundred, four to three talk. You can send us a tweet at Radio Boston's Katherine I'll start with you in the state I know the state provides a framework as opposed to a specific curriculum but can you tell us on the state level? How do you think about teaching US history? Well in Massachusetts American history really starts in third grade. This is where we start to introduce some of the foundational events in American history and the Massachusetts Framework, which as you mentioned, defines the standards for what we expect children to learn at each grade level really begin precolonial times and they continue through the modern era There's the traditional facts and figures of as what you might think of as. History but our standards and Massachusetts really emphasize critical thinking skills, skills like formulating questions, conducting research to understand what happened in the past evaluating sources synthesizing information We really put a premium on those skills in the context of understanding the events in American history because these are the skills that children will need to become participants in our democratic society when they're adults. So deal. Let me turn to you for second your history teacher. You're in the classroom what is your mindset when you're deciding exactly what to teach how to teach it? That's a great question. So as an educator, I'm a black woman, a mother daughter sister wife and I have many more other identities come with me into the classroom. But as an educator and as a teacher, it's not my job necessarily to teach students you know what the things but you know rather how to think. So when looking at all of the Massachusetts standards which are really thorough Boston public schools has a really great. History and social studies department so I can look for their resources they put together field trip ideas you go the library of Congress. So yes, there are standards but it's really in the delivery and knowing the students in front of you about how you're going to you know you hit those standards and how to make history come alive and connect to the present fifth grade is particularly interesting because it covers united? States history. Up until civil rights, right this is a history I've learned my entire life but of course, I bring my identities, but it's more about taking. The students in front of me, where are they coming from? What is their perspective in kind of then going you don't find any resources to bring this history you know into the classroom. So Khalil, we just heard from both Catherine India a lot of emphasis to use his words on not what to think but hotta think critical thinking critical thinking skills. It is interesting. The president specifically mentioned the sixteen nineteen project and it seems maybe the seventeen seventy six commission is kinda counterpoint to that. Can you remind us what was the goal of the sixteen thousand, nine project at an? Wide is it so difficult and so important to to include a sixteen nineteen does the concept of slavery content on full slavery teaching about our nation's history with slavery. Sure because sixteen, thousand, nine projects set out to. Provoke a national reckoning and conversation about the under. misunderstood role of African Americans. In both the founding of the nation, the wealth accumulation that made America the richest country in the world of the cultural uniqueness and footprint of America's cultural industries from music to Hollywood alongside the peculiarities of our liberal democracy by comparison to other. Western European countries we are. We are by per capita. Federal spending the stinginess nation relative to other countries that are European liberal democracies. We also have the largest population of people under some form of criminal justice supervision. So the sixteen nineteen project centered the story of African Americans and racism to help explain how it is. The country came to be how it evolved and what it looks like and how it behaves today We know. Really, well based on some survey. Information largely produced by the Southern Poverty Law Center. How poorly? These themes are taken out in typical US history curricular starting in elementary school through high school we have other kinds of evidence from studies of textbooks and how they talk specifically about these issues, and we can compare in places like Texas versus California as the New York Times did just a few months ago how these issues are treated quite differently in textbooks. themselves. So the sixteen nineteen project sought to to have a national conversation about what's at stake in our civic education the stories we tell about who we are as a nation. I'm going to go to the phones for just a minute eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five we've got John on the line from Dorchester John. Go ahead. Hi thanks for taking my call I. The conversation is so important to me, and one thing that's in I've been struck with is You Know Nineteen twenty there was a horrific massacre by your whites against blacks and the lack Wall Street, and it's something ties and not learn about. In school at all I mean. It's it's really a traumatic events in history and something that. Wasn't mentioned at all I. Think you know we get this narrative I got the near the growing up that Oh we had slowly and then it was over and everything was Nice but it wasn't and not teaching critical aspect history. Does everybody a disservice. Our. Democracy John. Thank you for that. I'm going to add one more voice. We've got Laura from West Roxbury Laura ahead. Hi, So I'm calling in from West Roxbury. I'm a teacher used to be a teacher in high park and I just wanted to say that I think conflicting critical race theory or or a racially and gender and sexuality. Aware history with anti-americanism is really toxic So my students who are largely black around an immigrant came in the day after trump got elected and I was wearing an American flag and they. Were horrified because they were in tears and they were so scared in Salt Lake America wasn't for them anymore and I should with them the quote that if you don't like with the American flag stands for don't burn it, wash it and that their ancestors had fought and died to give them a place in America and the police in this country that they should be proud of and fight for and I think that's really what A multicultural history does is like demonstrate for them that they have a police in our history. Laura. Thank you so much I. I'm interested how those two comments resonate for you. Well I. Think about that place you know your place in history so Text. Book. When you pick it up, it is written from a perspective and go into primary sources. You can actually explore multiple perspectives of the same event and I think that is where you know a lot of people might call it. Revisionist history will know we can, for example, War World War Two we can read a text book maybe we can study some maps. We also can look at some things from Japanese internment camps so you have. To just take multiple perspectives because that is the true like the truth lies somewhere in between there and I feel like a lot of textbooks that I grew up with you know just presented things as one way versus if you really take a step back from history, get primary sources in front of you, you actually can make those connections yourself and weaves together your own that speaks to Tulsa as well. I knew about it because I'm black but. I don't think my students do about. It also goes through a separate issue of what's developmentally appropriate on you bring into the classroom and that's something you know I'm not gonNA teach students about the atrocities committed by Columbus but we can talk about you know you know Columbus's voyage. We can talk about you know the indigenous people already living here, and then what happened to them but that developmental appropriate kind of nature you know in the classroom is very difficult to navigate. So, Catherine and Khalil I, in listening to both of your first couple of answers and thinking about this. One thing I wanted to ask the two of you. We seem to be at a moment in our country where and maybe we always where but I'm going to focus on the moment we're on right now for just a minute where we are developing a counter narratives to each other about who we are, what our history is, what should make us proud what we need to challenge etc, and I understand we have an important. Tradition of a decentralized approach to curriculum in schools I wonder is the school building the classroom part of the place where we develop collective sherrod narratives about who we are as people who we are as a country, and if that's the case, how do you work that part of it into how to figure out what to teach in the classroom Catherine? I think I'll start with you. You've got the perspective of the Commonwealth on this. Sure one of the things that we emphasized in our state standards for history and social science is understanding. The progress that the United States has made and some of the shared values that we at least purport to hold as a nation while at the same time. Encouraging honest informed academic discussions about some of the challenges that we have faced in striving to form a more perfect union conversations about prejudice, racism and bigotry Those issues are real in American history and Shouldn't be whitewashed in the interest of telling a single story We really believe that to develop critical thinking in our students were not in the business of training them in a particular ideology work helping them learn to think and part of being a well educated person being a citizen and our democracy is holding onto complexity. There's no one single story of America and were teaching a historical narrative that's not limited to just one perspective. Khalil does that feel right to you? Well I. If the question was what role does the school play in Creating a sense of shared values and and a common good that reflects our nation our sense of nationhood than it is absolutely essential. It's probably the most important socialising toossion around these questions but I I guess I would say that Historians Produce Much of the knowledge rooted in archival information whether it's diaries of political leaders or day men and women who who lived through those times in order to arrive at a kind of preponderance of evidence of what happened and while I do understand the role of primary secondary educators in. Different kinds of perspectives historians tend not to present history as if everybody's opinion mattered a long time ago political history was simply the record of what political elites said and they disagreed history often bore out who was right versus who was wrong for the past forty years. We've had something like social history, which is much more diversity of voices in terms of how different kinds of people experienced it and I think that's been an incredible revolution. What we see in the trump administration in this moment is a lamentation on a stall jeff for a kind of top down political elite version of history using the founding fathers as our as our vehicle for understanding why today we have to get back to that. But this would be akin to saying trump's version of the world is the only version that should make it into the history books as we move forward and that would be an absurdity. So. So the school ask to actually actually function as a place to engage these debates and not simply to leave them to chance at students, figure it out on their own. A scrap. One more caller here Roberts on the line from Franklin rather go ahead. Hi when I grew up in the sixties and seventies history was a separate class than a class called civics and I believe clearly, and strongly that we should make sure everyone understands you know what happened to indigenous peoples and what happened in slavery but what they need to learn I think is Asian American African American immigrants. What is the now? What is the Constitution provide? Why? Of Vogue is important why you should Serve in your municipal and local boards and maybe une councils that doesn't around anymore. Someone mentioned shared values just from the last conversation. I think that's the share value that what it means to be an American basically the longest democracy we have so far versus other countries except Britain or whatever I just think I just think we had to go back to a civics lesson that separate and apart from a history. Thanks for that Robert I. Appreciate it. So D- I. Mean we're talking about all these things that we should do and I really WanNa bring it back now to you and the decisions that you make day to day in the classroom and I'm wondering especially, are you pivoting for example, when students bring up certain kinds of conversations to me be different content than you had planned I understand there are some strict. Guidelines, but I wonder how much freedom you feel to go where the kids want to go to help them suss this stuff out. I mean at first starts with building a really safe and collaborative learning environment because the classroom needs to be that safe space where students can take risks they can say something that you know maybe like grappling with and they're not gonNa be you know no one's GonNa come down on them or say you can't see that for these that's the space of the classroom. Know specifically, of course, when you have these conversations, different things come up and as a teacher you have to first and foremost be really well informed about history yourself. So we were having a discussion about the declaration of independence and we were talking about the constitution and then a student we said, will I rent So. I'm leaving my money to somebody else. And I was like, well, why are you thinking this? So we ended up going into this whole conversation about you know property and what it means own property and who owns property, and you know he was like, well, maybe my mom doesn't own property because she was born somewhere else and now I'm GonNa American but so yes, the classroom is first and foremost safe-space because of course, things are gonna come up as the. Adult in charge we have to know how to pivot you know and and you know bring it back to those connections. Right what happened in the past is continual informing what's happening right now. And Catherine I want to pick up further on Roberts call he was advocating for US teaching. A kind of civics and also kind of history I know the state make some decisions about emphasis. My understanding is there was a two thousand eighteen revision that put an emphasis on civics. How do you make those decisions? Do you consult with experts with historians? Khalil? How does that happen if you could tell me the next minute or so yes, I'm so glad that Robert brought that up because we do have a really renewed emphasis on civics So to revise the our standards or expectations for what students are to learn in school, it's a lengthy process that takes two to three years on average The Department conducts research consults with experts. In this case, it would be historians to understand advances in the discipline that need to be reflected in what our kids learn in school a panel of educators and experts rewrite the standards There's an opportunity for the public to weigh in and all of this happens before. Our revised expectations are changed. So Khalil I've got about thirty seconds left, and in that time I'd like to ask. If you had one message to parents and kids about how to engage with learning history. What would that message be? A be fearless in using the books that have long sat on shelves because people were. Ignoring, all that great work. Read things fall when re Tony Morrison. Read the great works that are coming out now from authors like Abram Kindy, and others who are producing wonderful young adult readers on these topics. There's so much to explore at this point. Khalil Gibran Muhammed professor of history race in public policy at the Kennedy School thank you. You're, welcome. Kathryn Tarfa Director of literacy and humanities for the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and secondary education. Thanks to you. Thank you. And Dea Riegler teacher at the Elliott, K. through eight school and history teacher of the year. Thank you. Thanks for having me.

Khalil US Massachusetts America Khalil Gibran Muhammed professor of history Boston president Massachusetts Department of El New York Times Catherine Laura Elliott K. federal government Robert Catherine Targa DEA Boston Public School district National Endowment
Nightly Fireworks Are A Headache For Cities And Town Across Massachusetts

Radio Boston

48:37 min | 1 year ago

Nightly Fireworks Are A Headache For Cities And Town Across Massachusetts

"The State's Department of Elementary and Secondary Education released guidance today on how schools could reopen this fall, and it includes a lot of things you might expect having teachers and students where facemask spacing desks at least three feet apart and keeping students in the same group throughout the school day. But there are still some unanswered questions joining us now to help answer. Some of those questions is Jeff Riley. WHO's the Commissioner of the Education Department? Commissioner Riley thanks so much for joining us today. So I WANNA start by acknowledging you had a pretty tough balancing act here, trying to weigh public health and safety concerns with concerns about students, academic and emotional wellbeing Some curious as you were forming this plan. What are some of the most important factors you were thinking about? You know for us the key. I think was the safety of our students and teachers as we saw to go back and we kind of researched and really enlisted the best medical people we can find to help us think through what are the best actions we can take to make school safe when we do return. So speaking of medical experts, I know. You got a letter from the Massachusetts. Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics really encouraging students to go back to in classroom learning in the fall they're especially concerned with children who rely on additional services, school supplies like counseling services or food supplements, things like that and they're also concerned that remote learning kind of exacerbates the achievement disparities across income levels racial groups did you? What did you make of that letter? Jeff response to some of those concerns. Yeah I think we grateful for the endorsement from the incoming President of the Pediatric Association in Massachusetts They believe he believes, and their association believes that kids should go back to school. There are costs associated with kids being out of school and we've seen some of those. We understand this food. Insecurity is trauma mental health issues. There's all the racial issues that. That have come up that school would be a good place for teachers to kind of work on helping students process that information. So they're you know they're? They're certainly on a lot of reasons to go back to school and at the same time. We recognize that we want to do so in a way. That's you know as safe as completely pulsing. So, there are concerns that just being closed for the the few months that schools were closed this past term that basically some students could be up to a year behind in terms of of where they would be education wise that study that was published by The New York Times. Do you have any specific approaches to catching those students up that that might have fallen behind during the period of closure. Yes, we do I mean what I would say is first and foremost. I don't think anyone believes that. Any type of remote learning can ever replace What happens an in person instruction We just don't think it's comparable with that, said We're not exactly sure what the gaps will be. We do think that there will be learning loss, and we do need to kind of a sort that out and assess that in our students. There have been some who have said that. We need to go to assessment in the first week of school and I've said no, I think we need to get our kids back into the routine of learning and focus on their social emotional health in the beginning. But there will be a time and district's always do this in the first month where they kind of assess where students are functioning, and at that point will really have a better idea of what the learning losses, and where it is, and then when we talk about how to remediate that we've put out a multi-million dollar grant program for districts that are interested both in the summer, and over the vacations to work with students who have fallen behind. So you, talk about concerns. Bringing kids back to the classroom MASSINC polling group recently did a poll kind of looking at different groups of parents, and how they are thinking about returning to school in the fall. And there was some pretty staggering numbers in terms of black and Latino parents of K. Twelve k through twelve students Basically sixty nine percents of white parents, either felt very or somewhat confident in sending their kids back to school, but just forty eight percent of black parents forty four percent of Latino. Parents feel the same way. I am struck by the fact that those are the same racial groups that have been hit. Disproportionately by the pandemic. What would you say to? Some of those parents who are feeling those concerns right now? Well I, mean look I wanna be clear our parents. We respect their decisions and their choices on their children schooling, and so we understand there are concerns, and we're going to be sympathetic to those and work with parents as schools open on what they choose to do. I. DO think that we have seen variation across the state in communities. They met hit hard and some others that haven't and so the question for me is. How do we provide additional supports to those districts that have been hit the hardest and or those districts that have been historically changed? To make sure that they get the. Resources that they need a technical financial. Computer devices such so that we can get out so we can make it as fair as possible and at the same time you know today I. Think was the first day we saw the medical community. Stand up and say we do think going back to school as the way to go, and so you know we're going to let parents make their decisions on. What they think is best for their children. We're going to try to do is make sure that the sense of equity and fairness. Across our communities. You mentioned financial is one of the concerns obviously anytime. You're talking about schools that are often asked to do a lot on a shoestring budget We actually spoke with Joseph Sawyer Superintendent of Shrewsbury public schools. and. He said he's confident. In in the research that the state has done in consulting with public health experts, but basically the challenge is figuring out how to afford everything on this pretty condensed time line. Here's a little bit of what he said. If! You've had a lot of experience with it. If you've seen your family members, your neighbor, neighbors go through the symptoms actually speed. Of Mass. MASSINC polling group for Joseph Sawyer four forget who four from control challenges of remote broadcasts bear with its both trying to plan for doing school a away that we've never done before at the same time with huge question marks about the amount of funding that will have not knowing the level of staffing will have to be able to execute on the kind of planning and. Work that will need to happen to come back to school in the fall, is it the most complex worked at school administered dot in their career. So I understand commissioner that you wanted to leave things open so that districts would have flexibility to do what they feel is right for their district but in terms of funding What can you tell schools who are looking at hey? The state has a potentially four billion dollar shortfall in the budget We know that Gateway Community for example. We're going to get an extra two hundred seventeen million dollars this year alone. What would you? Worried that the funding to establish these new protocols just isn't going to be there. Well! It's certainly something that we have to kind of pressure test. What I would say is what we know is this? The Department of Education applied for and received a federal money almost two hundred million dollars that we sent out. To districts are they're eligible to apply for those dollars, and it's based on a title one formula so essentially the poor communities get more money today. In addition to that the governor announced an additional two hundred million dollars are for districts to get even more money because I think there is a recognition that to. Bring School's back under the new medical kind of editions or parameters. Cost money now the heart and what we don't know right now is will there be a four stimulus package from the federal government, and what will the funding look like in Massachusetts and because we don't know, and and because we probably won't know until. July or August Steven, and maybe even beyond that what we've done at the department has said be prepared for all contingencies be prepared for a remote learning, be prepared for a hybrid model and be prepared for an in person model with these medical grammars. But what I think is an advocate for the educational community we need to kind of. Really stand tall and say that there are funds that are going to be needed. To do this safely and to do it well. Yeah I think I. I know some activists in the state of asked if if you're willing to dip into the about three and a half billion dollar rainy day fund. Is that something the state's thinking about? If the federal government doesn't come through, so so you know I. Don't want to speak for the administration. On the Department of Education but I think they'll look at everything given the financial situation, and I think a lot of people now are waiting to see what the federal government is going to do with this fourth stimulus package or not, so I think that will be kind of a tipping point until then you know the best we can do as you know. We've been able to get additional dollars for the schools, and we can plan for a variety of contingencies so that we can get the best possible outcome. So I want to come back to something you said about preparing. Basically all contingencies understand. We don't know what things are going to look like in the fall but from a teacher's perspective, that obviously presents a pretty big challenge I. WanNa. Play a little bit of sound here. From Joe Allen Persad, include an inclusion in moderate disabilities physics teacher at Madison. Park Technical Vocational High School talking about kind of what that means for teachers on the ground. That is so much work to now have to plan for online learning as well as in person learning. The idea these two things like. Oh, just record your lessons, Oh just. That that is indicative that you are not a teacher. That's not what you really need to do to engage students online. So I actually a former high school teacher, myself and I totally can understand where Joel is coming from there. You would present a lesson plan totally differently if you're connecting remotely versus if you're in the classroom. So what do you make of the fact that you're asking teachers to basically prepare to lesson plans as a coach the fall? So. I don't think that's exactly what's happening. What we're what we're looking to do right now is to say. We, don't have control over the trajectory of the virus. We're not exactly sure. If we're going to have a second spike or not in the fall, and so at the end of the day we have to be ready for all contingencies now what I think the teacher is speaking to and as a former employee at Madison Park when I would say as you know, we have to be smart about how we figure this out and in person, learning is obviously probably the most desirable possibility, but if you do hybrid learning. What we need to do is minimize the extra. Effort could on teachers by doing that now you could do that in several ways you could use teachers that have underlying medical conditions were over a certain age who may not be? Able to come back into the classroom and put them on the online portion of that. You we, we are in the process of looking at learning management platform, which is a computer based program, which is more student self directed and so there's just different opportunities to look at it now. The live streaming option is also a possibility right if you're teaching a class of fifteen kids, this fifteen of your other kids sitting at home, watching the lesson online. That's a possibility that some districts have done There are some complications that come with that but I think there's. Ways to sort out the issues, and we just have to be very thoughtful about how we do it. Again, I understand the leaving options open to districts is done out of a sense of letting them kind of control. What's best for their situation? I am wondering if you have any concerns that some districts either won't fall. The guidelines don't have the resources to follow the guidelines and therefore are putting their staff and students more at risk than others. Well, what we're what we're saying right now is we have turned out. Guidance has specific. Medical parameters done by experts in the medical field in Boston. which is you know, Boston University guarded Massachusetts as you know, a leading medical of place in the in the world, and we're asking people to kind of feasability test. What in-person learning could look like and so? We're GONNA get more of that information in the next several weeks to see you know. Can districts do this or not? What does it look like some districts might be able. Able to do it without making any changes to their schedules, some districts might need to stand up a few extra classrooms to reduce class size, and then some districts that might have to do something different because Maybe the class sizes are large, or what have you and so what we need to do is have schools and districts do this feasibility testing given these new medical grandmothers, and then we'll really have a better sense of one as possible. I'm glad you mentioned class size, because I think that's something. Obviously, some district's had expressed concern over. But also something that that summer surprised. There wasn't some sort of guidance in terms of of class sizes Why did you guys decide not to include that in the plan? Just done differently, right, it's it's not done by specific number. It's done by specific distance so what we said was. We want our districts and schools to aim for six feet of distancing, but no less than three feet. And, so it's that three-foot number which will determine what class sizes can be, and it'll be based on the size of the classroom so obviously larger classrooms get old more students than smaller ones won't fewer, but that is kind of the Individual School district work that needs to take place so that disres- in schools can understand what is feasible or not. Are you concerned at all about the timeline in doing so I mean. We're looking in only a few months before September. It's pretty tight to get ready for the school year anyway and now we have all these additional challenges. Now I think you know the superintendents and principals really kind of risen to the challenge around this feasibility study and And I think that they're going to be able to turn that around relatively quickly, and with that said you know. The summer is approaching I know it seems like the school year has just ended, but the the new school year starts quickly and so there is work to be done and. You know we're going to endeavor to do it. I'm curious in terms of input. How much you've heard from parents as you've been formulating this plan. the MASSINC polling group survey. That I mentioned found that almost seventy percent of parents say they haven't been asked for input on on reopening. Do you wish that there had been more parental involvement, and is there a way that could have been done or do you feel that that you've adequately heard from the population? So we at the state of heard a lot from parents. On a variety of issues, perhaps the one that's we've heard most often is about complex special needs. Parents who want their kids back in school because their kids have been regressing significantly by not having the services they get at the school. with that said we've put in our guidance. Kind of a requirement that that districts in schools reach out multiple times to families over the summer to get a sense of where they're at. And and connect with them. Make sure they have updated information from families and really make sure that they are staying in touch with them. Because there is, there was some concern that not every district has been staying robustly in touch with their families throughout the the outbreak. Yeah Commissioner Rally as as were wanting to close here, I want to ask you as we've been having lots of conversations over the last few weeks. Something that that is kind of Ben present through all of them is our national reckoning with racial inequity. And I'm wondering if you see this as a moment to potentially make major changes or reforms to either curriculum, or what schooling looks like. How are you thinking about that in this moment? So equity has been a has been one of the top priority of the department since I took over a couple of years ago. We have a real focus inside of the department on improving the diversity amongst our teachers and principals and superintendents right now we know. Forty percent of our students are students of color, but only eight percent of our teachers are and we knew we need to do better. The research is clear that students who see someone that looks like them are more likely to do better academically in high school and more likely have better life outcomes, and yet we are behind on really diversifying our workforce at the same time we recognize that kids have a lot of questions right and there's been. Heightened anxiety amongst everyone in the country, and we think that schools are the place where I mean I think in Massachusetts. We have the best teachers in the country. And I think that our kids would benefit by having them at the head of the glass, leading some of these discussions, some of which may involve by the way. How are we reflecting? Off Voices in our curriculum. So that disparity that you outlined is pretty staggering Do you have any specific steps? I mean I understand everybody's thinking and talking about how to increase diversity, but do you have specific steps that that You'd like to see or that. You recommend for districts across the state so. You know I did some of this work in my previous role and Lawrence where we were able to triple the number of Latino teachers and a five year period and we were able to do that because we're able to. Kind of track are high school graduates who went to college ring them back offer them things like signing bonuses tuition reimbursement. We put them in. Something called the knocker program, which is amazing mortgage program where no points, no closing costs, and if your average person. Person has getting a mortgage rate for four percent today we were getting our young teachers mortgage rate for like one or two percent and so we were able to kind of rebuild our middle class and Lawrence by bringing our students back, and they were getting mortgages that were significantly cheaper than what they had to pay Lawrence for rent, and so I think there are suite of services and doucments that we can make to try to improve the diversity our teacher corps. That's. Commissioner marched. No. That's okay I appreciate it I think something to really chew on there. That's Jeff. Riley Commissioner of early and secondary. Education Commissioner rally thanks so much for the time today. Thanks for having me. I'm wondering. Have you been hearing a lot of this lately? Doesn't sound fireworks popping outside one of our producer Waltz apartment last night as they have been most nights for the past few weeks and we weren't sure we sent him out less than if you'd be successful getting that sound, but you might not actually be surprised he was. That's because from Boston to Salem to new Bedford. Authorities are reporting a massive uptick in fire complaints this year Mayor Walsh actually said complaints in Boston through the month of May were up more than two thousand percent. So what is going on here to help us? Break it all down his liquicia burke president of the west of Washington Coalition, a neighborhood group in Dorchester. LIQUICIA Wilkin Radio, Boston. How you doing crafts, thanks for having me. I appreciate having opportunity to come on your show to speak about and community issues. That we're. We're happy to check in with you and also joining me and you is bill for editor and publisher of the Dorchester reporter. Bill Welcome back to Radio Boston to you as well. All Right? We'll check on whether or not. We have bill there, but I also want to hear from all of you out there. Are you hearing fireworks your neighborhood? Does it feel like it's more than usual affecting your sleep, or is it stressing you or maybe your out or are you yourself setting them offer? Do you know someone who is? You can call us one, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five. That's one eight, hundred four to three talk, or you can send us a tweet at Radio Boston. So before we dive into what's going on in? I do want to say that. This is a problem happening. As we said across the country, and so let's check in with a north shore community in Salem Mayor Kim. Driscoll recently announced a new campaign cracking down on fireworks in Salem Mayor Driscoll Welcome to radio, Boston well. Great to be here, Chris. So. Give us a sense of what the situation is like in Salem in terms of fireworks. Sure we have number of residents or just really feeling fed up and frustrated similar to Boston, and so many other communities I talked to colleagues out in Western mass on the South Shore. Everyone is just being a huge uptick in both the amount of activity and the shell size of the fireworks. You know, so it's it's louder and it's more disruptive. Folks are pretty sleep, deprived and really concerned about the disturbance last year from May first June. Fifteenth we had five fireworks. Complaints logged into into our offices. this year for that same time period we've had over a hundred and fourteen complaints logged, and so we've seen a two thousand, one hundred and eighty percent increase as well and I think beyond the disruption night at causes for families, anyone living with trauma and pets. We're also concerned about this. The fire safety hazard. We have a lot of wood frame structures where fairly dense city and so it's something we're trying to take seriously and see if we can stem stem the activity from happening. What do you think it's such an increase this year? And how are you planning on tackling this issue in Salem? Yeah you know we're really not exactly sure why. What? What's made a big difference that we've speculated that you know with out any other ceremonies happening. People are celebrating graduations and birthdays and anniversaries in this way. We don't know if there's more marketing. We are close to the new line and there's seems to be a lot of marketing happening from some of the fireworks companies, they're directly targeting communities or if it's just. Something that everyone took their federal stimulus checks and bought fireworks. We are really not sure from our perspective. We are trying to make sure people know that this is illegal. What the dangers are so we've got a robust public education campaign. We're working on. We've also adopted sort of an anonymous reporting tool so residents can log on. And help us pinpoint where these things are happening. oftentimes, even when we respond of people scatter, you're not really sure who is lighting off the fireworks, so we can track and log it. We can try some more targeted interventions, and then really trying to both fire, department, personnel and police helping through our community policing efforts. Have recognized that not only are these unlawful They're dangerous. And so we we have increased fines and are doing everything we can to remind people how disruptive and disrespectful at his two neighbors. That Salem Mayor Kim Driscoll Marriage Echo. Thanks so much for checking in with us today. Appreciate it. Sure Liquicia. I WANNA spend this to you LIQUICIA. You just heard what the mayor had to say about Salem. How does that compare to to what you're experiencing in Dorchester? I definitely would ditto her experience We are experiencing the same thing here in Dorchester with fireworks all hours of the night i. mean they start maybe around seven o'clock and afternoon maybe six, which it's not even dark yet. How ever we will hear them at those hours, and then they will carry on throughout the night in all throughout the middle of the night, one, two, three, four o'clock in the morning. Morning and whether really sure when they were coming from You know so. We definitely have been dealing with that, but one of the ways that we've been trying to work with. The Community posed a Colin the police all the time. which you know, unfortunately, we had to call the police to have them come out because it was just a bad, but a way to try to not have to call the. The police we have been working with the community. We drafted up a nice letter. Just basically saying like. Hey, this is who we are where the western Washington. we would like everybody to just be respectful to the community. We have you know seniors in the neighborhood. We have veterans that stuff from PTSD. We have children go to school in the morning and have pets that you know are just not that fond. Fond of fireworks and so we just gave a kind letter just asking people for consideration, not really like telling them. Hey, you know what I mean. Stop doing this. We're just basically saying. Hey, you have consideration. If you are going to do it, because it is at a point where it's not really controlled that much, you know what I mean so it was different. Notice any kind of response to that letter. We have noticed that there has been a slowdown in the amount of fireworks that we have heard however I think that could be a mix of definitely I. WanNa give it up to know police department. I have seen them definitely patrolling the neighborhood looking around, so it definitely make things more safe so I think in conjunction with the police doing their ride through our letters indefinitely complained to the mayor's office. All those things together help to kind of tone things down With the particular neighbors that you know were doing them at the time, but we do feel like it has slowed down just a tad. It, not non existent. Starting to get some calls lined up one, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five, I want to get right to phones, but I bill forty I want to bring you in on this as well. You've been covering Dorchester for a long time. What are you seeing and hearing and have you ever seen anything like this before? look at every summer is bad okay in in terms of the noise level with fireworks, people who lived in Dorchester for any amount of time many many see pretty used to it and I it sometimes I like an airplane noise, which is another issue quality of life issue in the city and sometimes you you. You learn to tune it out this summer. That's pretty much impossible to do. in the spring and this is going back. months now so it's it's had a tattoo. An effective is definitely more complaints. There's definitely more Calls to Boston policed for for folks seeking the mitigated and what we've seen in our coverage is counselors Julia Mayo who has really been leading on this issue locally. She lives in Dorchester. in represents the whole city. She convened an online forum a couple of weeks ago with it drew a large amount of resonance. Three hundred seventy people registered many other people. Participated and watched it and people were. From all corners of the community are concerned about it. We heard especially in a in a point away from Ronald. ODEM, whose whose son it was murdered back in two thousand seven in Dorchester son Steven and he talked about how when when he was a young man. And we we use a kid growing up here. He used to you know play with fireworks like a lot of us did it's not an uncommon thing but what's happened to him? Is that this this onslaught of of of fireworks all sometimes all day and all night it really is a is a trigger for him. a reminder of his son's death and I think people in our community have to have to convey those kinds of messages to one another Let our neighbors no for those of us. Who are who are From. Whether it be P., T. S. T. or who have young children, or or who were disturbed by this that that this is a real thing and and it folks need to be aware of the the effect. It's having on the neighbors. Yeah you mentioned Boston Councilor Julia Makiya her efforts to address this issue We actually spoke to her earlier today, so I, WanNa play a little bit of that. We also filed an ordinance through the City Council To. Have you know to explore an alternate response instead of police and so my hope is through this ordinance. We create alternate way to deal with these sort of I'm called. So she's talking about organizing with community groups, youth programs, and and basically trying to bypass law enforcement on on this. What do you make of that approach? I guess. Yeah I. I would take I. I think she filed this with Michelle. Woo Lee Edwards to other two of her colleagues on the council. I think that there's some merit to this, you know. I think Boston police probably might be among those who who would like to see this. Be Somebody else's problem Boston police show up to these scenes often, and there's some in in this in this context this season so often by fireworks calls. And very little they can do. They don't have the power to arrest anybody for firing off fireworks because. It's not enforceable that way you can seize the fireworks and you can find people, but you're not gonNA. You're not going to arrest them by the way people in our community. We really don't want to see people you know. Being arrested for this I think it's. It's something that that I think counselor may is onto something that there could be some kind of alternate city service that response to these calls and seeks to address it in cooperation with neighbors. Yakuza. I'm curious. Add onto that I also feel like in addition. then needs to be like just resources for the kids I feel like right now. Their kids don't have anything else to do. Do the adults However you know offering them something making sure that they're busy throughout the summer. Maybe community groups putting on you know different days where their street Kinda gets a break from traffic where we give out like some you know some ice, cream cones, or maybe you know Bob said goals, or whatever to the kid like. We have to find another way for them to like use their energy. Energy whether it's getting them jobs west, Washington has been working with TNT which is a tab a triangle and we've actually been creating a program where we can actually help some of the US within our community to have something job, so they don't have to be outside doing fireworks, and and not be being busy the reason why the western Washington advocates to get apart put an neighborhood there so that the kids have somewhere to play so that they do not have to be doing things like fireworks. You know what I mean just giving them. Things that are that are really constructive and. Letting them, know that the community is here for them and trying to like help them through this difficult time, and not just this time, but you know all the times in the future because there will be times where there will be dead space where you know, we may have to fill that with some love and some joy, and some happiness for our community, and maybe once people see that you know we're here for the community where he had to try to incorporate everybody and we want everybody to be apart then maybe. These type of situations come up you. We can all have better conversations in regards to it, not just call the police because like you said No. I mean it's everybody to be happy and and people. Think. You're you're right on the money there. Let's get some callers in here. Maureen in Roslindale. You're up first Maureen. Welcome. What's on your mind? thank you vote initially when I called I was going to say that these are challenging times, and maybe we all just need to take. I WANNA. Thank Latisha for that very well. Phrased letter. I think it. Just you know speaks to what a good representative of her community. She must be We live in Roslindale, Roxbury and We're hearing fireworks every single night and They are starting. You know from afternoon and sometimes you know choose three in the morning. you know our way has just been a turn off the air conditioner higher It feels like it's not that different than power saw or a lawnmower hedge clipper that somebody might be running. During the Jake however I. Did hear Bills Concerns about John. I think it was. about people who suffer from Peachy S G and people who have pets, and and may be challenging children that are trying to to sleep I think there are a lot of different factors here Maureen and thank you so much for the call. I want to bring in another caller shelly in JP SHELLY WELCOME RADIO BOSTON. Thank you very much. So, what's your experience been here and fireworks? Yes, we've been hearing. Fire were. Almost every night and sometimes. I think. Till four in the morning and last week, my husband and I took a walk down to the police station and J P just to. See what what they knew about it and they are totally aware and not much. They can do unless they actually catch. Well I'm telling you what they told me unless. CATCH THE AD. and it's not fireworks that I see colors. It's just you know loud banging whether you know years ago is a child they were you. People use caps, and all that with a cloud of course now with the Windows closed in the ACC on. It's not as bothersome but I think if whatever the reason they're doing it. If they need more activities to keep people busy, young people busy that. Was a great idea from Latisha so. Why is an interesting question and thanks so much for the Call Shelly We actually spoke to April Walton earlier today. She's the manager of Phantom fireworks in Seabrook New Hampshire so kind of just over the border and she says in her thirty one years at the store business busier than she's ever seen it, but she did drawn interesting comparison back to two thousand eight during that recession, people were having staycationing, so we saw a big uptick again then because people were staying home instead of going away and spending thousands of dollars on their travel, and you know hotels or whatever eating out, so they were coming here and getting fireworks, and having you know family valve accuser in their backyard. Thought, that was really interesting. I'm curious bill in the quiz. Show what you think if this is. This increases from people just blowing off steam. About Phantom fireworks. Okay I'm fired up about Phantom fireworks. Okay, let me just tell you because. They have been sending flyers to our community, promoting fireworks and promoting people to buy fireworks, and they feel like just because they right on the flyer. Oh, I'm fireworks are illegal in the State of Massachusetts that it's okay to peddle this within our communities, so not only if people didn't have access to get in the fireworks, they're giving them access by sending these flyers to their house, so. So I, personally have made a phone call to fan fireworks and I spoke to their legal department and I told them that they should take all of the Boston Massachusetts Zip code off of there, especially in the city of Boston should take their ZIP codes off of their mailing address, because fireworks are illegal in the city of Boston. So that's what I feel about fan of fireworks. Yeah, not just the city of Boston. They're illegal in the entire state of Massachusetts, and it is interesting. Because April also told us that New Hampshire customers actually make up their smallest percentage. They have a big chunk of Massachusetts customers, but they also have customers from all around the region Connecticut New Jersey, a Bill I'm wondering what what's your take on that in terms of marketing and and the access to fireworks. Right across the border. Right then of course that that's not a new phenomenon every year obviously New Hampshire is a is a is a prime source of munitions but to the why I think the you know what we've heard from Boston police who are responding to two neighbors, complaints and we're you know privy to those communications the community service officers here in district eleven in Dorchester for instance. Are Legitimately telling neighbors look This is a perfect storm and we've never seen anything quite like it. either. They are attributing it to the The quarantine to the you know the effects of people being stuck at home, and being stuck in home indefinitely in some in some measurement and there's nothing much that the police can do about it, so they're. They're telling people. Look got you kind of weather this out and And that's that's been their communication to residents complaining. And I should note that April also told us that they don't promote illegal. Use that that they. Focus on legal sales I'm just curious. If you to have some final thoughts on July fourth I think we can probably expect this to continue. Yeah, go ahead! I have a final dot like my biggest concern about definitely the fireworks is not just the noise and the inconsideration for the community and in neighbors and the people that really need to get their sleep, but it's also with crime coming with it, you know what I mean, so it's more like the fireworks and being gone off. You don't if the gun shot, or if it's a firework The police have come you. You know to our community several times in regard to fireworks or a shooting within our community and our neighbor, not to know if something is a firework or a gun shot, and if you're safe or not, that's our biggest concern within our community. We want our community to be safe. You know what I mean we don't want. Health is the burn down. We don't want our neighbors cars to be shot up with. with Roman candlesticks, and we don't want people roof catching fire. You know what I mean so I. Think our biggest concern is safety for our community. That's Liquicia Burke President of the West Washington Coalition neighborhood. Group in Dorchester. liquicia thanks so much for joining us today. Gear! And also with US was bill fourie editor and publisher of the Dorchester Report Bill always great to talk to you. Thanks for being with us. Thanks for having me just last hour. Boston Mayor Marty Walsh Announce New Equity Cabinet within his administration as well as a major initiative in the city aimed at raising millions of dollars to address racial equity in Boston. This fine will invest in nonprofits that empower black and Brown residents. In economic development. In public health. And Youth Employment in education. In. The Arts and other areas its mission is to increase safety and wellbeing an equity and the prosperity of the Black and Brown community. It's called. The Boston Racial Equity Fund and the chair of the steering committee. Is Lee Pelton? He's the president, also the president of Emerson College, and he joins us now President Penton. Welcome radio. Boston well, thank you. It's good to be here. Thank you. So I'd love to start if you could just tell us a little bit more about what the fund aims to do, and how it will accomplish that goal. Well first of all, let me say that I. Applaud the mayor's efforts and initiatives create cabinet level of program also to create a this equity. And would also like to not. You know this is an initiative that he and his leadership team have been working on for some time. And I know John Burroughs of the economic leadership. There has been working on this This is this is tangible. It is real and it can make a real difference in our community, and it's the mayor of spoke this afternoon. The purpose of this is to close the racial disparity gaps in economic development. In public health in US, unemployment in education, and in net worse and much more. Yeah I mean obviously this is coming amid a national push to address some of the systemic grace racism in our country, and we've got protests calling for defunding police departments and Demonstrations over police killings. Are You satisfied with the response from Boston so far. And how severe do you think the racial divide is here in the city? Well. You know we obviously have a very long way to go with respect to. A what we refer to as structural racism. which is different than bigotry. That is about it. That refers to the structural impediments. That continue to create and sustain. These disparities along racial lines the ones that I just mentioned in Economic Development Public Elston education in net worth. And so on this is a step forward in the in the right direction. It's a positive step obviously. I I do want to emphasize that you know this is. This is not something to be fixed and what I mean by that. This is not something that we fixing in walk away from. This is going to require long-term a sustained. A commitment. On because the issues that are being addressed a Har- are are have been around really since the founding of this nation. I WANNA, ask you president Peltonen on a personal level after the killing of George Floyd Minneapolis at the hands of white police officers. You wrote an incredibly powerful letter to the Emerson community. About your personal experience wondering if you could tell us a little bit about your decision to send that letter, and and what the process was like writing it. well as I, said at the beginning of the letter I'm writing both as a man in America and as a president. Of. And my purpose was to make the invisible visible by telling my own story I. Mean Story Stories are very powerful? Their instruments of? Change in telling. My story was my hope that I could also. Tell George Floyd Story. The man that we knew before police officer. Put His. Knee on his neck for eight minutes and forty six seconds with his left hand, casually in his left pocket. I said in my letter that what made this possible is that George Fluid was invisible? To, this police officer! He wasn't human. And it was his invisibility and the dehumanisation of him. That allowed this officer to murder him. Very casually was great, callous and in plain sight. Yeah I mean again at the letter itself is is powerful, and obviously the stories behind it even more so I'm wondering you have a leadership role at Emerson. Did that complicate your decision to write it? And what's the reaction been like since you put that out there? Well. We've I've gotten great support you know it's. It's apparently reached millions of people. And I've I've gotten. Emails from around the world. So, it's had an impact I. Think one of the things that he has done. At least I'm told that it has done. Is to the? For other black leaders to tell their stories very similar to my own. and to make it clear. particularly to White America that Being having privileged does not inoculate. Black Brown people. From Mason it. It does not, and it does not inoculated from the. You know the great racial disparities that we face. I should also mention that I'm very pleased that. The Boston, equity flying will be con-. Complement the work that's already underway by some of Boston's most prominent. Men and women of Color in the executive rates. Of. Who have a initiated their own equity fund? A President Peltonen, obviously we're starting to run out of time, and there's so much to talk about. We'd love to have you back sometime down the road to to really Kinda dig into the stuff but I do want to close by asking at the end of your letter. You say the most important question is what are you going to do so kind of a two part other specific plans of things you plan to do at Emerson. And what would you say to someone who says? This is such a big problem what can I an individual person actually do to help? We're going to do a lot at Emerson. Some redoubling our efforts in recruiting students, retaining students in terms of hiring making sure that there is diversity. At the senior leadership level that they're folks of Color Brown. Black folks of color there. We're also going to look at our procurement Operation and make sure that that would. We're acting affirmatively. With you know hiring and contracting with A. Businesses owned by folks of color, so it will be do do a lot of that but most of all understand that we have to do. This was kind of incredible urgency. Because this is not a moment. This is a movement that we're in. and. This is really a wreck being for America. That will have to deal. And then in terms of listeners out there saying, how can I help? What what is it? I should be doing. Do you have a message for them? We've. Got About thirty seconds, but yeah I would say for those of you. WHO PROTESTS IN MARCH? Thank you, you know these protests and rallies have been. A multi racial event very young. Some people in high school and most pointing is go read Richard History so that you understand to full extent. The. Race in America. Lee Pelton is the twelfth president of Emerson College President pelted again. Love to have you back on sometime down the road. Really appreciate your time today. Thank you for having me.

Boston Massachusetts Dorchester Commissioner President US Jeff Riley Department of Elementary and S Salem editor and publisher American Academy of Pediatrics Lee Pelton America Liquicia Burke President Education Department Steven Emerson College president Joseph Sawyer
Teachers Rally At State House For Remote Learning

Radio Boston

03:08 min | 10 months ago

Teachers Rally At State House For Remote Learning

"This hour union teachers are rallying at the State House calling on the governor to make all schools remote only at least at the start this fall according to Governor Baker more than seventy percent of Massachusetts School district's currently planned to bring students into the building at least part time this fall wbz kitchen reporter carry young at the State House joins us now they're carry. Good afternoon. So, Carrie what are you seeing right now and what are the demands that teachers are making it this rally Yeah. So right now there's about a hundred I would say teachers from the American. Federation of Teachers in the Massachusetts Teachers Association, they are the ones that are outside our Sit got caution tape and they are standing six feet apart in front of the State House yelling you know only one, it's safe or not one death but they also give teachers and other option if they weren't feeling comfortable being in person you're hearing. Any COURT car horn honking behind me because they told folks if you're not comfortable, just drive by several times and show your support by honking or mourn. So it's a it's a loud and busy place here at the State House and like you said, they're demanding that schools not open up in person at all that everyone starts Goatley at least and then phase in to in person learning later when the health metrics say that safe. So, this is a union organized rally. There are two others around the state today. What kind of reaction are they getting from state leaders? Yes, so I did touch base with the Department of Elementary and secondary education as well as Secretary Peiser, office and state leaders are telling me that you know as far as their to this goes they say that they are following the recommendations of like the American Academy of Pediatrics and other public health officials and you know will only proceed with what they're hearing is safe. They also did point out in a statement as well that you know that there are social and emotional sort of There are social emotional benefits to being at school and kids could be hurt by being out of school as long as well. So what are teachers and parents saying carry? It feels like to some extent they're being pitted against each other in this whole school reopening. Yeah I mean there's all kinds of us here. There are some parents I heard from a couple of teachers here at the rally who were saying, some parents are telling us why don't you just go back to work and you know there is some there is some sentence that it's like it's not that I stopped working. You know we just aren't in the building and that there are other parents that are on the side of I don't feel safe sending my child into the school building either so it's just it's there are so many varied opinion here that are very strong, which is why I think you're hearing so much sort of tension on this. Well, that's WB our education reporter carry young reporting live at the State House at a rally this hour carry. Thanks for taking time out to join us. You're welcome.

State House Federation of Teachers reporter Massachusetts Teachers Associa Massachusetts School district Governor Baker Secretary Peiser Carrie American Academy of Pediatrics Goatley Department of Elementary seventy percent six feet
234: Distory: A Podcast About Life With Disabilities

Latino Rebels Radio

15:29 min | 2 years ago

234: Distory: A Podcast About Life With Disabilities

"Lows knows you'll do it right to get your deck. Ready for entertaining. We're here to help top brands like cabinet and Faust bars, you can refresh your deck at the right price and we can match any color stance. You're sure to get the look you're going for those sparks tearstained sealer starts his lowest thirty five ninety eight. When you're finished out of pop of color with two for ten dollars. Select hanging baskets for simple and refreshing updates. Do it right for less. Start with Lowe's. Offers valid through five fifteen. See store for details. US only excludes Alaska into white. Hey, guys Luella here of Latino rebels radio. It is Tuesday fourteen two thousand nineteen and we've been featuring the final entries of food doodle media's first community podcast lab. And this is the last entry, and I'm going to turn it over to doodo media's executive director, Mick good friend Erica deadly. Welcome to Futura media groups community podcast lab, a partnership between future media WB. You are and mass creative this story by Maria Cristina DEVE is about how she struggled with dyslexia and actually felt disconnected from her family because teachers and doctors told her parents not to have her speak Spanish, but only English until she was much older, everyone is special and their own unique way. And that's especially important to remember in public systems like education, one size doesn't fit all this became clear to me and my family. When my teachers struggled to recognize my symptoms of this Alexia and continue to teach me like any other student this caused me many struggles both in terms of language as well as in terms of self esteem and other things which are very important to a young child life disabilities. Like dyslexia impact around one out of five children in the state of Massachusetts. This is according to Senator Barbara the down the end, this is not a small number. It means that basically every classroom has someone with dyslexia or another disability. Unfortunately, the resources dyslexic need to succeed in school are not always properly offered. I'm Ray Christina that by and this is the story a podcast about life with disabilities. Made possible by the Fukudome media community podcast lab. This story starts with my mom. I expressed my concerns Dr in you being behind. Name is Kanye her native tongue is Spanish she wants to speak in both English and Spanish to me. But when I showed signs that I was not learning easer. She went to the doctor to ask what would be best. My doctor recommended my mom, speak, only in English prevent confusion and allow me to catch up. But this was a solution that meant putting aside something that was very important to me Spanish. What did you? I was no really concerned about it. Not thinking about a time about the parked ohi. You know, be able to speak fluent is punish how you communicate. With family is my biggest considerable hull, you were to become indicated Indian violent would you go to school every day and UPS or the time again, this was a temporary solution that only pushed the real issue further into the future. This became much clear when I entered kindergarten. Why I started really getting a little concerns where when the kids start doing ABC's. E f g a tie Jake on you know, they all riding a little mom pop. Little simple things you cannot get the concept of the of the lettuce. A phil. What's consent? I went to speak immediately to the to the teacher. But later, my mom started to notice I was having trouble with my ABC's, which are the fundamentals for reading. That's what my mom got really concerned and started to speak with the teachers in all your pictures that is required as to meeting. So when anybody's is. There were no concerns regarding how you were the better in the classroom, and we'll see once as okay, even though I could see that you wouldn't make him progress. It was also the school year deters are the worst recommendation for you to repeat kindergarten. I was like where did they come from? When we would having all this means I see what's going on k now they're recommending for you to repeat kindergarten. So I come so many questions about that tied. I have been there was no a meaning that I was bitty happy to have on. Whether this was no happy is because I hide to communicate you with the teacher to see force was shown. We'll see what you say. The meeting is the federal member greatly was that the symptoms that I was I was explaining to the that you were able to read that they needed to have more time for you to be able to to be classes, if you come for with the, you know, the basic so overeating. Asked if I they will be testing available for the school to save which was something else. They can do the question, and they are sure me that it was nothing to level. I think a parent needs to say, well, look, what can be done to more closely observe and to get some data on what's happening with the child. This is Carl Poconos. He is a public school liaison for the landmark school landmark focuses specifically on teaching kids with dyslexia, even if it means not receiving direct service at that point or getting a diagnosis, but let's get some observational data to show what's actually happening and to request testing as soon as possible. So that the some objective data as well as the observational because it's too easy for teachers to say, oh, it's it's a developmental issue. They'll grow out of it don't worry weightless way to while. I don't think that's a satisfactory answer. But that's exactly the answer them. My mom got. She was trying to do this checking in with the teachers trying to get feedback in terms of how I was doing in class. She was always trying to get notes. About my performance. But the teacher never seemed to have any feedback to give even after the school had recommended I repeat kindergarten. They told my mom. The issue was not that serious. They told her that I was young and that would be fine, but she became concerned again one in the middle of the school year things continued you would know the most ready any growth in your ability to read and Julia to remember some of the or the alphabet continued to have problems in regard recalling information on percent that that concerns the teacher who was Colonel shocked. I was continue bringing those same concerns. And she was keeping telling me that it was no considerable I failed that teachers have a grasp while what's going on with you. We have a very much a lot of this. Dreaming about a high what learning disagreement about your ability to read which was selling that were doing a little progress. She was sending books from the school to the house for you to really any whatever to read those books. They would not concern you able to read the books so this to give different book. Also price you wouldn't to read you will already memorize those books. My teachers thought I had been reading the whole time. But I had only been memorizing the books we were doing in class in many ways, I would have considered this a success because I wanted to be normal. I wanted to peer like I could read like the other kids. Because what kid wants to feel like they're behind all their peers. And my teacher saw what I was using as my coping mechanisms and mistook them as meaning that, I actually understood the building blocks of reading this went on for years and years same conversation after same conversation with my teachers, but no progress, and it's something that could have been resolved quickly with the right support. But it took years to even address to even recognize in second grade. I was trying to solve a word problem. I recall completing free out of four sentences. But I couldn't think of a fourth word that I knew how to spell so I asked for help and someone's adjusted the word car and showed me how to spell Carr C A R. But by second grade, most people already know how to spell car. It encompasses many. Areas in the academic realm. The reading the written expression, the oral language expression mass spelling that it's it's an disability. That's going to be with them. But there are ways to address it school was telling me that they wouldn't want to win Bella shown for for you. So I found never later who did a completed the independent wish for you did a battery of testing a week off of the giveaway. Call me, I said, well, I am I am completely stone about the results of liberation. I wanted to say that I got a scare. Oh my God. What happened? I said you order has very high Q, but the sending a very chronic form of dyslexia. Finally, I had a diagnosis. And finally the school started. Having me meet several times a week with a special education teacher who taught me using the Wilson method and approach that emphasizes heavily on repetition as well as other strategies to help teach students and still so grateful to miss Pedro as she made such a difference in helping me learn, and as she noted I did really well in her classes you. She just took off you would able to complete all books on the on the Wilson program. And what she mentioned to me is that she had never have a stolen who was able to make progress as quickly as you did a little bit better much, much better. Look more more happy to and you would looking forward for this clashes to read he will able to to know what's going in the blackboard. What did teach reading the blackboard? So it was a big difference. Things got better with reading and writing. I still didn't know Spanish it was so many as what's going on with you at a time between. Going in and out different things. Listen time because you did have to catch up. But I do believe that will have in very healthy for you. If I could have a stick in the home and talk to you in Spanish, my Spanish, language classes didn't have services similar to the Wilson method, nor did I have that really important period of time in early childhood, which is ideal for learning second language anymore. Time had gone by. And a moment had been lost in the shuffle of delays after delays. My mom had tried her best. I think as pot in you to Montaigne communication with school. You have considered to be in this concerns to teacher, even thus to appoint that speedier debater for the indicators and the in the school system, but it's important to have that open communication, even the in my case I felt that inning inning took me anywhere. But gimme the ability to to think outside the box. In October two thousand eighteen Massachusetts. Governor Charlie Baker signed a Bill which would require the department of elementary and secondary education in Massachusetts to create a series of guidelines to help in screening students who have displayed at least one of the signs of dyslexia as well as increased training for teachers on the topic of this Lexi, this proposal has received strong support from advocacy groups such as coding dyslexia. But it has also been met with concerns about the costs. It will require to be implemented. However, I believe the cost of students going undiagnosed is a far worse prospect to me this sounds like a really wonderful Bill. So I'll hold my final verdict until we see how it will be implemented. But looking back. I can see how I showed many of the different signs that I could have dyslexia. And I have to wonder if something like this Bill these rules had been in place. If I could have had a better experience in terms of education. Will this Bill actually help people time will only tell? I want to say Karl token landmark school, miss pito. My mom Tuta media appear X podcast garage. And everyone else that has supported me for out this production. This has been distorted thank you so much for this. This.

Massachusetts Bill US Luella Alaska doodo media Lowe Maria Cristina DEVE executive director ABC Senator Barbara Kanye Ray Christina Jake Carl Poconos Governor Charlie Baker ABC Mick Karl
White Supremacy Groups See Boost In Membership Following Debate

Radio Boston

48:32 min | 9 months ago

White Supremacy Groups See Boost In Membership Following Debate

"Wight supremacist organizations are actually a part of regular conversation in America today after a stunning moment from Tuesday night's presidential debate. You want to call them what you want to call him. Give me your name. Give me a price. Proud. Unripe problem. Stand back and stand by but I'll tell you what I'll tell you what somebody's got to do something about Antifa and the left. Researchers at the Harvard. Kennedy. School track online hate groups like the proud boy say they've seen hundreds more people join since Tuesday night including here in New England joining us now is John Donovan Research Director of the Shorenstein Center on media politics and public policy at the Kennedy School Joan Welcome back to Radio Boston. Thank you for having me. It's a shame that. Studio. I know it would be great to see you in person what has happened since the president refused to condemn white supremacy and used the phrase stand back and stand by at the debate. yet for the militia groups and white supremacists online they were obviously like everybody else watching the debates. So when they got a wink and a nod from the president's we saw an uptick in activity in groups that they were chattering in and also They used the slogan to create a bunch of means and even a t shirt, and now they are Embracing new wave of media attention and really trying to drive their issue into public discussion and mainly prior to this. The reason why that came up is because we saw these groups organizing even though they had been removed from facebook and twitter and twenty eighteen, they were creeping back onto these platforms underneath the banner of blue lives matter groups in back the blue campaigns. Okay. You just said embracing new wave of media attention. So I want to pause for a second having done some homework this week on best practices in reporting on white supremacist groups I want ask, is it problematic that we have already said one groups named multiple? Times on our air already during this discussion, how should we think about that? It's a really good question and when a group like that gets a national stage, we end up really having to think twice about what it is that we say in public about them and so one of the things that journalists should be really cognizant of is just not giving these people the microphone you don't WanNa call up the proud boys and say, hey, why don't you tell me what your group represents, which under normal circumstances for journalists is the first thing you would do? So. Why don't you tell us about the proud boys who they are the wider ecosystem in which they operate so It goes back to twenty sixteen in the the initial wave of white supremacy that we were talking about back then which was called the alt-right. The proud boys were a group that were looking to fashion themselves as similar but different in. So they posted a lot of jokey videos of themselves online described themselves as a drinking club and One of the main features was that people had to take an oath which said. similar things that we would. We've heard from white supremacist like you know, I'm proud male chauvinist and I won't apologize for inventing the modern world in. So there are a lot of jokey things about this group from twenty sixteen that are still things that people think this group subscribes to. But over the last several years, this group has been at the forefront of some of the most violent political events in specifically the Pacific northwest and most recently were involved in. A series of violent events related to these trumpcare vans that were being organized or these mega caravans where groups would show up in PORTLAND. Several dozen cars and. Trucks and in in one such occasion they had brought Paintball guns and we're shooting at protesters and other passersby and so groups like this are known entities in different areas But once they reach this sort of national stage it becomes really important for people to understand that this is a violent organization that has Ties both to militia groups and It does. you know really subscribed to white supremacist ideologies. So John I want to shift our focus here both away from that organization and back towards home you say that you've been seeing tracking hundreds of people joined these groups since the debate I do think there is a misconception that this only happens in say. Midwestern states, southern states, you just mentioned the Pacific Northwest, but this is something that's happening here in New England to is. Yeah. So if anybody's been out to some of the protests, you've seen counter protesters that are you know in support of these police you know police more broadly, and you'll see some of their t shirts and ways in which they've organized around back the blue or blue lives matter which that on its surface is not a problem. But when you start to look at well, what other things are they doing? where else are they congregating online? You see that a group Lake Super Happy Fun. America. which doesn't sound like what it is. has been the in the background organizing What was this? What was the straight pride parade. A few months ago, and then also several rallies in Boston over the summer in support of police. But when you look at the pictures of those events, people are wearing open nationalist paraphernalia in signal signals, and so we have to take seriously the fact that these groups see. Certain Themes as opportunities to do a bit of a Bayton switch, which is that of course yes they do support the. The police but that isn't the only feature that's bringing them together. So I do want to point out two things. One for listeners you are not equating people who are pro law enforcement with these white supremacy organizations two super happy fun hot. The last word always escapes my head super. America also organized the rally in two thousand seventeen over the summer where there was kind of protesting a in Boston. Let's move. Yeah and I just want it. Yeah. I want to reiterate I don't find. I don't think there's a problem with people in support of law enforcement and and really trying to bridge the gaps in communities around communication. Unfortunately, what we're seeing is is these groups are are congregating under the cover of and we saw this back in two, thousand, sixteen in two, thousand, fifteen at a number of trump rallies known white supremacists were using the fact of the rally to. Openly, advocate their positions in public. So now president trump has since made an additional statement since Tuesday night saying quote I don't know who the problems are. I can only say they have to stand down let law enforcement do their work unquote I wanted to ask you how you read that a walk back. A disavowal is actually similar to what he already said what is your take? In this situation I think that we don't really know anybody's intentions right when or what what trump deiter didn't know but I think it's important that when he says lawn let law enforcement do their job. It's because law enforcement are the ones who are reckoning with the militias that are showing up in the streets, the armed white vigilante groups that are showing up in the streets and what's telling about it is the statement that trump made. He talked about the proud boys and then in the next breath, he talked about anti-fascist protesters and the violence on the left. And this has been a particular focus of the proud boys One of the reasons why they were deep platform by facebook and twitter and twenty eighteen is because they would call for public rallies and when they would go out they, there would be antifascist protesters would come out reaction and proud boys weren't just showing up to these rallies and and. Then a skirmish broke out they were showing up with weapons they were showing up both with clubs and other kinds of knives and also pepper spray, and we were when you look at the footage of these these events, it's just a rolling street brawl in. So it becomes really dangerous for police to have to deal with dynamics like that where people are armed. So I want to ask this next question thoughtfully which you talked about the president immediately pivoting to talk about left wing extremism. He said it's the real problem on Tuesday night. He has repeatedly argued when push on white supremacy or. ANTIFA is the truth threat I WANNA clarify at the beginning of this year. The FBI placed racially violent extremists. The majority of which it has said are quote fueled by some kind of white supremacy on quote on par with foreign terror or? And last month FBI director Christopher Wray testified that ANTIFA is an ideology, not an organization. Nevertheless, we hear people talking about concern about the presence of Antifa, at protests as well despite those facts that I just laid out, is it appropriate to argue some equivalence between these kinds of groups? I. It's a difficult question because we wouldn't ask the same thing about you know feminism nobody's saying, well, who's the feminine? WHO's the organizer of feminism right and WHO's behind it? You actually have to think about the local in specific in contingent situations that protests arise in in so we will see We will see protests become violent for different reasons in different cities and in cities that have will local anarchist contingent of of folks that are you know going to many different kinds of protests, not just recent ones that have been doing it for many years the police have a way of approaching them and have a way of of working with groups like that. Right now, over the summer, we've seen a bunch of people just people that are not really well organized that. are going out into the streets for various reasons and whatever kicks off the violence in those areas is often when you talk to activists or business people in the local area, a lot of it has to do with local dynamics and the ways in which those protests are being handled in. So if we look back into July when federal agents were showing up in unmarked cars and arresting people in the Pacific northwest and you heard activists saying, we don't know what's going on our people are being disappeared. That adds to a kind of tension that is is more likely going to end in violence because people are not able to assess the threats that are being made against them, and we do see then those areas start to to turn into It starts to be really difficult relationships between the police, the federal government and local local protesters but it's it's really hard to say because on the flip side with this with the right wing. Violence you'll see in their chat rooms. You'll see and their groups that they will talk about what weapons they're gonNA bring They'll talk about how much they can't wait to get their hands on. You know these protesters will talk by name about protesters that they want to assault and so that kind of fora and or and where they're openly talking about it is is where we have more evidence of the actual coordination of violence. So in listening to you. So some groups are specifically threatening armed violence. If they believe the election as fraudulent on Tuesday night, we heard president trump invoke his supporters are or exhort his supporters to go to the polls to watch what is going on. The president has also repeatedly said that the election likely will be fraudulent even though there's no evidence for that. It sounds like we should not just take all of that is trolling. It sounds like you think there is reason to take it quite seriously. Is that right? I'm we are in such a specific situation that it's really hard to even assess what's going to happen tomorrow. But we know pretty confidently that on November third, we are not going to have of Victor, which is to say that it's GonNa take a while for votes to be counted. There's a believe eight states that can't even open. mail in ballots. Until the the you know November third is as the election day and so that interim period where we are waiting for the votes to be counted and cast is going to be a very historically significant time where there's going to be a lot of anxiety and fear and what we know about disinformation as it really Paris cynically attaches itself to fear and outrage and so. I'm very concerned that calls for public action and the current situation that we're in where people are are showing up armed, and in some ways playing the role of police in their communities is going to be is going to lead to violence in different areas, and the last thing I'll say about this is also about the. The end of the debate where trump called for people to be poll-watchers not a lot of people know what the process around poll watching is, but you can't actually just go to a poll in hang out a polling station hang out and watch what's happening and ask people about the ballots and things you actually if you are involved in a campaign, there's. A process by which people can become poll-watchers and if you are canvassing, you have to be a certain amount of feet from the front door of any polling station. But I have a feeling that when people find that out, which is the truth they're going to feel as if somehow their rights are being trampled on and we're going to get into a very difficult situation. And that is Joan of research director of the Shorenstein Center on media politics and Public Policy at Harvard Joan thanks. Thank you for having me appreciate it. President trump recently pledged to sign an executive order creating quote the seventeen, seventy, six and quote which he says will promote more patriotic education. He also announced at the National Endowment for the humanities has awarded a grant to fund the creation of a pro American curriculum. Here he is explaining that decision at excuse me a constitution day event last month critical race theory. Sixteen thousand nine project. And the crusade against American history is toxic propaganda. Ideological poison. That if. Not removed will dissolve the civic bonds that tie together. Will destroy our country. Now, the federal government cannot mandate local curriculum, but it does US funding to encourage or discourage certain content or approaches. So we've ourselves asking, what do we teach in the Commonwealth? Who decides how is that negotiated between teachers, districts, the state historians, and so today we're going to get a peek behind the curtain at that process of deciding what we teach, how we teach it, joining us as Dea Riegler Science, and social studies teacher at the Elliott K. through eight school the Boston Public School district also the Massachusetts history teacher of the year do welcome to Radio Boston, and congratulations. Thank you very much happy to be here. Also joining Catherine Targa director of literacy and humanities for the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Catherine Welcome. Thank you for having me. And Khalil Gibran Muhammed professor of history race in public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School and a contributor to the New York Times Sixteen nineteen. Project Khalil Welcome back to the show. Thanks for having me. Listeners do you have questions about what we teach and how we decide or opinions and how we teach US history in our schools? You feel like we receive an honest do you feel like you receive an honest representation of our nation's history in school or your kids call us eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five that's one eight, hundred, four to three talk. You can send us a tweet at radio. Boston's Katherine I. I'll start with you in the state I know the state provides a framework as opposed to a specific curriculum but can you tell us on the state level? How do you think about teaching US history? Well in Massachusetts history really starts in third grade. This is where we start to introduce some of the foundational events in American history and the Massachusetts Framework which as you mentioned, defines the standards for what we expect children to learn at each grade level really begin precolonial times and they continue through the modern era The traditional facts and figures of as what you might think of as history but our standards and Massachusetts really emphasize critical thinking skills, skills like formulating questions, conducting research to understand what happened in the past evaluating sources synthesizing information We really put a premium on those skills in the context of understanding the events in American history because these are the skills that children will need to become participants in our democratic society when they're adults. Suit deal let me turn to you for your history teacher. You're in the classroom what is your mindset when you're deciding exactly what to teach how to teach it? That's a great question. So as an educator, I'm a black woman mother daughter sister wife and I have many more other identities come with me into the classroom. But as an educator and as a teacher, it's not my job necessarily to teach students you know what the things but you know rather how to think. So when looking at all of the Massachusetts standards which are really thorough Boston public schools has a really great. History and social studies department. So I can look for their for forces they put together field trip ideas you go the library of Congress. So yes, there are standards, but it's really in the delivery and knowing the students in front of you about how you're going to you know hit those standards and how to make history come alive and connect to the present Fifth Grade is particularly interesting because it covers United States history. Up until civil rights, right this is a history I've learned my entire life but of course, I bring my identities but it's more about taking. The students in front of me where are they coming from? What is their perspective in kind of then going you know finding resources to bring this history you know into the classroom. So Khalil. We just heard from both Catherine India, a lot of emphasis to use his words on not what to think but hot think critical thinking critical thinking skills. It is interesting that President specifically mentioned the sixteen nineteen project and it seems maybe the seventeen seventy six commission kinda counterpoint to that. Can you remind us what was the goal of the Sixteen Nineteen Project at and? Why is it so difficult and so important to to include a sixteen nineteen does the concept of slavery content on Fil slavery teaching about our nation's history was slavery. Sure because sixty, nine, hundred projects set out to. Provoke a national reckoning and conversation about the under. misunderstood role of African Americans and both the founding of the nation, the wealth accumulation that made America the richest country in the world of the cultural uniqueness and footprint of America's. Cultural Industries from music to Hollywood alongside the peculiarities of our liberal democracy by comparison to other western European countries we are. We are by per capita. Federal spending the stingiest nation relative to other countries that are European liberal democracies. We also have the largest population of people under some form of criminal justice supervision. So the sixteen nineteen project centered the story of African Americans and racism to help explain how it is. The country came to be how it evolved and what it looks like and how it behaves today We know. Really. Well, based on some survey information largely produced by the Southern Poverty Law Center. How Poorly These themes are taken out in typical US history curricula of starting in elementary school through high school we have other kinds of evidence from studies of textbooks and how they talk specifically about these issues, and we can compare in places like Texas versus California as the New York Times did just a few months ago how these issues are treated quite differently in textbooks. themselves. So the sixteen nineteen project sought to to have a national conversation about what's at stake in our civic education the stories we tell about who we are as a nation. I'm going to go to the phones for just a minute eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five, we've got John on the line from Dorchester John Go ahead. Hi. Thanks for taking my call I the conversation. So important to me, and one thing that's in I've been struck with is You Know Nineteen twenty there is a horrific massacre by your whites against blacks in the lack, wall, street, and it's something ties and not learn about. In school at all, I mean it's it's really a traumatic events in history and something that. Wasn't mentioned at all and I. Think you know we get this narrative I got the the growing up that. We have. And then it was over and everything was Nice. But it wasn't and not teaching critical asked history. Does everybody has a service. Our democracy. That time. Thank you for that I'm going to add one more voice. We've got Laura from West Roxbury Laura. Go ahead. Hi So I'm calling in from West Roxbury. I'm a teacher used to be a teacher in Hyde Park and I just wanted to say that I think conflicting critical race theory or or a racially and gender and sexuality aware history with anti-americanism is really toxic So my students who are largely black around an immigrant came in the day after trump got elected and I was wearing an American flag and. They were horrified because they were in tears and they were so scared in salt. Lake. America wasn't for them anymore and I should with them the quote that if you don't like with the American flag stands for don't burn it, wash it and that their ancestors had fought and died to give them a place in America and the police in this country that they should be of and fight for and I think that's really what? A multicultural history does is like demonstrate for them that they have police in our history. Laura thank you so much. I. Interested how those two comments resonate for you. Well I think about that place, you know your place in history. So a context book when you pick it up, it is written from a perspective and go into primary sources. You can actually explore multiple perspectives of the same of that, and I think that is where you know a lot of people might call it revisionist history. No, we can enter for example, War World War Two we can read a text book maybe we can study some maps we also can look at some things. From Japanese internment camp, so you have to just take multiple perspectives because that is the true like the truth lies somewhere in between there and I feel like a lot of textbooks that I grew up with you know just presented things as one way versus if you really take a step back from history, get primary sources in front of you, you actually can make those connections yourself and weaves together your own that speaks to Tulsa as well. I knew about it because I'm black but. I don't think my students do about. It also goes to a separate issue of like what's developmentally appropriate on you bring into the classroom and that's something you know I'm not gonNA teach students about the atrocities committed by Columbus but we can talk about you know you know Columbus's voyage. We can talk about you know the indigenous people already living here, and then what happened to them but that developmental appropriate kind of nature you know in the classroom is very difficult to navigate. So Catherine and Khalil I in listening to both of your first couple of answers and thinking about this. One thing I wanted to ask the two of you. We seem to be at a moment in our country where and maybe we always were but I'm going to focus on the moment we're on right now for just a minute where we are developing counter narratives to each other about who we are, what our history is, what should make us proud what we need to challenge etc, and I understand we have an important tradition. Of A decentralized approach to curriculum in schools, I, I wonder is the school building the classroom part of the place where we develop collective shared narratives about who we are as people who we are as a country, and if that's the case, how do you work that part of it into how to figure out what to teach in the classroom Catherine I think I'll start with you. You've got the perspective of the Commonwealth on this. Sure. So one of the things that we emphasized in our state standards for history and social science is understanding. The progress that the United States has made and some of the shared values that we at least purport to hold as a nation while at the same time encouraging honest informed academic discussions about some of the challenges that we have faced in striving to form a more perfect union conversations about prejudice, racism and bigotry Those issues are real in American history and Shouldn't be whitewashed in the interest of telling a single story We really believe that to develop critical thinking in our students were not in the business of training them in a particular ideology was helping them learn to think and part of being a well educated person being a citizen and our democracy is holding onto complexity. There's no one single story of America and were teaching a historical narrative that's not limited to just one perspective. Khalil does that feel right to you? Well I. If the question was what role does the school play in? Creating a sense of shared values and a common good that reflects our nation our sense of nationhood than it is absolutely essential. It's probably the most important socialising toossion around these questions but I I guess I would say that Historians Produce Much of the knowledge rooted in archival information whether it's diaries of political leaders or every day men and women who who lived through those times in order to arrive at a kind of preponderance of evidence of what happened and while I do understand the role of of primary secondary educators in an weighing different kinds of perspectives. Historians tend not to present history as if everybody's opinion mattered a long time ago political history was simply the record of what political elites said and they disagreed history often bore out who was right versus who was wrong for the past forty years we've had. Something like social history, which is much more diversity of voices in terms of how different kinds of people experienced it and I think that's been an incredible revolution. What we see in the trump administration in this moment is a lamentation on a stall jeff for a kind of top down political elite version of history using the founding fathers as our as our vehicle for understanding why today we have to get back to that. But this would be a CANTU saying trump's version of the world is the only version that should make it into the history books as we move forward and that would be an absurdity. So so the school has to actually. Actually function as a place to engage these debates and not simply the leave them to chance at students will figure it out on their own. A scribe one more caller here. Roberts on the line from Franklin rather go ahead. Hi, when I grew up in the sixties and seventies history was a separate class than a class called civics and I believe clearly and strongly that we should make sure everyone understands you know what happened to indigenous peoples and what happened in slavery but what they need to learn I think is Asian American African American immigrants. What is the now? What is the Constitution provide? Why of vote is important why you should Serve in your municipal local boards and maybe une councils that doesn't around anymore. Someone mentioned shared values just from the last conversation I. think that's the share value that what it means to be an American immortal. Basically the longest democracy we have so far versus other countries except Britain or whatever i. just think I just think we have to go back to a civics lesson that separate and apart from a history. Thanks for that. Robert I appreciate it. So D- I mean we're talking about all these things that we should do and I really WanNa bring it back now to you and the decisions that you make day to day in the classroom and I'm wondering especially are you pivoting? For example, when students bring up certain kinds of conversations to maybe different content than you had planned, I understand there are some strict. Guidelines but I wonder how much freedom you feel to go where the kids want to go to help them suss this stuff out. I mean at first started building a really faith in collaborative learning environment because the classroom needs to be that safe space where students can take risks they can say something that you know maybe they're like grappling with and they're not GonNa be you know? No one's GONNA come down on them or say you can't see that these. That's the space of the classroom you know specifically, of course, when you have these conversations, different things come up and as a teacher you have to first and foremost be really well informed about history yourself. So we were having a discussion about the declaration of independence we were talking about the constitution and then a student we said, will I rent? So I'm leaving my money to somebody else. And I was like, well, why are you thinking this? So we ended up going into this whole conversation about you know property and what it means on property and who owns property and you know he was like, well, maybe my mom doesn't own property because she was born somewhere else and now I'm GonNa. American. But. Yet the classroom is first and foremost safe-space because of course, things are gonNA come up but as the educators and the adult in charge, we have to know how to pivot you know an and you know bring it back to those connections. Right? What happened in the past is continual informing what's happening right now. And Catherine I want to pick up further on Roberts call he was advocating for US teaching. A kind of civics and also kind of history I know the state make some decisions about emphasis. My understanding is there was a two thousand eighteen revision that put an emphasis on civics. How do you make those decisions? Do you consult with experts with historians like Khalil? How does that happen if you could tell me the next minute or so? Yes, I'm so glad that Robert brought that up because we do have really renewed emphasis on six So to revise the our standards or expectations for what students are to learn in school, it's a lengthy process that takes two to three years on average The Department conducts research consults with experts. In this case, it would be historians to understand advances in the discipline that need to be reflected in what our kids learn in school a panel of educators and experts rewrite the standards There's an opportunity for the public to weigh in and all of this happens before. Our revised expectations are changed. So Khalil I've got about thirty seconds left, and in that time I'd like to ask if you had one message to parents and kids about how to engage with learning history. What would that message be? Fearless. Using the books that have long sat on shelves because people were. Ignoring all that great work read things fall when re Tony Morrison. Read the great works that are coming out now from authors like Abram, kindy, and others who are producing wonderful young adult readers on these topics. There's so much to explore at this point. Khalil Gibran Muhammed professor of history race in public policy at the Kennedy School thank you. You're welcome. Kathryn Targa director of literacy and humanities for the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and secondary education. Thanks to you. Thank you. And Dea riegler teacher at the Elliott K. through eight school and history teacher of the year. Thank you. Thanks for having me. I'm, not Susanna Daring. Young. This Weekend Music Educator Rob Capela will make his only trip all year to Boston to record a version of his what makes it great music series presented by the celebrity series. The show takes part classic songs and breaks down what makes them so great. His boxton show will focus on the works of Cole Porter Porter was the American composer and songwriter behind early mid century popular musicals anything goes and Kiss Me Kate here he is singing his hit song. Feels like a weird time to be talking about cold. In Two thousand twenty. So when we reached rob from New, York I asked him, why did he decided his one performance this year to focus on Cole Porter. Cole Porter is enormously popular and he's enormously popular interestingly enough right now for very similar reasons to he was popular then you know so many of Cole, Porter's most famous songs were written in the middle of the depression. I mean anything goes written in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, four I mean, the thirties was a fantastic decade for Cole porter though for almost no one else in America you know in a way it was like the Tiger King of its. Time only a much classier version but you know it provided a wonderful escape into this world where everybody is beautifully dressed has impeccable manners and speaks in perfect rhymed couplets. There was an enormous number of people who went to the movies in staggering numbers during the depression. This kind of escape was popular in. So many different ways miniature golf became hugely popular in the nineteen thirties that would cole porter offers really is this fantastic escape into this wonderful world of A. Possibility that was somehow on the horizon but not present how are we looking to entertain meant to help us escape and and is there any part of reality that you find in this music to you either in the face of horrific situation you either look at it you try to escape from it. But what I think is wonderful about Cole Porter is though it might seem because the surface is. So, glittering, and so distant from those gritty realities of the depression as if he were avoiding it beneath that glittering surface are all these issues of love loss regret despair. So once you get past the glittering surface and the white tie and tails, there's all those fundamental human realities that have been neath the surface that make it much more than tiger king you know and I was a little kid. I used to watch musicals on Saturday mornings on TV, and it was fred astaire and Ginger Rogers was this wealthy elite exclusive club that you would escape into which Cole Porter not only presented. But really was apart of and I wonder in the comparisons that you're making. Is there a Cole Porter today do we have somebody out there in music right now that is sort of our Cole Porter in. This moment well, I would say the closest to a Cole Porter in this moment though now he's near the end of his life with certainly Stephen Sondheim who is capturing in a way their own world because as you just mentioned Cole Porter was not only transporting us to what to most people seem like fictional world that they weren't living in. It was the world that he was actually living in. For him, it wasn't a fiction he was wearing light entails nearly every day dinner. Fred astaire yeah he was Fred Astaire. Sometime. Also was really talking from his own world as well but somehow found even in his own unique world something that connected with everyone else's world. Now in your concerts in your performances, you will sort of help us with the curtain behind the music of a song and help us to understand what makes it great and I understand. You're going to walk us through the chorus of your, the top one, thousand, nine, hundred four is anything goes I always Ethel Merman right who I hear in the back of my mind that sort of your Ta. which perfect that's how. The radio thing doesn't work out I see. I would have SORTA. Let you start to walk us through the magic of that. Song. I think first of all, you know if you really want to get a sense of what porter's world was like during the depression, there's this wonderful article written by this New Yorker writer Margaret Harriman at the time, and she talks about the composition of your the top. She says, you're the top was composed quote during a separate booth Lutwa Twat when coal and Miss Alastair McIntosh entertain themselves by making up a list of superlatives that rind porter considered the song just. A. Trick and thought people would soon be bored by rather than being bored by it. People joined in and newspapers reported that the game around town in the winter of nineteen thirty, four, thirty, five was writing new verses to you're the top sometimes loot ones I mean that's what porter his social circle were doing in nineteen, thirty, four, thirty, five at the height of the depression, and in fact said, this is this is a musical six game six degrees of Kevin Bacon. And in fact, it was not only him but he would get three hundred parodies a month in the mail from other people who joined it, and again talk about escape. So you just have to get that million before you even start hearing the incredible song itself. Now, to talk about the song itself, you know probably the most famous question that every great songwriter has ever been asked is what comes first the words or the music while I'm now going. To solve this once, and for all the truth is it makes absolutely no difference. It's the combination of the two that counts and often ported rhythmic genius is the key. So let's just look at the very beginning of the famous. You're the top and let's build up just the first three words you're the top from ordinary degrade in four stages. So let's start with the bad version that I rode with your the top three even notes. This is not great. Your thought top now I haven't changed a note of porter. All I've done is change the rhythm and now it's utterly boring. You're the TUMP. Now let's make a little bit better by speeding up just the top and turning it into a syncopation. So not your the top, but you're the top like this. Your. The top it starts to come to life Yeah Alison. I'm wiggle in with you. But now even better porter also syncopated your off the beat as well. So now it's actually You're the top and suddenly those words come alive just because of the way he said it and one more fantastic thing that's the key to it all now, you might have noticed that the piano is playing a little leap up before that vocal entrance and that leap up is the essence of your the top. Now, the truth is I've been cheating I've actually been playing a simple opt of the same notes on bottom and top. but. Leaves higher to fantastic distance. Up to the top and the harmony under your, the top has one great note listen closely. This is subtle. Ordinary would be this. You'll work the top but instead of. He changes one note to. A. It's these tiny changes that are the difference between Gordon Gray why does that feel so different I mean it literally physically feels different to hear that because this has no tension. This is Oh, what's GONNA come next? It's again it's that tension beneath the socially perfect persona it all looks lovely on the surface you're the top and everything being neat and tidy, but beneath it. There's always this tension. Now remember the porter was married for thirty four years to a woman who was once described as the most beautiful woman in the world it was actually a marriage of convenience and he was a closeted homosexual and so there's so much tension beneath the surface of all the lyrics. Of Cole Porter. This is a regular life with a regular marriage, this porter. Now. Porter is a master having lyrics unfold in the perfect pace for the audience to follow. So there's a little filler in the piano after you're the top the pianos. which gives the audience time to get ready to hear the witty description that follows. Now, here's how PORTA works follow closely we've got three notes for your the top. He keeps those three notes as the core. The first three of what comes next you're the top become the first three notes of your. Call Lussier what I call additive construction you keep the three. and. Add more. Now even in that first phrase, you now see how many great choices there are. I'll slow it down. We got the first great leap. To a distant, we've got the great core that made you shiver under your the top with our double syncopation. We've got our little Phil. Getting. US Ready and then we've got our new added version. You're Akal CEO in five seconds of music. It was so interesting to have you talk about he's a he was a popular as an escape right and yet there were all of these difficult things happening underneath and it and it really is interesting. It's like the listener at some visceral level understand that that's what we're. Doing here right. So you've got that dissonance in that tension, which is what everyone's living through, and then you get this little promise of but okay. Now we're going to have the escapist fun here comes the list and you get both at the same time, and in fact, what comes next is a perfect example of what you described. Now you just heard you're the top the first way. You're the time but when it repeats its lower and it's now in a minor key, which gives us a different side to the same words A. Top There's more than we see on the surface and then even that little piano. Phil changes accordingly, the first time was in major and it was bright like this. Now. It's in China and lower. Things are not always what they seem importer. I'll just ahead to the any there's so much more if you come and listen to our program, the celebrities, but the ending is somehow the essence of porter came. That's wonderfully new self deprecating ending to finish the song. But if baby I'm the bottom, you're the top. But what could be a more perfect way to end the song completely encapsulating the text? In the music then to have the highest note of the song, be the final note of the song as the singer sings the words you're the top at the top of the range of the singer and the range of the song in literally is the top. But if they be on the bottom, you're the top and the wit continues to the final note he takes that little opening Piano Phil. Does the exact same notes higher, but with different cords underneath. And then instead of simply resolving an ending squarely on the beat, and here he delays to the last instant that tension we're talking about. Way. Dow. Gun. Poor. resolution. Feel resolved. Wow, we're hobbling was the first time you found yourself thinking You know you sort of discovered Cole Porter as. One of these musical magicians that you teach us about well, you know, I. was writing a book that for the last ten years. I. Was working on a book that came out in November called listening for America inside the Great American songbook from Gershwin Tucson time, and over the ten years each year I would pick one composer to focus on that year when I spent on porter was truly a discovery for me because I just always thought of the surface of porter and I had no idea how much was going on underneath us for example, I had no idea one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, seven, he had this tragic. Riding accident that for the last twenty, seven years of his life, he had thirty operations was crippled and in pain and only stopped writing the day after he finally had to have his leg amputated I had no idea. So it was really during that year of research when I discovered what was beneath the glittering surface and realized how powerful that is and that that's what really connects us because in the end as long as there is love loss yearning and regret, there will always be order that is composer Rab capital rap. Thank you so much for being with us today taking into the world and the music of Cole Porter. Thanks so much for having. All probably Miss Baugh. If. We will go out with the top. This version is performed by Kaphalo and Broadway Singers Sally Wilford and Michael. Winther at Jordan. Hall, the two singers will accompany capital this weekend in for more on what makes it great presented by the celebrity series you can go to our website Radio Boston Dot Org Roma Symphony by Strauss you're at Ascott show for today Radio Boston is produced by Jamie Bologna Zoe Mitchell Chris, sitter Paris Allston. Tim Scope is technical director with engineering today. By Glenn Alexander, our executive producer is attach Hoti TCI during. Thanks for listening. Join US again tomorrow for Radio Boston's we can review. But if baby I'm the bottom, you're the top.

Cole Porter Porter America US Boston Khalil Gibran Muhammed president trump Pacific northwest Massachusetts director ANTIFA facebook John Donovan Harvard twitter New York Times cole porter PORTLAND Shorenstein Center Kennedy School
Local Schools Prepare For Remote Learning In The Fall

Radio Boston

24:53 min | 11 months ago

Local Schools Prepare For Remote Learning In The Fall

"And. The countdown is on about one month ago until school starts in the fall. But with the corona virus pendant pandemic, still spiking across the country and a few troubling signs here in New England what our school districts parents teachers students to do Massachusetts Commissioner of Education Jeff. Riley is urging school districts to open in person in the fall and so far Somerville Cambridge and Boston made their September plans. Public. So listeners, we wanna hear from you. What's your town planning? What would you like your town to plan? Are you concerned about the fall and the kids? Are you a student? What's your take? Call us at one eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five that's one eight, hundred, four to three talk and we want to kick this off with Wvu our education reporter, Max Larkin. Hello Max. I Jamie. So yesterday Max on the show we heard from Boston city councillor. Kenzi. Balk, just as Boston public schools was putting out their draft plan now that we've had time to read it, what does it actually say? And notably, Jamie does not say there's going to be the prompt return earn a all fifty three thousand EPS students to classrooms. The report says either the district will begin fully remote meeting students at home or pursue a kind of hybrid model in other words, students, sharing space coming in certain days of the week and learning partly online, and then beyond that, there's a good deal of uncertainty in. Plan, the document we got was prominently labeled draft. One and I just want to give you a telling sentence I kind of flavor of IT students and staff. We'll be back in our school buildings in some manner on some schedule at some point during the twenty twenty one school year and then offering those two big options namely remote or hybrid for the start of the year bs administrators are doing just what a large majority of surveyed BBS. Families told them. They wanted to get two thirds of respondents including the vast majority of black and Latino respondents telling the district they wanted either online or a hybrid model this fall. Got It. So Max I should note that you're joining us remotely because so much of what wr is doing is from home and and there's so much uncertainty in what you're saying here to about the about the plan. What does it say that the state's largest public school system is so uncertain? Well I think that they just don't. Know what the Hell's going to look like. It you know we haven't apparently came to the virus even if we had, it could change quickly. We've got thousands of college students coming back to Greater Boston, soon, for instance, and so I guess the implicit argument of this plan is that this whole community decision bound to be informed by a mayor and governor decide and the recommendations of the city's public health officials. Kimmy senior adviser to be Superintendent Brenda Caselli, as she told reporters this morning that there just aren't really good options on offer right now, and she s for everyone's help as the plan takes shape. Please give us your better ideas so that we can incorporate those. And make make this plan better so that it's the best thing for this community when we get to the first day of school. So I. I just want to note that's a real effort to reach out to the community. You know where there are tons of different concerns housing health and food and work and disabilities, and that's something BPS has always done and yet at the same time I'm sure some people wanted a more concrete view of what's going to happen this fall. So speaking of concrete views do we have more clarity on what Somerville announcing we're going to we're going to hear in a moment from someone in Somerville Cambridge Doing. Yeah. In Somerville they have taken that more concrete route. They said, we're just not going to open buildings for any student on the first day of school you had city and district officials say they're just not yet confident in. The ventilation systems and our buildings, and also that they want to get this virus program up and running reliably before they reopened I spoke to rummy bridge. WHO's the president of the Somerville Teachers Association, the Union there. He told me there's some relief among his educator members that there is a plan for the wall even if it's not. What they would've for act in spring. And you know one of these meetings one of the teacher said, you know every day we don't make decision I`Ma worst teacher in the fall that you know people need time to plan to figure out what the year is going to look like most educators didn't WanNa return to a remote model they want that. Recognition of reality that that's likely where we're going to end up. So meanwhile, you've got Cambridge's superintendent proposing a slightly more nuanced approach under that plan students from grades four to twelve will stay home Jamie but then plan to reopen buildings kind of on an individual basis, safer students with disabilities, as well as for younger kids who might get a whole lot more out of being in a classroom and get a lot less out of online learning and Cambridge's school committee will vote on that plant. I think tomorrow night. So I mentioned at the top there that commissioner Riley was urging schools yesterday to get back in person what what's his argument? What's his case for that? Yeah Riley told this panel put on by the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce. Bet He does still want in person learning to happen. As soon as possible he was relying on the guidance of the American Academy of Pediatricians and that group said in late June that schools ought to find a way to get kids physically back in schools because schools are in effect more than schools we have. You know almost twelve million children in America with limited access to food they might get meals or snacks at at school many others rely on schools for help or support in cases of disability, and then there's all this learning time that can easily be lost when teachers aren't laying eyes on kids directly. So Riley is still saying best is to go back in person, but I do think that's Going to depend on the public health picture to Jamie cases suddenly surged when teachers and parents might start worrying so much that that advice might no longer seem practical or sensible. So we're obviously waiting on a number of districts When will we have every single town plan and what are you hearing about this decision by the commissioner to really have each city and town make their own choice? Yeah on the first part, there's a deadline here desi the Department of Elementary and secondary education of which Riley is in charge. They've asked for comprehensive plans to be submitted by August tenth, and I, think that's this coming Monday. If I'm not mistaken as for the local decision making element here, obviously you do have the counter example California where Governor Gavin newsom created a pretty strict system that will limit how schools can physically reopened how quickly last month I think many teachers would love it if Governor Charlie, Baker took a stronger line against physical reopening here. But then again, we have a time honored tradition of. Local, decision making on schools in Massachusetts. Surprising. That's been the case on this issue as well. Obviously, that might look a lot worse in hindsight, schools became an apparent vector for the virus this all. So Max, you mentioned some of the many many issues that face parents, teachers, administrators, students in the fall we're GONNA take some calls here coming up but but how our schools that are having some in-person presence dealing with safety Yes something I hear again and again from teachers and administrators is that they want students and parents to understand that even if schools do physically reopen, this will not be a return to normal save a social distancing will start at the bus stop and officials. Hope it will continue throughout the day people will be spaced out soon, it'll be asked to wear masks or face shields in class, and then I, think of the buildings Jamie when BBS did a survey of its physical plant a few years ago dozens of schools scored moderate problems with their ventilation systems and. A dozen more needed the wholesale replacement of those systems dozens more had problems with their windows were supposed to remain open this fall if that's possible. So I think there's going to be a lot of Jerry rigging and a lot of concern about the physical plant that students will be in fiscal. As you said, that's every was long before the pandemic right WBZ education reporter Max Larkin standby only take a couple of calls here one, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five is the phone number. Jack is calling from Jamaica Plain on your mind. Oh. Yeah. Hi thanks for taking my call on just I'm having some concerns as an after school teacher. I've been an after school educated for ten years on in Brookline and. I'm Mike Concerned. More votes. He's a hybrid model. How does that you know kind of play into the after school programming that parents rely on for care and then the kind of as the safety model goes is like if I'm GonNa, we're using the kindergarten classroom and they're in there all day in the turnover how do you go from the daytime to the after school in? In. Such a short time with a proper cleaning and ventilation. Are you worried about safety check? I am worried about safety I have a partner on you know obviously, it affects teachers and kids and families but you know the my household, my partner has parents that she sees for vulnerable and so then it kind of you know this going to make me not be able to see my family for the holiday. Am I gonNA be. Liability, city. Thank you, Jack. Thanks for the call there. I also want to go to Donna, she's calling from Brockton, Donna what's on your mind? How? Yes I just wanted to find out the study that came up in South Korea. The large study that says that children under ten don't spend the virus as much as old children over ten, and maybe we can just concentrate on a different plan for those kids to get them to school sooner just because they spread it less and Other concern is in the schools in the school systems that have a lot of blessing that would also be another consideration to take into account like. Maybe parents can bring their kids to school versus on the bus but I have a step stepson who's four years old in Boston and It's very hard to teach him at home and he does have a disability. So to get these kids younger kids in school with disabilities and and things like that. I think we should prioritize them over the older kid. Thank you done yet. Let's those are the issues that we're talking about here Max, and actually I want to turn to someone who's grappling with these. Issues as we speak joining us on the line is the chair of the Somerville School Committee carry a carry Norman carry welcome to Radio Boston. Thank you for having me so we. Just I just want to get your initial thoughts and reactions to what we heard from Jack and Donna there those are real concerns that I understand there folks outside of Somerville. But that I'm sure folks in Somerville are facing. well I pr- to say this is complex and unprecedented is an understatement it. It is not just rethinking and looking at. district wide considerations, ventilation, but someone talked about buses. The Minutia of this is I cannot be overstated. So if a student is at the bus stop and we're going to take their temperature do is there someone at the bus stop taking the temperature of the student before they get on the bus and if they have a fever or they turned around who is where I mean, there's so many decisions and so much procedural work that needs to be done to do this safely and and I know foremost this is a health crisis in safety is in in Somerville and I'm sure and every other district, the number one concern it is insanely complex and we are working hard to sort it out but. I hear I'm a parent as well. parent teachers concerned. Students. Concerns too about going back I. It's enormous and yet we're all working toward how do you deliver the best education you can. During a pandemic well listeners, the phone number is one, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five that's one eight, hundred, four to three talk. How are you thinking about half schooling in the fall where you worried about? What are your concerns? What do you think your city or town should be doing? Give us a ring Carey Carey Norman from Somerville. It is complex at the same time. There is this concern about an entire lost generation of students. How how do you counter? How do you balance those two things as a as a public official and as you said as a parent? I I wish I had the magic answer. Right every decision what we know is school kids learn best in person we know our teachers want to be in schools with our our students and we know parents need they need to work and and and we also need to consider the health concerns first and foremost of it is It it. It's mind boggling and yet we need to move forward. So in Summerville, we were initially starting remote a planning working towards a phased in in person. You. Know Hybrid model we will always have remote for our teachers and students who are unable or are uncomfortable coming back in person but we need to also prioritize our younger students who we know remote learning hasn't gone well for the pre. K. to second to third grade. Our special education students are English language learners, students, specialized programming they as we as we were able to open buildings and come back into faced in. We will also need to prioritize our most vulnerable students and also have a more robust. remote learning experience for all of our students. So wbz our education reporter Max and I want to bring you back in here. What are we hearing about remote learning? You know we know that there have been challenges from March on through the end of the school year. So so what what are you seeing in your reporting about remote learning and how how that will impact students in the fall? IAEA. Flavor of it and Romney Bridges comments earlier, and certainly we've heard a little bit about it and it's nobody's idea of a good time. But I think the one thing that can really make remote learning a struggle is if you're learning how to do it on the fly reassuringly was case in the spring I think one of the virtues of the plan in Somerville is now you've told teachers with a, you know a monk and. More to prep that they will be doing this modality or paradigm is sometimes called, and at least then you can craft your curriculum and programming to work in that way that being said I, you know I spoke to parents of students with disabilities and parents of really young kids. Remote learning is is next to impossible in in some of those families and that that's involved some really heroic adaptation on behalf of. Caters and families. So I think it will work better this fall it seems to me talking to. Some teachers, but it's imperfect to be sure. Got It and carry Norman Chair of the Somerville School Committee I do want to ask you what happens if a student gets sick or a teacher gets sick or class needs to be quarantined these the kind of things that some of weighing. Oh yes absolutely and so intolerable the schools are working closely with our city health department's our city, our health, our community partners we're working closely with. Community Health Cambridge Health Alliance We don't have yet exactly what those protocols will be Those are all scenarios we need to. You know what happens if one student is how do you keep the the wants your in person the smallest number of kids in a in a cohort so that if someone does test by visited, it minimizes at all I mean. Going, back to school, there is no perfect answer. The goal is to to mitigate the risk as as much as we possibly can and to be prepared. One of the reasons we're going remote initially is because we want to have all of those safety protocols, all of those health protocols in place beforehand because these are inevitable situations that are are going to arise We're GonNa, do everything we can not to, but we need to be prepared I mean I. I've been talking with a lot of parents and a lot of The upside of of Covid is these online school committee meetings. We had over three hundred people. Nine Ninety people were able to do public comment on Monday night, and so there is a lot of listening and a lot of the community, how to form these plans. But is You have to really take into every. Possible configuration cove is teaching us that our lives are Wiley intertwined in that the needs of each individual student and family is also unique and so we need to there isn't one plan that's going to answer all the questions I keep saying we need to prepared with the most resources and flexibility to be able to respond to however the the. The virus whatever form it takes and whatever the needs are our community, our teachers in our students. Well, that's carry Norman. She's chair of the Somerville School Committee Carrie Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you so much I want to go back to the phones now have got becky calling from Newton becky welcome to Radio Boston what's on your mind? Thank you very much I am a longtime middle school teacher in Newton. I'm also a parent in and I talking to a few parents this morning just informally on the street and people were talking about how much we want the hybrid model you know thinking that's bull in person is not even a possibility at this point although the district hasn't made a formal announcement but the thought of hybrid meaning some kids go Monday Tuesday other kids go Thursday, Friday and what I pointed out to. Maybe leaning day or something wouldn't Wednesday would be cleaning right? I would assume cleaning at school and more remote learning at home I really don't know I haven't been told but with parents didn't understand which I pointed out is that you know in the spring one of the largest challenges of teaching remotely for me at least I teach eighth grade with that you know I, it was hard for me to. Give. The support that I wanted to give both to General Ed and Special Ed students with the remote curriculum. So you know you can put something online, but you can try to be as clear with the pedagogy as you can. But it doesn't mean kids won't need support just like if they were in school and you presented something, then you go around and you support. Individually. So doing that at school is difficult my thought to the parents. This morning was when half of the cohort is at home and the doing the remote assignment that we posted and the other half is with me in the classroom, I am not physically able to support the kids doing the remote learning at home at all. So that will be a shift for less support. It's A. Real challenge and thank you for the call Becky and I want to bring in another voice who's dealing with a maybe A. Higher. Age. Group right. We have Joel Persad. She's an inclusion moderate disabilities physics teacher at Madison Park Technical Vocational High School in Boston welcome to Radio Boston. Joylin neither. Hi I'm here. Thank you for having me. Thanks for joining us We just heard from becky there in Newton. She's a middle school teacher and she has some concerns. What are your concerns? Yeah. You know as a mater disabilities teacher myself I am always thinking about how am I providing accommodation to my students and how they may not be getting that what they need and Entirety, and she mentioned the hybrid model and what people do not know is that yes, during those times. They are not where they're engaging as the learning. Basically they said to curb the amount of hours we shouldn't really be engaging with them like I can tell you every teacher is not going to do that. We're going to end up doing the extra work to make sure the students are getting what they need but the truth is yet, you're only getting half of the crime whereas even though we are remote, I am with you all the time I am able to see you. I am able to have conversations with you can see my assets right Bertha's two days on, and then two days off three days off actually I think that we need to really be thinking about how really the remote learning although difficult. Does allow for more interaction and more assistance and more accommodation than this hybrid model. and. So then what is your response to Commissioner Riley who who really is pushing for getting students back person? I mean first and foremost We all I want to be very clear teachers want to be with our students desperately we agree that. All unanimously, I would say that this way teaching of being together. An excellent is what we want to be doing. However, we need to be thinking about their hope not just their health, but also the community. is they go back to thinking about transportation and we need to remember that the association PD pediatrician she said that. We. Really needed to have focus on reopening fools in a way that maximizes safety learning and the wellbeing of children, and it would require new investments and we did not invest in a way that would allow us to reopen an equitable and Safeway. So yeah, I agree we all want to be there but unfortunately, we didn't put in the work necessary to make it so as safe equitable. So Joel and finally what's your message to your students to the parents to the folks who are calling in who are just as frustrated perhaps as you are. I would say that we need to make sure that we are making our heard that we are saying, let's not have a one-size-fits-all approach when we're thinking about people speaking about elementary middle versus high school let spend about them individually and know that teachers truly do want to do our best work and we just need the support of the district because this is a lot of work and we have not been given a full brand. So we be expected to have a perfect plans. Let's all be patient with one another but also make it very clear what our desires our and that health and safety are at the forefront in. In tandem and they are tantamount education. Joylin Persad is a teacher at Madison Park technical. Vocational. High. School in Boston Joylin. Thank you. Thank. You and W our education reporter Max. Larkin. If I still have you just just to wrap up here, we've heard a lot and we have a number of callers who who, unfortunately we're out of time and won't get to including someone who's noting that you know this study about students and children being less. Susceptible to corona viruses is just is perhaps one study and there's a lot. We don't know about the virus but Max in hearing all of our guest today our callers. How are you thinking about where we're headed in the fall? Yeah. Jamie I. Think you hear some resignation particularly as Gary Norman speaks that that none of this feels good. We all would have hoped that we were passed this now you know that we you know the virus was was sort of totally under control in the United States, but that's not the situation and then you know I can't help. But look at the example of Israel where schools reopened here they had virus under control and then schools became vector. That's something we should all be trying to avoid You know pretty ardent lay even as we rushed to serve the educational social and. Emotional needs of students you know in the interim while we wait for a happier time. He that seems to be the message year of two, thousand, twenty while we wait for happier time Wvu our education reporter Max Larkin. Thank you so much. Max Anki Jamie.

Max Boston Somerville Max Anki Jamie Somerville School Committee Commissioner Riley reporter Max Larkin school teacher Wvu Massachusetts Jack Carey Carey Norman Somerville Cambridge Joylin Persad Newton Gary Norman Somerville Somerville Teachers Associatio
BPR Full Show 6/25/20: The New School

Boston Public Radio Podcast

2:46:52 hr | 1 year ago

BPR Full Show 6/25/20: The New School

"Support for Boston, public radio comes from literally farms committed to transforming the way. Food is grown in New England. Fresh lettuce harvested daily in Massachusetts all year round. It's the lettuce. Locals love learn more at literally. FARMS DOT COM. COMING UP ON BOSTON, public radio at the first wave is, but in some states is beginning to look like February while some states seeing data trending in the right direction and more than twenty states, case counts are on the rise, and some even fear that those rising whiz could crashed right into a second one meal lack of any national strategy from the white. House is turn the nation into a patchwork of strategies to mitigate the worst of the virus talk to Chuck Todd up next about which direction he thinks the country's going. On Jared Bowen in for Jim Brady, after spending eighteen years in the Milton Public School. System one teacher never imagined she'd be the subject of a misconduct investigation, the reason having an earnest conversation with students about racism and police violence in the United States dot classroom conversation is now forcing Milton to have their own reckoning with systemic racism, and how they teach their children about race later learn more from Paul revel got him more next on Boston public radio? The radio I am Margery eagan Jim. Brady has the day off jared, Borgetti. Executive Senator is going to be joining me and just a little bit, but for now it is me and Chuck Todd Chuck Todd courses is the host of meet the press on NBC News NBC's Political Director Good Morning Chuck Todd how are you. I'm Marjorie. How are you? Well you know these crazy times as we all know Chuck Todd I've been reading and listening to your show and others. all day and all night and the consensus is that we are having a searching of this virus around the country, and we didn't have to be here and is threatening not only people's lives, but the restarting the economy the. Recorded cases up three percent compared to last month. So what's going on here? Well I mean the. Everything to scientists told us was going to happen would happen and yet our leaders didn't listen. I, mean you know one of the things that struck us this morning when we were preparing our morning newsletter for street. Is You know? When when people all right, so what happened? What did we do wrong well? We didn't do anything right is really what it starts right? We were late with testing. We were late with the first lockout. And then when we did the lockdown, it was not uniform. It was not. All, you know I don't think they did it. And the in and everybody that did it didn't do it the right way you you know the president sort of kind of getting in the way then new remember those guidelines to reopen your state. Do you know that the White House rolled goes out. Once was one day they wrote these guidelines and no state followed them. No state, there were these statistic metrics sure to follow. And then you know and everybody we you know when they would be asked the statement following your recommendation, they said well. You know some states know best and all this stuff well. If you want to know what fifty different plans deal with the car, virus would lead us to. It's now. We are right back where we started when you look at the new case Kerr, the the current cases the caseload total. We're now over what we were before. We're right back. It's as if we did nothing. And you know I I you know it's like. What's stunning to me? Is the federal government shrug and shoulders yeah. Okay Really. There's some there's some fascinating new polling, and I know people are suspicious of polls, and all that and I know that they didn't come out so well. Accurately at least we didn't do that. Wellness statewide polls look around, but one of the interesting things in this new. York Times poll is talking about how. A lot of voters are still with the present or a slight majority on the economy that they could do a better job than Biden. But we're. He's taking a shellacking and we can talk about this more in detail later is on his handling of corona virus race relations. So since we've been hearing constantly. From John Bolton getting reelected is is really what trump has been. Focused on since day one. What does he do better? Corona virus. I know I. It's sort of like for a guy that supposedly motivated by the polls. He's not reading these I. Mean you know if he sees every pulling? Problem is a problem with his base. while. We gotta do this, so he? You know he thinks. You know and I. Don't know whether it's bad. Advice getting or the Yes. Yes, men! That's the women that he's surrounded by who tell them how great he is all the time misleading him making him think that everything is fine. You know, but the fact is. You're right if you look right now, the the case curve. Of the viruses and the and and trump's pulling deficit, or or basically a parallel track right I mean it's like he loses a point with every five thousand when when our caseloads increase on a daily basis by five thousand so. I do think it's an impact, and there's no doubt every time there has been a a sort of a race issue pop up during the trump presidency. He's mishandled it and his numbers of down. That stuff just always turns off suburban white voters. and I think you know the question now is used to get them back. The question now is. Can you get him back and people could be both today like these going to get back. read this morning where. Again, it's a poll and Paul's can change, but things haven't look so grim says Jimmy Carter. Presidency at the stage for an incumbent presidency, and we all know Jimmy Carter did not do. Did Not do well. Let's talk a little bit about the president deciding to take away federal funding from drive through testing sites in in Texas. Again and trying to get it, he he seemed to go in the opposite direction of where he should be going. Well how? Does know how to repulse in Texas. The state's senior. I don't think this is a good idea. For the federal government to pull buddy protesting. Sites I mean John. Cornyn can read a poll Greg. Abbott is reading polls Doug Ducey and Arizona's reading poll. The fact is avenue Ducey watching them right now. They are freaking out because they can't. They know their base. What let them do what they probably should do. which is due shutdown, so they're begging people to to stay in. Please stay at home I'm not gonNA already. Please please please please your likes it yesterday so doug. Ducey, you know came out hard against that Scottsdale Guy who made that. Unfortunate referenced. I can't breathe in trying to go after mask-wearing and I thought boy. That's a governor. Desperate, to show independence that he's independent, you know but I think that the fact is they do feel the pressure. They are feeling the political and I think that the president. Either is immune to this doesn't see it or just is refusing to believe it or just doesn't want to lead on this I, it is just. This failure on the virus. This is this is this is a failed presidency at this point, because of his handling the virus, pure and simple and I just I. Don't know why he doesn't WanNa. Fix It if I were failing. Don't you work your tail off to try to unveil whether you get a bad grade in a semester to test whatever it is I don't understand why he's not trying harder to fix this instead. He's trying harder to pretend. It doesn't exist I'm GONNA pull funding? I'M GONNA. Cancel the national. Emergency what! Yeah and the proposal to have the US marshals go out and help protect the monuments. A- that are have been pulled. The statues many them represented confederate figures. I don't know how that will look if you see a confrontation between protesters. And US marshals on your vision. If. This is your reaction to the current political moment that you need to send marshals out to protect. statues You're sitting in front of your Barcalounger watching way too much Fox News and reading your twitter feed Mr President. Let's talk a little bit more about the politics going on I. talked about this New York. TIMES CNN I think it is a poll. That just came out of it. Looked at Biden being way ahead nationwide, but much more significant is the battleground states. Were Biden. In Michigan for example where we had the governor widmer that a lot of people didn't like thought she was being too tough about reopening. Things sooner. I think the president didn't have much use for her. Biden ahead by Eleven Wisconsin by eleven Pennsylvania by ten. Florida by six Arizona I mean these numbers are are. Pretty good for Biden. Though it is it is they are? They should be a you know. Five alarm fire for for the trump's campaign I mean. It is you know there was? There was a joke last you know last year Generic Democrat was crushing president trump and every matchup right generic Democrat always plan, then you. Matching people up in the race would get closer. Joe Biden has done something that that people have always wondered. If was possible. He basically turned himself into the generic alternative. And I don't mean that would be the spiriting of Joe Pine. I do see that there is some appeal to the fact that he isn't a rabble rouser did he is preaching com that he isn't trying you know. The the funny thing is everything that trump thinks is a negative about five might actually be a positive right now. Doesn't get out there and campaign. That's what people want. He's not this. That's what people are looking for. You. Know, the more calm he projects. Doing what he's doing. Today is GonNa Drive to Lancaster Pennsylvania and do a political event. You know, but everything is about a hundred mile radius of Wilmington Delaware and. If it ain't broke. Don't fix it right. You know it may be boring. Watching somebody hand the ball off twenty five times in a row and run the football, three or four yards at a time, but if suddenly after three months. Data, Wisconsin and Michigan it's. It's looking pretty good, isn't it? It's a lot of fun the root for your team when they're undefeated. No matter how boring they are. It's no fun to watch. And I know people. Where's the RAZZLE fizzle? Okay, you know look at the scoreboard. Well I. Don't know that you would know better than I by the way we're talking with chuck. Todd from meet the press. You know better than I. But I was reading about the Democrats are planning a virtual convention in August Week of the seventeenth going to be much shorter while Republicans presence. Look on a do the in the live convention in Jacksonville. Conventions really. I tell me if they do I. Don't know, but but one of them is going to be risking people's. Pins in one of. Well and there was a poll in. Do All County Florida which encompasses Jacksonville where a majority of residents were against it? the RNC coming. We're nervous about coming because of the virus and. For what it's worth Super Bowl County is one of these counties that said. Republicans Kinda have to carry if they're gonNA, carry the state. Democrats have been, but you know when they do well, they do well and duval a very to segregate county. Duval's very segregated got. A nasty racial history, but it's a, but it's a very sort of evenly demographically a pretty splits up pretty county, and that's a convention that could really sort of. You know there's some hardcore suburban. Republican voters there that have been softening. And that is a you know. That is something that's that. If that convention goes south, it could actually take Florida's with it. if they're not careful, I will say this about the conventions, are they that important i? Don't I especially I think this year there will be a gee. whiz factor to the conventions because unusual, so they will get some. I think for the Democrats introducing. They're running mate. is gonNA mean a lot and especially if the running mate is going to be. a woman of color. That's going to be a huge deal. That'll be a big moment. and so and and you know Val demings. You need to use it to get people to get to know her and introduce right. You know even if it's Comma Harris, it's not like you know. We think we know. Combine you know the pup. You know that you don't really know. You know somebody. on a national stage. No matter what so you want to introduce them in that sense for the president, the conventions usually are about rebutting. Or trying to make know essentially rebutting whatever gains, the Democrats might have made the week or the two weeks before. And that's where I. Don't know what you know for for for them. You know basically turned their convention into a one day convention by trying to get all the Jacksonville and and the you know for the last event and that that's all that's going to matter at the end of the day and that. So it Chuck Todd On. Any other. Presidency? What happened yesterday and Congress when you had? To prosecutors former prosecutors Allen's Alinsky who is involved in the Rogers case basically talking about the total politicization of the Department of Justice and really trashing the attorney general. I, tell people what happened, but it's kind of lost in the shuffle I think, isn't it yeah? I've got lost to. I mean you had two people that. Errands Alinsky to the stone. A gentleman named Don Baer who's who was a deputy attorney general, but we served in multiple administrations. He's the one that had that damning quote that I've served in. Two. Republican administrations when democratic and he was just. Just late into bar and just. He was one that provided context that it wasn't just on the big stuff. That they were politicizing things, so it was unlike petty stuff, and that it was almost like. Hey, the president has got a friend WHO's in this industry can investigate this type of. Corruption and it was just. It really was a troubling affair and and. It certainly fed some preconceived notions for plenty of people out there but I'll tell you this. The the Justice Department's reputation has is probably about as low as it's been since Nixon. I think that you know it's interesting is with the right. You Know Fox. Demonized and character assassinated Eric holder for most of the years that he was in the apartment, so you already had the conservatives who were? who were sort of fed this propaganda that somehow Eric holder was politicizing that department, and so then bill bar comes in, and does does the things that they thought holder did, but didn't do, but they're actually doing. Is My point like everything. They accused holder of dewey which he did, which there was no evidence, the backup that he was doing. They're actually doing. It was like some odd form of projection. And the bottom line is this. The left now doesn't trust the Justice Department the right doesn't trust the Justice Department. We have a very troubling situation here and I. Kinda think we have to radically reform. How we appoint attorneys general how we appoint political appointees at all there I think we have to create a totally different situation because we have I think corrupted this to a point where I don't know how recoverable it. Like, like what like have some kind of? Panos. Partisan. No you're just change it to what you do. The Fed and the way you did the FBI the attorney general can get fired. But you can stagger stagger the appointments. Their five-year terms all across the board, but they're staggered so you you hopefully have leadership team that is never appointed by one president at any one time in the Justice Department and you just do it. The Way FBI is done. That's all it's still president's prerogative to fire Ag. You wouldn't take away an executive power like that, but you try to create more. You know you sort of like look. You'RE NOT GONNA. Take away the fact that they might be politically appointed. But you create these these these five year terms, and maybe even let Congress point or let another thing appoint one of the positions. They all have to get confirmed or something like that, but. There is a way to at least create. What I think is at least. Create a little more political transparency for the public. One last quick thing. Checked out before you take off. I saw on your show yesterday talking about John Thune the United States. Senator from south, Dakota. Tell people why you were talking about him. So he is the number two guy, in the Senate, right now and st it's very. Very, South Dakota him in his very toned down way made it pretty clear that the president needs to change. His tone needs to changes message, independence are not. Responding to IT and. And the way he said it almost came across his if He didn't say he didn't think the president could change his tone, but certainly seemed to say. The president had to change his stuff. and it for me was the Canarian. This was a member of leadership. This was the most. To anybody that high up be of the president's message and I thought he did it very gently. He did not personal. He was trying to me. That felt like a guy. Desperate it to see if the president would listen to him, you're you're sitting on. How come we can't read a poll? John Thune can read a poll and in his own way. He was trying to beg the president or read a poll. Because he and others have not only concerned about the presidency obviously, but concerned about the Senate. Look I don't think trump I. don't think Democrat Republicans hold the Senate if trump loses. It doesn't. There's too many races are aligned with the battleground state. So this is they're. They're totally an unless they can come up with some. Kabuki theatre here you know. Maybe they get like a surprise to print court retirement like Clarence, Thomas or something, and then they could fill that rallies Republicans into thinking. Hey, at least split your ticket. Vote Republican for Senate, Democrat for president, but you know I I just don't think that messaging in our polarized environments. Is Workable anymore? You know trying to get people to split their ticket I. Just don't think we live in that. We live in a split. We're not living in a split ticket climate right now. which I hope things down. There are okay down there. In DC the cases in DC. There they are doing okay. Guys are kicking. Everybody's failing Massachusetts right so last time I checked, I think. We're a mask. Masks central up here. Well! You know we find. The governor had an upgraded. Get Yeah. Go ahead. What no, no, no, no, no, we we! The good news here's! We were mass here, too. I went to A. Memorial service at memorial service sorts in the backyard yesterday and we are masks and. you know everybody's wearing mask around here but. That isn't the case in the south. That's for sure well. People at protests up here, which was a good thing because it made you less nervous about being at the protest, and I think it resulted in fewer people, a very small numbers of people. Getting affected the protests. Went Down One nine one day during the protest week here and we were pleasantly surprised at all the mask it. Hey Chuck, great to talk to you as always. Artery have a good week. Thank you very very much you, too. Chuck Todd joins US every week. He's moderate. Meet the press which you can catch. Sunday mornings at ten thirty at NBC Boston Cheltenham most providers. He's also the host of meet the press daily on MSNBC in the Political Director for NBC News. Jared Bowen popping in here now. Coming up corona virus cases are surging in states that were in a rush to reopen alarming public health officials along the way, so we're taking your calls. Asking is giving you the jitters about Massachusetts opening up. This is eighty nine seven W.. G. B. H. Boston public. Radio. Welcome back to Boston public radio. If you just heard Jared Bowen is in for Jim, Brady so a corona virus resurgence, wiping out two months of progress in the United States and sending infections too dismal new levels in Florida Texas Arizona California while cases are declining in New England. Are You worried that a sinks continue to reopen the curve that it works so hard to flatten will grow our numbers, eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seventy, eight, seven, seven, three, one, eighty, nine seventy. Are you worried, too? That the economy that is so struggling and so many millions of people. Losing their jobs at worried about losing their jobs, if cases continue to skyrocket in other parts of the country, this is going to really put the economy in horrible position. Our number again eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine seventy. BE PR at. W., G. B. H. Dot. Org is the email you can tweet us at boss public radio. I find this just astounding these. Especially that we just talk with Chuck Todd about wearing masks. And a lot of states were this number going through the? They're not wear masks I. Sort of. I mean the evidence is overwhelming. I guess people don't believe in science, or they think it's anti trump to wear a mask, but. Wow. It's taking a big risk. Mar So incredibly fortunate to be honest to live in this state and in this community where so many people are wearing masks because he I think clearly, we're seeing by the numbers. It made a difference I know we're among the last to reopen, so there's that factor in into, but you see what's happening around this country, and your your question I feel like I've begun shifting mindset and even operating in getting prepared for the fact that we might be back in lockdown mode. As we see this spread throughout the country while the efforts to reopen continue relatively unabated at this point I I know some restaurant tours, and I just saw story about a guy in New Orleans. Who voted terribly closed his own restaurant because I just didn't think it was responsible, but we don't really see that happening on the statewide level in so many cases. Well you mentioned when you went out to eat and I had this same experience where the server had a mask on, everybody was separated from everybody else and it was outside. I saw governor Cuomo yesterday. Now. Of course, he's Andrew Cuomo from new. York, don't be stopping people but license places that come across the border into New York, and they're gonNA make people that come in their quarantine for two weeks this joint effort with Connecticut New Jersey and New York. They want fourteen day quarantine for visitors from from hospice. PALLIATIVE, perhaps because everybody was. In Florida was talking about, they didn't want anybody to come down there from. New York but disconcerting that when people have worked so hard and people have lost their businesses in their jobs in their workplaces and people obviously now up over one hundred twenty thousand people have lost their lives to. We at the highest. Thirty percent in compared to last month across the country. This is like a surge. It's. If you try to comparisons, which is a little bit apples and oranges, but it's going to say compare ourselves to some of the hard hit countries in Europe like Italy where it just seemed like the apocalypse had absolute settled in that country with those horrific scenes that we saw, but it's been completely turned around, and and so far seems so successfully so now I say it's kind of apples and oranges, because our country is so much larger, there is such A. Densely populated areas in some places, not and others of course, and different governments and government officials controlling and. How things operate so perhaps not necessarily the same, but you do see a situation like that and you think well I. can't we be on that same trend to go from absolute darkness to finding a way forward? Yeah and the other thing is that? We saw photographs earlier on young people and young people are being impacted tremendously another other less likely to die, which obviously is good, but you can get very very sick from corona virus, and there's some evidence now of people, not recovering fully their lung function, or at least. A struggle to get it back, so those young people that may have been get twenty twenty one. They want to go out to bars. They WANNA have fun. But those those people are starting to get sick now and when you see people on TV say that they're young people. They're not worried about crony virus gajate worried about their mother, their father, their grandmother. I, it seems an incredibly selfish thing at this stage of the game, not to wear a mask well and I guess for a lot of people. It's probably difficult. Difficult to reconcile you look outside right now. And the sun is shining, and it's summer, and you just feel like life is led up a little bit. It's so it's really hard to reconcile that in our midst is horrific virus that is still getting people very sick. That is still keep killing so many people and we'll continue unabated if we're not wearing masks. Numbers Eight, seven, seven, three, hundred, eighty, nine seventy. Let's start with Grayson Newton high grace. Hi How are you? Good. What's up. Chris you there. We Lost Grace Okay? We only have a little bit of time, so we'll have to go to David from Lexington now. David's much time. I WANNA. Get a lot of calls in. High Okay, I'm high lot. I know you call it in public, and you see lots of people wearing masks. What I'm concerned about is people that know each other or slightly know each other getting together on beaches. I know one family. It's letting their kids play with other kids, and of course not wearing masks, and they're getting close and in Connecticut. Connecticut I go to this beach area in Connecticut and everybody is just. There's nobody wearing masks. I mean even on the streets walking on the streets because they think. Oh, you know we're all good. You know we. We know each other. We're not a bunch of You know low income, essential workers from bridgeport, Connecticut or something. We just sort of this. Attitude which I'm afraid is going to set us up if you know. The virus gets going in one spot again, it could just like wildfire through these social groups. That's what I'm afraid of I don't know what to think about it. Yeah well at least the beach. If a place, you're going to be without a mask, not that. I mean I think the beach is one place where you can be. Let things down a little bit of your socially. Distancing 'cause it's windy at the beach right? Are you a little bit? About the beach, jared not necessarily I as we talk about I, run all the time. And I'm I've become much more mindful of the wind I will tell you that when when people are coming by me when bicyclists or whipping by me and I don't necessarily know that they're coming up behind me, so you want to be mindful, but I think David makes a great point. The longer that we get into this more confidence, people have if they find that they or their loved ones. Our friends haven't gotten sick. We can squeeze one more quick. Call here where we go and you guys. Don't know it was good. Elaine Hi Lena. Hi Thank you for taking my call. I will be quick so one of the greatest numbers that we've had and we've all heard about it. It's about nearly sixty percent of the mortality rate over on the state was actually coming from seniors. And actually that is the one group, and which the trend actually continues to move up Starting in May, the mortality rate for eighty plus group was roughly. Twenty five percent now it's thirty percent. And so I would say that while the state is taking its time slowly. in terms of trying to look at how overall it opens up their still population, in which the trend is moving in the wrong direction in. It's not seriously being factored in terms of the overall policies that are needed for that. So. What do you want? You want people. You want things to not open up. I think that things junior to open up, but the reality is is that. There are policies that are actually not favorable to seniors. Necessarily, for instance, the governor has put forward as a piece of legislation. In which he does not want to include senior housing. in the mandatory reporting of cases for mandatory cases and deaths for elderly home. Elena we are a lot of time I apologize. We're going to have to go and I. Don't know what that is. You're talking about either, but it's something I should look into because I was not aware of that apologized Leonard, but we got to move on. Thanks for the call. Will coming up in meeting with the US Attorney General did Boston. Police Commissioner William Gross lower the Bar Andrea Cabral joins us for her. Take on that and more on this week's edition of Law and order stay tuned to eighty nine seven W. G. B.. H. Boston public radio. Welcome back to Boston Public Radio Jim. Brady has the day off judd born. W. G. B. H. Executive. Arts alert is filling in for Jim. Hello again jared. And joining us a line for another edition of Law and order. Is ANDROID ABROA-? She's a former county sheriff secretary public safety. She's now the CEO of ascend. Andrew Brawl. Well Hello Marjory and hello, jared! How are you? I'm I'm I'm fine just ahead our you. Yeah Yeah I i. hear everything in Your Moist and agree. Crazy Times Andrea. Crazy Times crazy times getting crazier all the time, but I wanted to start with a piece in the globe. Dubina Carlin's Stephen near about this of reporting in the globe about police salaries. Dozens over three, hundred, grand, quite a few over two, hundred grand and They focused in on this one captain John Dan Lucky. Who is the number to salary earner. But he's a very bad record. Six Open internal investigations. There are some people. Some of the most respected black ministers in town Jeffrey Brown miniature. culpepper says he's not a bad guy, but he's seen in this pride. Not. This straight pride rally abusing. Protesters a lot of stuff here. Seventeen instances allegedly of double dipping on police details. What's going on? Disclosure I do know Jack. Dan Lucky I worked with him many many years ago. when I was in the Suffolk County DA's office. And Yeah I mean. Jackson lucky has been around for a very long time. he's he's certainly has been. or in his younger days was a part of a lot of the community policing I have no accounting for anything recent that has been going on with him. and like you. I find that sort of an interesting dichotomy where you do have some folks speaking out on his behalf, but an actual record here that that is troubling. especially because he's a captain, and because you know that carries with it, a significant amount of authority the captain's run the district and and Have Authority elsewhere, so it is. It's very very troubling. This is I can say that this is not. My encounters with him as a prosecutor. Didn't involve any of the things, or might you know not any knowledge of any complaints about him? when I was a prosecutor but You. Know people you know as a as they get older in their in their profession and their on the job for a long a number of years can change, and these things are troubling in the number of complaints is troubling. The what's been videotaped during protests and other things is troubling. in the nature of it is is that you can have several internal investigations are ongoing at one time, and still be on the job and that's just the way the rules work, and you know they're. They're taken and turn. The investigations are taken in turn and decisions are made And it can ultimately result in very little discipline, something more serious. I think up to this point I. Think what's identified in the globe is the most serious level of discipline is a one day suspension. Say That not knowing about the facts of any of these things, but being very much aware of the videotape. Straight brings to mind when the in the early Globe story talked about the guy that was a chief moneymaker had actually been fired by previous police commissioner. Davis for various transgressions, and then he was reinstated now as a top moneymaker, and the Union doesn't respond to any of the the inquiries from reporters here. We talk about systemic stomach. Racism there seems to be a systemic discipline problem. And and in certain cases anyway, please unions covering up for people. They shouldn't cover up for because if you get away with these things. Obviously you keep doing them. Any hope in this whole reimagining police that we're going to be reimagining the way unions work. Well? We talked about this. I think you know last week. About how provisions in a contract are you know layered in over years and years? Of Time, depending on. A city financial position at the time that contracts are up for renewal. And the kinds of provisions that can wind up in contracts this. I mean the disciplinary provisions of very very old, and nearly all of Boston's contracts particularly so with law enforcement that call for arbitration. and a process that is often very very very lengthy, and and very frequently ends with an arbitrator reversing the discipline that management has given out up to and including reversing termination. which is why you find Supervisors reluctant to impose it because we're you know even when I was in the sheriff's office, it was like that. you always have to weigh. The possible is the possibility that this person will be returned to the job with backpay, and will end up doing more damage by their return than If you if you put in something short of termination that doesn't get reversed and no management. No manager should really be in the position of having to weigh that out every single time. and you know like I've said this many times. I'm in favor of collective bargaining. I. Think you know unions were founded for the right reasons. I. Don't know that all of them still exist for the right reasons if you protect. The worst actors among your members as a mechanism of protecting the jobs of your members. Then you're. You're inevitably going to become part of the problem. And I do think that unions need to focus more on increasing the overall quality of their membership. versus the quantity. Well some of the things that he's been accused of. Murdering mentioned he knocking protester to the ground, ripping apart of another protester sign. This is all from video that the globe has reviewed in their reporting, and then using pepper spray to the extent that he got the nickname pepper Jack, but it seems in seeing now that as incidents like this are reported, and we see the the larger horrific killings around this country that more and more Americans are not tolerating. What would we coming to understand and something I'm sure the police unions probably want to pay attention to as well. I I would hope that that would be true, but ultimately these things are not going to get resolved publicly. So in order to find out you know there's a chance of finding out. It's GonNa. It's GonNa be because someone asks directly. you know what the discipline was? What ultimately happened to the case and gets a response to that? That's you know that's about the only way that the public would find out because he's on trial. These aren't criminal trials where anybody can go, you know when watch and see what happens. This is internal police. You know disciplined so to your point into. Marjorie point. You know any conversations about reform. should. In my view, be less focused on training because I think that. You know. You can. You can do training, and for you need training and all that other kind of stuff. It's really about culture change. and some of that is going to involve relooking at ORT. Scrutinizing these contracts in pulling back I think some of the provisions in the contract. No contract is set in stone. They are just treated like that. In Massachusetts and elsewhere, as though they are once once, something is in place. It is irrevocable. It is not irrevocable. You just have to have the political will, and quite frankly the energy to Be Very intentional about modifying or removing those provisions that research data, and evidence shows are are more detrimental to the community that that police are supposed to serve then. Than It is worth so I I. It's always a question of political well, this is no different well. There's SUPPO- last week. That showed that more Americans at least in June our. This call was taken in June. Anyway are starting to pay more attention and are having less tolerance for this is. This is just a product of the moment or do you think we are seeing the culture shift the you just talked about needs to happen. I'm cautiously optimistic. I very much. Want to believe that it's a culture shift but you know history makes me more of a religion that is concerned, but I do think that provision that. Affirmatively obligate other police officers to prevent excessive force and prevent harm and to and to report. I mean that's one of the hardest things. not just in law enforcement, but enforcement is particularly acute. is to get. People to come forward when they see some intervene in the moment, but then even come forward later on when they see, something is wrong. that is gonNA. That's one of the hardest you know various to chip away at. In law enforcement. It's very very very much part of the culture. We're talking in brawl for another edition of Law and order enter. There's a fascinating police police piece gives me so much talk about police piece in the Atlantic which is getting better and better all the time about the difficulty that the president is in trump will have running against another. kind of moderate White Guy, he's not gonna be able to play the culture wars and won't have rush limbaugh talking about how Hillary Clinton's a Feminazi with the testicle lock box and Suspi says what did you think of this piece? I was written by Adam Serwer. Who is? Absolutely superior right of the Atlantic is. Adam Serwer wrote the piece. The cruelty is the point that's where we got. That's why it was immediately adopted by everyone. In every time anyone talked about you know. Children in cages undocumented People being physically abused, sexually abused anyone of the wide variety, the near universe of things that the trump administration is done. The the end line is always. The cruelty is the point because the thing you know these horrible things that happen are inexplicable. But for you know bigotry, prejudice, and desire to actually inflict cruelty on people so Adam Sarah wrote that piece for the Atlantic and again he's you know your ears again. Pointing out something that is really important because it says. This is not just about what it says about trump. It is about what it says about. American voters. Yeah. You know you you can wager culture war, but if nobody's fighting with you. You're fighting it by yourself. Trump was successful in two thousand sixteen because there were enough people. Completely blinded by their hatred of the Obama. Presidency and the prospect. Of a Hillary Clinton. Presidency. That they, it was easy for them to get behind someone like trump, or at least easy for them to not make the racism and misogyny a dealbreaker, and it's not. You can't blame him for being you know sort of. You know dense about it or not not being forthcoming about it. He came down the escalator with with them and people didn't say hey. The know that's just unacceptable. And then of course he took it on. He took off from there, but the point that Adams was making here. Is that Impart because. Joe Biden is clearly sort of a white guy at a moderate and even somewhat bland in that right nothing that he's that trump is trying to do is sticking. They can't find a name for him. I resist. nicknamed. Yeah, it's a marketing and product problem. He's got one great line in this piece. In twenty twenty trump fans cannot even come up with Biden. T shirts to sell because as we see so far. The president is still sticking with sleepy joe which. To carry him very far especially if you see the latest poll numbers. Exactly exactly so you. Know, Joe Biden is taking a very measured approach. He gets some criticism for that because people want to see him, sort of more fired up and more angry, but I do think that there's a method to that there that that he's measured approach is there. He's got pretty good strategy folks around him. And you know he sort of calmly response to everything that the Donald Trump does but sure you wear. A T shirt that says sleepy Joe, most people are GonNa think your name of Jones. Out About Yourself, and it doesn't, but but the but the Lynch pin to me for this is they can't. He can't get people to He's unable to weaponize. People's bigotry and misogynists misogyny. To Build this sort of groundswell of dislike for Joe Biden. He's not able to do that and it and it says so much about him that this is where he has to be in order to get support. He has no other arrows in his quiver, because this is who he is as a person, but it also says so much about the voting public to the extent that there are still millions of people out there. That will vote for him that this is what he needs to do to get them. To vote for him. This is what they're looking for from him in order to vote for him, and that's why he's frustrated. 'cause he can't provide it. So. Tied Joe Biden. He's trying to say Joe. Biden will be a puppet of the radical left. That's as close as he's been able to come, and that's clearly alive. Yeah. It's hard to see him as a puppet, the radical left. After all his years in DC and You can certainly way in and people have on police commissioner will will gross meeting with the Attorney General Bar, but I also wanted to ask you about yesterday up on Capitol Hill where there were these hearings. About the Justice, Department Corruption Alice, Alinsky. In the Roger Stone case prosecuting the friend of the president's basically talking about the incredible. Pressure that the DOJ people have felt to be nice to the president's friends, and then to investigate people that don't deserve investigating so. both or either. What do you think? Both up, sorry, both or either was well really gross met with took. It costs for picture with with with bar. He's gotten widely trashed for. He's defended himself. He's kind of widely trash for it, but the attorney himself was totally trashed yesterday by DOJ prosecutors. Yeah love shows two things I took may have an opinion on the on the form, but as the latter is really in terms of the implications for the country far more important because it wasn't just this Alinsky in Elias. Talking about for Alinsky parts the pressure to treat Roger Stone differently precisely because of his relationship to trump and for Elias as pod, the use of federal litigation and antitrust cases sort of Cherry picking the ones that you don't like and the interesting cases there. It was also Christopher air. Yes. He was all race. He was unbelievable and he. You know for him to sit there. as a former head of DOJ and say. This is I've never seen any one so dangerous both to the DOJ in the country in my entire career, and here is why his testimony was so damning, because he because he he was under George Bush, the Bush administration. No one's going to be able to tag him. Some sort of you know hater of conservative. He was so damning that. Louie Gohmert who. STANDS MOVES DISMISS IN CONGRESS HE'S A congress. Member House from Texas. Started banging his ring on the table to create noise. Because the only thing he could think to do to combat testimony that damning was to try to drown it out. And that's where we are right that yeah people from both sides, two thousand alumni of the DOJ has called for bar to be impeached and removed it is, it is astounding to me the damage that someone much smarter than trump has been able to do with the chief law enforcement agency in the country, and if people didn't see that testimony, try to. To pull it up on demand, C. SPAN's carrying it. you real-. It really has to be seen to be believed. There is complete corruption corruption in the criminal cases corruption in the civil cases and Donald Trump has adopted all of the sort of trump roy, cohn methods for getting these things done, and he should be removed immediately. He should be impeached. It was Donald Air was the guy's name. Is the former US of? Turning. Yeah, that's okay, that's okay. I may be kidding. I make mistakes. All Time is my middle name. But I, just happened to watch it, too. And I saw he was so calm and this is Donald Air giving his testimony so calm and this. Guy. That seemed range from Texas banging away. It was just kind of crazy crazy thing the whole thing. What do you think about really gross in the attorney, general meeting and posing for a picture? Well. I think you know. I take Willy's point that he he, he saw merit. However, people might disagree with him. He Samaritan having the conversation with. That said you. You absolutely have to know. Who you're dealing with when you sit down with them, and just even the idea that you would say I don't want a picture, and then trust him not to immediately posted when everything he does is driven by the and the politics. You sort of know that once once you agree to the picture that's out of your hands, so if you're if he's going to take a picture, insist that the only picture that has taken is one where you are sitting across the table from him and you are making your point. or you have people from Europe shop. Take the picture, and then you have control over it, but beyond the optics of it. You. Do I mean you know some of the criticism I? Think should be well taken. You do have to consider. Whether or not, it's a waste of your time. Now it can be important to make those points, and to and to say where the city of Boston is an all of this, but you. It's always with someone like William Bar. It's always a balance of what they're going to get out of this appearance and what you may get out of this visit. And whether or not, you're GONNA. Be Doing more good for your department or from this for the city of Boston then whatever detriment might result is a result of people knowing that you met with this person and he's just so bars just so fundamentally. Dishonest, and an ideologue and politically driven it is, it is a legitimate question. Is You know why bother to set and with someone like that? But if you do decide and like I, said I I, you know I take commissioner the Commissioner at his word. you do decide that there is merit to it. You've gotTa make sure that you are. Controlling that process as much as possible so that it can't be twisted, and it can't be used for the other person's end, so it's. It's it's. It's exhausting to have to go through these calculations to meet with the top law enforcement when you're law, enforcement, person, the top and your city to meet with the top law enforcement person on the federal level, but that's where we're at. Is Incredible. This stuff could happen like one day of running virus through. The Joe Getting track. I mean you just can't keep up Andrew. It's exhausting for his all. Remember the impeachment happened this year. How Seon Days Andrew Thank you. All right, thank you talk soon. Joins US every week for law and order. She's the former Suffolk County sheriff and Secretary of Public Safety. She's now the CEO of ascend coming up. We'll bring you live coverage of governor Charlie Baker's press conference. This is eighty nine seven W. G., B., H. Boston public radio. Coming up on Boston public radio when outbreak corona virus began at the soldiers home in Holyoke, in March came as a shock to the mayor, the governor and the Secretary of Health and Human Services now seventy six are dead from the virus, and the newly released investigation by former federal attorney mark. Pearlstine says the death could have been prevented Governor Charlie Baker has his administration except some of the blame, his Veterans Affair Secretary has resigned, but will more action be taken. We'll learn more. More than we carry the governor's press conference live today on Juror going in for Jim Brady. Rain can stand in the way of your dinner date now. that indoor dining has resumed in Massachusetts and for everyone worried about that loud Patriot one table over you're in luck. Under the new guidelines, services will be masked tables socially distanced, and at some places, temperature checks might be the norm in a few minutes. We'll learn more from corby cummock that more next on Boston public radio. Welcome back to Boston public radio I. Am Margery EAGAN. Jim Brady has the day off joining me. Is Executive. Arcelor WGC. Bowen hello again jared. On the screen looks nice and Malibu where you are right now. Right. You're at at the beach. The my face God. So. We're going to be bringing you the moment stars live coverage of governor breakers press conference today. He's at the State House. He's going to be joined by Lieutenant Governor, Count Pollino Secretive Education James. Peiser and commissioner the Department of Elementary and secondary education. Jeffrey Riley a lot of news about schools so as soon as we get to the governor We're going to talk to you. We're GONNA. Cut Right to that, but me will open the lines again. On the same subject we started talking to you briefly about before the surge around the country in Corona, virus particularly in southern and. Western states and some mid. Western states we've got. Florida hit hard. Texas hit hard Oklahoma South Carolina Arizona California which was doing so well for awhile. Apparently California's so big. There's different regulations to different parts of the state. Some parts of statesmen doing better than others, but things are not very well at all there if you're concerned about this if you concerned. About family and friends you might have. They're concerned about the economy being tanked if we have this repeat of this surge of cases. We had. A thirty percent. Case. Jump up compared to last month with records numbers record numbers of people hospitalising a lot of the people that are hospitalized now are pretty young. They're not older people. They're people that are between the age. They're very few children. Thank goodness, but between eighteen and twenty nine between a going up right up to under fifty less likely to die, but still likely to get this virus number eight, seven, seven, three Oh one, eighty, nine seventy. You can email us at. W. G. B. H. DOT ORG or tweet us at boss public radio. What do I find? This very disconcerting, jared. It's kind of you feel like we're heading in the wrong direction. We have more cases than anybody else in the world. We're, not. Capable of handling this definitely headed in the wrong direction, and it's because we're not heeding the advice, and that's the problem i. The officials are telling us now. It seems more evidence of community spread, especially for people gathering bars, and so many states where that is allowable. That's not allowable here. Restaurants will be opened for indoor dining, but you can't sit at the bar. You must remove yourself to a table. They've also despite that's come after holidays like Memorial Day or even earlier on Easter, which means people are gathering. It's what about in caller said earlier people feel confident because they haven't been sick. Maybe people in their circles or even their outer circles haven't been sick so. So they feel more immune is or wrong orbit. Perhaps that's what people are feeling. And then we see the people who give these interviews and just say they don't care that this is this is their life. They're going to do what they want to do with it. Without as you said, taking into consideration that you know, they're going to visit grandmother or their parents and other people who are way more susceptible than they might be although a lot of those young people, even here in Massachusetts did end up in the hospital and in the ICU. To the Governor Baker! Massachusetts urged everyone who'd been to protests here to get tested and when they did that, they found the rate of infection was really quite. I was shocked. One of the things that was encouraging about that is that. People were wearing masks. I didn't see anybody without a massive protest. I was at and also. People were. Aside. Obviously, so that's says something that you can be outside in large groups, wearing masks, and not always be socially distancing mostly being okay, so it does show the. Wearing a really matters, and it really begs the question of what's going on with people who don't. Wear. These masks understands become a political issue. It's supposed to be anti-trump. My goodness I would be more worried about my health I guess then I would be about politics, but anyway that's just me. Eight, seven, seven, three at one, eighty, nine seventy. Eight, seven, seven, three, one, eighty, nine seventy BP W. G. B.. H. Dot Org will take your calls until the governor appears what start with Chris in Rhode Island Hi, Chris. Hello I am so happy. You guys reopened this topic I am calling from the frontlines of phase two and I would like to just share with my fellow Rhode Islanders and my co workers in Massachusetts. When you're wearing a mask well, I wear a mask, not on your head on your neck over your mouth. Wait for it, also your nose. I know an. Interesting that you have to. You feel like you have to point that out. I've out of reason. Good reason I'm sure. Yes I it is I was very encouraged as we've reopened the location that I worked for. A and a Lotta people entered wearing masks. However, a lot of people also entered the mosque just over their mouth and case they are not familiar with how this virus works your mouth nose both need to be covered i. wish that I had the. Genome do and Charlie Baker so that they could put out a new PSA really maybe just please these dating how to mask, and how is almost useless to just cover your mouth? You know true confessions here. This is I. Don't know why I thought this. Make a difference, but you know sometimes you go someplace. You got your mask on to try and talk to somebody. They have no idea what you're saying so I would I would pull the mass below my nose. Even though I supposed to do that. Chris guilty as charged I'm trying not to do it anymore, but I think that uncovering my nose would help them. Read What My Lips were saying you understand. It didn't help it all of course, but sometimes I think that's because I did I didn't mean to do it. Chris was bad. It was bad, but I think that's part of why people do. They seem to think they're better understood. With their mass, blow their nose. It doesn't work that way. Though does Chris. Guy Suspect as a as an avid mask wear every day at work. I suspect that their mouth is very much closed underneath so really the only way this virus is spreading through their explains to nose. Again. Thank you thank you, thank you. I love you is hi. Jared your guest today. I love it when you're on loan. Chris, thank you for providing a platform for NITA share. This love you guys. You're absolutely right mouth, and not. Have you ever done that Giardi? Ever slip the mass. Blow your nose inadvertently. Did. Okay I've already. I've I've worn the mask. I can slip down just to tell you what I need to tell you and then thinking no, this is not what this is. Why do you think? The same thing, although understand better if I take it off my nose. No, that isn't how. The words to come out of mouth after remember that Vicki and Lynn. Hey I just wanted to say how grateful I am living in Massachusetts integrate. The government vacant for having followed the guidelines and kept us on track. I. Get so angry when people on television complaining about it so. I have a daughter in Florida who's fifties and has asthma and terrified of. What's GonNa? Happen down there so I just wanted to say we really. Do. Need to be really grateful. Thank you. I love you. Thank you, thank you. Thank you very much for the call? We're doing doing very well. New York's New, York, which was the epicentre which was just like a petri dish of infection. They're doing much better. The northeast is doing better. Connecticut's doing better. New Jersey by the way I mentioned earlier I mentioned again. Connecticut New York New Jersey have gotten together to say that anybody that goes there statesman. These hotspots has to be quarantined for fourteen days and Andrew. Cuomo the governor of new. York, so he's going to have the cops stop people at the border checking their license place in warning them of that quarantine. Of course it is the honor system quarantine jared. Andrew Cuomo new new media star is not fooling around. Well No, he's not and I think I. Wonder, too. If it's if it matters about exposure which you've seen around, you and those states didn't necessarily see what we saw here in new. York and we have this horrific. The soldiers home and I think you know I i. personally know somebody who died. I, know somebody who get horribly sick So you you. You have full complete understanding of the depths of this and what it can really mean, and so I think there's kind of an instilled culture here now at least in Massachusetts and communities about the importance of wearing this, but if you go somewhere else like Florida where again you see the people on the beaches, and you see people adamantly talking to cameras saying they don't. Wear a mask although it hasn't it also been interesting to see some of these people who've gone to these parties like the Ozark Lakes Party, and then they come back later and say I really shouldn't have done that I. I realise in hindsight, but of course by then it's too late, but it's just all matter of culture, and how how close the understanding of this comes to you? Susan, are you calling from Oakland California? I am. Oh Wow you're you're you're out there? Susan How's it going? Well you know I. Here's the thing I I guess I have. I don't see it as a hospital. Because We never had a huge spike and we still learn having a spike. We've had you know our state shutdown. Early! and. Our cases have gradually increase. So we do have more cases. Today that we had three months ago. Where where on a gradual increase? Witch means our hospital and. You know systems and have never gotten over run. And so I think you're setting records Susan California's setting records for new cases this week. It's not I. Don't think it's just addressing week. It's gradual. Yes, it's not. Not Reduced. And you're Ashley Right and saying some county. You know. Are Worse than others. A lot of the agricultural counties are. In trouble and you're nowhere just now seeing. Probably, we're seeing a response to people. Going out in May and party Yup. I live in I, live in. May Love Oakland on our. You know delightful lake. Where everybody likes to go out and enjoy themselves and. Susan, thank you. Thank you very much for the call. This says made a great point about the counties in California's huge state have different rules in terms of what you can do and what you can't do, and that was one of the things. Gavin, newsom. The governor was talking about that. It's not just one deal I mean. Charlie were a small state obviously compared to California and Charlie Baker's everybody should wear a mask, not mandated, but everybody should, and you do see in certain places Senator is down the Cape when. I go to visit my sister. You see far fewer people worry mass, and you see in Boston where. Everybody I see around. Here seems to be wearing mass. Don't you think I? Think, it's visually I. I live in the city and it just feels like it's outside like sitting. Outside your door or sitting outside your window because there you do see so many more people than you might see in a neighborhood because people are constantly walking by on the sidewalks, everybody is wearing masks, so it is a physical representation of this virus that you just see, so reminds you of the moment of. Of course once you move out of that once you go on vacation once, you've heard of the Cape You, you you you. You find that you're in a different area where where that's not the norm, there can be more social distancing less of an urgency if you're outside to feel the need a mask per the governor's own stipulation that long as you can maintain social distancing outside, you don't necessarily need to wear one outside so i. think it very much what you literally see. Apparently the president is having a town hall with a Sean Hannity who is a host on Fox, news and they are going to be wearing masks there now. We'll have to see if they actually enforce it, but from what I read this morning. Hanley wants to have masks there, so I don't know if that's. Concern for himself or just because he is a mask believer what but they are going to have town hall, so we'll see what happens to see how that evolves and California's interesting, too, because I know the Gavin, newsom were governor was praised so much of the beginning for really W- employing technology to help keep ahead of this and understand where surges might happen, and where outbreaks might happen, so it seemed that he had a strategy for this. especially with the West Coast being such a technological base so for this to be happening. It's even more concerning. Just getting island. Thanks for calling. Oh Hey. My echoing right now. Nope, we can hear you fine. Thank you calling. Okay. Good I got you on Bluetooth. Hi, I'm calling because I think it's so interesting that governor Cuomo I mean I think it's good that he's limiting the travel from other states and stopping people have certain license place, but if you remember just what a month ago, he was flipping out. Actually! Angry. Nobody wanted to boycott Rhode Island did all this stuff. She in her address breasts yesterday. She said I'm glad to see he's. He's coming around to see that. You Know I. was it was nothing personal? Around my way of thinking. We're doing super super well here in Rhode. Island. People have a lot of have had in the past, a lot of strong feelings, one way or another about our governor. I I haven't, but there are people that really didn't like her, but I think everybody at this point feels that she's done a really fantastic job as far as with the co Ho covy nineteen pandemic. We're all feeling healthy well informed, and I feel very confident with her leadership. Jessica thank you very much for the call. One of the great ironies we spoke about earlier with Chuck Todd is the president is really wants to get reelected. Every president wants to get reelected. And he can see from the polling that krona virus the way he's reacted to. This virus is really hurting him, so it's it's fascinating to me that he doesn't figure out some way to. Swerve. You know that he doesn't. Mean imagine if you came out and said everybody united. States should wear masks. Would it would that would make. You could just say I know he doesn't like to admit mistakes, but he could say the evidence now is overwhelming. Blah, blah, BLAH! Everybody should wear a massive in in the country. I think he'd be well received even by people who are not fans of him. Because he was finally taking the seriously. You know what I mean. Yeah, it's A. It's a good argument. With the diehard support he has. It is hard to believe that people would walk away from him if he were to say something like that. I don't think they would I think the president has been you know. The Sciences is convinced him. He says this is what we should do. This is what we should do I just when you see these numbers. A handling the protests on race and. Police brutality and the coronavirus. It's what's hurting and people are still with him. In large numbers on the economy. Is it. Reno in the Car High Reno Reno. Hey Hey. Why are you guys? Good? so yeah, so I I actually travel for for work as an essential employees, I visit Dentist's office doctor's offices and work on. Medical Equipment and I've been to. From California Colorado Unit, I've been probably a dozen and a half states during this whole thing so I've definitely been exposed to. Places that I didn't want to be exposed, but I I do see a lot of people opting not to wear masks. You know at airports when they don't have to and on planes when they don't have to, so that's Kinda. Concern. You know I see it I see a too often and. Then the most of the airlines tried to do their best, but it's always an awkward situation to put you know the flight attendants in where they have to go and confront someone and say you know. Can you please put your masks back on and and things like that so I mean me personally. I don't want to wear mouth I do because it's the right thing to do but yeah, I mean and something that I've noticed too is when you go through. Tsa Those little bins that you have to put your belongings. I haven't seen one airport. That cleans those after. They go into a pile of bring right back to the other side you listening all the places you've been all of the airports you've been through all of the plains. You've been on with other people, not wearing masks I. I can't believe that you do this, but. What makes you I? Mean you have to do it for work? We all have to work. Yeah I mean. How do you feel about having to do all of this and and knowing that you've done it successfully so far assuming that you haven't contracted it. I I mean I luckily I feel I feel very lucky. I mean I. do it because you know I. I love my job. I love my my clients that I visit and all the opposite that I go to they. They're taking all the precautions It's the it's the people in between that I can't control. I can control what I do, and washing my hands and wearing my mask and social distancing all that, but yeah the you'd be amazed about how many people are out there? That really don't seem to care or they don't care about others. They just worrying about you know their own their own pleasure as far as not having to wear it for whatever reasons. We know I'm curious on the airplanes I've seen him read different things. We are planes packed. You. Know I've seen I was just talking to yeah. I was talking to a friend about that today. most of the time you know you. Have you know window seat and a window seat and depending? You might have someone you know with only one seat in between you, so you're definitely not six feet away. I've been on. You Know I. Have to ask you a flight last night. it was. Absolutely packed. Yeah I've heard that read that as well which is a little bit frightening. I kind of thought we supposed to be have a middle seat at least between, but apparently that's not the case Reno. Thank you. Very much very much for the call. Thank you very much. Thank you very much. I want to fly anywhere. All right. Thank you. I appreciate the call and we. GonNa Bakers Press Conferences, beginning now you're listening to eighty nine seven W. G. B. H.. Good afternoon today, the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education is releasing initial guidance to bring students back to classrooms this fall. Before, getting into more details, I'd like to begin by providing an update on cove, nineteen testing cases and hospitalizations in the Commonwealth. Massachusetts continues to see encouraging public health data to support our gradual phased reopening. Will obviously keep monitoring this information every day. Yesterday more than seventy three hundred over nineteen tests were reported from across Massachusetts. One hundred, seventy, two new positive covert nineteen cases were confirmed. The seven day average positive rate of cases remains at one point nine percent marking in ninety four percent decline since mid-april. Additionally as of yesterday, there are currently nine hundred and thirty nine individuals hospitalized as a result of Covid, nineteen and one hundred and eighty one or in the ICU. These hospitalizations represent about seventy five percent drop since mid-april. We're obviously encouraged by all the progress. That's been made here in Massachusetts over the course of the past several months. But as a reminder, we all have a role to play. And we courage everyone to continue to wear face coverings to practice social distancing and good hygiene. It's obviously made a tremendous difference here in Massachusetts. Please stay home if you're sick and seek guidance for your medical provider if you present with covid nineteen symptoms. We're joined today by members of our administration as well as medical professionals who played integral roles and the design and development of the guidelines for schools to safely reopened in the fall. In developing the back to school plans the department. Our Administration considered not only the risks associated with covid nineteen for person schooling. But also the risks associated with continuing to keep students out of the classroom. Continued isolation poses very real risks to our kids, mental and physical health into their educational development. This plan will allow schools to responsibly do what is best for students, which is to bring them back to school to learn and grow. The detailed document relate released. Today was developed with extensive conversations with medical experts, school administrators and other education stakeholders commissioner Jeff Riley and his team worked with infectious. Disease Physicians Pediatricians and the COVID. Nineteen Command Centers Medical Advisory Board to develop these plans and thanks to that work the Massachusetts Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics supports this carefully developed guidance to bring kids back this fall. School officials now a blueprint that they can use to create plans using three models of learning with provide. Priority on planning in person instruction. Again, the goal is to get kids back to the classroom, but we're advising. Districts develop additional plans. These plans could be implemented over nineteen conditions, change and district's need to adjust their programs. Commissioner Riley will discuss the three plans details shortly. Over the past several weeks, Massachusetts is seen rates of infection ospital. And facility fatalities fall steadily even as the virus remains a significant concern. As we all know covid Nineteen Massachusetts is not static, and we'll continue to monitor the situation closely to make any adjustments that we need to make. Part of the challenge in developing this guidance is that we're talking about school year. That starts a few months from now and sometimes it's difficult to forecast. Where exactly will be when we get to September? This, guidance assumes that health data continues to stabilize and the requirements are still subject to revision. But now district's can get to work on their preparations to be ready for the fall. We also understand that there costs associated with implementing many of these recommendations, and that's why we're making available. Approximately two hundred million dollars in additional funding for district school costs related to reopening. This comes on top of the nearly five hundred, two million that our administration made available to cities towns to spend on covert related costs. At the end of last month. Massachusetts cities and towns also received almost two hundred million in federal, elementary and secondary school. Emergency Relief. Fund grants earlier this year, and additionally in partnership with Legislative Leadership Our administration is committing twenty five million dollars in federal funds to a matching grant program to fund technology purchases for remote learning. Should it become necessary for school districts? With Desi Guidance and financial support worth just about a billion dollars school officials have the information and the resources that don't need to implement the needed distance requirements, classroom, configurations, masks, and face covering requirements and symptom checks to make this all happen. Parents and guardians have done their part stepping up an extraordinary ways virtually overnight to become educators at enormously chat during an enormously challenging time. Now. We have an obligation to do everything we can to kids safely back into the classroom so that they can benefit from the guidance in the experience of their teachers, other leaders and their peers. To sum it up. We really appreciate the work that so many people put in to helping. US develop a plan to help. Kids safely return to the classroom in September. Secondly, this plan was developed with the support and assistance of many members of the infectious disease, healthcare and physician community, and we're really pleased at the mass general. The American Academy of Pediatrics endorsed it and third. There's almost a billion dollars in state and federal funding. That's available to make sure that our districts have the resources that they need to implement this plan. With that I'm going to turn it over to Lieutenant Governor. Thank you governor Baker and I wish to thank Secretary Peiser and Commissioner Riley and your teams for your hard work on behalf of our schools, and the children of our Commonwealth getting kids back to school is good for kids, but it's also good for the entire family. Over these past few months, parents have worked hard to keep their children active educated, and yes entertained while balancing work, and every other thing that parents juggle. This gyns will implement public health and safety requirements to ensure that as many students as possible head back to classrooms this fall. We knew we know how important how very important it is for kids to be in school, not just for academics, but for their social development, emotional needs and mental health needs. These, rules take every precaution. Possible and are grounded in the best possible possible medical advice which you will be hearing from shortly. Massachusetts consistently ranked in the highest in the nation in terms of education quality, and our administration is committed to continuing to provide our children with the high caliber education and learning that they deserve. As a mother of two high-school students I understand how much of an impact this shift has had on our children's daily lives from the classroom learning to after school activities to team sports. Are Students missed a lot this past spring, and it was hard for all of us to see them miss proms and graduations activities that they so enjoyed even saying goodbye to their friends and teachers at the end of the school year. And as we began to reopen the Commonwealth this month, I think a lot of us have helped have felt a sense of relief. As we begin to transition into new activities. And with today's announcement to reopen schools in the fall, our goals remain getting as many students as possible into classrooms into seats as safely as we can. This guidance give school districts enough detailed information and flexibility to maximize the number of students. They can bring back to classrooms. We understand this will be difficult for schools to make these changes. And we will continue to work with them to support them to implement these new regulations and guidance schools will look different in every community as they adapt to this new way of educating to best fit their specific needs and circumstances. We know. We are not out of the woods yet. In combat on combat this virus. We need to live with it. And we must continue to be cautious and vigilant and fighting this disease and protect ourselves our families and our neighbors. Everyone was continued to do their part. But going back to school has always felt like a new beginning. Getting our children back to school, this fall is critical. It's critical to their continued development both in and out of the classroom. In an order to facilitate a thriving workforce, we need to continue to equip students with the skills in the education to prepare them a to succeed in their future. And, returning to classroom is an important step toward this goal. Our kids deserve it. They deserve the opportunity to grow and succeed care in our Commonwealth I. Would now like to turn it over to commissioner Riley. Could afternoon everyone. I want to start by thanking our students, teachers and families for adapting the spring to this unprecedented situation. Today has sent out initial guidance to our schools and districts, adding them to be prepared for all contingencies for reopening this fall, which typically takes place around Labor Day. Additional fog guidance will be also released in July so Morris coming this guidance today was built with the help of our medical community. Some of whom are here today are reopening workgroup made up of students, parents, teachers, nurses, administrators, and other important stakeholders in the education sector. Recognizing. We do not have full control over the trajectory of the corona virus. We've asked schools and districts to prepare for three possibilities or models. The first, which was speaking about detail today, the in person model students returned to school and buildings. But schedules. Classrooms protocols are adapted to meet health and safety requirements. We prescribe in the guidance today. The second model is a hybrid model where some students would go back to school, while another group would stay home and learn remotely, and then they'd switch whether that is week on week off or different days of the week is to be determined. And then the final thing we're asking districts to plan for is remote learning. In the case for example of a second spike of the virus. Simply put, our goal is to get as students back to in person learning with the appropriate and safety requirements in place. This plans allows us to do that for the good of all of our kids. What we have learned from our medical expert is there is no one silver bullet that will help us mitigate risk. Instead it is a combination of strategies like hand, washing sanitizer, physical distancing and masks that when taken together, we'll make the difference. The health and safety requirements contained within our guidance document are crucial for they will allow districts and schools to begin planning. For what safe in person instruction could look like in the fall? Indeed while we're asking for these three plans, we're asking districts and schools to I prioritize developing the in person plan. With the new safety requirements, the department will closely monitor how this is progressing in the field, and we will offer technical support over the summer to help our schools and districts. And we know that this work will require resources and the districts will have to plan for those additional resources. We know that in particular special attention needs to be paid to are historically underfunded school districts, and we are grateful to this administration for releasing new money's today for schools including matching grant for technology, even as we recognize the full budget picture is not yet clear. We will continue to update our guidance as new information becomes available. This is especially true with the new medical research and studies that may come out over the summer and help us to better refine our expectations for what a safe in-person school experience will look like. And with that is my honor to turn it over to the doctor Sandra Nelson an infectious disease specialist from M.. G. H. and she's also on the Faculty of the Harvard Medical School Dr Meltzer. Thank you. Governor Baker who tenant governor, Palijo and Commissioner Riley. As an infectious diseases physician, I am proud that the nation's medical community shifted so quickly into emergency mode as the covert epidemic surged before us. The impact of this previously unknown illness has been like nothing we have ever seen before. We also recognized however that shutting down so much of our society to fight the medical battle, while vital has taken a significant toll on our communities on our children, their education and their wellbeing. Our medical advisory team was asked by Commissioner Riley to review our scientific understanding of Covid one thousand nine hundred children in order to ensure that medical issues would be an essential driver in any decision about moving education back into the classroom. The message from the medical community remains strong and consistent. We need to get our children back to school as soon as it is safe to do so. While the state of our scientific understanding remains incomplete. We have learned an unprecedented amount in a short time. We believe that the medical literature does in fact. Provide the tenants for a safe return to school. I. Children are less likely to acquire covid than. Adults We have seen in large population based studies as well as smaller household analyses that children are less likely to than adults to be diagnosed with Kobe and less likely to get sick when exposed. Second. When children are infected with covert. They are less likely to get severely ill than adults with covid. And third. When children acquire covert, they appear less likely to transmit infections to others relative to adults. This is in contrast to other respiratory virus infection, such as influenza, in which children are the major drivers of infection. Modeling Studies, also suggest that school closures have had less impact on slowing the epidemic down than other distancing measures. With this understanding and with a reduced incidence of Covid in our community, we do believe it is safe for our children to return to in person learning at school. But, this does not mean that we can let our guard down either in the schools or in our communities, our educational leaders will be instituting measures in the in the schools to reduce the chance of spread, and these include physical distancing measures as well as the use of face coverings. The guidance set forth will also be reassessed, both as our state of knowledge about Cova increases and potentially is conditions on the ground change. Return to in person. Learning can only be successful if we in the community do our part to keep the rates of transmission low now more than ever protecting an educating our children requires a village. We must all remain vigilant. Our children depend on it and they deserve nothing less. Now I'd like to introduce Dr Lloyd Fisher Pediatrician in Worcester and the incoming President of the Massachusetts Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Good afternoon. Thank you governor Baker Lieutenant Governor, Pulido and Commissioner Riley for having me here today. And for including the pediatricians in this particularly important discussion and decision about how we can safely bring our children back to school this fall. The Massachusetts Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics represents over seventeen hundred pediatricians across the Commonwealth, who are committed to the attainment of optimal, physical, mental and Social Health for all infants, children, adolescents and young adults. While for most children covid nineteen has not had the devastating and life threatening physical health effects that have occurred in adults. The negative impact on their education, mental health and social development has been substantial. The school experienced provide so much more than academic learning and the relationships that children form with their teachers. Other school personnel end. Their peers are critical to their emotional health and wellbeing. In my day to day, interactions with children and their families over the past few months, it has become clear that for many the remote learning experience has been a challenge. It is evident that these children value the virtual interaction that they have with their teachers and their classmates. However we see how difficult it can be for parents who are trying to work either at home out of the home. While, trying to help their children's sign into their zoom meetings with their class and assist them with their schoolwork. We know that the teachers and the school administrators have worked tirelessly to make the best possible experience for many children, especially those in the younger grades, but nothing can take the place of the daily face to face interaction that our children experience when attending school in person. In addition, children with emotional, psychological or developmental disabilities often receive necessary services through their schools. Because some of these services have been put on hold during the pandemic continued school closures will be especially detrimental to this group of vulnerable children. We are also concerned with how school closures will likely exacerbate the well documented achievement disparities across income levels and ethnic and racial groups. The Massachusetts Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Department of Elementary and secondary education share the goal of bringing most students in the Commonwealth back to in person learning this fall, while minimizing the risk to them to school staff and their families. We are quite pleased with the recommendations and are happy to endorse these guidelines. We are impressed with how thorough the workgroup was in researching current data, and their understanding of the spread of illness impact of the disease on children, likelihood of children, infecting others and the significant negative consequences that prolonged school closures have the educational, emotional and social, well being of children. We recognize that if there is a second wave, this fall or winter. We may need to move to a hybrid model or back to full remote learning. These guidelines outline important steps that school districts must take to ensure that if that were to occur, students will continue to advance in their learning. We know that for many parents and children. will be some hesitation and fear about resuming in person learning. It is our belief that the mitigation efforts outlined in these guidelines appropriately take into consideration, the many complexities of a return to school in the fall, and outlined the precautions necessary to maximize the benefit to our children. While minimizing risk to both them and those with interact. It is also critically important for our children to have a positive experience and feel comfortable with the modifications to the classroom, the curriculum and their interaction with teachers and peers despite the necessary changes. The understanding inexperienced that we in those across the globe have with this virus continues to expand each day. I and other pediatricians throughout the Commonwealth look forward to our continued work with the department as new information becomes available, that necessitates modifications to these guidelines. I know we all look forward to a time when we can relax some of the changes that our children will see this fall. And I am confident. That together, we can come up with an appropriate plan to make that happen when it makes sense. Thank you to the administration, the working group and the members of the Department of Elementary and secondary education for developing a plan that we at the Massachusetts Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Feel is in the best interest of the children in the Commonwealth, thank you. I will now turn things over to Secretary Peiser. Thank you Dr Fisher and thank you so much for the engagement in support of the academy in this important work. And good afternoon everyone. My main task today is to introduce Raquel Kasahda apparent from Lawrence who has watched her children struggle without the opportunity to go to school each day. Racquel was a member of the Commissioners K. Twelve reopening schools working group that provided input and feedback in today's initial guidance. Raquel is here to underline the importance of parents in this whole process, especially as schools and districts begin working on their own plans, and thinking about all the many details that are necessary for implementation. Those details may be small in the context of a district wide plan. But they can be extremely consequential individual families and children. So it is critical that parents are fully involved. As we plan for going back to school this fall, we obviously have to make the health and safety of our students, staff, teachers and communities, a top priority, and we have to make sure the parents feel comfortable and confident that the well being of their children will be our paramount concern. Of course wellbeing is not just about Cova Dr Fisher's. Just stated. The. Absence of school can cause an already has caused significant challenges for children and families, certainly related learning loss, but also exacerbating issues of mental health, food, insecurity and social and emotional development. At the same time when some students are not in school, they are in home or community environments that are not always as well monitored and safe as the school the school itself so even their physical health can be put at risk by school closures. All of these challenges are especially acute for students with special needs who desperately need access to the support services and the daily routines that only school and only in-person school can provide. A now the turn podium over to Racquel, Kasahda to provide her perspective on the importance of getting her children, and all children safely back to school as soon as possible. Sada. Good afternoon to all the people who are comforting US Bressan through the screen and different platform. To the government Charlie Baker Commissioner Jeffrey Riley. To, the all educator as cool on newsradio parents and the community members. And to the press for Recovery Searching Porch and topic. Thank you for the imports? -tunities to allow me to speak on behalf of the parents. My name is Raquel Kasahda advocated for the rights of people. We disability. I'm also the mother of all children. Why don't we disability? I was a member of the K. twelve working group academy teaching learning community for the state. We have been working very hard meeting twice a week to develop these kinds. As tearing I was there to make sure that the school official talks about their knees, concern and fear of the Parry when sending their children back to school. There was a voice and this working group represent pairing in that was me. I feel very comfortable sending my children back to school with these scoring hell and safety guidelines. My kids have been emotionally stressed by not being in school. And he's. been go for their health and for the tighter family. My Soul. We were palsy. He's cry every day because he's various stressed out, and because he needs who his routine back that will pro by his mental hell and I know a lot of parents are insensitive each other I am. She doesn't need to get their life back in parents to. They need to social life with their with their peers by. Taking the necessary major, there are the new skyline for required me to return to school. Parents should be countable with those new guidelines for a starting school. I'm sure the principal t-shirt professional in their staff of every school. We'll look through all those precaution place. There will be sure that they are followed by everyone. Life is not about fear. We know that we have to take care of ourselves in our children, too. At the same time we have to continue our life and leaving adopting ourselves to the new normal. Thank you. Now I will live to speak on behalf and the Latino community and a Spanish. We went to start this up tolls. We went to status at those personas, his tongue compagnon Tanto Canto. Same thing is still up front tire. Lord Chai I commissioner Jeffrey Riley. The lowest. It'll calories at Minnesota's install Ariz violence in the community that. Are Praying support ecstatic equally important topical. Grass yes, in tank coordinator Dick. 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Our case time in las nervous directly me and top our where Alice Coil! Komo's Communist Politics Satellite Cuevas. Los Maestro around told us is maybe that ensued, Saluda. Is Tara who? Plan. La Vida not throttling meal Salimo in most diagnosed with Rosie hope. The empathy nameless. Other! Will Be Muchas yes. Questions on this. Day, temperature checks. That seems simple. Low cost. You needed to gain Boston City Hall. There was a lot of conversation with. Medical Advisory Board and with. Dr Nelson and with the folks from the healthcare and pediatricians PEAC pediatric community and We came pretty close when we first started these discussions to making that recommendation with respect, the temperature checks. But literally the overwhelming response we got from everybody in the healthcare community was especially when you're talking about. Kids there are way too many false positives and false negatives to not only not make it worthwhile, but to create potential issues with respect. What people believe to be true? Many kids don't ever become symptomatic. They will test negative. because. They don't have a temperature. Many other kids will have a temperature because they've been running around in the school art before they went in or just engaging in activities that will elevate their temperature. They won't be sick and they'll get sent home. And so the overwhelming message that we got from the folks in the healthcare community was with respect to kids. Temperature checks will actually provide people with a lot of the wrong information with respect to the status of those kids when they show up at school, and that will create more problems than simply having a really aggressive program with respect to face coverings. Hygiene in washing an appropriate management of the school building. I think I'm GonNa let. I'm let the Commissioner speak to that one. So right now we're asking districts to plan for all three models, and in fact kind of do a feasability stuttle study on the in-person person model and I think after we let the schools do that feasability study. We'll have a better answer. Thing parents I need if there are concerned parents. Whether or not? If they don't feel comfortable sending their children. To know? Can you remote learning? Hybrid. We anticipate that we're going to be sympathetic to. Parents needs going forward. So our garden says when feasible trying to get to six feet, but no less than three feet, and that's based on medical research and let the doctors take it over to minute. But what we've seen across the world is France Denmark China, Japan Britain. I think next week are going towards the three foot. Mark because there seems to be growing research that says. The distance between three and six foot is somewhat negligible. It's when you get below three feet. There are more issues but Dr. do you want to take that one? Yes thank you. We do support the CDC recommendation of six feet of distance when separate when possible and especially when masks are not being used, but we acknowledge that that's not always feasible in a school setting, and as we started this, we did learn that many other countries in the world health. Organization have endorsed a distance of three feet as the minimum distance four separation, this is based on the distance that respiratory droplets, travel and respiratory droplets are the me. Okay, that was the press conference governor Baker and education officials about what's going to happen in school. There is going to be war guidance going forward, but basically the guys. Elaborate was in the globe this morning. Kids wearing face, Max's dolled wearing face masks. Kids being six feet apart. No less than three feet apart from each other eating breakfast and lunch in the classroom I thought was encouraging. The had an epidemiologist from mass general. Talking about. Children less likely to get the virus children less likely to transmit the virus Dr. Sanson talked about that. This pediatrician Dr Linda Fischer. Whose incoming President Massachusetts. Chapter the American Academy Pediatrics talked about. The terrible toll emotional. And Developmental That school closing has had on kids. And then we had a parent or CALC Asada from Lawrence Mother of four one of her children has cerebral palsy. She talked about the great toll taking on kids with disabilities going to hear more about this up next from Paul. revel when we speak to him. So that was about it deleting out jared that we should add. I think we should add. All the great news at the top ninety four percent decline since April. Yup for cases and hospitalizations dropped seventy five percent so again we continue on a great downward trend. So we'll talk more about this with Paul rebel. He's coming up next on eight nine seven W Gbh. L.! Welcome back to Boston public radio. Jared Bowen is in for Jim Rowdy and joining us on the line to talk about Corona virus, our education infrastructure and the press conference. We just heard talking about guidelines to reopen. Schools is Paul revel. He's a professor at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education where he also runs education redesign lab is latest book co authored with Elaine Weiss is broader boulder better. How schools and communities help students overcome the disadvantages of poverty I should add that we have. Zoe one of our assistance here one of our producers here is monitoring the governor's press conference. So anything more gets says that we need to know about. We'll get that to you as well. Hello Paul. Good Afternoon Margarine! Jared good to be with. Do Credit to be with you. So I mean the press conference is still going on, but the overall details about how we're going to go back to school have been set forth. And boy! If there were wherever was let's get back to school press conference. that. Was it Paul Ravel. What'd you think? Well. I thought they did a good job. particularly in presenting the medical. Evidence in support of their their push toward reopening in person in the fall If it was interesting that they really if you read the guidelines they're saying. Each district needs to have Clams along three things one is full reopening in person. A second is full online third is some kind of hybrid model. About what you find a lot of talk and district, but today they were. I think making the case that their favorite approach would be opening in person if it's at all possible to do that and they Marshall the medical community to help support that who made the case thought persuasively that. You know children are less likely to get corona virus in the first place less likely to have. Symptoms in the second place. The symptoms are less likely to be severe if they have them and forth they're less likely to transmit the disease than. Other populations so that they they diminished risk was made quite clear by the the medical community that same time the medical community underline the importance of You know the relationships. The social relationships that have been fractured in school and the need for children to get back to those relationships backed back to some sense of normalcy. One one of the words that I was struck by was feasability. The district's have to do a feasibility study in terms of the in person learning. I wonder what that means in terms of who gets. Gets to have a voice in this press conference. Marjorie said this was. Let's get back to school. These are all the great reasons. These are all the great people who have just spoken with authority about this but that doesn't mean that people aren't going to have reservations about this whether they be parents or the teachers themselves finding themselves in these more clustered situations. No question about it. I mean I think the. Teachers, unions and. You know parents, groups, and so forth are going to have. Feelings about it. I saw studying globe yesterday, talking about the difference between a white parents and parents of color in terms of their feelings about sending students back. Also, we have to say there are other guidelines yet to be released. We'll have a profound impact on whether it's school. Districts can do this, not least of which is the transportation guidelines. In the early sort of guidance that was coming out of the department. It made it sound as though buses. We're going to have to operate at roughly fifty percent of their original capacity. If that's the case, then you know in a district like Boston. You basically have to double your bus incapacity. Bussing already cost north of one hundred million dollars in Boston. They're not gonNA have one hundred million dollars, nor are sufficient number of buses around there to do that simultaneously. Have you need more buses and so? There's some major of bits of guidance that have yet to be sort of fully rolled out, and we'll have to see how that comes out to. In the end I suspect they'll They'll be bringing that out before too long. You Know Paul Rabble. You just mentioned the racial split that the goal of Said sixty percent of black and Latino parents are worried about going back to school versus forty four percent of white parents, and of course, the black and Latino Neighborhood much more effective. By Arizona and there's a lot of essential workers there so I soon. That's part of the hesitancy. Yeah, I mean I think that's. That's the concern coming from parents and communities have been more directly affected. They worry that if the increased exposure. you know you know through schools? The children have increased exposure that puts them. At even greater risk than they're already ironically on the other side of things is often those communities who are most negatively affected by schools being closed because they don't have access the internet or to the educational technology because they've got. Parents working multiple jobs and don't have as much time to spend at home with the kids getting them online and getting them set up and supporting their education so in many respects, those communities have more to lose with school, staying remote and and yet at the same time. They're significantly worried about the risks of of coming together, so I think that you know it was interesting. They had a a the Tino. Woman came in and spoke I think she was from warrants today about this, but obviously. Guidelines to take hold. They're going to have to do more work in engaging parents because I think a lot of parents are gonNA. Make their own decisions in the end of the one of the interesting things to see that if we have a full opening of school, how many parents just decide? Not to send their children for a while until they feel safe. But you know what was the most? Jarring thing to me in this press conference was the pediatrician Dr Fisher. Who who talked about the huge toll it was he didn't say this, but but the underlying since I got from. Coronavirus horrible, but the emotional developmental social. All those things that children need for a healthy life are going right down the down the tubes because of this. He. Really was pretty strong on that. Well yeah. I think there are a lot of dimensions to that I. Mean One. One set of numbers I saw recently compared the number of children who die from Corona virus, which is extraordinarily small versus the number of children who die from child abuse. and. Battering and things of that nature that that figgers substantially higher than than the number who died from the virus, and we know that the reports of child abuse are way down because there are no other adult overseeing children, and in a position to make report, so so that's one dimension, the other dimensions social dimension I guess Marjorie I think varies somewhat on the conditions and circumstances of children mean for some Yup children. Take for example, the apple family with two working parents, professional parents who are now all they have a vacation spot in some remote location, the Cape, or Vermont, and they retreat with their two kids and the to. Those children, it's almost like a summer, you know it's like a prolonged old-fashioned summer vacation and it's it's a pretty wonderful experience at some level, but at another at the opposite extreme. If you're cooped up in a dangerous neighborhood in a one room apartment with the whole family, living there and people are coming and going because of jobs, and you don't have adequate. Internet up and you can't go out. Out to see your friends well, this is devastating and isolate and You know hugely problematic, so it just very I. I keep saying if if one size doesn't fit all win. We're have school's in session for kids. One size doesn't fit all in in terms of our factory model approaching families, either it's even worse in the cases, families because the differences are huge in terms of assets and capacity. So call revel. It's interesting that we're talking now about going back to in-person land learning starting with in August-september, whenever school district's return, which also means is going to have to be a lot of work. That's going to be done over the next couple of months as people conduct these feasibility studies understand how they're going to operate with the the new normal as we say. Say, but at the same time as the globe is reported this week more than two thousand Massachusetts educators receive layoff or or non-renewal notices. I understand, and you can break this down for us at this is somewhat of a standard procedure, but we know this is not a standard time because of the told the economy has taken, and there are suddenly less reserves although. The governor did say that more money would be funneled to school districts in that press conference. So so, where do we think we stand with? What's what's school? Districts are going to be able to do in keeping staff. Yeah, well as districts are on pins and needles, relatives of the budget budget I mean usually. By this time of year. Budget issues have been resolved and local school and city councils approved. A budget for the school department by this time, because state aid is so uncertain now because we don't know about federal aid in response to this crisis, everybody's hopeful the Democrats put up a bill, but the Republicans have been reluctant to act on it. and he had a lot of political prognosticators say they'll have to come around. In Red States as well as in blue states to seeing that. State local government is not going to be able to function with the anticipated deficits due to shortfalls and collection of everything, real estate taxes to income taxes. At, the local and state level so. And for districts Strongly reliant on. State Aid They're really worried about the condition of their budget so they don't neither state, government or local government had the luxury of printing money or being able to do extensive borrowing to balance their budget, so they have to balance their budgets so in in order to comply with conditions, various contracts and whatnot. They have to notify people in advance. So, you had the globe. Article is actually a sample of a relatively small number of districts would that had ten or more pink slips? Forty seven districts involved in it and. You know they're. The districts are taking a cautious. Pass them for many of the district's when they do their pink slips. They're envisioning worst case scenario because they have to be prepared for that worst case scenario otherwise, they have to carry employees. They don't need can't afford art in the budget, so those numbers tend to be exaggerated in the early phases now and I think overtime. a number of those will be called back. Particularly, the budget picture improves. I was interested to see the governor's announcement today they included some access to some new funds that had previously been on the table, relative to assistance to local school district so. I really. We'll be well into August before some of these personnel decisions. Get finally made at the local level and again it will depend on the model that we choose in other words. We're now all talking about everybody back to school in person, but as I talked with superintendents around the car. It's more common to hear people talking about the hybrid model talking about adding. To covert of kids, one group comes in Monday and Tuesday then they free the schools up on Wednesday and everybody's online, and then the second group comes in Thursday, and Friday, and the first group gets educated online You know so. There are a lot of districts thinking that's the only realistic way to go. you know in light of particularly in light of these transportation requirements I know that's much under discussion in in Boston. For example, that's one possibility. We talked to Paul Education expert Paul revel Paul. This Milton Story we've talked about before, but it's worth mentioning again since you know how these things work. This distinguished teacher is a Kia Jarrett been there for eighteen years exemplary teacher I saw on. Jim Show she was an incredibly impressive woman. We're supposed to be talking about race now. She was told to talk about encouraged to talk about. Race from her superiors. She did a videotape lesson dissecting to Langston Hughes poems and a third palm that was about a killing a spider, and it talks about how to kill things because you're frightened and some kids were didn't understand that she tried to explain it by saying You don't kill someone like in the case of Almond, arbitrary talking about the young black jogger. who was killed in Georgia. Being, killed as she said quote by racist White People which many the cops are as well close quote so. This is she issued this lesson on June fourth on June fifth the next day, her principal calls in and says she is being placed on immediate pays leave. they've turned around a one eighty on this after community uproar. But how this even happened in the first place. Well, I think it's a reflects what happened to her the reflection of the. Status Quo old norms that we used to have in communities where you know in places that are generally speaking largely white. It's an uncomfortable topic to bring up the top race. I should have said I should have said Posses Min entropy. She's an African American woman. I should have said that at the start, but go ahead. So we're talking about having a you know a delicate conversation about a matter of race in a largely white community, in which there are lots of sensitivities that school leaders have to respond to and you know the old norms allowed you to sort of push that aside marginalized that discussion avoided if at all possible and not have anybody rocking the boats, because parents get upset about it, and so on and so forth we've now. Now with this current outpouring of concern about racial justice and social justice, the norms are in the process of changing right before our very eyes, and of course, if two or three weeks here so that a district what what Milton was doing? I hate to say, but would would have been fairly standard practice in most places to try and avoid anything controversial on the topic of race in a district that was largely white. now because society is starting to look at and think about these things differently because they've had so much evidence. Put in front of them. That we can no longer avoid grappling with these profound disparities and inequities in the injustice in our society that now the norms are changing so night. You saw a school department turn on a dime here from sort of sanctioning such activity to embracing the. The person involved and and and issuing an apology so I take it as a positive turnaround in an indication of where things. Are headed in the future. How restrictive can schools be in? This was all kind of impromptu. Let's deal with this issue within your own classroom. The teacher is innovative in the way that he or she in this case she deals with it and then is met with this kind of resistance. especially in this moment where things are changing where things have to be addressed where there isn't necessarily protocol or standards already in place how much latitude to teachers generally have? Well. Our. Schools are political organisms. They tend to reflect the communities, norms and values rather than to lead them. And, so while you know, there may be. Provision in our Constitution for free speech and we might sort of ascribed to ideals that we should be and open discussions and a diversity of opinions on matters of. Civic challenges and the like in our classrooms. When push comes to shove in school district. What matters is what? What resonates with people in the community. So we tend to manage schools to for peace and quiet, and for non controversy and teachers tend to get sanctioned. It's one of the reasons we have teacher. Tenure is to try and preserve resume and and safety for teachers to be able to get into There is in discussions that not everybody in the community would welcome because when people in the community don't. Appreciate the kinds of discussions that are happening, they will go to elected officials and say. Why are you permitting this? This is inappropriate. This is. This is negative community. Yeah to me to me because this story about this teacher getting hauled in and told you out of there because of. Talking, about racism on police officers with it. That's what happened in Milton. Per useful. To have the story in the globe all these black kids from Middlesex Taber. Noble and Green Oh andover BC high all deerfield all these hotshot private schools. Talking about the racism that was. They endured for years with with no. Teacher stepping in with no classmates setting, so it's just a perfect illustration of the double standard. That African Americans had put up with for centuries here that we don't want. We can make these black kids uncomfortable, so the cows come home. I mean. Incredible it's totally right whether we've done it. Through sort of political action in a you know in a school committee and a local community, or whether we do it through norms and behaviors that are tolerated in elite white lead institutions what black people are talking to us about. You're saying if you really want to change something, you start changing those norms and changing those policies, and you start opening up and having the kinds of discussions that you know they couldn't have in Milton, but they could have a Boston public. School. Yeah? Well people if people haven't seen it. The black students alumni public painful stories of racism, a prestigious prep schools. It's really an eye opening story to read some of the blatant racist stuff. These kids endured not just from classmates, but from teachers. Over, and over during their education. Ignorance and some of it was outright hostility and racism. but but the overriding story isn't. It was polera. There was no worse for these students. These students had suffer in silence private lake. And bear the scars that experience long into their later lives. What's interesting to that? As pointed out in this piece that these students are the children? These white students are the children of affluent white families. We're going to be the leaders of this raising kids. We're going to be the next leaders who have these values in them already were to make students of color uncomfortable. Yeah Well Paul thank you so much. Absolutely I, just to say. The need for greater diversity in these kinds of institutes think it's all too apparent during. I will paw right to speak with you. Is a professor at Harvard University's graduate. School of Education where he also runs. The education redesigned lab his book. Co authored with Elaine. Weiss's broader boulder better. How schools and communities help students overcome the disadvantages of poverty coming up. It's all things tech with Andy, NOCCO. He's next on eighty nine seven W. G.. B. H. Boston public radio. Walkabout to Boston Public Radio Jack Bonuses in for Jim Brady and not go is here with us today to give us the latest headlines, the intersection of tech, policy and commerce is a tech writer and blogger, and you can find his work at in not go dot. Com and follow him at NOCCO H and a TKO Hi Andy. So I'm very excited being an apple computer user, even if I, do have to wait for a while. Tell me what's going on with their I. don't even know what a CPU is, but whatever it is not going to buy from Intel anymore. Design their own so this is good news I think. Yeah all I can say is that this is one of the biggest moves apple has made. About the future of the Macintosh since the first Macintosh in nineteen five, this is just titanic. I don't mean the bad way I mean the good way the the the the view of of a computer. That's like the that's Kinda like the mothership that the chip that. Runs all the instructions and all the code that the thing has performed so obviously when you choose which CPU, you're putting into a computer. You're making a huge amount of decisions about what this thing can do. How fast it can do it! How much power consumes whether you can make this computer really really flat where the you needed to put it in a big box with fans, and for about ten years or so, apple has been buying it CPU's from Intel Oh name that everyone is familiar with. They also make overall chip that go into windows, machines, and this relationship work for a while, but it's like this relationship has this. This marriage was not going to last? For the past five years, apples been really upset within Intel, because for one thing just doesn't as on principle doesn't like having to be beholden to an outside supplier for something that important, but also that APP that Intel would announce. Okay, here's our new range of chips and apple would place their orders, and then like they would be in. A year late. Be Able to deliver them. That means that that means that now apple is go is getting. Insulted by all of its users say. Why don't you have a super powerful computer? Well, because we're waiting on these ships that we don't make ourselves so This has been a rumor for a long time. Apple has been making its own CPU's for for its apple watches for ipods for its iphones. Every time you've used one of those things they've designed, and had that thing manufactured that CPU from the ground up, so it's designed specifically for what not only this. This IPAD is supposed to do, but what this model of IPAD is supposed to do, and it's completely integrated with all the other electronics in it, and it's also completely integrated with the operating system, and the APPS that run so as you can imagine, you can do some really really powerful things when you're not using an off the show CPU designed to do anything for any computer. That's ever going to be made, but H chip. That's going to be designed to. Specifically be the best chip you can put into like a Mac book or a desktop, Mac, or something like that, so at their big developer conference this week they announced against rumored for a number of years, but he's now's the act the actual plan in the schedule. They're doing it over the next two years. They're transitioning the entire Macintosh line to their own custom designed apple, silicon, and the potential for this being a transformative thing for the MAC is, it's hard to. It's hard to know how to contain wants expectations because it could really revolutionized the whole thing, so andy say somebody just bought their Mac book within the last few months and Too Bad. What are on asking for a friend Marjorie. Friend. My friend Andy did advise me that was a good time to buy it, so you did buy back book do. Are you suddenly sitting on a dinosaur? When when the new product comes out, which seems to be like it'll be so much better. Not Really I. Think the truth, the as a practical thing. Anyone who bought an Intel based MAC this year. They're not gonNA. Notice any difference for the next five years or so. Apple has done this sort of transition twice before. the original chip that went into the original. Mac was a Motorola sixty eight thousand. Then they switched to power PC. PC which is a totally different CPU, and then they switched Intel another totally different CPU and the sound scary, because imagine that Massachusetts decided Oh, by the way starting next week, and over the next two years we're transitioning to everybody driving on the left hand side of the road. Instead of the right I know that a lot of us do that. That anyway, but that's how disruptive this could be, but apple knows how to do this transition, so you don't have to. Even though the software designed run on these new CPU's is completely compatible with Intel. You won't know the difference because the people who write that software, all they really have to do is raise. Click a little button letting the the the system that they used to build the software, and that system will build an Intel version of the software and a new apple chip version of that software. It'll all be in the same little bundle, and when you download your APP from the APP store or wherever your computer will know, wish version to run so you really shouldn't notice anything. That it's going to the only place where you might have a little bit of a Pang. Is that again? The things apple can do in the future when they have complete control over everything they can do things like You have the exact same macbook pro, but now the battery life is three or four hours longer or now. The or now it's going to be easier for them to do mobile broadband because they've already done the duct design, those chips for for the IPAD and the iphone. So or maybe that was the next version of the macbook air, which they're ultralight version, it can act. Maybe it'll look more like an IPAD. Super, super thin and more like a tablet. That's the sort of things you might miss out on, but if you. I'm in the same boat because my desktop Mac is now eight years old. I really was planning this year to upgrade my hardware If you need something right now, realized that the very first Max that they ship with this news chips that is GonNa be this year and they didn't say specifically. What kind is going to be whether? It's going to be a notebook and desktop, super powerful machine, whatever so if I'm looking for something like a replacement for my Mac mini and I really did need it right now. I don't know how how easy it would be for me to potentially two years. Years until they make this new apple version of it so if you need a machine right now, I would buy a machine right now if you can wait at least until the fall or the winter to see what that first machine is, and then, if you're looking for a MAC pro, and it's a Mac book pro great by the new one but it's you want to be a little bit forward seeking when you're thinking about this, because I'm most excited about the machines. That may not look anything like what we've got right now. 'cause like I said. The potential here is huge. Okay we're talking to tech man and did not go continuing now in our never ending seemingly never ending series of stories about black men getting arrested just for living their lives. Tell us this awful story about this facial recognition Detroit. Jewelry Heist tail. Yet. This is a terrible terrible story out of Michigan and basically what happened was A Detroit police totally misused facial recognition software I mean they almost they almost want us to demonstrate why there needs to be legislation either banning police use of facial recognition, software, or severally controlling. Because they made almost every mistake they could make. There was a there was a a robbery at a jewelry store in Detroit mistake number one was the photo they had of the suspect was a frame from a really bad blurry security camera, so strike one. You really do need a good reference photo. You can't just give give the. The system, a bad bad original number two the suspect was black, and these algorithms are known to be prejudiced against against a non white faces. They just simply haven't been trained. The software to recognize non-life faces They're optimized for white face, and so there's already been proven the it's been proven by MIT MIT and the National Institute of Standards, and Technology that there is a racial bias, so that's strike two then they through the software that there's no real standards to that they can go to to say that. Yes, we know for a fact. This works really well strike three number four. When they gotTA match the pre the the actual match they got, they'd actually matched against the entire almost forty to fifty million image I. Think the They went against the driver's license database of state of Michigan and. They found a match, but the software says in bold print at the very very top by the way this is, this is just a piece of information. You should not go making arrests on this. This is just because there is a degree of vulnerability of this data. And they basically and they went out they got they got a match to a jump. Robert Julian Board Chuck Williams and they just went ahead and a felony arrest warrant for him and pick them up in front of his house. and they didn't do any police any police work any investigation. They didn't even bother like punching his name into. Into Google and say here instagram account. I wonder if he was, he was posting videos from one hundred miles away on the date. Nope, and apparently as soon as they. As soon as he came in, it was obvious to even the investigators that wow this surveillance. This blurry surveillance photo is blurry as it is, doesn't look anything like this guy nonetheless, and this is. This is where if you're not already mad. I'm GonNa make you matter. realized that he was arrested. He was processed so that as a result of this is fingerprints DNA. His mugshot photo are all in the all the criminal database, and so As well as the the facts of his arrest, and it has to be now. Expunged of for this to not affect him for the rest of his life, they he. He was he he did get a preliminary court date. Obviously, the prosecutor said okay well. Obviously, this isn't the isn't the we're looking for, so we're not going to pursue for the chargers, but. Even, the even there. They didn't say okay. You're where we made a mistake. This is a good. Please go go and peace. They basically said we're going to let this guy go, but we're going to reserve the right to charge them later on if there's more information so only because he got got some help from the ACLU. This getting the sort of attention that it needs get. The that the state is now saying we will, you can petition who we will. We will arrange everything. We will make sure that there's no stain about this I need research records or anything like that, but this is realized that this isn't just the first time that this has ever happened. This is almost certainly just the first one to get this kind of publicity out. This is why this is so dangerous. That's my question is is how this happened. In Detroit how widespread do we know this is being used? or how widespread is the use? It's it's a huge huge business, and most of the companies that are doing this, they they. They aren't Google Microsoft. They aren't Amazon They've the ones that were even in that business to begin with. They weren't making a lot of progress with it, and so the and within the last month they said by the way until there's legislation about this. This. We're not going to be in this business at all. These are small small companies that are competing very very heavily to police departments, large and small unless basically unless the state or county has a law restricting or controlling the use facial recognition. It's a pretty good assumption that that county is using facial recognition in some way, shape or form. So and not. Tell us. What's going on in California with Auburn left? They're about to get a big hurt Hammer. De State of California so California has been very very much upset with lifting Uber as well as well as a lot of other state attorneys general because they're they while they were trying to create this business of rideshare, they decided to be really really cute and say that Oh all the drivers who use our APP. They're not our employees. They're simply independent. Contractors that are using our service just like other people. People are using our APP and using our service. Therefore, we don't have to pay them like employees remember that when someone is an employee, you have actual labor laws that you then have to follow such as you have to pay the minimum wage. You have to pay them Workman's COMP if they get hurt if you pay them overtime and six and sick, leave and insurance, and they have a right to they have. Have certain legal rights. If the company is treating them treating them in a very very bad way they've been getting around all of that against, they don't know these people are independent contractors. So last year California passed a new law defining gig workers. The GIG workers in the GIG economy that went into effect on January first. That basically says that no, you can't do that anymore. So this is the other shoe finally. Finally dropping a court date of August, six against a lift Newburgh to say look you. We are now forcing you to re register. All of your drivers as employee's. What happened this week yesterday? Is that The California basically asked for preliminary injunction from the court to say I, know court date isn't for another month about half the could you basically empire in Panama impelled him to do that right right now? I know that. I don't these. Lawsuits often take a long time, but it seems that this might be something. That Uber is especially fond of doing a right now because they have ha- I haven't seen their numbers for Uber and lift, but they have to have been hit incredibly hard by this pandemic and people not traveling at this point, and so, how does this help them from a financial point of view? Oh, it absolutely doesn't. It'll raise their costs. immeasurably about thirty percent to have to comply with basic labor. Regulations just on the announcement. the according to your times, shares of both companies fell eight percent It's and it's important to note. It's important to note that. Both of these companies have yet to actually post a profit as as yet so any change to how they're forced to do. Business could really have an immediate impact over how much it costs to take a a share all the way to what kind of service does do lifting newburgh want to serve now if they are. They're constrict constrained by how they can make their money. So India NOCCO. We just had the governor's press conference about going back to school in Massachusetts, but meanwhile unbeknownst to me until I. Read Your memo this morning. Tragedy is about to befall school children all over the state of Rhode Island or hurt Hammer. What's going on? Well. Actually. I don't I feel so. y'All. To live close enough to the town fire department that when I was a kid from like first grade through high school I'd be. That's one time I'd be awake a half hour before the alarm, because if I heard the fire horn pursuit. AM Snow Day no school. We get a day off well. Our Rhode Island. Education Commissioner says that well. We're not. We figured out how to do virtual learning now, so guess what? He said this is a quote. The snow days we the way we did them before are gone. We can do virtual distance learning, and now the name of and Fontenay Green. Cursed into the guy all summer long, so but they say is that now there's a there's bad weather. They can't over the schools. Guess what the hope your? I hope it didn't take that out the broadband to because you're doing education by by by distance learning like Oh. This is such a such a cultural tradition I just want. It's Kinda like when a person realizes that. Oh, no, the children are not learning how to speak Irish or how Chinese you don't know how to write. Anymore this is something that used to bind us altogether as a culture Sorry but I do think. I think you're right, though I think that a lot of people are going to catch onto this, because for parents is snow days are nightmare. If you have to go to work anyway, and then you're gonna find something to do with your kids. What are you GonNa do with kids? If you go to work, and also, kids have lost so much with the virus I bet. Rhode Island is just ahead of the curve here, don't you? I I'm sure you're right and and like I said. It's not just an immediate reaction to grow virus. I really think that things like employment is going to change. Not Be not necessarily because Corona virus is still out there. Even when there's a vaccine, this experience of being forced to try radical new ideas has taught a lot of different organizations. While you know what we allow people to simply come in maybe once a week. When there's something, they absolutely can't do outside the office and guess what everything worked out just fine. Maybe we should totally change the way that we do business, and maybe that that one hundred and fifty million dollar new campus building that we were going to build a house, our employees and our officers. Maybe we don't need that anymore. Maybe if he just renovated smaller space. Although although they'll be happy in June when when they get to. Remind myself of that. Senior Amado slogan down there. She's Gina. Knock it off. Raimondo called governor now. Shirts. Leading. Much. Thank you andy. I'm sorry about that laptop. It's a very very good back book. It's a lovely. I'm very happy with so thank you. Andy NOCCO joins US regularly. He's tech, writer and blogger. You can find his work. DOT COM and you can follow him at Nut Co... Pundits Graham twitter, and the like coming up if all the world is a stage, what kind of world are we living in our local theater? Companies are now suspending live performances. The Huntington Theatre Companies Michael Maso joins us to talk about how the pandemic is ups up ending Boston's theater scene. This is eighty nine seven W. H. Boston public radio. Welcome back to Boston, Public Radio Jim Bratty has the day off W. G.. B. H. Executive Arcelor jarred born is here for Jim? So the pandemic delivered a huge blow to the arts and cultural institutions and the hits just keep on coming yesterday. The Beloved Huntington Theatre Company announced it won't return to the stage until twenty twenty one, and then it will have to furlough Orlando a majority of its staff because of this public health crisis, joining us on the line to talk about what it took to make this difficult decisions, Michael, Maso, the managing director of the Hundred Theater Company. Michael Welcome back to Boston public radio. Thank you very much for coming on with US TODAY Thank you thank you both Marjorie and jared. To be here so? So I just said you just had to make this this terrible announcement. About your season. Tell US exactly how you came to this decision Michael. Tall. With everyone in the especially the performing arts I mean we gather people for a living every gathered people for an important purpose, but the fundamental aspect of what we do is we bring people together for this communal experience, and it became just clearer and clearer time that the notion of large gatherings that we require to do theatre. isn't going to happen in the immediate future, and you know especially if you take a look at the trend lines that our country is facing in terms of the the case caseloads going up instead of going in the right direction. Direction there just doesn't seem to be a pass, and and and you know in addition to not being able to bring people together, even if we could have brought people together, and the government says you're allowed over one hundred fifty people. We have to think about the safety of our audiences. The safety of artists just imagine trying to worst a play with social distancing right now. There is not a single professional production of theatre rehearsing in the country. Because the Actors Union has made it very clear with that. It's not safe to even do that. So we were just faced with the inevitable of saying that it should least. Early Twenty, twenty one when we can really start doing our job again, so Michael Once I put the numbers together. I realized that essentially. The Huntington is going to be dark for about a year. That's assuming you open your first production next spring, which is maybe on the early side of what you're anticipating of course, nobody knows the answers. How do you survive something like this? So that that's exactly right, we shut down along with almost everybody else on March twelfth to Thirteenth We were the of when the earliest of. Industries impacted, and certainly we will be among the latest to come back, and I think that roughly saying that will be out of the producing and presenting business for year, and and basically we will be out of our primary source of earned revenue for a year is absolutely true, and so we are we obviously it forced us to go through the very difficult and painful decision about reducing staff during. During this time and it seems to me we have. We have a couple of jobs I. obviously the only way we can pay our bills is going to be through some creative use of perhaps our spaces, but mostly it's going to be relying on our contributed income base and our donors and board members and the foundations and corporations in this community who value the arts and the conversations that we create we will. Continue to do education. PROGRAMS WE'RE GONNA continue to work wherever founding relationship with Tottenham Economy Charter school. We're GONNA. Be Doing. We have programs which serve about thirty thousand young people, a year and the only thing we won't be able to do is bring those young people into the theater, but we're deeply connected and committed to continuing the education of young people, but it is certainly going to be a challenge, and every single step is going to be new, and so we we, we have a plan, but we certainly are going to be adjusting it Every every month as we see whether or not, we're really able to to get ready to come back again and provide the service provided for thirty eight years to Boston. Is there any way to resent theater at all and I ask satellite of last week on open studio had Julianne Boyd on the show Caesar. Artistic Director of Barrington Stage Company out in Pittsfield where she has found a path forward It's not conventional by any means. They've taken out a number of seats. She agrees that it's not a financial model. You that that's completely sustainable, because you can't take out seats been in, expect still bringing the ticket revenue that you need to keep you going, but she's also. Found a way to bring people through the theater that they're. It's not so cumbersome. She's presenting to start off a one person show so there isn't that issue with the Actors Equity Union of actors having to Rehearse together and be in tight spaces. And she did. They're bringing in a couple of concerts in that have sold out, so she finds that there is the audience demand. is she completely the outlier there or is? Is there a hybrid that you can put together? I think that. An outlier in as you can say, you can do I, suppose you can do a one person show. Don't have to rehearse it I. Don't know in fact that that. That even their plan has got the approval of the. Union but I assume they will work out, but you know if you're trying to do or. Plays that that speaks to you know to your community, and in terms of the division of Your Institution. you know there are a few single person plays, but even then the notion that let's say at the at the at the call were two billion, which the Huntington runs so in order to social distance, and that's assuming you're probably taking a three hundred seventy space, the the Wimbley Theater, and reducing it to somewhere around fifty or sixty seats at at at our Huntington. Avenue Space News be reducing an eight hundred seat theater I hundred and fifty or two hundred seats. And a number one it's it's economically unfeasible, but also imagine trying to be an accom- trying to accommodate you know the experience of being in a house of people who are experiencing and reacting along with you and laughing. You're going to fundamentally change that experience If you try to do that, and it's it's It's there will be experiment, and certainly we can put some concert on stage, perhaps and keep people in small houses, and we are going to be offering some digital programming, but it's not fundamentally the same thing. We're talking with Michael Maso. He's managing director. The Huntington Theatre Mike I wonder what you're hearing from your actors. Because A lot of people are in the same boat. They're not doing theater and in some cases and not doing that much. In, Hollywood, so what are people do to survive? You know it's a very difficult time. I think a lot of the the actors I mean. When when the pandemic I hit, facebook was lit up by every actor trying to get into the unemployment system I'm or so many actors trying to get into the unemployment system, which was first so overloaded at the beginning of the pandemic in particular but you know there are other opportunities I mean I know people who the people who have opportunities and our writing but but it's a very challenging time to be an artist in the American theater. You know you just mentioned in order. Stay afloat. You largely rely on philanthropy and community organizations and donors and foundations here to step into sport I. Don't need to tell you. Maybe our audience needs to know that in Europe. The government funding can be fairly substantial for the arts, but we certainly don't have that here in this country. And I begin to wonder as you stretch into that year long cycle when the people stepping forward trying to give so much to so many organizations when they begin to become tapped out I mean. Do you have a feel for what what the reserves is among the philanthropic sector? I think you're absolutely right? And of course there is there is no such thing as an unlimited a tap that we can either expect, or frankly that that we can that we deserve. It's not an unlimited fund of money, and there's so many needs are being caused by this pandemic and and the social unrest in in the country that that there are lots of other ways that donors need to spend their money I think one of the things that we're. We're not doing well. You know I know that there's a lot of conversation about the airline industry. There's a lot of conversation about the restaurant industry on all of that is very well deserved, but there is no field in the country that is going to be more negatively impacted than the art, then performing arts, and that's whether it's nonprofit or commercial, and there should be a dedicated piece of any relief act that is committed to sustaining the cultural life of this country. Wanted we in the couple minutes we have left. His House Q. Not only. Are you dealing with the economic ramifications but? There's also a focus on theater right now. As we look at the issue of systemic racism in this country, a letter was written recently by signed initially a much many more people now by about three hundred people of color who said that theater needs to change in this country everything from the media to the administrators to the creative teams about what's being presented in what is represented on stage. How are you dealing with that D- to acknowledge that you probably have worked to do yourself at Huntington. Of course we do I. Mean you know we are a majority white institution, and and and we've operated under a structure that we know major reexamining I mean. We've had a lot of conversation over the last two weeks. About how to address issues of institutional racism within our organization, but but I also had contribute to the larger conversation about that I mean many many people on that initial lift were people who the Huntington has really strong and powerful relationships with, and I think there are a lot of people who are saying of course we work with you, of course you. You, know you we are. We are friends with you, but that's still doesn't mean that you need that. You don't need to play your role in in sort of rebalancing the power dynamic in this country, and in the American theater and the American theater as as as many people have said is is is is the power resides in the white community. Well Michael This is a very difficult situation you're in, but I wish you the best of like. You're going to be much messed I think it's GonNa people are GonNa Miss you very much around here. You do great stuff there. Is it what's the? What's the one by? The Conservatory Boylston Street at the street, Huntington Avenue Hundred Avenue. In the South End. Yeah, thank you so much for being with us. I'm I'm very sorry. Well, you know we have extraordinary and smart people who are working with us, and you know one way or the other, and it may be that it's you know we're looking of course to our public health officials to help us all feel that we can get together again, but you know to. Theater is a very resilient industry. We have very resilient. People there have been interruptions before. They're even been pandemics before, and we've come back and we will gather and do our work again even if it takes us a year. I just keep thinking of that first curtain. Call that we're going to see There will be so much emotion that night gets to happen. Will indeed there will Michael Thank you I'm? Chess, thank you so. Much. Yes, thank you. That was Michael Maso managing director of the Huntington. Theatre company. We are done. Thank you very much for listening to another edition of Boston public radio. Tune in tomorrow, Jim, we'll be back. Ask Mayor Marty Walsh up here at noon to take our questions in your call, so we have some set him forward PR W. G. B. H. DOT ORG or call us. Crew Chelsea Murs Arjun Singh's Matthews. Can you believe it uncommonly? Engineers John the club Parker offset engineers. Dave Goldstein and Michael Smith What store not open studio jared. This week we're talking to Ron Muhtar. She's a brookline photographer who is typically known for her up and close portrait's largely of young women as she started photographing children in her career, but during the pandemic, she started photographing people from far, and it is astonishing work how much you can capture from afar in the pandemic. Oh good, and then we'll take province. Take you to province sound to see this wonderful collection of early art that was made in that community. That really gives you a picture of it especially. If you're missing province town because you can't get there, it's all online. John thanks a lot for filling in for Mr Brody appreciated. It's great to be with you. Okay. I'm Marga Regan's. Thank you very much for tuning in. Please tune again tomorrow. Mardi to be with US Giradi be back. Thanks for listening to have a great afternoon.

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Week In Review: Gov. Baker Rolls Back Phase 3, School Districts Release Remote Plans

Radio Boston

39:24 min | 11 months ago

Week In Review: Gov. Baker Rolls Back Phase 3, School Districts Release Remote Plans

"Friday means we can review and we begin today with big news from Governor Charlie Baker just this afternoon Baker announced. He's slowing our states reopening process amid an uptick in Corona virus cases indefinitely postponing step two of phase three five weeks ago we laid out new economic sectors that could open and phase three. This uptick in take cases and reports of people not adhering to the guidance we put forth here in Massachusetts means we cannot move forward at this time or anytime soon in the near future. For, more on the changes coming down from the governor's office. Let's turn to Radio Boston's Chris Siddiq, Chris. Hello. Jamie so step to face three postponed indefinitely. What does that mean? Well. First of all, it's the first time we've officially seen from Governor Baker that things are not going one hundred percent to plan Logistically, what does it mean? It means that activities that have a greater chance of contact like the Governor Lists Laser Tag Roller Skating trampolines obstacle courses things like that. on their website also means indoor performance venues theaters in that sort of thing, would not be allowed. To Open for the near future feeders but movie theaters, I was just going to say Yeah we remember movie theaters opened at the beginning of July so that that's not count included in that but we do know the indoor limit is still at twenty five people so and he also reduced the outdoor gathering size from one hundred, two, fifty. Do you consider this a rollback then of where we were? Seems, it does seem like a both pause and a slight rollback. He's not exactly sank certain sectors of industry needs to close that have been allowed to open. But as you said, he's limiting the gathering size outdoors to fifty people in that now applies to both public and private property seemed to have a real frustration with bars that he said were masquerading as restaurants. Basically, if you put pretzels or chips or something out for folks who were getting drinks that shouldn't count and they're really going to focus on making sure places that are serving alcohol are also serving food that's prepared on site, and all of these are supposed to kick in on Tuesday. Thiele. ICEES. Just. How bad are the numbers right now? So it it feels as if these are, this is an early uptick. We'd heard rumblings over the last week or so from medical experts that numbers were sort of trending upwards everybody likes to look at that seven day average as opposed to one day where you might have kind of a statistical anomaly for the entire month of July pretty much the percent of positive test rates was below two percent for the last week or so we've seen that creep at or above two percent and I think that's one of the metrics that really has folks in the governor's office word. What does the governor's office and what did he announce today? What are they doing in terms of trying to stem that tide beyond pausing? Yeah. The other side of his announcement today was he's creating a task force to focus on enforcement. Here's a little bit about what he had to say about that. Today. I'm authorizing all state and local police officers. To enforce these orders and event hosts violate these orders will be subject to fines. So, that that's something Jamie that Governor Baker has resisted throughout this. He really wanted to leave enforcement up to local control he said that communities have been frustrated by the fact that they'll call authorities and authorities basically have nothing to do. So he's now authorising fines. and. It'll be interesting to see. He said they're gonNA focus on hard hit areas so that immediately brings to mind the question of equity will these rules be enforced equally. Across all communities we'll have to see how it shakes out but This is definitely a change in tactics from Governor Baker Chris I have to say in watching the governor in the last couple of days and weeks he seemed to be saying over and over again don't make me turn this car around and today he sounded even more exacerbated at I want to play just another clip here. This is where he described how he's been social distancing since March outside of the people that I work with on socially distance basis we spent time with about ten people period. Since March. People need to understand the big groups. Especially if people don't distance. Don't wear face coverings. Create in many cases spread Chris. What did you make of this moment? He seems to sort of be reflecting how many how so many of us are feeling right now yeah. I, was really struck by that moment to Jamie. I felt like for those of us who have taken the seriously and done the things that Governor Baker has asked folks to do quarantine as much as possible limit recreational activities make sure you're not gathering in large groups and distancing at all whenever possible there's a I think a. Portion of the population that seems to have gone back to living life as normal. We've seen reports of these kind of large-scale parties happening in different places across the state and and I think for folks who are making the sacrifices doing the things that the is asking them to do. It can be incredibly frustrating and and create a real sense of anger and confusion for when you also see folks who are not doing that, and then you see numbers trending upwards in terms of cases. Finally Chris mentioned that you know we're under a number of orders here. There's the travel order that's in place since Monday what does all of this mean going forward for the people of Massachusetts? I think it means a couple of things I think number one it means that the threat of a second way is real and it's something that Governor Baker and his task force is taking very seriously. I also think it's a reminder of how much pain this causes both in the direct result of obviously cases and hospitalizations and deaths these a real people, obviously his numbers on a page but also secondarily economically we've seen you know the survey that came out this week almost a third of people think they might not be able to pay them rant businesses closing and layoffs across the board. So I I think there's a real concern in a real sense of pain being felt by a lot of folks in the state and it's troubling to see things going in the wrong direction. Radio Boston's Chris Cedric thanks and we'll talk to you a little later in the show. All right. Thanks. Jimmy. So let's pick it up right there. With our we review panelists joining us on the line is said he warrant the Executive Director of the Shorenstein Center on media politics and public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, and former mayor of Newton said he welcome back to Radio Boston Great to be with you and grey back also with us, his Charlie Chippy, oh a senior fellow at the Pioneer Institute and principle of CHIPO. Strategies Charlie welcome to you. Here and listeners pull chair. How were you reacting to the governor's rollback here and the uptick in cases is the right move or another crippling blow to our economy. Call US share your thoughts one, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five. That's one, eight, hundred, four to three talk. Okay. So I want to start there with with that Setti Warren Baker announcing these rollbacks right decision. Well. I think the governor did make the right decision you know early on when this crisis started unfolding, I started engaging with a group. called. The Cove Nineteen Action Coalition their physician led at the end of the day. This is about falling the data and the science and unlike some other states and other governors I believe that this governor has been doing that Early on that being said, you know we've got to really watch this over the course of the next several weeks and months to continue to look at whether this uptick continues on and put other measures in place. But one thing I would say about the amount that's today that I. I also think we have to keep an eye on is the enforcement element. you know there are sets of data that shows. People of Color Over police, the different communities and I I think we need keep an eye on on the numbers the data as a as the enforcement element to this puts goes into play. Charlie how do we balance those two things? The need perhaps in certain communities where we're numbers might be spiking with also making sure that we're not over policing certain communities. Yeah, and it's very difficult. It's very difficult balance because of the fact that men, of course, many of those communities where the numbers are spiking are communities where there are high percentages of people of Color. So it is really a for law enforcement not just from our. For these this enforcement group that Governor Baker announced today I think this is GonNa be the challenge that they have to face because. I would just reinforce what? What said, he just said look I support Governor Baker did today a what I don't know and I think only by a few experts really fully understand is how much know about exactly the nature of the of this sort of uptick is it more generalized is due to specific things that we can point to You know if it is more generalized is suspected may be ultimately. I wonder if we won't need to do more than than this to get it under control I certainly support these steps today. Well, that's that's sort of the issue there right said he is. The governor has been saying over and over again there are these clusters there. There's few groups of bad behavior and he sites foul myth and a couple other places Chatham these big parties in this hotel gardener But could it be a little bit a mixture of both things bad behavior and also the fact that we're open. Yeah, it could be it could be a combination of both and one other thing to mention with communities of color. You know there are a number of reasons why the numbers are higher There's a lot of black and Brown people and industries jobs that are on the front lines. So their exposure is higher and on and on. So I do I do think that that needs to be to be realized. But yeah, they're putting the combination of both. Yeah. There could be a combination of both I think. The governor voicing his frustration over those parties is important and and and vocalizing that. Have to you know come to terms with the data and the science, and the fact that that this virus is something that we we we can't actually control. What we can do is is is moderate our behavior and listen to oppositions and scientists. One Eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five is the phone number. What do you make of this l.? Let's go to Karen calling from Newton Karen you're next on Radio Boston. I own a restaurant in Newton and I really experienced the duality of this. Also having mother-in-law that was isn't a nursing home so I just want to add that. I think we need clarity and great public messaging around the high risk behaviors, which clearly are the big gathering events. The super spreading activity and also. Give people a perspective on the low risk events I was on a phone call with Dr Paul. Courier from. M. G. H. recently and he indicated that restaurants are following all the protocols that we know to do the distancing math cleaning that dining in with another person or with your family in a restaurant is considered by his estimate and he saw the first publication here as a lower activity. So I, I don't want to miss. Also the importance of. Happening to the economy we are about. To go off a cliff in terms of our industry and local independent restaurants are the biggest multiplier of economic. Dollars that we have here in is your own at risk. I think every restaurants that risk I'm grateful that. We. Have sales that are continuing to trend slowly up, and because of this base we have we have enough base that people are comfortable dining inside. But I am working with the restaurant owners group and I can tell you the fall is coming and without another PTP, you will see a lot of restaurant owners having makes them very difficult decisions. So yes, it's a deeply concerning time and I think if we can crack the right message. So we talked about low risk behaviors versus high risk. Live with this for a while. So thank you. Got It. Thanks for the call their Setti Warren. How about that this idea that not only do we need to get the messaging right but we also have to make sure we balance the economic needs of everyone out there. Yeah Karen makes a great point what am I like when my former constituents on the business side look as a former mayor or someone that's been and government different parts of government the one piece to this and I think is important is not to create a false choice terrence right that we should follow the science Make sure people know those the low risk behaviors are at the same. Time, there's a responsibility for government to intervene to ensure that that businesses can stay afloat through this terrible time and that individuals can stay afloat I don't think we should be in a position where we choose public safety over economic condition. So I also would say there's a there are government interventions at varying levels that need to happen, and we shouldn't just create a false choice. Charlie chip. In the event of a second surge are we ready financially? O. God. Hantuli no. Certainly not I mean look you know I I I did a a piece with Greg Sullivan policy brief while back talking about the unemployment situation for Pioneer Institute and and you know we were calling for a federal block grants to. To to pay for the additional. Cost. In that state government is going to face censure. Local governments will face as well and you know pioneers not really in the business of calling for those kinds of things. I, mean look the the the the kind of costs that state government's and local governments are having to face and the fact that unlike the federal government they can't just run deficits. I think that we are not at all in the financial condition that we need to be to deal with this, and I would for this as a guy who used to work for all song is back in the day and named fuel remember just can't help but point out. Over. Over the last few years as we had, you know what is at least at the macro level a very good economy rather than paying down the debt to help us the able to deal with an like this it only skyrocketed and that is very problematic. These kind of times when to go back to the phones here rick is calling from Orleans Rick Welcome Radio Boston Hello, Ricky there. Yes. Rick. I think we. We, lost you there. Rick are let's try another caller here. Let's go to Christine is calling from Somerville Christine. You're next radio awesome. Hi thank you so much for taking my call I just WanNa say I disagree with what I've heard about you know communities of color. Focusing on education rather than enforcement there and but I just want to say that from the beginning, I have really valued the governor's approach. But if also felt like the priorities are way off, we've prioritized opening restaurants and bars we can't now predict we can't confirm whether our children can go back to school safely if kids being in school is a major economic driver. We can't guarantee the safety. We're asking teachers to put their lives on the line. So bars and restaurants can open. So I understand the economic impact, but we can't get our kids back to school, and if we can't get our kids docu school, we can't get the economy back together. So the priorities have been off from the beginning and I think there needs to be a major shift towards how do we get children back in school? I can go back to work. For for for that call and I just WanNa note that bars are not allowed to open yet under under the the rules the governor's orders but so Christine brings up of course, schools is a big part of this conversation and I wanNA play a clip here from the governor this this afternoon because in some ways, it's interesting that he's rolling back but at the same time pushing to open in person schooling, let's listen. If. You think about kindergarten first grade, second grade, third grade, the grades the generally speaking most of the tasks in the studies that have been done make pretty clear. Are those least likely to be infected in the first place. Trying to teach those kids how to read remotely. Mean that's not how you teach kids how to read. So said he warned how about that? Well look, I think from around the country we're seeing students that went back into the classroom during the summer are displaying some higher transmission and getting second, and so there's still a lot of unknowns in around the science of young people I I'm not disagreeing with what the governor said, but there's still a lot of unknowns around that. You know I'm paranoid twelve year old and a nine year old one in middle school one in elementary. And I in my district has not made a decision here, Newton owner direction or go but it is a really frightening prospect to think about The choice that we're going to have to make and a lot of parents are going to have to make and whether they send their kids back in if that district opens up or not. Lastly I i. think it was last caller that brought up disparities. She's right that that really a number of months ago you know there should have been a real effort to figure out what the options might be based on the science. You know if you go all off mine. Districts are doing on you're going to see huge disparities of folks and underserved communities within that district. If you do a hybrid, you're going to see some disparity so. That has been. You know we haven't concentrated on that in a serious way and and I think. We also have despaired a higher level even under the best of circumstances, right? Kobe Kobe need has exposed a lot of those those disparities exist to you're right. Go ahead Charlie. That is certainly true if I could also back to a Christine's call I. Guess. The thing I would disagree with her on is I i. don't see this as a as a trade off of restaurants for schools I mean to be honest with you. I, I don't really see that. Schools are going to be open be able to open safely at least not right away, and I don't think that the fact that we've opened restaurants is the reason why I I think that that is just You know that business the reality of this virus in what we're facing right now and there is you know there's just there's no good way out of this there's no doubt that not opening schools. in person is going to affect everybody negatively. But as disproportionately impact those who who are poor and have US opportunities in the first place you know but you know. It just seems to me not realistic to be able to do that right away, and I would also add that while I think for the very early eight grades. Teaching. Remotely is not the most effective thing to do. I would say that when it comes to remote education, there are places that do it well, not necessarily a as the governor set to teach people to read, but there are places that have done it pretty well, and Massachusetts is not one of those places we have not. We have not done well in terms of the switch to a remote education when you compare compare it to what some other places have done Charlie. Just to push back a little bit on that idea of a trade off, we heard from Dr Sheesh jaw from Harvard, and he's one of those folks who concerned about our reopening in schools and so when play a little bit a tape from him here is we said look forget schools we don't really care of kids are all online then you probably have a bit more running room. You can let the infections rate get higher you won't fill up your hospitals too much and. We'll get sick and some people will die, but you can tolerate a certain level. If you actually care about schools, then you probably need to tolerate a much much lower level of indoor doubter. So that was restaurants, bars chips. Is that the tradeoff there. Well. Yeah. Look at to a degree. I don't I don't I think it's absolutely right. I think that we're going to need to go at this. If we have to take further steps, which I suspect that we will is definitely going to be greater limitations on indoor gatherings There's no doubt about that but I don't think that it's appropriate to say that we have been in any way profligate with allowing stuffed up open up by crazy you know To the to the To the detriment of other things like putting getting students back to school look we don't. We're figuring this out as we go, and thankfully we know a whole lot more than we didn't March but we don't have all the answers yet, and so the best thing we can do is to be guided by the Science and to act accordingly I, WanNa go to a break and in just a moment here but I i WanNa see if we can get a rick from Orleans back on here rick welcome to Radio Boston. Thank you so much I'm in several of the high risk groups, my family and I live year round in Orleans? I'm in a wheelchair about the hit seventy and I'm coming off round of chemotherapy. And my wife and I are just really very concerned at the normal behavior that we see from. So many visitors to the Cape and probably a good number of regular Cape residents or year rounders. We see so many people not wearing masks. We see young people clustering in groups having parties on the beach. We see restaurant outdoor patios where tables is certainly not six feet apart and it's an awful feeling to. Realize that every time you put your mask and gloves on if you have to go outside to buy food or go to the drugstore or any other life Aaron, you're putting your life at risk because people are simply not taking things seriously. Rick I just do want to ask you how you're doing and hope your I. Hope you're doing. Okay. I'm doing well, thank you and I I support the governor. I think he's doing the right thing unfortunately I believe we're going to have to make examples out of some people because there's simply not taking it seriously it's I can hear the frustration in your voice there. So thanks thanks for sharing that with US I want to turn to a caller. Here we have betsy from Brewster Betsy you're on Radio Boston. Hi I'm really disgusted by the scofflaws and I think that a fine is not gonNa make a difference. So what I? Is what three hundred dollar fine. Yeah I don't think it'll make a difference. I think people will just ignore it. What I think we should do is collect names and social security numbers and healthcare information, and then when people show up at the hospital say, Oh, sorry, you don't qualify anymore forgetting any healthcare from this hospital. Betsy, thanks for the Call City War and You know we are at a place where A lot of information is being collected by the government right now, we've got the travel order in place where you have to register when you come into the state. How about that idea that betsy puts on the table. Well, I. I'm not sure the ethical or legal possibilities of of these proposal, but I think I hear her frustration around this and I think one of the challenges I think that we have around us is it really has been politicized nationally I started off at the top talking about the data science and how within the media. Ecosystem, there's just a lot of mixed messages depending on what you watch and what you consume and I think that's a really serious challenge right now when people are making decisions around around their own behavior I think that that that SORTA has clouded the focus on on science and medicine, and it's a real challenge moving moving forward. We'll charlie part of it is much of the science and what we know is unknown if that if that makes sense. Right that's right. I mean look I think we all remember not very long ago March. April we were being told well, don't wear masks. It's not gonNA make any difference and Now, we know more and masks are seems to be the single most important thing we can do. To protect ourselves and to protect others the to an even greater degree. So that's very true. I think you. You take that and you add it to just the just the human you know just the. just being tired of this. You know it's you know it just it's just hard to maintain it but you know we're we're hopefully not that far from. A from a a vaccine and we just have to keep it up a little bit longer. Well, of course, in the meantime, there's also universities that we haven't even touched on talking about coming back bringing in person students back to Boston is that a concern for you said, he warren, you were the mayor of Newton and Boston College is right on its border. They're they're planning on bringing some students back to campus. Does that concern you? Yeah. Well, I'd be very, very concerned. You Know We Boston College where we have two other colleges within Newton. These are the types of things we gotTA. Monitor we've got to look at the numbers we've gotta look at the data on and you know government officials need to engage with those college presidents and leadership about about whether or not they should move forward every. There should be thinking about this Every hound should be thinking about this border, select persons and such. This is one of those pieces around the reopening that were government has to play will on and can't. Sort of play fair Attitude towards. It. We've got Siri calling from Haven Sarah you're next on Radio Boston. So I just want to speak to somebody that had mentioned that Massachusetts didn't do real well in the turnaround or that teachers weren't doing you know student for learning enough I can tell you that most of the teachers that I know only did we end up working more hours than we've ever worked in a day but I myself would be on my computer which students at night and I have special education. So I would do one to one with some of my students but I also had parents that didn't get their students up at ten forty five. Or eleven o'clock in the morning and would let them stay up till four o'clock in the morning whether you're mandated to sign into school or not. Your teachers were all working. We were all there with lessons to be taught. So you know I have to I have to say that maybe we did do a really good job, and maybe there were just some people that didn't acclimate to getting getting their children or I. Don't didn't want parents fighting with children but you know ten eleven o'clock in the morning kids should be up an online and ready to learn serious. No. There's no question that it has been a challenge for everyone involved Charlie Y-. I'm the one who said that I I'm sorry. Sorry I wanna be clear about that my my. With what Massachusetts has done is the lack of readiness on the part of districts and on the part of the Department of Elementary, and secondary education I'm certainly not blaming the fact that we were not good at at remote education on the teachers I I I don't think it had anything to do with the teachers. I think it said we had to do with a lack of preparedness and the lack of what needed to be done to make 'em. It's never going to be a seamless transition in a situation like this but the most seamless transition possible. This is this is an administrative issue and and not a teacher issue at all JEN is calling from Tyngsborough John you're next Radio Boston. Hi. Hi What's on your mind? So. I am a parent of two small children with down syndrome in Tyngsborough and I'm also a high school teacher to neighboring. and I've been on my school's reopening. Developing the three unfortunately. Unfortunately. We're Lee losing. You hear your line is breaking up but but let's try Jeremy Who's calling from Clinton Jeremy. Boston. Hi Yeah as your previous caller had said I as well as a teacher in Massachusetts. And we found like most of the teachers found it incredibly hard when the commissioner headed came out and said that The students will be passed on and. Changed up how the grading work and it made it extremely hard for the teachers and I don't think a lot of parents not that, and so the questions of. How hard it was for the teachers to develop a good program was kinda hampered by giving away easy grades for that Great, thanks for the Call Their Jeremy Setti Warren before we move onto another topic here. I just want to ask you. Is there any good way to approach this right now? It just seems like every option is difficult challenging and leaves everyone dissatisfied. Well look you know I sat by school committee as the Mayor and when we were not dealing with covert nineteen, you know district with diverse backgrounds races challenges as far as special education was was already complicated. This makes it even more I think that Charlie made some some very good points. One of the challenges that we have is that every district is on their own and every district is making their own their own administrative decisions. One of the towns superintendent administrators at said I need to understand the science behind this better and I need Guidance and advice. So I can make the right decisions and I think that's exactly right. I think that there's a role for state government in engaging with districts on the ground giving them best science and understanding and data sets and coming up with the best guidance on how to implement either offline, which I think is where we may be heading and address the disparities within the district whether it's special education undershirt kids there really needs to be you know connection with state and local government and and we'll guidance so that district's can make the right decisions. I do want to shift gears here in in the few minutes that we have left and talk a little bit about a ruling that came down right at the end of our show last Friday with implications reverberating in Boston this week the decision from a panel of federal judges to throw out the death penalty sentence for Jihad sir knife citing significant issues with juror impartiality. In the case, the guilty verdict and his life without parole sentence stands. It's now up to the Justice Department as to how to proceed pursue the death penalty further with another sentencing trial or allow the life sentence to hold said, he charlie, what are your reactions to this decision? Well, I'LL START I mean I'M A. Speaking Lawyers Never Practice Law Dan. My Life you know look it just seems man I. I am admittedly biased because I'm not a fan of the death penalty, but it just seems to me that when you have a situation where you'll carson, I will spend the rest of his life in jail that to put the system them and more importantly the victims and their families and everything through all this again n not to mention all the countless appeals and everything that you would have just in pursuit of a death sentence as opposed to life in prison and I I'm sure you know this is obviously a hot button issue and there are many who will disagree with me. But I, I just don't see that as as as worth it one of the folks. Who who might disagree with you on that is Liz Norden her sons Paul and j p each lost a leg in the bombing and she was a vocal proponent of the death penalty for Sarnia. We spoke at the end of last week. Here's what she said. You know seventy s and we live every day but. Somewhat of novelty has set in and if you kind of move on and move and then they have to go through it all over again really just sucks. So I will go I went every day almost every day for the first time I know exactly what I`ll Do it again. Maybe. Seri warned this idea that for so many of us life of course goes on it changes were gonNA pandemic now and for the victims and their families as Charlie was describing to there's there's always that pain and potentially more pain to revisit the horrific scenes of that day again in court. Yes, you know I was mayor during the the awful terrorist attack, the the the Boston marathon goes right through the and right by City Hall and I remember that day vividly when the race was stopped and renters had to go into city hall there was panic. there was trauma people trying to get in touch with their loved ones at the end of the. The race that couldn't get in touch with them. and you know then you remember the horrific scenes and the victims. the people that died. and the people that were in and around that scene it was so dramatic and so traumatic. When I think about this The question is you know what is right for those families and people who suffered great loss what's right for the community that suffered the trauma Boston and our state When you think about this, that's how I think about it I have grave reservations around that. I know there's a split within some of the family. Some of the families don't want you see another trot trial some families do. But I think we have to ask ourselves that question is that well that yield justice by going through another trial and I i. have serious reservations about it as a as a resident I would never want to speak for the families but certainly as a resident, our state I serious reservations about it and I admitted Charlie do have a pretty serious problems with the death penalty, but aside whether you believe it or not. I think that is. That is essential question to us the the the family of eight year old Martin, Richard who was killed on the finish line They of course, have declined requests to speak this week to news outlets instead referring folks to their twenty fifteen essay in the Boston Globe. Where they write in part, the continued pursuit of the death penalty could bring years of appeals and prolong reliving the most painful day of our lives. We hope our two remaining children do not have to grow up with the lingering painful reminder of what the defendant took from them, which years of appeals would undoubtably bring. and. Early, this week we spoke with WBZ, our reporter, America's David Bowie and he said exactly, as you described it setting no punishment will truly bring justice. What is justice in the end? You know. Seems to me that justice is Martin richest coming alive and people being restored? Leagues. Arms. We don't have justice and that sort and we're not GONNA get. We're not going to get that justice for Martin Richard as as. He says. So how do we get any sense of justice Charlie chip y'all. Well, that's you know that is that is the question here and I wholeheartedly agree with setting that really this has to be viewed through the Lens of the people. It's affected the most and when I see those families as split as they are. I just think I think the the closest thing we can come to justice is to not pursue this further but again, and you know I'm You, know they're? Not The last word on that this is you know there's such. Correctly. Such strong feelings on this in both ways and no sometimes justices very imperfect and I'm afraid that that's largely what the cases here. There's also said he wore in an argument that. Death as difficult as the whole process is is final. That's our naive is twenty seven now and. Maybe. There's a concern that someday over the next seventy or so years of his life. If he served a life sentence, something could change laws could change presidents change but that there's a finality in that ultimate Penalty that that maybe could bring closure to some families. Well I. You know I Trust Judge Gertner on this one and I trust her legal background and legal minden saying that this man will never get out and she was pretty adamant about that in our public comments and I and I think that that's true and I think that unfortunately the horrific heinous act that he did Has. What. Charlie said you know justice is perfect here. but for some knowing that this man. Will Never See the light of day, and we'll have to live with this. Every day is is a is a partial piece of justice. That's important. Said, he warned the director of the Shorenstein Center on media politics and public policy at the Kennedy School and former mayor of Newton. said he thank you for joining us today for this week in review. Very much appreciate being with you. Thank you and Charlie chip Chipo a senior fellow at the Pioneer Institute and Principal of Chipo Strategies. Thanks for joining us as well. Thank you Jamie.

Governor Charlie Baker Boston Massachusetts Governor Baker Chris I Setti Warren Baker Governor Baker Jamie rick Pioneer Institute Newton Charlie chip Setti Warren Christine Newton Karen Shorenstein Center Dr Paul Thiele Orleans senior fellow Newton
Week In Review: BPS Fall Plans, Local Elections, DNC Convention

Radio Boston

42:04 min | 10 months ago

Week In Review: BPS Fall Plans, Local Elections, DNC Convention

"Let's turn to our weekend review panelists with us, remotely is Jane Swift Former Republican Massachusetts Governor. Now the president and executive director of learn launch governor swift. Welcome back to Radio Boston. Thank you so much for having me. Also with us as Michael Curry former president of the Boston, branch of the ACP, a member of the national. NWC. People word and deputy co in general counsel for the Massachusetts League of community. Health, Centers Michael Welcome back to you. Thank YOU GLAD TO BE A. Listeners PALAPA chair join the conversation. The state's largest school district is starting the year all remote just found it out call us with your reactions. What do you make the decision? What about what your city in town is doing city or town how you feel about that eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five that's eight hundred, four to three talk. So Jane Michael so much for the myth of a sleepy August. Things seemed to be changing every day Jane. What's your reaction to the news? This afternoon? Well, I can't say that I'm surprised as I think we've talked about on this show before learn launch which I run has a contract with the Department of Elementary and secondary education. We have been working all summer long with school and district leaders to try to help them build their capacity for these new modes of learning and This is an incredibly complex time and I would just disagree a little bit and there's going to be nothing normal about the school year. It's not going to be normal at its start for parents for students for school leaders for teachers. And the more that folks Begin. To think about ways to make it a positive experience where possible That it can work for them as hard as that is I, think the better that's not at all to diminish the. Ordinary challenges that these schedules present but I do think it is important to point out in. Boston as Mayor Walsh said as well as in many districts across the Commonwealth I got and besides. The work we're doing officially learn launch lots of friends who have been calling me who are getting these letters from their district. This choice, really the most families have never had before asking them to select a mode of learning and that in of itself is causing a great deal of confusion although ultimately a lot of empowerment for parents. Who unlike in the spring at least are able to evaluate what might work best for their families and their children? and Michael Are there winners and losers with this announcement You know I almost hate to frame it that way but I have to believe there will be those who Are thrilled about this and those who are are crushed that seems to be the only type of option that we're facing with schools reopening. To the I would describe it as a conflicting and. Priorities I. Think this is what a pandemic has taught us that you know whether it's you know contract curtailing the spread in protecting be economy that conflict that existed preserving. and. A good sound medical a judgment around what protects you from virus, and now at this point around schools we're looking at, you know, how do we keep our kids on track for quality education and dealing with the social emotional support that they need in the conflict comes when we're also talking about keeping students, parents, teachers safe and we're seeing credit to to the mayor for making that decision. was based on student Aaron. Engagement. And then making a choice along with the city of, but I'll tell you it's probably also pressure because if you look across the country Chicago, your teachers unions are really mobilizing because they realize that this disease is taking lives It's taking the lives of many teachers that are most in that demographic of being risks. And where a at a really difficult place. So I. Think if there's any message is also a sort of a case study after this pandemic is over all the competing priorities that are playing out in society. So, Jane yesterday, we were talking with former governor deval Patrick about a whole bunch of things, and one of the things that came up was whether the state has struck the right balance between. And Freedom of choice for districts and we heard Max at the top you're talking about that that the governor wants people in person but has left it up to the districts. You know governor. Patrick had said that it's a hard balance and he also talked about the importance teachers play for families. Here he is. No home schooling is no joke it's hard and. You know if there are silver linings to some of this I. Hope More folks are are respecting and honoring what teachers do day in and day out it's it's magical. And it's enabling, of course especially for working for working parents. So he hits both things, they're incredible role that teachers play and the fact that working parents need that. I I want to ask another former governor what is the right balance in providing guidance or mandates versus leaving it up to local Districts at the governor doesn't seem to be thrilled with the choices. A lot of districts are making right now we have at least thirty percent of Massachusetts district choosing to start online and we've heard superintendents say boy it sure what a help to have some more specific mandates as we tried to thread this needle. Well when there are a whole range of imperfect choices and not a lot of time with which to create a new structure. I. Think that's where you end up. I will say that to think the public health I listened to the CEO of Children's Hospital Sandy Fenwick on a podcast yesterday talking about the different. Reasons why there is a lot that would say we're there's levels of disease why it would make sense to send children to school. I will tell you that moving between a hybrid model in a fully remote model knowing a lot about Ed Tech. And continuity of pedagogy is a very, very difficult thing to do, and for the last almost twenty years having worked in Bene- proponent for these innovative flexible models none of them were built to be able to scale up to handle every student in the entire country coming into those models all at once I think the most important thing for all of us to focus on as we're in the middle of this pandemic and I think Michael was talking about that. This is A. Burden for many students, local control will change what the complexity and the model looks like town to town, but one thing won't change. There are a segment of students for whom. The equity issues will be profound and learning loss will be a scale that we will not have seen before as common well and as a country, and so doing everything we can to mitigate that learning loss in to make whatever choices districts in states make less less inequitable I. Think is the obligation that we all have and then figuring out as we come out at some point of this crisis situation, how we mitigate those inequities is going to really be the work of the next probably. Five years. So. We're going to continue to talk about this. We have been for weeks will continue to do so. Boston and listeners as a note. Mayor Marty Walsh will join us on Monday for our monthly segment with him and of course, we'll be talking about it with him. Then to before we go to a break Michael Jane I want to switch gears there's another piece of news that broken the last twenty four hours. The Justice Department has said that it will in fact attempt to reinstate the death penalty for Boston Marathon bomber joe her so naive after an appeals court overruled the previous death sentence. So US Attorney Andrew Welling intends to appeal to the Supreme Court I and is prepared to mount a second trial. Judge Nancy Gertner. who was w legal analyst a retired federal judge talked about this supreme. Court. Angle this morning on morning edition. Here she is. I am very skeptical that the Supreme Court would take this case. This is not a case that raised any unusual a legal issues or was involved involved the issues as to which of course were divided. This is a straightforward application of law to fax. So, then it probably comes down to another trial Michael Reactions. Agree I can't imagine the Supreme Court taking this case either I think it is a emotionally charged a decision. I and I'd be interesting with the polling is saying a what people think about whether the desk you should be in this case we know here in Massachusetts we've been collectively oppose the death penalty, but this is sort of a touching close to the nerve As we lost lives here in the city and it terrorized. The community I have my own concerns death penalty that that are clear as a as a civil rights activist but I am concerned if. This becomes just the opening door to to more death penalty cases. Jane I remember way back when reflecting as a guest on Radio Boston the day that are knife was found guilty that the arcs of justice in the legal process are different than the of healing and I. Wonder How does re opening the sentencing case affect our collective ability to heal here in the Commonwealth and the ability to heal the families who are most. Affected by the bombing. Glad that that is the question you pose to me because that was where my. Reaction, when is my heart just aches for the families anyone who's ever lost a child anybody who suffered the loss of family member. Knows that it's not as if those wounds ever close the paying just changes and in its shape, but I feel. Just such. Compassion and empathy for the families to will be put through another public. Trial and I just am. That the US Attorney's office has been in contact with those victims because often times the wheels of justice forget to include the thoughts and emotions of victims, and certainly in this case in particular where the lives that were lost were the lives of young people and parents in particular have had to live with that reality I would hope. The their thoughts have been taken into consideration with all the decisions that are being made. And Michael just briefly before we go to break if Joe Biden takes over in November because obviously there's no chance. This is going to go to trial in seventy six days. Or after November I guess. Yet, let me backtrack because he won't actually if he wins taken a over until January but with the Biden administration likely changed course. I think that's unclear. you know I don't know in would have to search is to buy Biden's position on this particular issue with sort of seared in my mind is Biden's coming here after those bombings in his speech. at the Church where he was very emotional. Probably one of the best beaches I've seen him give other than the speech of the convention. So I think this would be emotional for him as well. Having lost a son. Under different circumstances but again, the governor's point about the connection of losing child I. Think it's unclear and we're GONNA turn our attention now to the first virtual political convention in history it was rich with characters and sound. Let's hear some of it. We would people call forty eighth quadrennial Democratic National Convention to order. Jaw should be alive today. Brianna Taylor should be alive today. Mart. Arbor should be alive today Eric Garner should be alive today Stefan Clock Tatyana Jefferson Sandra Bland they should all be alive today. My Dad was a healthy sixty five year old his only pre existing condition trusting Donald Trump, and for that he paid with his life. Donald. Trump. IS THE WRONG PRESIDENT FOR OUR COUNTRY DONALD TRUMP hasn't grown into the job. Because he can't. covid nineteen was trump's biggest test. He failed miserably the Calorie Comeback State of Rhode Island cast one vote for Bernie, Sanders and thirty votes for the next President Joe. Biden, that I'm here tonight is a testament to the dedication of generations before me. Women and men who believed so fiercely. In the promise of equality liberty and justice for all about a few months ago I met him in new. Hampshire was really amazing to hear that someone like me became. Who've advice? president if you entrust me with the presidency, I, will draw the best of us not the worst. I'll be an ally of the light not the darkness. It's time for us for we the people to come together. And we heard there from felonies floyd. Kristen Pisa, first, Lady, Michelle Obama President Barack Obama Senator Elizabeth Warren. Representative Joseph McNamara Senator Kamla Brayden Harrington and Vice President Joe Biden listeners. Did you watch? Were you convinced and what did you think of this new format or medium is at the way we should do national conventions in the years to come you can call us at eight hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five, eight, hundred, four to three talk or tweet us at Radio Boston. So Michael Let's start with the top line. What are your takeaways from the Democratic National. Convention this week. Yeah I think we've all been sort of forced in this moment of a pandemic to do things. Differently this convention really will off not only the Republican convention but other conventions across the country that will be virtual I thought you know quite frankly, I found much more substance in my many years of a one going to conventions in to a watching convenient conventions. I thought that was so much more substance a lot less of the pomp and circumstance to have so much diversity as they traveled the country for the nominations with with a lot of racial ethnic cultural diversity within within those those votes. I thought it was pretty rich to have the young man, a sharing his connection to Joe Biden I. Think for me. There's some highlights the floyd family still speaking to the injustice of his murderer and those other murders across the country. It was compelling to me First Lady Obama's remarks I thought she was surgical a surgical in her Her Chase does she made against a our current president i. hope that Republican Voters Independent voters were listening and not caught up in sort of stuck on their commitment to this president. But about his failure to be the president that we expected him to be we hoped. We should have hoped that he would be and then last but not least, I thought about President Obama gave the most masterful speech that I've ever heard him give a combined with a Comma Harrison Joe. Biden Were very effective as well. So Jane Michael. Just. Talked about some of the most powerful speeches there. He also said that he hopes that the messages were going to reach Republicans and independent voters. There were actually interestingly a parade of prominent Republicans John Casick Colin Powell. Let's listen for just a second here to Republican and former Ohio Governor John Kasich who ran for president by the way literally standing across worlds endorsing Biden over trump periods I'm sure they're Republicans and independents who couldn't imagine crossing over to support a democrat. They fear Joe may turn sharp left and leave them behind. I don't believe that because I know the measure of the man, it's reasonable faithful respectful and you know no one pushes joe around. Is it. Going to work. Jane. So. It like any election, there's a very narrow group of people who have not decided particularly. In this election with this president and the goal has to be. To reach that group. Voters and I think to a certain degree. What you're trying to do is to give. Them to either come to vote or the poll ever for Joe Biden is. A third party candidate or Just, not voting at all, and so I think from that standpoint it was Appropriate to bring in those other voices, it seems clear that they are less worried. About getting the far left progressive voters to the polls are very motivated in much more concerned about those traditional swing voters who do include sort of moderate. Suburban Independence and Republicans. Let's go to the phones here eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five that's one eight, hundred, four to three talk. We've got Marjorie on the line from Chelmsford Marjorie what's on your mind. I just simply looking at the amount of time and energy that's spent on these campaign trails and conventions I. Think at this point people can access information for themselves and it would be nice to see each candidate published a list of who they would put in their cabinet, what their goals are, what their platform is and let people decide simply on that and not how well they speak or have they're wearing. Thanks for that Marjorie. So Michael that would really undo retail politics. What do you think Marjorie thought there. I'm always a fan of we get very traditional around how we do things I think what is called for in this time across the country especially as we engage younger voters is how do we do things differently? So you know I would not dismiss what she said I would say less you know we should generate conversation around how we should approach conventions forward I will tell you. I don't believe people have the information their fingertips. In fact, people don't always know where to go to get accurate reliable information I appreciated hearing from those speakers during the convention we heard much from Obama before that was the the medium through which we were able to hear him. So maybe it's a hybrid maybe we do some things differently so I appreciate her thinking different. And I soon. Michael. You mean we hadn't heard much about this race from President Obama before that. Exactly. Good. Yeah and Jane Marjorie also talked about the platform and I was I've been interested to think about how New England has affected that platform here's Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren who gave a convention speech and she used her reputation as the plans candidate to endorse Biden's policies. Here she is. I love a good plan and Joe Biden has some really good plans plans to bring back union jobs in manufacturing and create new union jobs in clean energy plans to increase social security benefits. Cancel billions in student loan debt. These plans reflect the central truth. Our economic system has been rigged to give bailouts to billionaires and kicked dirt in the face of everyone else. So. We know she's been advising Joe Biden. We know there were a bunch of sanders delegates who were pushing really hard or pushing back on the fact that Medicare for all written Medicare for all did not make it into that platform. Did New England have a big impact on the Democratic Party this year. So I think there definitely has been a lot of the progressives in the a New England progressives who had an impact. I would just say that. It is to be determined whether or not Biden. Sticks, wigs from of the leftward turn that he certainly made based on the strong challenge from Senator, Warren and Bernie Sanders too strong progressives. Would their voting record of where the vice-president Biden was during his long tenure in public service I think with his selection of a running mate in some of the tenor of the convention. A little bit of the moving back to the center that you generally see but he was a are ways left based on some of those New England progressives pushing him there during. The primary election so From that angle yes they had an impact. So. One of the things that you just talked about was the New England progressives and we do know that there's been some push and pull over the presence of the more progressive wing of the party Elizabeth. Warren did feature large. But Alexandra Ohkoso Akhazia Cortez didn't necessary I think necessarily I think we have a caller who wants to talk about that. So let's go to the phones we've got Oliver in Watertown High twin to point out a couple of things So the first thing is I think John Casick was actually notable standing in a fork in the road, not a crossroads and not in his speech. So I think that's kind of symbolic. I think in the sense that it indicates how different is. The fact that he was given relatively long speaking time versus progresses previous caller mentioned like AFC and other Progressives Ed Markey who is facing a challenge from the right. Massachusetts and other inside battle going on and Democratic Party and I think it speaks to that that he was given on this kind of platform and. Were not. Oliver. Thanks for that and Michael Curry let me turn to you on. That does seem to be a push me pull you struggle about who owns this party. Now, the young upcoming significantly more progressive leaders even like our own Massachusetts Congresswoman IANNA Presley, or more middle of the road. Representatives of the party including many would say the new vice presidential pick Comma Harris. Yeah I. Don't I don't quite frankly I think that that we've gained that much traction net that folks like the Yana Presley Ale sees a have gained much traction yet and I think there's a hope among younger voters that there is a groundswell more momentum to change the face and the movement of the Party I don't think we're anywhere close to that right now and I think quite frankly to the call point I think that that whole DNC convention was really aimed at voters that they think they need to. I often say Democrats are fail playing. Chess that we tend to play checkers too much when when Republicans played shit s that was a chess game that was really about winning as the governor said, swift said, winning over the middle of the road folks those independence, those of a moderate Republicans and trying to win them over because they're not happy with this president either and in order to tone that down you didn't talk about defunding lease was a lot about. not surprising right because they're they're trying to play chess at the convention. But I I honestly think it disturbs me that racial justice, environmental climate, justice and. Reducing student debt is considered far left when it should just be. WHAT'S RIGHT There's so much here that I also want to cover and we're going to break soon. So there are two things that I really WanNa make sure we at least touch on I'm going to give you two pieces of sound here I is senator. Harrison her speech where she spoke about the racial disparity and how people are affected by the Corona Virus Black Latino and indigenous people are suffering and dying disproportionately. And this is not a coincidence. It is the effect of structural racism. Of inequities in education and technology healthcare and housing. Job. Security and transportation. And then here is a clip from Vice President Joe Biden's speech last night that sort of captures the feel of all he said in those twenty five minutes. Let's begin you and I together one nation under God. Nine our love for America, nine hundred and our love for each other. For love is more powerful than hate, hope is more powerful than fear and is more powerful than dark. This is our moment. This is our mission. So Jane Michael Just spoke strongly about the frustration of more progressive issues like environmental justice, for example, or or structural racism being considered far left in the party and I know you're a Republican but it's why I want to turn to you here. There did seem to be a particular authority to the voice of Senator. Harris. Pulling those messages out in her acceptance speech and it was striking that the vice president has gone with a message of love and light Is there something different that the Democratic Party is offering to the wide swath of America than we might have seen for years ago? So i. do think that they are attempting to appeal much more broadly. Joe Biden appeals in Blue Collar America. In the very places that Hillary. Clinton did not in to a certain degree. This is about narrative to. You are who you are and both the vice presidential and presidential candidate I. Think did a good job in the limited time they had about appealing to their authentic self and to those issues where they have credibility a strong message to broaden their base. and Michael before we go to break sort of last word from you, what does the party need to do next? What do you want to see and hear in these remaining fewer than eighty days? Yeah. I think most importantly as we gotta ignite the base we know that too many young too many black and Brown folks did not show up in the last president election because they were not happy with quite frankly the party and maybe there was some concerns even around politics center on the net got caught up in sort of the Clinton Crime Bill History. And eighteen show up. It is very important. I think convention made this point in the the first lady Obama made his point we cannot afford not to show up this time. Right? elections have consequences. So we are making that campaign over the next seven days that every person who cares about a supreme court nominee federal judgeships, a consent decrees reason department of Justice. Voter protection. Police violence, all those issues that people across this country R- are marching in the streets about if you care about those issues, no matter what you feel intuitively about Joe Biden or Comma Harris and her prosecutorial background you gotTa Show Up. And We've covered the Democratic National Convention all week the Republican National Convention Starts Next Week One, million people roughly in the Commonwealth voted for Donald Trump in two thousand sixteen and we will bring the same kind of analysis. The same kind of voices for the RNC next week as we did this week. So listeners, let's talk local politics. Now, what races are you watching? What do you make of the heat in the Senate race or the strange unfolding scandal in the race between Congressman, Richard Neal and? Holyoke mayor Alex Morse. Are you trying to choose between one of the nine Democratic candidates in the fourth or maybe weighing whether to return Seth Moulton to Congress in the sixth call with your thoughts at eight hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five that's one eight, hundred, four to three talk. So Michael and Jane I think we have to start with the Kennedy Market Race where Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi startled I think the political world by endorsing. Kennedy. Yesterday here is Nancy Pelosi. Never, before had the times demand that we elect courageous leaders as today, and that is why am proud to endorse Joe Kennedy for Senate? In two, thousand, eighteen when we took back the house Joe campaigned across America to make that victory possible. He knows that to achieve progressive change, you must be on the front lines leading movements of people. Michael Were you surprised? Yeah absolutely was surprise I know that there is a really a rule within the Democratic Party that they've been in utilizing and it goes back many years but I think for me. Win The party came out and supported cop one over Yada press the year Massachusetts. Many of us were upset about it and I felt like particularly when I thought about the Congressional Black Caucus supported many of them supporting Capuano over Presley. It felt like they didn't know what the Times calling for. So I think there tends to be this old Politic within the. Party that is said, will support the incumbent. This was a flip for Nancy Pelosi. At we expected her to support a if either stay out of it or support the incumbent and she supported Kennedy's case I. Think you'll see across the country of some people wait and even I think RDA is up counties wait in a mini elected officials await in very upset. That the party rule of really trying to preserve incumbents was that table was turned over in this case. Actually so I I have the tweets county da Rachel rollins a tweeted quote. So at Speaker Pelosi can insert herself on our us. Senate race. But at Presley was not a speaker at the Convention Nancy, the future of the Democratic Party is not a privileged legacy candidate. It is at Rep Presley at Ao see at ill. Han and APP REP Rashida I'm sticking with Ed Unquote. Now it's worth noting that she has endorsed marquee and that according to the Boston Globe Nancy Pelosi has in fact help. sentitive Ilhan Omar and Rashida to lead fight off primary challengers. But to Michael's point Jane is this another sign of a struggle for the soul of the Party the future of the party or do we always see these kinds of backs and fourths? Parties Change I I really don't know. Yeah I think this one is really. Hard to figure out, and there's always you know a back room story that you don't really understand I think it was definitely a coup frankly for Joe Kennedy. I. Think the race was starting to a couple of weeks ago slip away for a little bit and he seems to have regained footing in Memento and south I think that you know this going down to the wire. Michael Will, it affect the race. I think it could affect the race I. Think there is very loyal in super fans of Speaker Pelosi here. New England Massachusetts, particularly that will maybe. Consider this marching orders for the party. So I think there are people may be in lockstep and may move their vote or just decided this point to go a with Kennedy I don't know I I. I say this is a conflict for me because I like both of them I think both of them have been champions on issues of be care about They have some racial stuff to unpack address and we've seen that out in this race but they're both good guys in in both marks of from civil rights groups for their work. So I also WanNa take a minute to talk about this strange and unfolding controversy over accusations against holyoke mayor Alex Morse, who's challenging the chair of the House Wanes and means Congressman Richard Neal in the first That's your neck of the woods Jane. Swift I I need to set this up because it's complicated. College Democrats accused the mayor of having sexual relationships with adult age college students in a way that abused power while teaching at Umass amherst. Then there were accusations that a young person who? Wanted to work for congressman, neal was behind the original accusations and revelations that the State party had foreknowledge and even provided legal counsel to the group that's according to reporting in the intercept more who's thirty one and openly gay denies that he behaved inappropriately and feels the attacks plan old tropes about gay men and young people. Now, UMASS AMHERST and the State party are both launching investigations. Richard Neal has avoided the topic once again, gene is this politics as usual or is there something uglier going on here? Well. I'll tell you this usually in western mass in the first Congressional district, which is what this is since the. Merger of the two districts. This is my district. Politics are a little tamer than they are. We don't usually get coverage by the Boston news media. There's not a dominant TV market. So this is a little unusual for the first congressional district. I think. This is actually become national news and so. I would say that this is not politics as usual for this mostly rural and sort of gateway cities blue-collar industrial at district, and I'm not sure to tell you the truth how it will play out. There are some very progressive enclaves with college towns, and I think this story has cut to ultimately the benefit of the Challenger but I do think it. Will cause pause in some of the more traditionally conservative parts of the district. So I I think it's just a very unfortunate chapter I would like to think they're still places in our Commonwealth and in our country where we can debate on the issues. So Michael State Senator Julian Sierra this week 'til WB are that this will have a chilling effect on lgbtq political hopefuls and that it's harmful to the community. Here he is. I can tell you. It has a chilling effect because I know people who have bought twice about running for public office because they're LGBTQ and they are concerned about how their personal lives will be distorted and used against them. Politics is definitely a blood sport. You know I think that's just something that I've sort of accepted. And State Senator Siri himself is gay does one have to accept this Michael an is there a double standard being applied here? Yeah you know a good friends with Senator Sierra and take him. As the as the authority on the subject as as he would if we were talking about rates issues and he would defer to me, I have huge difference here that if you're LGBTQ and you want to run for office these kind of accusations and what could potentially be a use of trump's will will deter you from running. So we have to we have to take that seriously and figure out if. This case is an example of that or not, and I think if there is anything to be investigated, so should lead it investigate If not then I hope that it remains on the substance of the issues an ear. As he said, I was thinking the same thing politics is obliged or It's gotten somewhat worse than blood sport is day. So this race as become very difficult for all. So in about a minute, I wanna go to our hubs. We have fun ones this week and I WANNA make sure to take time for them. So just very briefly from each of you Jane. State of politics in the Commonwealth are we healthy right now? So I think that the some of these primary races primaries are always a little bit ugly because people agree on the. Issues in. So unfortunately, it devolves. To some of these other issues hopefully will recover. And Michael, what do you think? Absolutely. Agree with the governor now one you know she and I agree a lot I think she and I are not as much. Republican Democrat as we become friends. So I'm GonNa say she was absolutely right. Well and I love that right because that's the proof that when we have conversations across any kind of political divide, what we tend to do is find common ground coming 'cause. So let's keep. Let's keep doing that. All right. Now before we run out of time here, I do want to leave the space for our hubs. These are these brief local events are stories that caught our attention this week like a why don't you go first? Yeah. I think this story that caught my attention this week is one is growing it hasn't really caught. Most people's attention. But USA Today visit local stories around the eventual vaccine, which looks like it'll probably be the first quarter of next year and the whole line of issues around equity and access to the vaccine. So even at a clinical trials standpoint is the diversity within the clinical trials, which historically there has not been in the historical deterred. The reasons why people don't get in clinical trials like syphilis experimentation abusive after American. Leading up to the prioritization of essential workers, healthcare workers, and people of Color who are disparately impacted by the disease. There are campaigns going on right now to start to figure all that out before we get to a vaccine and we're in this tense moment about how distribute. Jane how about you what you're about this week? So Michael is going to make me look bad because he's being very eloquent and serious as a really. Thoughtful subject. It's true exactly. But his mother also importantly sending to students. Back, to campus one of whom is not gonNA go back and I've been following very closely. All the news. Nationally About how that is playing out on college campuses Vanderbilt's Provo sent a very strongly worded letter to their. Campus Syracuse, a bunch of freshmen showed up on the quad did not behave but the best place to look is I'm GonNa try to Sam were cool than I. Am Tick Tock Chin for short my children have showed me. There is a tic TAC, video and Chin for short says, if he hears the parties he will snitch. As we've lived some sound. Yes we heard you were going to do this Jane. So we pulled some sound a little bit of it. We did. A little bit if I received word of any partying going on the campus that I attend, I'm telling if you think about it online university US premium version of debris I am not doing academy from all I refuse is just kind of get. So the whole theme of this or these two students in their dorm saying you party I'm telling an Jane I agree with you I have a freshman going off to be you moving in tomorrow and this was exactly what she needed to hear today. She laughed hard. She's. That when she saw that Tick Tock, well, I just want to express my gratitude to both of you for being with us today. We all benefit from such thoughtfulness and high quality conversation. That's former Massachusetts Governor Jane Swift who's now the president and executive director of learn launch. Thank you Jane. Thank you. and Michael It's more wonderful. Every time Michael Curry former president of the Boston branch of the N. double ACP a member of the national on. People were and deputy CEO General Counsel for the Massachusetts League of community health centers. Thanks Michael. Thank you as always?

Jane Michael Joe Biden Jane Massachusetts Harrison Joe Boston president Democratic Party PRESIDENT Michael Governor Jane Swift Donald Trump Lady Obama Michael Curry Radio Boston Vice President Senator Elizabeth Warren governor deval Patrick Senator Nancy Pelosi
Week In Review: Close Contact Businesses Reopen, Devastating Report On Holyoke Soldiers' Home

Radio Boston

46:33 min | 1 year ago

Week In Review: Close Contact Businesses Reopen, Devastating Report On Holyoke Soldiers' Home

"It's Friday the end of the first week of step to phase two of Massachusetts reopening, and that's where we'll begin with are we can review indoor dining nail salons other personal services reopening this week and governor Baker says it's thanks to the resiliency of the people of Massachusetts. People in Massachusetts have done wonderful work mostly one at a time on their own to take what was a thirty percent positive test rate back in April down to a two percent positive test rate today. But it's not all good news this week we also saw a scathing independent report on the handling of the corona virus outbreak at the soldiers home holyoke in late March that outbreak ultimately cost seventy six veterans their lives. The evidence contained in this report makes clear that there was an abject failure of leadership at the holyoke soldiers home, starting with the superintendent and by other members of his senior team. Also this week, new guidelines for opening state schools, a new Boston budget passed by the city council after a heated debate, and the mayor launches a Racial Equity Fund to address structural racism. That fund will be headed by Emerson College President Lee Pelton this is a step forward in the right direction is a positive step obviously. I do want to emphasize. This is not something to be fixed in what I mean by that. This is not something that we fixed and then walk away from. A lot to cover this week and we want you to join us for the conversation. What are you thinking about? In terms of reopening spikes and surges of Corona, virus and other states or on policing reform structural racism? It's all on the table. Call us one, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five. That's one eight hundred four to three talk. We turn now to our week in review panel and joining us I is Susan Tracy. She's a former state Rep. The democratic strategist and president of the Strategy Group Susan Welcome back to the show. Thanks Chris. And also with us is Jennifer Sarah Political analyst, lawyer and director of the Independent Women's law center Jennifer Welcome back to you, too. Thanks Chris Nice to be here. So I mentioned we're. End of the first week of step to phase two for those of you keeping track bet means on the ground. that indoor dining restarted. We also seeing nail salons tattoo parlors massage therapists allowed to reopen again. Obviously all with a new restrictions, so let me ask you guys I. Do you think we're ready to take this next step this week? I absolutely think we were ready to take the step I. Think we've I. Think Been Ready for some time to be honest with you. I think what we're learning now. Is You know that we failed our elderly population in our at risk population while locking down our healthy population in ways that some people now think were unnecessary. Susan what about you? Well I I. Agree that we're ready to take the next step I don't. Agree with everything. Jennifer said I think. We've taken a really measured approach to this I think there's a lot of uncertainty and unknown. The governor and the mayor I would say to been guide guided by science experts and I think that and certainly the poll results when you start to look at where the public is that reflect that I think people. Appreciate that and I think that this measured sensitive database science-based approach to how we've handled things has worked well and I. Think we're showing the results of that today. Yeah I, think most people would agree. This is obviously a tough balancing act in terms of worrying about public health and safety concerns, and also obviously a huge economic costs of shutting things down the way we did. We spoke at the beginning of the week to a couple of restaurant owners and I wanNA play a little bit of sound from Rob, Anderson, these owner chef of the canteen and province town. At his establishment. They're not planning on opening any indoor seating. He said he's lucky. He has the big patio back right on the beach, so it doesn't feel the need. But he's concerned about some of the restrictions that basically it's not going to be financially viable for a lot of restaurants to reopen his what he said we. WanNa fight WANNA. Keep going want to keep our staff employed. If any restaurant isn't hitting fifty percent capacity or more. I think they're bound to close you know I. Don't think many restaurants are gonNA. Make it I'm sorry to be a Debbie Downer. We already operate on incredibly small margins, so those restaurants that aren't going to be able to hit that capacity or fill those seats, and then the way there's no way can work. Jennifer I do want to know you're on the board of the mass fiscal alliance, and they're supporting lawsuits against governor. Baker is lockdown restrictions so first of all. Let me ask you. Do you think that the restrictions are too tight? And would you go as far as saying they're unconstitutional as the lawsuit is arguing. So. Let's talk about the law I WHAT THE LAWSUIT IS ARGUING! Is that Governor Baker didn't have the power to to lockdown the state in the way that he did. And essentially states have broad police powers to deal with emergencies but the way our state has set things up. Is that the governor's emergency? Powers are limited to particular circumstances that don't include public. Health, and Massachusetts Law actually provides the gives the power to deal with public health issues to local authorities The legislature could have and could still give governor Baker the power. Emergency powers in a public health crisis, but it hasn't done that, and so the lawsuit essentially argues that there's a separation of powers problem with the way. He exercised his authority as for. Whether the whether the approach was. You know was was the right approach on the merits. Actually think at the beginning. It was one hundred percents, and I think we needed to shelter in place close everything down in order to flatten the curve. But as we've come into spring and now summer, and we have flattened at the car I. Think it's time to start letting the public about their lives again and start to rebuild economically and in every other way. I- obsessing. Right we are starting to gradually come alive again and allow things to open I think in a smart and measured way and again. I think decisions that are based on science. Best information that's available to you and data are what should be driving this discussion and I think we are in such unchartered times that it. Bold leadership hard leadership, tough decisions made with the best information available and I I give our leaders credit because I believe that's what they're trying to do. I agree, but I think the problem. Is You know where the science really shows? Now that we made a horrible mistake is in the realm of education, and the science is pretty clear now that children and teens are not at risk. Risk for this disease, they are much greater risk for influenza and pneumonia than they are for this. They are not super spreaders as seared at the beginning and the evidence is pretty much in the virtual learning is not effective. It has horrible disparate impact in poor and minority communities that are falling farther behind the upper class. Communities That were able to manage virtual learning better. And so while I do think that many of the shutdowns lockdowns. Keeping the schools closed for the entire school year was knots, and I would very much like to see them open fully wall. and. We're going to schools in just a second and Jennifer just WANNA point out you, you are part of a parents organization called bring kids back Massachusetts, basically asking the governor to fully reopen schools, but before we turn to schools. I'm curious how you guys are thinking about the surge of cases. We're seeing in other places across the country right now. There's kind of an unenforced two week. Travel Quarantine recommended for people who come here. Do you think there's something more that Massachusetts could or should do in terms of trying to keep? MORE CORONA virus cases from coming to the state. For personally. Go ahead says. Yeah personally I think. We're the policy that they are putting in place where they're asking people on somewhat of an honor system to. Quarantine when they get here to not be actively trying to police people to me, make sense. There is an element of all of this is about individuals doing the right thing and giving people guiding information to make good choices to help prevent the spread like. We're a mask when you're out. It's not a hard thing to ask. If people stay away from you know, try to socially distance. Try to stay out of large crowds. I think those are reasonable and fair things. Look, it's not normal, but it's a new normal that I think can help lead us to getting to. A place in life until we find a vaccine where we can at least have some sense of life as we know it, it's not perfect, but I I find it to be a reasonable thing to ask of people. Yeah I think it's important to remember the just because we're starting to open up and the governor's giving businesses permission to open and people. Her mission to do things doesn't mean you have to do them or that you should do them. And everybody has to think carefully about that may have actually heard a number of older people including my parents said that they can't wait to go back to the movie theaters and I looked at them and said. You're eighty five. You're not going to the movies doom, even if they open. That doesn't mean you should be going if you're in a high risk category, so people need to You know they still need to take care. They need to take care of themselves of their families. Their communities in and make sure that high risk. People don't do things just because they're allowed to do them. A great point I want to bring a couple of callers voices here one, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five five. If you want to join the conversation Dave in Yarmouth, Europe I that I welcome Dave. What's on your mind? High you know I've heard a lot in the last couple of days kind of like a victory lap. We've been taking up here in the northeast. Cuomo said something about the states play politics, and they lost the ones that are having the bigger explosions. You Know People Forget. We have almost fifty thousand people dead helping here in the northeast from this. New. York New Jersey. Connecticut and Massachusetts we almost eight thousand people who died from this Massachusetts, so we should really be careful what we say about other places 'cause. We didn't do a great job. Maybe now we are back then we didn't. Well I have. A I have to agree with you. I don't think this political, and you know these a lot of the states that are seeing the spike are places that have are very high temperatures right now where it's not. Even safe to spend long periods of time outside and I. What I've read is that being in malls and movie theaters and highly air conditioned places where the say marriages continues to re circulate is partially responsible for the spike I mean we can open up here in Massachusetts because you know. Restaurants can keep all their windows open. Even if they have indoor dining, but they can't do that in. In Jennifer I have to jump in there. Though because I think even you would agree that that the places we are seeing the spikes whether it's related to the cause or not, we we don't really know yet, but it is consistent that the places where it's biking like like Arizona like Oklahoma. The messaging his been pretty inconsistent from government officials in terms of how concerned folks should be. Well. That may be, but fact remains that an Arizona Texas Florida in the summer months. They pretty much live in hermetically sealed boxes, which are are the worst places and we net. We now know that bringing people together indoors for long periods of time where they're too close, and can breathe on each other is is what caused this disease to spread so opening up New England with like I said open windows open doors. Fresh air is a lot different than opening up in Miami and hanging out at the mall. But we're also seeing indoor businesses open here Massachusetts now. Why is that okay? Whereas other places, you're saying that's the source of the problem. Well because here you go into a business you to your shopping, you leave, but if you're congregating socially at the mall with your friends, if you're if you're doing your morning walks at the mall. You know with your baby, Stroller or your? You know your friends from the senior center and you're spending large amounts of time indoors close to people that's much more problematic than popping into walgreens to pick up your prescription or going to the gap in buying a shirt. All right I want to bring one more caller, and on this before we move on Janet in Cape Ann you're up next radio, BOSTON, Janet, what's on your mind? Hi Thank you for taking my call. Can you hear me all right? Yup, we can Huron. What's what do you think of that? Thank you I did that three comments I wanted to make make a statement. Charlie? Baker did not lock down. Bats statement with NATO. Leah he did not like a stab. He asked the shelter in place and he lost homemade click. He knew he didn't have the Pala to quote unquote lock. So, that was incorrect statement. I didn't feel that other shocking. It's an interesting point Genita- and there was a Russian about order versus advisory. When we were talking about the stay at home. instructions Susan. What do you make of Baker's overall approach before we turn to schools? In general I think he has been guided by science he has been. Guided by experts telling them telling him what is probably the best thing to do? Are there mistakes. Could we have done something differently if we look back? Will we learn of course, but we've never experienced a pandemic. We've never experienced something like this and I think. He has taken the facts and used fact and science and data to guide decision making, and as best as possible. I feel that our leaders have been giving US consistent messages. To the best of their ability, it hasn't and have modeled what they're suggesting we should do, and that's I. Think extremely critical as well. If you're asking people to wear masks, you should wear a mask yourself. If you're asking people to distance, you should show that you distance and I think in our state. In in our cities and towns I. I do think there has been more consistency and I think facts, data and science have driven our decisions. As the Democratic strategist, Charlie Baker obviously Republican governor. I would say that for cities and towns as well. You know what I would say is this isn't about Democrats and Republicans, and I think our state has approached it that way. This isn't this isn't a you know a partisan pandemic. It's a pandemic and virus that is affecting people regardless of whether they have a D-. An? I or an hour after their party affiliation, so I don't even like talking about it that way and I respect our state because we haven't thought about it that way. All right. That's a fair point. We're GONNA move from D. R. and I to ABC's. Let's talk about schools. New Guidelines from the Massachusetts. Department of Elementary and secondary education came out this week. A lot of it's probably what you would expect. The teachers and students have to wear masks. You have to space desks at least three feet apart and you to try to keep students in the same group throughout the school day. What did you guys think of the guidance from the state in terms of reopening schools as fall? Thought there were a lot of really encouraging things about it and they do you press a lot of the recommendations with some good scientific data that I encourage everybody to look at including the fact that children are not at risk for this disease that they are not spreaders of this disease but what's interesting to me is after after laying out that. That that science in that data, the school then habits to kids need to our masks, which is sort of curious to me because the data in the science doesn't really call for that, and in fact, if you look at the day, care centers that have been operating for essential workers throughout new. York City and other places that have been hard hit. Those children for the most part are not wearing masks, and there have not been outbreaks. teachers probably need to masks and the adults in education. Especially needs to distance from each other, but the kids don't need to do so quite as much Certainly they should you know teachers should try to keep them apart, but I would argue anybody who's ever tried to keep an eight year old from whispering a secret to her best friend is never had a child. Yeah I had a little bit of a laugh about that myself. As the father of a five year old and a one and a half year old just to the challenge of having kids. Wear and keep their mess on up Susan. What did you think of the? Present. I so I go ahead. I thought sort of having school systems be ready to approach this in the three distinct ways that they suggested one. We go back. Everything is relatively in a normal space to we have a hybrid model or three. We do a distance peace, and to be prepared for any of those three options to me just seems sensible because there's so much unknown that's ahead, you know. I do think I agree. It's going to be really hard to manage in particular younger kids with distancing and masks, and I think we're going to have to you know figure out what's the best approach for those younger kids and how we deal with this again? We need to be guided by. You. Know by science as we make. Those decisions as Iran, interesting. Yet. I don't mean to jump in there, but yeah. Yeah, exactly and I think that flexibility is interesting, because I think it can be both seen as a strength and as a weakness. I WANNA. Play a little bit tape. We have from Joel in persad inclusion in moderate disabilities physics teacher, at Mars at Madison Park Technical Vocational High School, and she talks a little bit about kind of the challenges in preparing multiple lesson plans for the year. That is so much work to now have to plan for online learning as well as in person learning the idea that these two things like. Oh, just record your lessons, Oh just. That that is indicative that you are not a teacher. That's not you really need to do to engage students online. So what about that pushback that? We already asked so much of our teachers. Are they getting the support they need and is it too much to ask that they'd be prepared for all in classroom, all remote or a hybrid of something in between. I certainly can understand. That would be a difficult. Situation to prepare for as a teacher, but. I. Don't know that there's an option for us to to choose a different half of than to be prepared in all respects for what September might look like so I I understand the frustration. Hopefully this is the last summer will ever have to do this, but I just think that we're all in a really hard place and I think that goes for parents and kids as well I think, and you know people running schools. I think all of us are in unchartered difficult time, and we're going to have to figure out how to work together and how to how to get past some of the hard parts of this together, and it's going to be hard. Yeah I think. I've talked to a lot of parents and a lot of teachers and I haven't encountered one of thumb. Who thinks that what went on in the spring actually constituted learning or that it will it anyway well. Jennifer I do want to ask you a question about a parents comfort in kids returning to school because there was some interesting data from a MASSINC polling group. Survey, that that came out this week. That basically found that sixty nine percent of white parents feel either very or somewhat confident sending their kids back to school in the fall. Only forty eight percent of black parents, forty four percent of Latino parents. And those are obviously racial groups that were hit disproportionately hard by the pandemic. You're saying. We need to get all these kids back in the classroom. What would you say to these parents who were saying I don't feel comfortable. Sending my kid back to school I would say two things nobody who feels uncomfortable. Sending their child to school should be forced to do so. There should be There should be homeschooling available there should be. Online access for kids who whose parents aren't comfortable. Sending them back and teachers should be able to take leave of absence or teach online virtually if that is what they are most comfortable with, but that said schools need to open for the vast majority of people who do want to go back number two. I would say that what really needs to happen is an education campaign because. Herons don't have access to the data. They don't have access to the studies that show that in Europe where they've reopened the schools that there haven't been outbreaks. The kids are safe and I think it behooves our leaders. Both our local community leaders and the Governor to reassure parents the. Kids. Is really quite quite low, and once they have that information if they choose not to send their children back, that is certainly their choice, but I would argue that poor and minority communities are the ones who have suffered academically the most from the shutdown, and I would I would love to see those kids back in school, still with US remotely of course Susan Tracy President of strategy, Group and Jennifer Sarah Director of the Independent Women's law center, and feel free to join us at the table here for the conversation, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five five. Susan Jennifer I want to ask about a really just devastating story that came out this week. a major state report, looking into the failures of leadership, essentially at the soldiers home in Holyoke I wanna play a piece of sound. This is wbz reporter Mariam Wasser, who's been covering the story from the beginning going through some of the quotes from workers and staff at the facility, and this is tough to listen to but I. I think it's important for context. Here's what they said. A recreational therapist who is instructed to help with the move said that she felt like she was quote. Walking the veterans to their death in the veterans were terrified as other social worker felt like it was like moving concentration camp where moving these unknowing veterans off to die, and other people saginaw never get these images out of my mind what we did. What was done to these veterans? Really tough to read through that report What did you make of what the independent? Report found. And what does it say about? Leadership in the department. Well you might remember you had me on a while back. When the story first broke, and at the time I was I was hesitant to jump all over the the administrators of the of the home. Just because we didn't have all the facts and you know I hate to just pile on. When we're in the midst of pandemic and and. The information was was so unclear and so hazy. Now we have the report and I'm ready to pile on. Because it really wasn't this handled And it's sad. We've we failed are most vulnerable communities in this and we really did There's no reason this should have happened. And hopefully there will be some reforms that come out of that, but that doesn't change the fact that seventy some odd I think seventy six lives were lost and it didn't need to be lost. Yes Susan what about you? Your? Your I really well I mean. It's probably like everybody's first reaction. There have been so many sad stories during this pandemic I have to say from Massachusetts, if not a national perspective, this is among the saddest. It's you know your heart breaks for all of those families. They put their trust in that home. Quite, honestly they put their trust in our government and they were failed You know we can't go back in time. You can only go forward and we have got to learn from this. Could be other round of this pandemic and fall. We have to learn from it and. WE HAVE TO BE COMMITTED To, making sure something like this never happens again. So, to that point, Governor Baker spoke about the report. I WANNA play a little bit of what he said. In the wake of its release, our administration did not properly oversee the superintendent. And his team during this tenure, the lack of oversight contributed to the tragic failure to protect the veterans at the soldiers home when covid nineteen struck vulnerable patients in the long term care facility. So he says it right there. Our administration did not properly oversee We Know Francisco. Your Anna has resigned was asked to step down. Do More people in this administration needs to be held accountable for this what what needs to be done? In the wake of this report. You know I don't know if more people need to be held accountable light. Certainly think you know that's a good start. Perhaps there are others I I don't feel that I have fact to to make that call and say you know someone should be gone. I think the most important thing we can do. Is To make sure that you know all of the existing facilities. We saw what has happened throughout nursing homes and congregate care facilities. We can't let that happen again. We have to rethink how we. Manage these facilities. We have to make sure we have P P available. We have to make sure our testing is up all the things we've been talking about. We can't talk about them. We have to deliver on them. I agree with Susan and you know we need to make sure that the people who are running nursing homes are either medical professionals that are experienced. Who have experienced in healthcare, and I understand that the gentleman running this home was military man, and maybe they were reasons for wanting. A military head of a home for veterans but they they shouldn't have hired somebody without any healthcare experience at all. That was a big mistake and that should never happen again. I'm curious how you see this. In terms of governor, bakers time running the state. He's had a few of these scandals now. The DCF scandal was a little bit of a hold over from the previous administration, but you had the NBA Twenty fifteen that disastrous winter, the state police overtime scandals still ongoing. Don't know exactly how big the scope, but that's going to be You had the are MVP nightmare. Now you've got this report on the holyoke soldiers home you also had. Congressmen and women from Massachusetts calling for. Investigation into the Chelsea soldiers home. How much responsibility do you think Governor Baker? Bears in these. Well I think as long as you have government you're. You're always going to have scandal. and I think Charlie Baker said a pretty darn good job of trying to root it out and address it when it occurs on his watch. I don't know that you can blame him for it. Happening in the first instance you, you know, you can look at what he does with these reports, and whether he acts on the recommendations, I think that's that's the more important question. I do think response I think responsibility rests with the governor. I agree how he response to it. What he does is important. But as an elected leader, you can't accept the good things that you do in reject the bad. Come together and This will be something I think that. That probably haunts them personally to tell you the truth you know when he looks back at his time as governor. Yeah I think that's a fair point, too. If you've been following his presser over the last few months, he gets the most choked up kind of talking about visiting Dad, and then when he talks about the veterans population in general, clearly an emotional topic for him. We're going to turn to some Boston city news, but before we do that. Jennifer I just wanted to bring in one caller who wanted to respond to something you said while we were talking about schools reopening in the fall. Mike in Worcester Europe next welcome Radio Boston Mike what's on your mind. Hey. I just wanted to comment on the reopening of schools and everything I've got parent of three kids. One of them was two years old and other another two twin girls who are ten years old. The all got coronavirus like a month ago and even though the data as they are not victims of. The pandemic and they don't. They don't carry the. They don't want anything what we saw in those two weeks and they were trying to recover from it. It's not something that you would want to wish even the kids who want to go back to school or anything like that so I. Think the data is the reality of someone like me was going through experiences. My kids and I think they needs to be a discussion on that on thinking. What exactly are we saying that there's to do and if they give the coronavirus? Unlucky few going to get. It is not going to be fun. The almost went to the hospital. Luckily, they okay now, but to manage that and to go through. That experience was not something that you would want any of the kids who are going back to school, and so there needs to be cautioned. That was my point. Yeah Mike appreciate you sharing and and thanks. Yeah, exactly sorry. You had to go through that what he's recovered. Sorry, go ahead, Jennifer. Yeah. No I was just GonNa say I'm sorry. Your kids had to go through that but they are amongst the few who have and and the reality is. It's horrible when kids get influenza to and children die of influenza yet, we we have never shut the schools down because of that, but that Jennifer, but that's not nearly the same rate as the coronavirus overseers cove nineteen. It's absolutely not true. More children have died this year from the flu then from the coronavirus. That is one hundred percent. The data and the, because because we've taken major precautions when corona virus got here though you can't act as if those are exactly the same situation I'm sorry Chris, if you look at the science and the data, and frankly I've been collecting I've been going through reports from from Jama and I've been going through reports studies out of Australia and all across Europe fact of the matter. Matter is that the that the percentage of children who get seriously ill from this is very very small, and had the rest of the population not been so adversely affected. We would have never shut down the schools because of it the reason. We still don't know all the sides I. Don't WanNa get into debating the science too much here, but I do know the experts. Say! Right. We're right, but the experts I think there's a pretty big consensus that this deadlier the flu, but moving regardless of whether it's A. Declare, I didn't say it wasn't deadlier than the flow I said the risks should children is allow, and the children who do get it a recover much more easily than adults and are hospitalized at much lower frequency, and those are facts so I think we're still learning a lot as I mean if you've been following over the last few months. Obviously even the experts are learning a lot as we go, so we'll see how that goes, but even Mike and Think is just drawing a point that there will be some kids affected when kids go back to school. But. Obviously is a factor. Here is a very big problem. You can't eliminate risk when kids can go to school and they can fall off a swing set and crack their head open. Kids are at risk from school shootings. Kids are at risk from catching influenza. Kids are always going to be somewhat at risks. At school as as people are in life, and the question is not whether there is some risk, the question is how much of a risk in can we mitigate it? That is that those are the only relevant questions otherwise. We'd never send anyone to school. Well I would say. Okay go ahead. That's all that's all. Susan, I love go ahead and respond in the most I was just going to say it's not about simply mitigating. It's about minimising mitigating and let letting scientists guide how we make those choices well again. If you read the report that came out from the state, it sites all of the data I've been talking about about the very low risk to students. And so you know people can can argue about what the best protocols are. Should students mask or not mask? Should the desks be three feet apart or six feet apart? Those are all things that scientists need to weigh in on. And of course you know some precautions needs to be taken, but the question of whether or not students should go back to school is pretty scientifically clear and I I would argue I mean. We haven't talked about this, but it's not just the academic disparity that are resulting from the school closures, their physical and mental health issues that are cropping up all over this country teams against because of the school closures spikes is. All. We did talk to Education Commissioner Jeff Riley yesterday on the show and we did talk about the fact that it's not even just. The mental health is also food insecurity. There's a lot of additional services that schools provide so that is a factor as well as part of the equation on. Do you want to shift gears? I do want to shift gears a bit before we run out of time because there were some other stories that unfolded in Boston this week, one of those took place at the city council. They passed a more than three and a half billion billion dollar budget, which does move twenty percent of the the Boston police department's overtime budget to other programs. Do you agree with the Council's decision to pass the budget. There was a bit of a contentious debate over that devotedly was eight to five in the end. What did you guys think of? Councils moved to pass the budget. I have to tell you I watched much of that council budget meeting. and. I was really impressed with the thoughtfulness of counselors. This I thought I understood where they were coming from even though their perspectives might have been different, you know I think four I thought counselor who's of the ways and means. Committee did an excellent job at sort of laying out the rationale for why she was supporting the budget i. Thought that the conversation for those who supported it around concerned about potential job. Losses and reduction in budget increases that they had advocated for for social programs which would be deeply hurt by going to what they would have to. One twelfth budget was very compelling, and I understood how they got to wanting to support that budget. I also understood you know when I heard an and I. Thought Counsellor Edwards had a very interesting conversation for those of you. Who didn't see it I thought she made a compelling case for why she voted for the budget. And for those against I, also understood where they were coming from which was wanted to make a statement that we need to do more, we need to go. we need to go further than we've gone on this budget so I. Think if if I had to say I think it's good that the budget is in place I also think it's good that there was a strong enough opposition that it it continues. The discussion enforces. What I think is going to be a more of a longer term. And push to really make the kind of systemic change. I don't think you can do that. One budget vote, but I think the the message was heard loud and clear, and I think it set a tone. I think the key now is to work together work with the mayor and and let's get done, and not just you know have votes, but let's actually turn those votes into action so I I was very out of the by by the whole debate. On both part of that message, you're talking about Susan. City Councillor Julia put this way I'm no longer interested in having drip drop incremental changes. This vote is not just about the budget. It's about building a long term strategy and sending a message and a signal that we will not do business as usual anymore Jennifer. What did you make of the whole situation? Well I'm not in favor of defunding. The police are at reallocating resources from from the police department. Necessarily unless you know. The police budgets particularly bloated. Police protect minority communities. police included minority officers and this whole notion that to get racial justice. We need to get rid of police is frankly a little crazy. I don't know that the notion is me to get rid of police. defunding the police means take some of that money. As as Mayor Walsh suggested in his budget and move it to other social programs to support the population right. So you know what you know what happens when you know the first thing to go when you decide the police, the first thing to go is training implicit bias training. Excessive force training as the first thing that goes and you know the problem with heading so much overtime is what you really want. Is You want experienced police officers to stay with the force, and and as police officers get older and they need extra money because. Whatever their financial responsibilities grow a lot of the mead, these overtime jobs, and you want those people to stay with the force. What you don't want is young, inexperienced rookies, going into these intense situations and reacting inappropriately and sometimes violently. Jennifer I I I think. It's it's an interesting point because I think some would say an actually commissioner gross himself said he thinks police performed too many functions in our current society, and that if you took some of those functions away, if you provide funding for other resources whether it'd be professionals to deal with mental health situations. That is a way to to basically reallocate some of those money, some of those funds and to improve. What police are able to do with their resources, so What would you say that? Sure I mean I think it's part of a larger conversation right because. Obviously every police budget you could look at it and say well. This could be better spent here in this could be better spent there and I have no objection to those conversations, but the primary problem when it comes to police, brutality is the fact that we have police unions involved in discipline and that the police executives like commissioner, Gos- don't have the authority to fire. Bad COPs that is the number one problem when it comes to police brutality but we also need more training for our. Our police. There are a lot of things we we also need more money for social services as you said, but budgets are limited, and so I don't I don't think that we should cut police funding just to punish this department for something that happened somewhere else to make some social statement. I think we need to have in depth conversations about what the needs of this department and this community are and that may not look like the the needs of the Minneapolis Police Department or any other place, Arvin. Susan. What about you? What do you think? Well the budget conversation was not about defunding the police with the conversation that I walked up watched. It was a lot bigger than Matt, and it was really more about it was somewhat about police, and it was also about budget priorities in general is about concerns about contracts i. only one percent of city contracts go to women and minorities, and that's ridiculous, so I think that the larger conversation is about you know kind of catch phrases like defunding the police, which means different things to different people, but a really serious conversation about. How do you allocate that three point five billion dollars in a way that is fair in a way that. Helps every neighborhood of the city in a way that you know serves the people of the of the city of Boston. The best and I did feel that there was an opportunity with the council. And I think they you know the. We need to work together the mayor and the council to work together to try to do what's right for the for the people of Boston and that's the opportunity. It's not getting caught in phrases, and you know you know fights and language that just gets people all ginned up. The you know. Let's cut through that nonsense and let's really do things that help people. To that point Susan of the mayor working with the city, Council Mayor Walsh yesterday announced a major initiative to help combat the systemic racism establishing a equity. Can We Equity Fund? Excuse me in Boston. Here's Mayor Walsh. Talking about that fund. This find will invest in nonprofit than empower black and Brown residents in economic development. In public health. And Youth Employment and education. In the arts and other areas its mission is to increase safety and being an equity in the prosperity of the Black and Brown community. We talked to. Emerson called President Lee. Pelton. Who's going to chair? The Steering Committee for that fund yesterday, said basically this is one step of many, but that is a tangible step up Susan. What did you think of this move from there? You know I thought it was I thought it was a good move because it allows an action to happen immediately and anyone who knows how government works knows that it's hard within the confines of government. To make something happen immediately. It's just difficult. but to actually create a fund that. Is. That can put dollars out on the street immediately. I give credit for, but I think in the long term to create the kind of systemic changes that I think people are. Hungry for right now in to ensure that economic opportunity is spread more evenly around the city. I think that's GonNa. Take time and I think the kind of commitment. Go back to what I said. Before the commitment to people working together to really get, there is critical but I I give him credit because it's hard to find a way to say I'm GonNa make a difference right now and try to do something that helps and i. do feel like being able to. Create some resources to help especially in this time. Allows action to take place right away. An action versus words are the go where people wanna be these days. Obviously a lot more to come on that we will keep an eye on that and continue the conversation as that moves along up before we completely run out of time I. do want to turn to our hubs of kind of local stories events. That caught your attention this week Jennifer Sarah's. Why don't we start with you? Hubbub is really sort of for the youth of the Commonwealth been of the country. We've seen a lot of student activism in. You know activism surrounding Racial Social Justice but I think what we're also going to see in the next few weeks is a lot of student activism, surrounding their future and opening the schools, and I've seen a lot of young people starting to write to their superintendents, talking about a staging protests possibly at the offices of their superintendents. At the State House. And I think it's a great thing to see the young people of this. Commonwealth getting involved about initiatives that affects them deeply. Always love seeing youth involvement Susan. What about you? Well I decided that as we end the week, there's always so much going on. And these weeks go by so fast I wanted to reflect on comment that happened earlier this week by Dr Fauci who on Tuesday, right wanted to end really positively here, said regarding a vaccine. It will be when, and not if it arrives and is cautiously optimistic that some vaccine could be available at the end of the year. All Right? Unfortunately, we're out of time, so you'll just have to leave wondering what my hubbub could possibly have been. Out Susan Tracy, former state REP, democratic strategist president of the Strategy Group Susan thanks so much for your time. Appreciate a creek. For Having Nice weekend. Jennifer Birth Sarah's political analysts lawyer director of the Independent Women's law center Jennifer. Thanks as always for being with us. Problem great talking to you.

Susan Jennifer Massachusetts Susan BOSTON governor Baker Susan Tracy Charlie Baker Baker Holyoke Europe Jennifer I superintendent Independent Women influenza Chris Nice Lee Pelton We Equity Fund Mayor Walsh president
Boston Public Schools To Start Entirely Online This Fall

Radio Boston

46:54 min | 10 months ago

Boston Public Schools To Start Entirely Online This Fall

"Local news breaking this afternoon Boston Mayor Marty Walsh announces the Boston Public Schools will start entirely online this year and then phase in hybrid learning model. After here's Mayor Walsh at a press conference, just a few hours ago we feel this is the best approach educate our children. It creates a staggered. Approach for students to return to the classroom. In a safe and careful way. So here to tell us what this means for parents students teachers is wbz education reporter Max Larkin Max welcome back to Radio Boston. Thanks to see on. So, Max we're hearing Boston public schools starts entirely online may not stay. That way doesn't sound like it plans to stay that way. What is the plan? Yeah. There's this effort here to kind of find the best of all possible worlds when all possible worlds are all little dicey so Teachers will show up back in school September eighth, and then the year will kick off on September twenty first with remote learning for every student. Now, then on October first or I should say no earlier than October, first, the students with the highest needs will be allowed to come back and then they'll sort of gradually roll out basically so that younger students can get back and buildings over the course of October. Now, these are not fixed dates says we'll discuss and Mayor Walsh also emphasized there's an element of choice here or families where people can opt out of in-person learning we can have listen. We had being responsive to all of the concerns that families and our children have. We are making the in-school component of hybrid learning an optional step families. And this theme of Optional Flexible Call. An audible seems to Kinda. Flow through all of it in person dates as you said, Max are not set in stone. So where is that flexibility? Blocks what's the latest students might be into even know. I don't think we do not see ANA and I'm sure that's causing an extra layer of anxiety for families, teachers and students today I think so much is going to depend on daily Churn Pandemic Ada on today's press conference for example. Mayor. Walsh pointed out that if the covid politics straight for the city at large rises to four percent or above in person school just can't go forward but. Gone, of course, there's still working out the. kinks that equation you know what happens if it's four percent in East Boston. We're last week it was seven percent or in Madame and where it was four point two percent, and then you have the state in the background yesterday Governor Charlie Baker repeated his play when he's made many times saying the science favors in person learning as much as possible. But so far he's left that decision to local officials. So. How are parents and teachers feeling this afternoon? Have you heard you know outstanding concerns, questions, reactions. Yes this is pretty fresh news and the last citywide snapshot we have of Opinion Dates from July. If you wait bad survey to match the racial and ethnic makeup of the city about a third of families wanted this kind of fully online start and they're gonNA get it starting on September twenty first and then about thirty eight percent more at a blended or Brid model, which is what ill get depending on the Kobe data and the ages and needs of their child or children at some. Point in October. So a bunch of parents seem to be pleased that there's going to be this mad rush physically into schools but then you also see people in the minority on social media asking what our working parents supposed to do in yet more weeks of remote learning with kids at home, and then finally you have some teachers saying, well, this might be safe for kids but a lot more of us are expected to be back in building, starting on September eighth. So there's some worry there. So, Max, what's the next step for a Boston public school students, parents what do they do now? Well I think you've got to prepare you WANNA make sure that you have adequate technological resources at home for more weeks than in remote learning That was a big problem in the spring. notionally everyone's got a chromebook from the district who needs one, but there'll be programs to make sure that the tech is adequate. Then you might want to have a conversation as a family about whether you want to be one of those families that opts out decides not to do this and then otherwise it's it's you know sort of back to school as slightly normal I think. Well. We're going to continue to watch this with you Max and as you said, this is fresh news. So I really appreciate you hopping onto Radio Boston to update our listeners. That's WBZ, our education reporter. Max Larkin. Thank you. Let's turn to our weekend review panelists with US remotely is Jane Swift Former Republican Massachusetts Governor. Now, the President and executive director of learn launch governor swift. Welcome back to Radio Boston. Thank you so much for me. Also with us as Michael Curry former president of the Boston branch of the Aa See p a member of the national. NWC. People word and Deputy Co counsel for the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers Michael Welcome back to you. Thank you gotTA BE A. Listeners PALAPA chair join the conversation. The state's largest school district is starting the year all remote just found it out call us with your reactions. What do you make the decision? What about what your city in town is doing city or town how you feeling about that eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five that's eight hundred, four to three talk. So Jane Michael so much for the myth of sleepy August. Thing seemed to be changing every day. Jane what's your reaction to the news? This afternoon? Well, I can't say that I'm surprised as I think we've talked about on this show before learn launch which I run has a contract with the Department of Elementary and secondary education. We have been working all summer long with school and district leaders to try to help them build their capacity for these new modes of learning and. This is an incredibly complex time and I would just disagree a little bit and there's going to be nothing normal about the school year. It's not going to be a normal at its start for parents for students for school leaders for teachers. and. The more that folks begin to think about ways to make it a positive experience where possible. Ways that it can work for them as hard as that is I think the better that's not at all to diminish the extraordinary challenges that these schedules present but I do think it is important to point out in Boston as Mayor Walsh said, as well as in many districts across the Commonwealth I got and besides the work we're doing officially at learn launch lots of friends who have been calling me who are getting these letters from their district with this choice really the most families have never had before asking them to select a mode of learning and that in of itself is causing a great deal of confusion although ultimately a lot of empowerment for parents. Who unlike in the spring at least are able to evaluate what might work? For their families and their children. and Michael, are there winners and losers with this announcement? You know I I almost hate to frame it that way but I have to believe there will be those who? Are thrilled about this in those who are are crushed that seems to be the only type of option that we're facing with schools reopening. To the I would describe it as a conflicting and competing priorities. I think this is what a pandemic has taught us that you know whether it's you know contract curtailing the spread in protecting B- economy that conflict that existed preserving PP and getting a good sound medical judgment around what protects you from virus, and now we're at this point around schools and we're looking at you know how do we keep our kids on track for quality education in dealing with the social emotional support that they need in the conflict comes when we're also talking about keeping students, parents, teachers safe and we're seeing credit to to the mayor for making that decision. WAS BASED ON STUDENT AARON ENGAGEMENT In them making a choice along with the city of but I'll tell you it's probably also pressure because if you look across the country Chicago, your teachers unions are really mobilizing because they realize that this disease is taking lives It's taking the lives of many teachers that are most in that demographic of being risks. And where a really difficult place so i. Think this. Any message is also a sort of a case study after this pandemic is over all the competing priorities that are playing out in society. So, Jane yesterday, we were talking with former governor deval Patrick about a whole bunch of things, and one of the things that came up was whether the state has struck the right balance between guidance and freedom of choice for districts and we heard Max at the top. You're talking about that that the governor wants people in person but has left it up to the districts. You Know Governor Patrick had said that it's a hard balance and he also talked about the importance teachers play for families. Here he is. You know homeschooling is no joke it is hard and. You know if there are silver linings to some of this, I. Hope More folks are are respecting and honoring would teachers do day in and day out? It's magical. And enabling, of course. Especially, for working for working parents. So he hits both things they're the incredible world that teachers play and the fact that working parents need that I I want to ask another former governor, what is the right balance in providing guidance or mandates versus leaving it up to local? Districts at the governor doesn't seem to be thrilled with the choices. A lot of districts are making right now we have at least thirty percent of Massachusetts district choosing to start online and we've heard superintendents say boy it sure would help to have some more specific mandates as we tried to thread this needle. Well, when there are a whole range of imperfect choices and not a lot of time with which to create a new structure I. think that's where you end up. I will say that serve the public health I listened to. The CEO of Children's Hospital Sandy Fenwick on a podcast yesterday talking about the different. Reasons why there is a lot that would say where there's low levels of disease why it would make sense to send children to school. I will tell you that moving between a hybrid model and a fully remote model knowing a lot about Ed Tech and continuity of pedagogy is a very, very difficult thing to do and for the last almost twenty years. Having worked in Bene- proponent for these innovative flexible models none of them were built to be able to scale to handle every student in the entire country coming into those models all at once I think the most important thing for all of us to focus on as we're in the middle of this pandemic and I think Michael was talking about that. This is a huge burden for many students. Local control will change what the complexity and the model like town to town but one thing won't change There are a segment of students for whom. The equity issues will be profound and learning loss will be a scale that we will not have seen before as common well and as a country and so doing everything we can to mitigate that learning loss in to make whatever choices districts in states make less less inequitable I think is the obligation that we all have and then figuring out as we come out at some point of this crisis situation, how we mitigate those inequities is going to really be the work of the next probably. Five years. So we're going to continue to talk about this. We have been for weeks will continue to do so here on Radio Boston and listeners as a note mayor, Marty Walsh will join us on Monday for our monthly segment with him, and of course, we'll be talking about it with him. Then to before we go to a break Michael Jane I want to switch. Gears, there's another piece of news that broke in the last twenty, four hours. The Justice Department has said that it will, in fact, attempt to reinstate the death penalty for Boston. Marathon bomber joe her of after an appeals court overruled the previous death sentence. So US Attorney Andrew Welling intends to appeal to the Supreme Court I and is prepared to mount a second trial. Judge. Nancy Gertner who was WBRC legal analyst a retired federal judge talked about this Supreme Court Angle this morning on morning edition. Here she is. I am very skeptical that the Supreme Court would take this case. This is not a case that raised any unusual Issues or was involved you know involved the issues as to which courts were divided. This is a straightforward application of law to fax. So then it probably comes down to another trial Michael Reactions. Yeah I agree I can't imagine the Supreme Court taking this case either I think it is a emotionally charged a decision I and I'd be interesting with the polling his saying a what people think about whether the death penalty should be in this case we know here in Massachusetts we've been collectively opposed the death penalty, but this is sort of a touching close to the nerve as we lost lives here in the city and it terrorized. The community I have my own concerns death penalty that that are clear as a as a civil rights activist of but I am concerned if. This becomes just the opening door to to more death penalty cases. Jane, I remember way back when reflecting as a guest on Radio Boston the day that's our knife was found guilty that the arcs of justice in the legal process are different than the Ark of healing and I. Wonder How does re opening the sentencing case affect our collective ability to heal here in the Commonwealth and the ability to heal the families who are most directly affected by the bombing. Glad that that is the question you pose to me because that was where my. Reaction when is my heart just aches for the families anyone who's ever lost a child anybody who suffered the loss of member. Knows that it's not as if those wounds ever close the paying just changes and. Shape but I feel. Just such. Compassion and empathy for the families who will be put through another public. Trial and I just am hopeful that the US Attorney's office has been in contact with those victims because often times the wheels of justice forget to include the thoughts and emotions of victims, and certainly in this case in particular where the lives that were lost were the lives of young people and parents in particular have had to live with that reality I would hope. The their thoughts have been taken into consideration with all the decisions that are being made. And Michael just briefly before we go to break if Joe Biden takes over in November because obviously there's no chance. This is going to go to trial in seventy six days. Or after November I guess. Yet let me backtrack because he won't actually if he wins taken a over until January but with the Biden administration likely changed course. I think that's unclear. I don't know in would have to search back is to Biden's position on this particular issue with sort of seared in my mind is Biden's coming here after those bombings in his speech. at the Church where he was very emotional probably one of the best beaches I've seen him give other than the speech of the convention. So I think this would be emotional for him as well. Having lost a son. Under different circumstances but again to the governor's point about the connection of losing child, I think it's unclear and we're GONNA turn our attention now to the first virtual political convention in history, it was rich with characters and sound. Let's hear some of it. We would people call forty eighth quadrennial democratic. National Convention to. Order. Jaw should be alive today Brianna Taylor should be alive today Mart Arbor should be lab today Eric Garner should be alive today Stefan, clock Tatyana Jefferson Sandra Bland. They should all be alive today my dad was a healthy sixty five year old his only pre existing condition was trusting Donald Trump, and for that he paid with his life. Donald Trump is the wrong president for our country. Donald Trump hasn't grown into the job. Because he can't. covid nineteen was trump's biggest test. He failed miserably the column Comeback State of Rhode Island cast one vote for Bernie Sanders and thirty four votes for the next President Joe Biden that I'm here tonight is a testament to the dedication of generations before me. Women and men who believed so fiercely. In the promise of equality liberty and justice for all about a few months ago I met him in New Hampshire it was really amazing to hear that someone like me became. Move Advice. president if you entrust me with the presidency, I will draw on the best of us not the worst. I'll be an ally of the light, not the darkness. It's time for us for we the people to come together. And we heard there from felonies floyd. Kristen or Pisa First Lady Michelle Obama President Barack Obama Senator Elizabeth Warren Representative Joseph McNamara Senator Kamla Harris Brayden Harrington and Vice President Joe Biden listeners did you watch were you convinced and what did you think of this new format or medium is that the way we should do national conventions in the years to come you can call us at eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five that's one eight, hundred four to three talk or tweet us at Radio Boston. So Michael, let's start with the top line. What are your takeaways from the Democratic National Convention this week. Yeah I think we've all been sort of forced in this moment of a pandemic to do things differently, this convention really will off not only the Republican convention but other conventions across the country that will be virtual I thought you know quite frankly I found much more substance in my many years of one going conventions in to a watching convenient conventions. More substance a lot less of the pomp and circumstance to have so much diversity as they traveled the country for the nominations with with a lot of racial ethnic cultural diversity within within those those votes I thought it was pretty rich to have the young man charing his connection to Joe Biden I think for me. There's some highlights the floyd family still speaking to the injustice of his murderer and those other murders across the country it was compelling to me. First Lady. Obama's remarks I thought she was surgical a surgical. In her her case does she made against a our current president. I hope that Republican voters independent voters were listening and not caught up in sort of stuck on their commitment to this president. But about his failure to be the president that we expected him to be we hoped will we should have hoped that he would be and then last but not least I thought about president. Obama gave the most masterful speech that I've ever heard him give a combined with a Comma Harrison Joe, Biden who were very effective as well. So Jane Michael Just talked about some of the most powerful speeches there. He also said, he hopes that the messages were to reach Republicans and independent voters. There were actually interestingly a parade of prominent Republicans John Casick Colin Powell. Let's listen for just a second here to Republican and former Ohio Governor John Casick who ran for president by the way literally standing across worlds endorsing Biden over trump periods. I'm sure there Republicans and independents who couldn't imagine crossing over to support a democrat. They fear Joe may turn sharp left and leave them behind. I don't believe that because I know the measure of the man, it's reasonable faithful respectful and you know no one pushes Joe. Around Is it. GonNa Work Jane. So you know it's like any election. There's a very narrow group of people who have not decided particularly. In this election with this president and the goal has to be. To reach that group of voters and I, think to a certain degree. What you're trying to do is to give. Them to either come to vote or to pull ever for. Joe Biden is. A third party candidate or Just. Not Voting at all and so I think from that standpoint it was. Appropriate to bring in those other voices it seems clear that they are less worried. About getting the you know far left progressive voters to the polls who are very motivated a much more concerned about those traditional swing voters who do include sort of moderate. Suburban independence, and Republicans. Let's go to the phones here eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five that's one eight, hundred, four to three talk. We've got Marjorie on the line from Chelmsford Marjorie what's on your mind? I just simply looking at the amount of time and energy that's spent on these campaign trails and conventions I. Think at this point, people can access information for themselves and it would be nice to see each candidate published a list of who they would put in their cabinet, what their goals are, what their platform is and let people decide simply on that and not how well they speak or have they're wearing. Thanks for that Marjorie. So Michael that would really undo retail politics. What do you think arteries thought there? I'm always a fan of we get very traditional around how we do things I think what is called for in this time across the country especially as we engage younger voters is how do we do things differently? So I would not dismiss what she said I would say less. You know we should generate conversation around how we should approach conventions forward I will tell you. I don't believe people have all the information fingertips. In fact, of people don't always know where to go to get accurate reliable information. I appreciated hearing from those speakers during the convention we have not heard much from Obama before that was the the medium through which we were able to hear him. So you know maybe it's a hybrid maybe we do some things differently. So I appreciate her thinking differently. And I soon. Michael you mean we hadn't heard much about this race from President Obama before that. Exactly. Been Give. Yeah and Jane Marjorie also talked about the platform and I was I've been interested to think about how New England has affected that platform here's Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren who gave a convention speech and she used her reputation as the plans candidate to endorse Biden's policies here she is. I love a good plan and Joe Biden has some really good plans plans to bring back union jobs in manufacturing and create new union jobs in clean energy plans to increase social security benefits. Cancel billions in student loan debt. These plans reflect the central truth. Our economic system has been rigged to give bailouts to billionaires and kick dirt in the face of everyone else. So. We know she's been advising Joe. Biden we know there were a bunch of sanders delegates who were pushing really hard or pushing back on the fact that Medicare for all written Medicare for all did not make it into that platform. Did New England have a big impact on the Democratic Party this year? So I think there definitely has been a lot of the progressives in the and New England progressives who had an impact. I. Would just say that It is to be determined whether or not Biden. Sticks wigs from of the leftward turn that he certainly made based on the strong challenge from both Senator Warren and Bernie Sanders too strong progressives are to the left would their voting record of where? The Vice President Biden was during his long tenure in public service. I think with his selection of a running mate in some of the tenor of the convention. A little bit of the moving back to the center that you generally see but he was a are ways left based on some of those New England progressive pushing him there during. The primary election so I think from that angle yes they had an impact. So. One of the things that you just talked about was the New England progressives and we do know that there's been some push and pull over the presence of the more progressive wing of the party Elizabeth. Warren did feature large there but Alexandra. OHKOSO, Akhazia Cortez didn't know. I think necessarily I think we have a caller who wants to talk about that. So let's go to the phones. We've got Oliver in watertown. High twin the point out a couple of things So the first thing is I think John Casick was actually notably standing at a fork in the road, not a crossroads and not in his speech. So I think that's kind of symbolic i. think in the sense that it indicates how different is. The fact that he was given relatively long speaking time versus progresses previous caller mentioned AFC and other Progressive Ed Markey who is facing a challenge from the right in Massachusetts and other inside going on and Democrat Party and I think it speaks to that that he was given on this kind of platform and. We're not. Oliver, thanks for that and Michael Curry. Let me turn to you on. That does seem to be a push me pull you struggle. About who owns this party? Now the young upcoming significantly more progressive leaders even like our own Massachusetts, congresswoman, IANNA, Presley or more middle of the road. Representatives of the party including many would say the new. Vice Presidential. Pick Comma Harris. Yeah. I don't I don't quite frankly I think that that we've gained that much traction net that folks like the Yana Presley Ale sees a have gained much traction yet and I think there's a hope among younger voters that there is a groundswell more momentum to change the face and the movement of the Party I don't think we're anywhere close to that right now and I think quite frankly to the call. I think that that whole DNC convention was really aimed at voters that they think they need to. I. Often say Democrats are fail playing a chess that we tend to play checkers too much when when Republicans played s that was a chess game that was really about winning as the governor said, governor swift, said, winning over the middle of the road folks independence of a moderate Republicans and trying to win them over 'cause they're not happy with this president either and in order to tone that down you didn't talk about the funding lease was a lot about. not surprising right because they're they're trying to play chess at the convention but I I honestly think it disturbs me that racial justice, environmental climate, justice and. Reducing student debt is considered far left when it should just be what's right There's so much here that I also want to cover and we're going to break. So there are two things that I really WANNA. Make sure we at least touch on I'm gonNA give you two pieces of sound here I is Senator Harrison her speech where she spoke about the racial disparity and how people are affected by the Corona Virus Black Latino and indigenous people are suffering and dying disproportionately. And this is not a coincidence. It is the effect of structural. Racism. Of inequities in education and technology healthcare and housing, job security and transportation. And then here is a clip from Vice President Joe Biden's speech last night that sort of captures the feel of all he said in those twenty five minutes. Let's begin you and I together one nation under God. Our love for America nine hundred and our love for each other. For love is more powerful than hate hope is more powerful than fear and light is more powerful than dark. This is our moment. This is our mission. So. Jane Michael Just spoke strongly about the frustration of more progressive issues like environmental justice, for example, or or structural racism being considered far left in the party and I know you're a Republican but it's why I want to turn to you here. There did seem to be a particular authority to the voice of Senator Harris, pulling those messages out in her acceptance speech and it was striking that the vice president has gone with a message of love and light Is there something different that the Democratic Party is offering to the wide swath of America than we might have seen for years ago? So I do think that they are attempting to appeal much more broadly. Joe Biden appeals in Blue Collar America. In the very places that Hillary Clinton did not in to a certain degree this is about narrative to. You are who you are and both the vice presidential and presidential candidate I think did a good job in the limited time they had about appealing to their authentic self and to those issues where they have credibility a strong message to broaden their base. and Michael before we go to break sorta last word from you. What does the Party need to do next? What do you want to see and hear in these remaining fewer than eighty days? Yeah, I think most importantly as we gotta ignite the base That too many young people too many black and Brown folks did not show up in the last president election because they were not happy with quite frankly the party and maybe there was some concerns even around politics singer I think they got caught up in sort of the Clinton Crime Bill that history age show up. It is very important I think the convention made this point. In the the first lady Obama made his. We cannot afford not to show up this time. Right. The elections have consequences. So we are making that campaign over the next seven days that every person who cares about a supreme court nominee federal judgeships, a consent decree department of Justice voter protection. police violence, all those issues that people across this country you're are marching in the streets about if you care about those issues, no matter what you feel intuitively about Joe Biden or Comma Harris in her prosecutorial background you gotTa Show Up. and. We've covered the Democratic National Convention all week the Republican National Convention starts next week one million people roughly in the Commonwealth voted for Donald Trump in two thousand sixteen, and we will bring the same kind of analysis the same kind of voices for the RNC next week as we did this week. So listeners, let's talk local politics. Now, what races are you watching? What do you make of the heat in the Senate race or the strange unfolding scandal in the race between Congressman Richard Neal and? Holyoke Mayor Alex Morse are you trying to choose between one of the nine Democratic candidates in the fourth or maybe weighing whether to return Seth Moulton to Congress in the sixth call with your thoughts at eight hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five that's one eight, hundred, four to three talk. So Michael and Jane. I, think we have to start with the Kennedy Market Race where Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi startled I think the political world by endorsing Kennedy yesterday here is Nancy. Pelosi. Never before had the times demand that we elect courageous leaders as today, and that is why am proud to endorse Joe Kennedy for Senate? In two, thousand, eighteen when we took back the house Joe campaigned across. America to make that victory possible. He knows that to achieve aggressive change, you must be on the front lines leading movements of people. Michael Were you surprised? Absolute was surprised I know that there is a really a rule within the Democratic, party that they've been. Utilizing and it goes back many years. But I think for me a win, the party came out and supported cop one over Yada press the year Massachusetts a media bus were upset about it and I felt like Gigli when I thought about the Congressional Black Caucus supported many of them supporting Capuano over Presley, it felt like they didn't know what the Times calling for. So I think there tends to be this old Politic within the Democratic, party. That said, will support the incumbent. This was a flip for Nancy Pelosi. At. We expected her to support a if either stay out of it of support the incumbent and she supported Kennedy's case I think you'll see across the country of some people wait in even think our DA is up counties wait in a mini elected officials await in very upset. That the party rule of really trying to preserve incumbents of was that table was turned over in this case. Your actually. So I have the Tweets County da Rachel. Rollins tweeted quote. So at Speaker Pelosi can insert herself on our us. Senate race. But at a Presley, was not a speaker at the Convention Nancy the future of the Democratic Party is not a privileged legacy candidate. It is at Rep Presley at REP ASC at Ilhan and APP REP Rashida. I'm sticking with ED UNQUOTE. Now it's worth. Noting that she has endorsed marquee and that according to the Boston Globe Nancy Pelosi has in fact, help representatives Ilhan Omar and Rashida to lead fight off primary challengers but to Michael's point, Jane is this another sign of a struggle for the soul of the Party the future of the Party or do we always see these kinds of backs and fourths as parties change I I, really don't know. Yeah, I. Think. This is really. Hard to figure out, and there's always you know a back room story that you don't really understand. It was definitely a coup frankly for Joe candidate I think the race was starting to a couple of weeks ago slip away from him a little bit and he seems to have regained footing in Memento and so I think that this was going down to the wire. Michael Will it affect the race. I think it could affect the race. I think there is very loyal in super fans of Speaker Pelosi here New England Massachusetts. Particularly That will maybe. Consider. This marching orders for the party. So I think there are people may be in lockstep in May, move their vote or just decided is point to go along with Kennedy I don't know I I I say this is a conflict for me because I like both of them I. Think both of them have been champions on issues of care about They have some racial stuff to unpack and address and seen lay out in this race but they're both good guys in in both get high marks of from civil rights groups for their work. So I also WanNa take a minute to talk about this strange and unfolding controversy over accusations against Holyoke, Mayor Alex Morse who's challenging the chair of the House Wanes and means Congressman Richard Neal in the first That's your neck of the woods Jane Swift. I need to set this up because it's complicated. College Democrats accused the mayor of having sexual relationships with adult age college students in a way that abused power while teaching at UMASS. Amherst. Then there were accusations that a young person who wanted to work for congressman neal was behind the original. And revelations that the State Party had foreknowledge and even provided legal counsel to the group that's according to reporting in the intercept more seuss thirty-one openly gay denies that he behaved inappropriately and feels the tax plan old tropes about gay men and young people now Umass Amherst and the State party are both launching investigations. Richard Neal has avoided the topic once again, Jane is this politics as usual or is there something uglier going on here? Well I'll tell you this usually in western mass in the first Congressional district, which is what this is since the merger of the two districts, this is my district. Politics are a little tamer than they are. We don't usually get coverage by the Boston news media and there's not a dominant TV market. So this is a little unusual for the first congressional district I think this is actually become national news, and so I would say that this is not politics as usual for this mostly rural and sort of gateway cities blue-collar industrial at district, and I'm not sure to tell you the truth how it will play out. There are some very progressive enclaves with college towns and I think this story has cut to ultimately the benefit of the Challenger. But I do think it. Will cause pause and some of the more traditionally conservative parts of the district. So I I think it's just a very unfortunate chapter I would like to think there are still places in our Commonwealth in our country where we can debate on the issues. So Michael State Senator Julian Sierra this week. 'til WB are that this will have a chilling effect on lgbtq political hopefuls and that it's harmful to the community here he is I can tell you it has a chilling effect because I know people who have bought twice about running for public office because they're LGBTQ and they are concerned about how their personal lives will be distorted and use against them. Politics is definitely a blood sport. You know I think that's just something that I've sort of accepted. And State Senator Siri himself is gay does one have to accept this Michael and is there a double standard being applied here? Yeah you know I'm a I'm good friends with Senator Sierra and take him. As the as the authority on the subject as as he would if we were talking about raisch rates issues and he would defer to me I have huge difference here that if you're LGBTQ and you want to run for office these kind of accusations and what could potentially be a use of trump's will will deter you from running. So we have to we have to take that seriously and figure out. If this case is an example of that or not, and I think if there is anything to be investigated, so should lead investigate if not then I hope that it remains on the substance of the issues an ear. As he said, I was thinking the same thing politics a pledge for It's gotten worse than blood sport is days. So this race as become very difficult for all. So in about a minute I want to go to our hubs. We have fun ones this week and I WANNA make sure to take time for them. So just very briefly from each of you Jane. State of politics in the Commonwealth are we healthy right now? So I think that the some of these primary racist primaries are always a little bit ugly because people agree on the. Issues in so unfortunately it devolves. To some of these other issues hopefully will recover. And Michael, what do you think? Absolutely agree with the governor now, one you know she and I agree a lot. I think she and I are not as much Republican Democrat as we become friends. So I'm GonNa say she was absolutely right. Well and I love that right because that's the proof that when we have conversations across any kind of political divide, what we tend to do is find common ground coming 'cause. So let's keep. Let's keep doing that. All right. Now before we run out of time here, I do want to leave the space for our hubs. These are these brief local events are stories that caught our attention this week Michael why don't you go first? Yeah, I think this story that caught my attention. This week is one is growing. It hasn't really caught most people's attention but USA Today visit local stories around the eventual vaccine which looks like it'll probably be the first quarter of next year and the whole line of issues around equity and access to the vaccine. So even at a clinical trials standpoint is the diversity within the clinical trials which historically there has not been in the historical deterred. The reasons that people don't get in clinical trials like syphilis experimentation abusive after. American. Leading up to the prioritization of essential workers, healthcare workers, and people of Color, who are disparately impacted by the disease. There are campaigns going on right now to start to figure all that out before we get to a vaccine and we're in this tense moment about how to distribute. Jane how about you what you're about this week? So Michael is going to make me look bad because he's being very eloquent and serious as a really. Awful subject. It's true exactly. But as a mother also importantly sending to students. Back, to campus one of is not going to go back. I've been following very closely. The News Nationally. About. How that is playing out on college campuses Vanderbilt's Provo sent a very strongly worded letter to their. Campus Syracuse a bunch of freshmen showed up on the quad did not behave but the best place to look is GonNa. Try to Sam were cool than I am Tiktok. Chin for short, my children have showed me. There is a tic TAC video and Chin for short says if he hears a parties, he will snitch as we've lived some sound. Yet we heard you were going to do this Jane. So we pulled some sound a. Bit of it. We did. A little bit if I received word of any partying going on the campus that I attend, I'm telling if you think about it online university. Of Premium version of debris I am not doing Khan, Academy from home I refuse is just. So, the whole theme of this or these two students in their dorm saying you party I'm telling Jane I agree I have a freshman going off to be you moving into tomorrow and this was exactly what she needed to hear today she laughed hard she. That when she saw that tick tock well, I just want to express my gratitude to both of you for being with us. Today. We all benefit from such thoughtfulness and high quality conversation. That's former Massachusetts Governor Jane Swift who's now the president and executive director of learned launch thinking Jane. Thank you. and Michael It's more wonderful. Every time Michael Curry President of the Boston branch of the N. double ACP a member of the national on. People were and deputy CEO General. Counsel. For the Massachusetts League of community health centers. Thanks Michael. Thank you as always.

Jane Michael president Joe Biden Jane Boston Massachusetts Radio Boston Governor Jane Swift Obama Marty Walsh Donald Trump Harrison Joe Democratic Party Vice President Michael Michael Curry Max Larkin Congressman Richard Neal Governor Charlie Baker Jane Marjorie
Baker Slows Reopening, But Pushes For In-Person Learning As School Districts Decide To Go Remote

Radio Boston

47:08 min | 11 months ago

Baker Slows Reopening, But Pushes For In-Person Learning As School Districts Decide To Go Remote

"Friday means we can review and we begin today with big news from Governor Charlie Baker. Just this afternoon Baker announced, he's slowing our states reopening process amid an uptick in Corona virus cases indefinitely postponing step two of phase three, five weeks ago we laid out new economic sectors that could open and phase three. This uptick in take cases and reports of people not adhering to the guidance we put forth here in Massachusetts means we cannot move forward at this time or anytime soon in the near future. For more on the changes coming down from the governor's office. Let's turn to Radio Boston's Chris Siddiq Chris Hello Jamie. So step to face three postponed indefinitely. What does that mean? Well, first of all, it's the first time we've officially seen from Governor Baker that things are not going one hundred percent to plan Logistically, what does it mean? It means that activities that have a greater chance of contact like the governor lists laser. Tag Roller Skating trampolines, obstacle courses, things like that. on their website also means indoor performance venues theaters in that sort of thing, would not be allowed. To Open for the near future feeders but movie theaters, I was just going to say yeah. We remember movie theaters opened at the beginning of July so that that's not count included in that but we do know the indoor limit is still at twenty five people so and he also reduced the outdoor gathering size from one hundred, two, fifty. Do you consider this a rollback then of where we were? Seems, it does seem like a both pause and a slight rollback. He's not exactly sank certain sectors of industry needs to close that have been allowed to open. But as you said, he's limiting the gathering size outdoors to fifty people in that now applies to both public and private property seemed to have a real frustration with bars that he said were masquerading as restaurants. Basically, if you put pretzels or chips or something out for folks who were getting drinks that shouldn't count and they're really going to focus on making sure places that are serving alcohol are also serving food that's prepared on site, and all of these are supposed to kick in on Tuesday thiele. ICEES. Just how bad are the numbers right now? So it, it feels as if these are, this is an early uptick. We'd heard rumblings over the last week or so from medical experts that numbers were sort of trending upwards everybody likes to look at that seven day average as opposed to one day where you might have kind of a statistical anomaly for the entire month of July pretty much the percent of positive test rates was below two percent for the last week or so we've seen that creep at or above two percent and I think that's one of the metrics that really has folks in the governor's office word. What does the governor's office and what did he announce today? What are they doing in terms of trying to stem that tide beyond pausing? Yeah. The other side of his announcement today was he's creating a task force to focus on enforcement. Here's a little bit about what he had to say about that. Today I'm authorizing all state and local police officers. To enforce these orders and event hosts violate these orders will be subject to fines. So that that's something Jamie that Governor Baker has resisted throughout this. He really wanted to leave enforcement up to local control he said that communities have been frustrated by the fact that they'll call authorities and authorities basically have nothing to do. So he's now authorising fines. And it'll be interesting to see. He said they're gonNA focus on hard hit areas so that immediately brings to mind the question of equity will these rules be enforced equally. Across all communities we'll have to see how it shakes out but This is definitely a change in tactics from Governor Baker Chris I have to say in watching the governor in the last couple of days and weeks he seemed to be saying over and over again, don't make me turn this car around and today he sounded even more exacerbated at I want to play just another clip here. This is where he described how he's been social distancing since March outside of the people that I work with on socially distance basis we spent time with about ten people period. Since March. People need to understand the big groups. Especially, if people don't distance. Don't wear face coverings. Create, in many cases spread Chris what did you make of this moment? He seems to sort of be reflecting how many how so many of us are feeling right now yeah. I was really struck by that moment to Jamie. I felt like for those of us who have taken the seriously and done the things that Governor Baker has asked folks to do quarantine as much as possible limit recreational activities make sure you're not gathering in large groups and distancing at all whenever possible There's a think A. Portion of the population that seems to have gone back to living life as normal we've seen reports of these kind of large-scale parties happening in different places across the state and and I think for folks who are making the sacrifices and doing the things that the is asking them to do. It can be incredibly frustrating and and create a real sense of anger and confusion for when you also see folks who are not doing that, and then you see numbers trending upwards in terms of cases. Finally, Chris mentioned that you know we're under a number of orders here. There's the travel order that's in place since Monday. What does all of this mean going forward for the people of Massachusetts? I think it means a couple of things I think number one it means that the threat of a second way is real and it's something that Governor Baker and his task force is taking very seriously. I also think it's a reminder of how much pain this causes both in the direct result of obviously cases and hospitalizations and deaths these a real people, obviously his numbers on a page But also secondarily economically we've seen you know the survey that came out this week almost a third of people think they might not be able to pay them rant businesses closing and layoffs across the board. So I I think there's a real concern in a real sense of pain being felt by a lot of folks in the state and it's troubling to see things going in the wrong direction. Radio Boston's Chris Cedric thanks, and we'll talk to you a little later in the show. All right. Thanks Jimmy. So let's pick it up right there. With our we review panelists joining us on the line is said he warrant the Executive Director of the Shorenstein Center on media politics and public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School and former Mayor of Newton said he welcome back to Radio Boston? Great to be with you and grey back also with us as Charlie chippy Oh a senior fellow at the Pioneer Institute and principle of Chipo, strategies Charlie welcome to you. Here. And listeners pull a chair. How were you reacting to the governor's rollback here and the uptick in cases is the right move or another crippling blow to our economy call us share your thoughts one, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five. That's one, eight, hundred, four to three talk. Okay. So I want to start there with with that Setti, Warren Baker announcing these rollbacks right decision. Well I think the governor did make the right decision you know early on when this crisis started unfolding, I started engaging with a group. Called the Cove Nineteen Action Coalition, their physician led at the end of the day. This is about falling the data and the science and unlike some other states and other governors I believe that this governor has been doing that Early on that being said, you know we've got to really watch this over the course of the next several weeks and months to continue to look at whether this uptick continues on and put other measures in place. But one thing I would say about the amount that's today that I I also think we have to keep an eye on is the enforcement element. you know there are sets of data that shows. People of Color Over police the different communities and I I think we need keep an eye on on the numbers the data as a as the enforcement element to this puts goes into play. Charlie how do we balance those two things? The need perhaps in certain communities where we're numbers might be spiking with also making sure that we're not over policing certain communities. Yeah and it's very difficult. It's very difficult balance because of the fact that men, of course, many of those communities where the numbers are spiking are communities where there are high percentages of people of Color. So it is really a for law enforcement, not just from force for these this enforcement group that Governor Baker announced today I. Think this is GonNa be the challenge that they have to face because. I would just reinforce what? What said, he just said look I support Governor Baker. Did Today a what I don't know and I think only by a few experts really fully understand is how much know about exactly the nature of the of this sort of uptick is it more generalized is due to specific things that we can point to You know if it is more generalized is suspected may be ultimately. I, wonder if we won't need to do more than than this to get it under control. I. Certainly Support these steps today. Well, that's that's sort of the issue they're right said he is the governor has been saying over and over again there are these clusters there. There's few groups of bad behavior and he sites foul myth and a couple other places, Chatham these big parties in this hotel gardener But. Could it be a little bit a mixture of both things bad behavior and also the fact that we're open. Yeah, it could be it could be a combination of both and one other thing to mention with communities of color. You know there are a number of reasons why the numbers are higher There's a lot of black and Brown people in industries jobs that are on the front lines. So their exposure is higher and on and on. So I. DO I do think that that needs to be to be realized. But yeah, they're putting the combination of both. Yeah I there could be a combination of both I think. The governor voicing his frustration over those parties is important and and and vocalizing that. But we also have to you know come to terms with the data and the science, and the fact that that this virus is something that we we we can't actually control. What we can do is is is moderate our behavior and listen to oppositions and scientists. One, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five is the phone number. What do you make of this l.? Let's go to Karen calling from Newton Karen you're next radio, Boston. I own a restaurant in Newton and I really experienced the duality of this. Also having mother-in-law that was isn't a nursing home so I just want to add that. I think we need clarity and great public messaging around the high risk behaviors which clearly are the big gathering event. The super spreading activity and also. Give people a perspective on the low risk events. I was on a phone call with Dr Paul Courier from M. G. H. Recently, and he indicated that restaurants are following all the protocols that we know to do the distancing math cleaning that dining in you know with another person or with your family in a restaurant is considered by his estimate and he saw the first publication here as a low risk activity. So I, I don't want to miss. Also. The importance of. Happening to the economy we are about. To go off a cliff in terms of our industry and local independent restaurants are the biggest multiplier of economic. Dollars that we have here in is your own at risk. I think every restaurants that risk I'm grateful that. We. Have sales that are continuing to trend slowly up, and because of this we have we have enough base that people are comfortable dining inside but I am working with the restaurant owners group and I can tell you the fall is coming and without another PTP, you will see a lot of restaurant owners having makes them very difficult decisions. So yes, it's a deeply concerning time and I think if we can crack the right message. So we talked about low risk behaviors versus high risk. Live with this for a while. So thank you. Got It. Thanks for the call their Setti. Warren how about that this idea that not only do we need to get the messaging right but we also have to make sure we balance the economic needs of everyone out there. Yeah. Karen makes a great point what am I like when my former constituents on the business side look as a former mayor or someone that's been and government different parts of government. The one piece to this and I think is important is not to create a false choice terrence right that we should follow the science Make sure people know those the low risk behaviors are at the same. Time. There's a responsibility for government to intervene to ensure that that businesses can stay afloat through this terrible time and that individuals can stay afloat I. Don't think we should be in a position where we choose public safety over economic condition. So I also would say there's a there are government interventions at varying levels that need to happen, and we shouldn't just create a false choice charlie chip. In. The event of a second surge are we ready financially? Oh God Hantuli. No. Certainly not I mean look You know I I I did a a piece with Greg Sullivan policy brief while back talking about the unemployment situation for Pioneer Institute and and you know we were calling for a federal block grants to. To to to pay for the additional. Cost in that state government is going to face censure. Local governments will face as well and you know pioneers not really in the business of calling for those kind of things. I, mean, look the the the the kind of costs that state government's and local governments are having to face and the fact that unlike the federal government they can't just run deficits. I think that we are not at all in the financial condition. That we need to be to deal with this and I would for this as a guy who used to work for all song is back in the day and named fuel remember just can't help but point out. Over. And over the last few years as we had, you know what is at least at the macro level a very good economy rather than paying down the debt to help us the able to deal with an like this it only skyrocketed and that is very problematic. These kind of times when to go back to the phones here, Rick is calling from Orleans Rick Welcome Radio? Boston. Hello Ricky there. Yes. Rick I think we. We lost you there. Rick are try another caller here. Let's go to Christine is calling from Somerville Christine. You're next radio awesome. Hi Thank you so much for taking my call I just WanNa say I disagree with what I've heard about. You know communities of color. Focusing on education rather than enforcement there and. but I just want to say that from the beginning I have really valued the governor's approach. But if also felt like the priorities are way off, we've prioritized opening restaurants and bars we can't now predict we can't confirm whether our children can go back to school safely if kids being in school is a major economic driver. We can't guarantee the safety. We're asking teachers to put their lives on the line. So bars and restaurants can open. So I understand the economic impact, but we can't get our kids back to school, and if we can't get our kids docu school, we can't get the economy back together. So the priorities have been off from the beginning and I think there needs to be a major shift towards how do we get children back in school there Can Go back to work. For for that call and I just WanNa note that bars are not allowed to open yet under under the the rules the governor's orders but so Christine brings up of course, schools is a big part of this conversation and I wanNA play a clip here from the governor this this afternoon because in some ways, it's interesting that he's rolling back but at the same time pushing to open in person schooling, let's listen. If you think about kindergarten first grade, second grade, third grade, the grades the generally speaking most of the tasks in the studies that have been done make pretty clear. Are those least likely to be infected in the first place. Trying to teach those kids how to read remotely. That's not how you teach kids how to read. So. said, he warned how about that? Well look I think from around the country we're seeing students that went back into the classroom during the summer are displaying some higher transmission and getting second, and so there's still a lot of unknowns in around the science of young people I I'm not disagreeing with what the governor said, but there's still a lot of unknowns around that. You know I'm a parent of a twelve year old and a nine year old one in middle school one in elementary. and. I in my district has not made a decision here Newton owner direction or go but it is a really frightening prospect to think about The choice that we're going to have to make and a lot of parents are going to have to make and whether they send their kids back in if that district opens up. or not. Lastly I I think it was last caller that brought up disparities. She's right that that really a number of months ago you know there should have been a real effort to figure out what the options might be based on the science. You know if you go all off mine, some districts are doing on you're going to see huge disparities of folks and underserved communities within that district. If you do a hybrid, you're going to see some disparity. So none of that has been you know we haven't concentrated on that in a serious way and and I think. We also have despaired a higher level even under the best of circumstances, right? Kobe Kobe need has exposed a lot of those those disparities exist to you're right. Go ahead Charlie. That is certainly true if I could also back to a Christine's call I. Guess. The thing I would disagree with her on is I. Don't see this as a as a trade off of restaurants for schools I mean to be honest with you. I I don't really see that. Schools are going to be open be able to open safely at least not right away and I don't think that the fact that we've open restaurants is the reason why I I think that that is just You know that business, the reality of this virus in what we're facing right now and there is you know there's just there's no good way out of this. There's no doubt that not opening schools. In person is going to affect everybody negatively. But as disproportionately impact those who who are poor and have US opportunities in the first place you know but you know. It just seems to me not realistic. To be able to do that right away and I would also add that while I think for the very early eight grades. Teaching. Remotely is not the most effective thing to do I would say that when it comes to remote education, there are places that do it well, not necessarily a as the governor set to teach people to read but there are places that have done it pretty well, and Massachusetts is not one of those places we have not. We have not done well in terms of the switch to a remote education when you compare compare it to what some other places have done. Charlie just to push back a little bit on that idea of a trade off we heard from Dr, Sheesh jaw from Harvard, and he's one of those folks who concerned about our reopening in schools and so when play a little bit a tape from him here is we said look forget schools. We don't really care of kids are all online they probably have a bit more running room. You can let the infections rate get higher you'll fill up your hospitals too much and. We'll get sick and some people will die, but you can tolerate a certain level. If you actually care about schools, then you probably need to tolerate a much much lower level of indoor doubter. So that was restaurants, bars chips. Is that the tradeoff there. Well. Yeah. Look at to a degree I don't I don't I. Think it's absolutely right I think that we're going to need to go at this. If we have to take further steps, which I suspect that we will is definitely going to be greater limitations on indoor gatherings There's no doubt about that but I don't think that it's appropriate to say that we have been in any way profligate with allowing stuffed up open up by crazy chick, you know To the to the To the detriment of other things like putting getting students back to school look we don't. We're figuring this out as we go, and thankfully we know a whole lot more than we didn't March but we don't have all the answers yet, and so the best thing we can do is to be guided by the Science and to act accordingly I want to go to a break and in just a moment here but I i WanNa see if we can get a rick from Orleans back on here, Rick Welcome to Radio Boston. Thank you so much I'm in several of the high risk groups, my family and I live year round in Orleans. I'm in a wheelchair about the hit seventy and I'm coming off round of chemotherapy. And my wife, and I are just really very concerned at the normal behavior that we see from. So many visitors to the Cape and probably a good number of regular Cape residents or year rounders. We see so many people not wearing masks. We see young people clustering in groups having parties on the beach. We see restaurant outdoor patios where tables is certainly not six feet apart and it's an awful feeling to. Realize that every time you put your mask and gloves on if you have to go outside to buy food or go to the drugstore or any other life Aaron you're putting your life at risk because people are simply not taking things seriously. Rick I. Just do want to ask you how you're doing and hope your I hope you're doing. Okay. I'm doing. Well, thank you and I I support the governor I. Think he's doing the right thing unfortunately I, believe we're going to have to make examples out of some people because there's simply not taking it seriously. It's I can hear the frustration in your voice there. So thanks thanks for sharing that with us. I want to turn to a caller here we have betsy from Brewster Betsy you're on Radio Boston. Hi I'm really disgusted by the scofflaws and I think that a find is not gonNA make a difference. So what I? Is What? Three hundred dollar fine. Yeah I don't think it'll make a difference I think people will just ignore it. What I think we should do is collect names and social security numbers and healthcare information, and then when people show up at the hospital say, Oh, sorry, you don't qualify anymore forgetting any healthcare from this hospital. Betsy, thanks for the call city war and. We are at a place where. Information is being collected by the government right now we've got the travel order in place where you have to register when you come into the state. How about that idea that betsy puts on the table. Well I I'm not sure the ethical or legal possibilities of of these proposal but I think I hear her frustration around this and I think one of the challenges I think that we have around us is it really has been politicized nationally I started off at the top talking about the data science and how within the media. Ecosystem, there's just a lot of mixed messages depending on what you watch and what you consume, and I think that's a really serious challenge right now when people are making decisions around their own behavior I think that that that SORTA has clouded the focus on on science and medicine, and it's a real challenge moving moving forward. We'll charlie part of it is much of the science and what we know is unknown if that if that makes sense. Right. That's right. I mean look I. Think we all remember not very long ago. March April we were being told well, don't wear masks. It's not gonNA make any difference and Now we know more and masks are seems to be the single most important thing we can do. To protect ourselves and to protect others the to an even greater degree. So that's very true I. Think you you take that and you add it to just the just the human. You know just the just being tired of this. You know it's you know it just it's just hard to maintain it. You. Know we're we're hopefully not that far from. A from a vaccine and we just have to keep it up a little bit longer. Well, of course, in the meantime, there's also universities that we haven't even touched on. Talking about coming back, bringing in person students back to Boston is that a concern for you said, he warren, you were the mayor of Newton and Boston college is right on its border. They're they're planning on bringing some students back to campus. Does that concern you? Yeah. Well, I'd be very, very concerned. You know we only Boston College where we have two other colleges within. Newton. These are the types of things we got monitor. We got to look at the numbers we've gotta look at the data on and you know government officials need to engage with those college presidents and leadership about about whether or not. They should move forward every there should be thinking about this Every hound should be thinking about this border, select persons and such. This is one of those pieces around the reopening that were government has to play will on and can't. Sort of play fair Attitude towards it. We've got Siri calling from Haven Sarah. You're next on. Radio. Boston. So. To speak to somebody that had mentioned that Massachusetts didn't do real well in the turnaround or that teachers weren't doing you know student for learning enough. I can tell you that most of the teachers that I know only did we end up working more hours than we've ever worked in a day but I myself would be on my computer with students at night and I have special education. So I would do one to one with some of my students but I also had parents that didn't get their students up at ten, forty, five or eleven. o'clock in the morning and would let them stay up till four o'clock in the morning whether you're mandated to sign into school or not. Your teachers were all working. We were all there with lessons to be taught. So you know I have to I have to say that maybe we did do a really good job, and maybe there were just some people that didn't acclimate to getting getting their children or I don't didn't want parents fighting with children but you know ten eleven o'clock in the morning kids should be up an online and ready to learn serious. No. There's no question that it has been a challenge for everyone involved Charlie Y-. I'm the one who said that I. I'm sorry. Sorry. I WANNA be clear about that my my. With what Massachusetts has done is the lack of readiness on the part of districts and on the part of the Department of Elementary and secondary education. I'm certainly not blaming the fact that we were not good at at remote education on the teachers I I I don't think it had anything to do with the teachers I. Think it said we had to do with the lack of preparedness and the lack of what needed to be done to make 'em. It's never going to be a seamless transition in a situation like this, but the most seamless transition possible. This is this is an administrative issue and and not a teacher issue at all JEN is calling from Tyngsborough John. You're next Radio Boston. Hi. Hi, what's on your mind? So. I am a parent of two small children with down syndrome instincts BRO, and I'm also a high school teacher to neighboring. and I've been on my school's reopening. Developing the three unfortunately. Unfortunately we're Lee losing. You hear your line is breaking up but but let's try Jeremy Who's calling from Clinton Jeremy. Boston. Hi Yeah as your previous caller had said I as well as a teacher in masters. And we found like most of the teachers found it incredibly hard when the commissioner headed came out and said that. The students will be passed on and. Changed up how the grading work and it made it extremely hard for the teachers and I don't think a lot of parents know that and so the questions of. How hard it was for the teachers to develop a good program was kinda hampered by giving away easy grades for that. Great thanks for the Call Their Jeremy Setti Warren before we move onto another topic here. I just want to ask you. Is there any good way to approach this right now? It just seems like every option is difficult challenging and leaves everyone dissatisfied. Well look you know I sat by school committee as the Mayor and when we were not dealing with covert nineteen. District with diverse backgrounds, races challenges as far as special education was was already complicated. This makes it even more. I think that Charlie made some some very good points. One of the challenges that we have is that every district is on their own and every district is making their own their own administrative decisions. One of the towns superintendent administrators at said, I need to understand the science behind this better and I need guidance and advice so I can make the right decisions and I. Think that's exactly right. I think that there's a role for state government in engaging with districts on the ground giving them best science and understanding and data sets and coming up with the best guidance on how to implement either off line, which I think is where we may be heading and address the disparities within the district whether it's special education undershirt kids there really needs to be you know connection with state and local government and and we'll guidance so that district's can make the right decisions. I do want to shift gears here in in the few minutes that we have left and talk a little bit about a ruling that came down right at the end of our show last Friday with a reverberating in Boston this week the decision from a panel of federal judges to throw out the death penalty sentence for Jihad sir knife citing significant issues with juror impartiality. In the case, the guilty verdict and his life without parole sentence stands. It's now up to the Justice Department as to how to proceed pursue the death penalty further with another sentencing trial or allow the life sentence to hold said, he charlie, what are your reactions to this decision? Well I'LL START I mean I'M A. Speaking Lawyers Never Practice Law Dan my life you know look it just seems man I, I am admittedly biased because I'm not a fan of the death penalty, but it just seems to me that when you have a situation where you'll carson, I will spend the rest of his life in jail that to put the them and more importantly the victims and their families and everything through all this again n not to mention all the countless appeals and everything that you would have just in pursuit of a death sentence as opposed to life in prison and I. I'm sure you know this is obviously a hot button issue and there are many who will disagree with me but I I, just don't see that as as as worth one of the folks. Who who might disagree with you on that is Liz Norden her sons and j p each lost a leg in the bombing and she was a vocal proponent of the death penalty for Sarnia we spoke at the end of last week. Here's what she said. You know seventy s and we live every day but. Somewhat of novelty has set in and if you kind of move on and we'll, and then they have to go through it all over again. Really just sucks. So I will go I win every day almost every day for the first time. I know exactly what I'll and I do it again. Maybe. Seri warned this idea that for so many of us life of course goes on it changes were gonNA pandemic now and for the victims and their families as Charlie was describing to there's there's always that pain and potentially more pain to revisit the horrific scenes of that day again in court. Yes you know I was mayor during. The Awful terrorist attack the the the Boston marathon goes right through the and right by City Hall and I remember that day vividly when the race was stopped and renters had to go into city hall there was panic. there was trauma people trying to get in touch with their loved ones at the end of the. The race that couldn't get in touch with them. and you know then you remember the horrific scenes and the victims. the people that died. and the people that were in and around that scene it was so dramatic and so traumatic. When I think about this The question is what is right for those families and people who suffered great loss what's right for the community that suffered the trauma Boston and our state? When you think about this that's how I think about it I have grave reservations around that. I know there's a split within some of the family. Some of the families don't want you see another trot trial some families do. But I think we have to ask ourselves that question is that well that yield justice by going through another trial and I I have serious reservations about it as a as a resident. I would never want to speak for the families but certainly as a resident, our state I serious reservations about it and I admitted Charlie do have a pretty serious problems with the death penalty, but aside whether you believe it or not. I think that is the. That is essential question to us the the the family of eight year old Martin Richard who was killed on the finish line They of course, have declined requests to speak this week to news outlets instead referring folks to their twenty fifteen essay in the Boston. Globe. Where they write in part, the continued pursuit of the death penalty could bring years of appeals and prolong reliving the most painful day of our lives. We hope our two remaining children do not have to grow up with the lingering painful reminder of what the defendant took from them, which years of appeals would undoubtably bring. And earlier this week we spoke with WBZ, our reporter America's David Bowie and he said exactly as you described it setting no punishment will truly bring justice. What is justice in the end? You know. Seems to me that justice is Martin richest coming alive and people being restored leagues arms. We don't have justice and that sort and we're not GONNA get. We're not going to get that justice for Martin, Richard, as as David Bory says. So. How do we get any sense of justice Charlie, chip y'all. Well. That's you know that is that is the question here and I wholeheartedly agree with setting that really this has to be viewed through the Lens of the people. It's affected the most and when I see those families as split as they are. I just think I think the the closest thing we can come to justice is to not pursue this further but again, and you know I'm You, know they're. Not The last word on that. This is you know there's such. Correctly such strong feelings on this in both ways and no sometimes justices very imperfect and I'm afraid that that's largely what the cases here. There's also said he wore in an argument that. Death as difficult as the whole process is is final. That's our naive is twenty seven now and. Maybe there's a concern that someday over the next seventy or so years of his life if he served a life sentence, something could change laws could change presidents change but that there's a finality in that ultimate Penalty that that maybe could bring closure to some families. Well I you know I trust judge Gertner on this one and I trust her legal background and legal minden saying that this man will never get out and she was pretty adamant about that in our public comments and I and I think that that's true and I think that unfortunately the horrific heinous act that he did Has. What Charlie said you know justice is perfect here. but for some knowing that this man. Will Never, see the light of day and we'll have to live with this. Every day is is a is a partial piece of justice. That's important. Said, he warned the director of the Shorenstein Center on media politics and public policy at the Kennedy School and former mayor of Newton said he thank you for joining us today for this week in review. Very much appreciate being with you. Thank you and Charlie chip Yo a senior fellow at the Pioneer Institute and Principal of chips strategies. Thanks for joining us as well. Jamie. It's Friday and believe it or not. We've actually got a couple of Boston sports teams in action tonight. So let's check the score with Radio Boston's Chris Citric Chris. Didn't we just talk to you? Yeah you can't get rid of me. Sorry here. On sports you're the expert. WHOA. Where do you WANNA start? ooh dealer's choice I like this. All right. I'm going to start with the Celtics because they've got actually a kind of a big game tonight It's what we call sports with a measuring stick game and basically is they're playing the Toronto Raptors, who are the two seat in the as the Celtics right now currently, the three seed a good chance to play a good team and figure out how good you are The Celtics have been con- up and down that we're halfway through these seating games before the basketball playoffs are going to start their two and two they had a big win. On Wednesday night against the nets, they put up one, hundred, forty, nine points that was nice to see 'cause they had looked a little lackadaisical kind of in their their first few games and so going up against Toronto tonight. Toronto's the defending champion. There are hungry team they lost choir Leonard in the off season potentially the best player in the League. As I said, they're the two seats. So it's a good chance to see kind of where this team stacks up. I'm hoping to see the Celtics. Come out hungry and aggressive. Tonight we'll see what happens Chris Matthews stick seating games. It's it's French to me. So what what does that actually? Mean basically, this is going to tell you where you're gonNA wind up in the playoffs, and if you're the number one team that means you are the best team in the regular season, you're going to have the easiest path to get to the finals. So the Celtics don't WanNa drop too far down that we really WANNA see him hold onto the three seen here it'll just mean they have a easier matchups getting to the finals basically are they any good? They are the question is gonNA show. Chris no it. So they have a lot of talent, right? The question is, do they show up every night and do they play a game when when the League paused back in mid March they look like they were really hitting their stride. It was of a tough hit for them while the Celtics and the bruins really looked like they were true title contenders Jason. TATUM was one of the top ten players in the league and they were giving consistent effort on the defensive end night in and night out. We haven't quite seen that so far in these seating games in the bubble down in. ORLANDO but we know they have the talent to. Do it. So really, it's just going to be a matter of, can they put it all together are they gonna put in the effort consistently and are they going to be able to play as a team basketball? I think more than any other sport chemistry matters you have bill the trust, your guys you have to know where they're going to be anticipate what they're gonNa do in certain situations and react and so really there you know the chicken off the Russ they've been off for months here, and so you can tell that it's taking them a little while to kind of hit that stride other enough games left for them to shake all at Rostov. Hopefully I don't know. We'll see I i. do think tonight will go along way telling us can they step up when they are facing a serious? Tonight really could be a statement game for them. excited. So there's also the red sox tonight what seven thirty, and then we've got the bruins this weekend I. that's right. Poppy August but. I love this Bruins Games on Sunday at a time. Still to be determined, we don't know when that game is going to be on Sunday wouldn't. Who knows the League has to tell us when they're gonNA schedule we don't really know why they haven't announced that yet the Red Sox, you mentioned rough reprieve start they dropped four four eight right now into a sixty game season it looks like it's GonNa be a rough year we've talked about baseball's allowing more teams to make the playoffs this year because it's such a weird season so they may even speak into the playoffs, but I'm not excited about what they're putting on the field, the Bruins. I'm much more interested in because I do think they are potentially the real deal although they also have kind of gotten off to a sluggish start in the restart here. So I'm wondering thinking about sports right now. Chris Snow fans in the sands. In the stands? What is the viewing experience like? Yeah it's it's weird I am so glad to have him back foreshore and I think it's interesting because sports for a long time. We all just kind of considered an escape from the world. You would sit down and watch a game and not really think about what's going on in the real world. That's not really the case anymore right. As you mentioned, you've got these screens we kind of. Virtual fans for for basketball fake around noise. Yeah. That's right. And some broadcasts are handling it better than others. I'll say I'm not a fan of the fake crowd noise I. Guess You gotTa have something, but it just feels like the energy isn't quite there You also have a lot of leaks. The NBA's probably taking the lead on on the social justice causes using the platform to draw attention to. Our current moment i. don't know if you've caught any footage these games but players have been allowed to put their choice of I think there were twenty nine options possible slogans on the back of their Jersey things like equality freedom black lives matter instead of their normally something been standing. Yeah. A lot of teams pretty much most of the League in terms of the NBA has been kneeling during the anthem coaches as well. So with all of that kind of aside I have to say the normalcy of it really is nice it's great to have that kind of routine of coming back to sports, having it having something to root for. The title. If any of the Boston teams win a title yeah you can say it's not really a title in kind of. Astra's gigs to. These are totally funky. It's kind of like a a one off basically, but it's still something a root for an and I just man I can't tell you how how how great it is to have that ritual Bonet Chris you know this I am admittedly famously not a sports person. But I don't I I know that sports is a big deal for the city and for for fans like you are you at least happy that there is some semblance of a season in in all of these sports I I can't tell you how big smile on my face was when I got to turn on the Celtics again and realized that I was going to get to. Enjoy. A game that's leading up to a tournament where Blair playoff stakes You know I'm not minimizing what we're dealing with. This is an incredibly tough moment for so many people for so many reasons but I think sports has this element of togetherness right? We've been so isolated over the last few months but I watch a game. It gives me an excuse to text my dad or. Talk to my buddies and it has it brings us together in a way that I think so much of the news is not able to do right now Texas Corona virus or something for a couple of hours you're thinking about something else like I was yelling at Gordon Hayward through my TV on Sunday just no. So Nice to complain about something that doesn't actually matter like when A. Resume of bad callers so that you get all upset and then you realize, oh, actually no hit batters to you that that matters it matters at the moment but you know I realized in terms of the grand scheme of things. Is there inconsequential things but it's nice to get upset about something and know that at something that's Christner last thirty seconds here not to be Debbie Downer but. We are in the middle of this pandemic. We we do have cases at least up taking a little bit here in Massachusetts. Are you worried it'll all go away again. I mean it's one of those things if it needs to go away needs to go away and and folks have raised ethical questions about the amount of testing resources that are being put into bringing these leagues back. I think football's probably doomed I. Don't think there's any chance to get through a full or even a half football season. We'll see baseball seems pretty committed to limping through and getting something, but I'm really hopeful Celtics and Bruins man deep runs in the playoffs give us something to believe. Ed gleese. Chris, you're doozy and excitement always gets me through Radio Boston's Chris. Thanks so much. Thanks for having Jimmy.

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How The Pandemic Is Impacting Working Women  And Their Financial Future

Radio Boston

47:37 min | 10 months ago

How The Pandemic Is Impacting Working Women And Their Financial Future

"We start today with a heated Massachusetts Senate race with a primary election less than two weeks away incumbent Senator Ed Markey is facing a challenge from fellow Democratic Congressman Joe. Kennedy. The third and the two met last night in their final debate before the September first election joining me now to break it all down WBU ours callum borders Kalem. Welcome back. Hello Again TCI. Okay. So this race has gotten pretty contentious in the last few weeks. There was this last debate last night co sponsored by WB OUR WSB BOSTON GLOBE UMASS Boston. What is your biggest takeaway? What I thought it was Kennedy's best debate at a time when he really needed it TCI after leading the race early he's either tied or trailing Ed Markey depending on which you believe. I thought what was really striking was the seemed a lot more comfortable than he has been in the past talking about his family. He really embraced the Kennedy Legacy e even made it unprompted the subject of his closing remarks. He also dropped the claim that he made in the previous debate TCI that he doesn't know whether his own father is funding a super PAC that's supporting his candidacy. I don't know how credible that was for a lot of voters and he dropped that and instead meshed Ed Markey on the defensive for not signing so-called people's pledge that might have kept super pacs out of the race. All right. So one of the issues that didn't come up in a big way last night was was Kennedy's association with his College Fraternity Kappa Alpha maybe you can tell us what was the issue there whether you were surprised that it didn't. Loom large last night. I was very surprised because Marquis has knocked Kennedy's fraternity membership in the past, and it was the subject of a front page Boston Globe story on the morning of the debate So just a review Kappa Alpha national. Fraternity. But it has a chapter at Stanford where Kennedy went for his Undergrad and it's a Frat really has deeply racist roots. Was Co founded by a former confederate soldier. It's really known for glorifying the old south, and so I thought not raising it was a missed opportunity marquis. and. You've done some additional reporting on that. Would you uncovered? Yeah, the student newspaper at Stanford has terrific archives said. So what I've done reading, some of those old issues is is learned that it was the last fraternity on campus to maintain an all white membership policy it used to organize events where members donned black face it was known for flying the confederate flag long after the National Kappa, Alpha order directed affiliates to drop the rebel banner. That kind of overt racism TC, on appears to have preceded Kennedy's membership nearly two thousands but he Hasn't publicly addressed his own chapters history. You know he's claimed that his chapter at Stanford had none of the traditions of the National Organization and what he has done is write a letter to the national order saying the disaffiliation from the group and I got it really interesting take on this from Lawrence Ross. He's an author who's written about fraternities and racism on college campuses and he thinks Kennedy actually should have used his power influenced trying to change. KAPPA. Alpha instead of just leaving the group. You're not going to create a anti-racist chapter if when you actually get pushback or you recognize construction that you belong to is actually racist then you just say, Oh, I didn't know that I'm gone that to me is a cop-out. You still going to stay and done the hard work I'd have much more respect for that. I'll just no need to Ross thinks the Kennedys overall record on racial justice is pretty good Tiana but he does think that this fraternity is blind spot for him. Okay, callum. No. The struggle for months has been differentiation between these two candidates besides the age difference where there other major issues that came up during the debate last night and get any clarity as a result. They agreed once again last night on such progressive proposals as moving to a single payer healthcare system passing the green new deal to combat climate change reforming police agencies to address racial inequities in law enforcement I. do think that standing out maybe a bit more important for Kennedy. TC, on it because he's the challenger and his argument basically boils down to I'm going to fight harder for these causes. then-senator Senator Marquis does. All right and Senator Markey has said throughout this race that he's running on his record I'm wondering that's come up before. Were there noteworthy worthy exchanges about his record? Yeah Mark. You said last night that he's got more than five hundred laws on the books over his decades in Washington and Kennedy was quick to Chime in and say, well, that includes bills you cosponsored. So it's not really as impressive as it sounds. I thought it was not surprising to see, Kennedy attack. Marquis support for the nineteen ninety, four crime bill. That of course is a law that a lot of Democrats are walking away from in recent years. It was more striking to see him go after the Telecommunications Act, which is not nearly as controversial as that crime bill. But Kennedy said last night that it had some major shortcomings you wrote the Telecommunications Act of Nineteen ninety-six. You've said that's one of your proudest achievements in Washington that created. Cable bills that are astronomical that created massive inequities in they're still eighteen towns in Massachusetts that don't have access to broadband and that teacher who's literally told to by the telephone poles. That land from Kennedy, there was a reference to a local teacher who says, she doesn't know how she's supposed to do promote instruction the school without broadband Internet. Marcus counter is basically that look the Telecommunications Act has done a lot more good than bad. The telecommunications are has created tens of thousands of new jobs. In Massachusetts, I'm very proud of that. but I'm even more proud of the fifty four billion dollar programs still the largest educational technology program in the history of the United States The provides the Internet Nana Desk of children in Chelsea Lawrence Roxbury at a pan in springfield. That's my program. I'll just point out what he says on a desk. He's talking about the classroom desk which it'd be great in a normal school year. But of course, not so great this year when everybody's zooming from. Okay. So quickly, let's talk about racial justice. It has been a big issue in the campaign and I know there was more discussion about Senator Markey's interaction with the Henry family last night. What did you make of that? Yeah just to review Dj Henry is a Black College student from Massachusetts who was shot dead by a white police officer in twenty ten and his parents are outspoken supporters of Kennedy. They say he's been a really strong ally for them over the years but the publicly criticised Ed Markey for in their view doing too little to achieve justice for their son and so when this came up, marquis sidesteps the first two questions about the Henry family and really focused on saying that he's proud of his constituent services overall and then after some pressing by the moderators, you've did finally say this I can't imagine the pain that the Henry family. Has Gone through it's unimaginable. That they have lost a son. I know that they were not happy with the meeting that they had with me. and I apologize to the family for that mark is referring there to a twenty fourteen meeting that he had with Dj Henry's parents and Kennedy made sure to emphasize that not happy is an understatement. According to Mr Henry's words they were dismissed. They were insulted he used the term colored to their faces. And then claims the signing onto to letters that my office wrote was somehow sufficient. It's not not when you lose a son. And I think the fact that we the fact that the United States senator thinks that this is somehow enough is emblematic of why we need change. The letters, US talking about their out of those two letters that multiple members of the mast allegation center the Justice Department asking it to take a closer look at the case. I also thought it was notable that Marquis once again didn't challenge the claim that he used the term colored. He's at a spokeswoman saying the past that he doesn't recall saying that, but he hasn't flatly denied it. He seems to not want to get into a dispute with the Henry family on that point. All right callum. Thanks for that rundown and I'm actually going to ask you to hang tight now because before we move on. I want to dive into another major political story, which is the ongoing democratic. Convention because last night, the GAL delegates officially nominated Joe Biden for the presidency they had to do it differently this year of course. So in the roll call across America, each state was given the chance to highlight whatever they want it in a short video presentation. While they cast their ballots, we saw fourth generation family farmer in Kansas tribal activists and South Dakota, special landmarks Edmund Pettus Bridge in Alabama, but Rhode Island caught the nation's and twitter's. Here's chair of the Rhode Island State Democratic Committee Joseph McNamara last night stayed appetizer. Calamari is available in all fifty states the column Comeback State of Rhode Island cast one vote for Bernie Sanders and thirty four votes for the next President Joe Biden. And joining us now is just if McNary representative McNamara welcome to Radio Boston. Good afternoon. Thank you for having me. So it turns out that your presentation was without question. One of the highlights from last night. Let me ask you did you expect it to land so much to be such a hit. I was as surprised as many of the views. I know that the story is compelling. Because many businesses and especially at the restaurant industry in virtually every state. Has Been Decimated by this pandemic. But on top of that the fishing industry in Rhode. Island that supplies many of the restaurants with quality seafood products was also devastated. So. Having a collaborative effort between these small businesses and state government. That instituted some new policies that enabled a fisherman. to sell their catches directly to the public. Through. The use of an innovative APP. And It helped get them through this pandemic and. Lord I. Let me just ask you there. I I appreciate that summary of why you did it because I think that was a question on our mind of all the things you could pick what was the story you wanted to tell with Calamari with the the restaurant worker next to you. So at the other question to ask you is what has the reaction been like and have you been hearing from folks here and around the country? Yes My Day has been spent doing interviews with radio stations and Public Broadcasting throughout the country and TV interviews down at the restaurant where we filmed. The Peace Switches Restaurant Warwick Rhode Island. With Chef John in Columbine. And people are very curious as to. You know what? I was asked the question today what happened with the Calamari. Well, it took us about twenty takes to get the. Right 'cause we had to condense everything into thirty seconds, and by the time we finished we were starving. So. we all partake and eight the columbine and it was still delicious even after sitting outside for an hour and a half at Well that's perfect. Rhode Island State Representative Joseph McNamara chair the Rhode Island State Democratic Committee you have been in demand today. Thanks for including Radio Boston. Well. It's a pleasure. I greatly appreciate the services you offer to the public and we do pick up the WB. You Signal Rhode Island so we're grateful for the work that you thank you. Thank you so much and still with us is WBZ, Callum Boris, kill him. So that's a little bit about the convention last night. In the time we have left what stood out to you so far when watching for tonight, we've got about a minute cal. Yeah what a delight that was beside from the column I thought that Jill Biden like a lot folks thought that she really stole the show last night makes it really compelling case for her husband's character I. think that was really one of the highlights so far for tonight you know for local listeners especially you know Senator Elizabeth Warren is going to be on the stage tonight and one thing to watch I think is how she makes the progressive. Case Four Joe Biden. That was the criticism she leveled against him when she was running against him in the primary of course, that he wasn't progressive enough. So how she went to make the case to her base tonight that you know what he may not be the candidate that you were hoping for, but the best option and get out and turn out for him I think that's something big to watch. Also looking forward to some good music from Jennifer Hudson tonight. All right. That's WBRC Kalemba. Much. Great to be with you. This hour union teachers are rallying at the State House calling governor to make all schools remote only at least at the start this fall according to Governor Baker more than seventy percent of Massachusetts School district's plan to bring students into the building at least part time this fall WBZ. Education reporter carry young at the State House joins us now. Hi there Kerry. Good afternoon. So, Carrie, what are you seeing right now and what are the demands that teachers are making it this rally Yes. So right now there's about a hundred. I would say teachers from the American Federation of Teachers in the Massachusetts Teachers Association they are the ones that are outside our It got caution tape and they are standing six feet apart in front of the State House yelling. Only when it's safe or not one but they also give teachers and other option if they weren't feeling comfortable being in person you're hearing any core car horn honking behind me because they told folks if you're not comfortable just drive by several times and show your support by honking their born. So it's a it's a loud and busy place here at the State House and like you said, they're demanding that schools not open up in person at all that everyone starts we're Goatley at least and then phase in two impersonal learning later when the health metrics say that it's safe. So carry. This is a union organized rally to others around the state today. What kind of reaction are they getting from state leaders? Yeah. So I did touch base with the Department of Elementary and secondary education as well as secretary. Pies's office and state leaders are telling me that As. Far as their response to this goes, they say that they are following the recommendations of like the American Academy of Pediatrics and other public health officials and you know we'll only proceed with what they're hearing is safe. They also did point out in a statement as well that You know that there are social and emotional sort of There are social and emotional benefits to being at school and kids could be hurt by being out of school this long as well. So what are teachers and parents saying carry? It feels like to some extent they're being pitted against each other in this whole school reopening struggle. Yeah I mean there's all kinds of youth here. There are some parents I heard from a couple of teachers here at the rally who were saying, some parents are telling us what don't you just go back to work and you know there is some there is some sentence that it's like it's not that I stopped working. You know we just aren't in the building and then there are other parents that are on the side of I don't feel safe sending my child into the school building either so it's just it's there are so many varied opinions here. That are very strong, which is why I think you're hearing so much sort of tension on this. Well. That's WB. You our education reporter carry young reporting live at the state. House at a rally this hour. Kerry. Thanks for taking time out to join us. You're welcome. So according to the Commonwealth, the majority of Massachusetts women work outside the home with just over sixty percent in the labor force of two thousand seventeen only now in the midst of this global pandemic, many of them are working in the home and even if they aren't working in the home, the kids are in the home school is in the home family members who need care and attention are in the home, and it is proving to be an impossible by one that the data shows that women face more significantly than men and fall promising little relief with the majority of the state schools returning at least partially online and thirty percent going fully online at the start and we just heard from. On that the pressure is on to increase the amount of time kids are spending learning at home. There are real costs to this crunch for income families, career relationships, mental health, and we want to size that up now and let's talk about what needs to be done. So share your experience, the pandemic changed life for you as a woman or a mom or for women in your life. What's it been like managing work and responsibilities at home call us at one, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, or you can tweet us at Radio Boston. So joining us for this conversation is memorable associate director of the women's economics excuse me up women's rights gender justice an inclusion hub for Oxfam America. Welcome Mara. Hi Wonderful to be here. Glad to have you, and also with this is Tania del Rio executive director for the Mayor's Office of Women's advancement their Tanya. Hi. Thank you so much for having me. Great to have you both. So let me turn to the two of you to paint the picture for us what is happening for working women during this pandemic. Marlins you start. So, my fear is that during this pandemic, we are falling into accepted patterns that women should shoulder the continued uncertainty around school and daycare availability. you know women. Traditionally, have been seen as the default providers of care for their families. This is work that is invisible and that is assumed. the coronavirus pandemic has made that work fantastically visible at this point. and now it's up to us as a society to see how we're going to support women and position them for success. And if we don't I, think we're GonNa see widespread attrition of women from the workforce and that's already happening right in. April alone the Research from the National Women's law center that showed that the entire decade entire prior decades workforce gains were lost in April alone. and. This is happening globally. This isn't just happening in the US. This is a global problem. So it's really the time to show leadership within our within our companies that employ women workers within our households, terms of men chipping in within employers, supporting men to be doing more around the house and with our government agencies to be allowing for paid leave for all flexible scheduling and and other benefits that are going to make this work for waiting to stand workforce. And Tanya what are you seeing and hearing in terms of how what Mara was just telling us about is manifesting in people's lives. Yeah I think Mara is absolutely right in the phenomena. She's describing are worried about it at the city of Boston as well. women have carried outside share to the burden and in this recession in this recession I guess it's different than what we have seen in past recessions because it's affected women's more in the past like in our last recession. We saw men's employment being more severely affected than women, and that's not what we're seeing. Now, we're seeing larger impact on sectors that have high female employment, and also we have women being more exposed to to the health risks of Kobe because they are disproportionately represented essential worker categories. So, it's having. An impact also in that way as far as you know, school and childcare closures American is absolutely right. This is an expectation that's placed on women. That is is just over-burdening them in we we have seen both in in larger research globally in national. But also in the research that we've been conducting with Boston residents through focus groups that caretakers are really a no win situation. Because their employers seem to have an expectation of similar output in terms of workers pre-coded but they're providing relief you to know accommodations for employees who have children or caretaking responsibilities for an elder family member someone who's sick and at the same time these caretakers who are again mostly women are fearful of losing their jobs. So they're trying to keep their work output stable. They obviously have a large larger responsibility now with caretaking, and so what what gives is their their own wellbeing in their mental health and the amount of sleep that they're getting like human basic needs that should be covering. People are sacrificing. Tanya thank you and I want to bring in another voice into the conversation. Now, we've got my Kia Kurski? Who is a single mom from Dorchester who works in homeless services. My Kia walk into Radio Boston. Thank you for having me. So you heard. Marin in Tanya there, what have things been like for you as a single working mom since March it's been very. Overwhelming really trying to navigate through this deming with two kids and work actually have to go into the office. It's been very hectic just trying to figure out how to do things. So. As a mother of two school aged voice. How have you managed it? what do the help of my church the table in Dorchester I've been able to one get prayer support through them my friends Saffy and Patricia, and then at one point when it was still very overwhelming, I decided to spend my children. So my family that live in Maryland they stayed there for two months just so I can kinda. Get a breath and. Try to bring some some sort of normal life into their life during that time. How did that feel for you and how did the voice react to that? my oldest son actually excited about it because he we you know we weren't doing anything they weren't going anywhere. They were really stuck in the House I will have people come to them My son he cried the first day and I was really emotional but I knew that this was the best Plan, for for my wellbeing, but for their because. I I'm working in the shelter I was really heard about it, but at the same time I had let me have some great but my phone and understand that I needed to do best for me am my on at the time. And my I know the boys are back. So now that summer's over new school years right around the corner what are you GonNa do? fun. I'm comfortable with him being home and being able to do school work remotely my younger son. However, I don't know what I'm GonNa do yet again, some some community for my church family the table they are. thinking about starting kindergarten around. So maybe I can send him there for three days and he did get a seat with BPS for. For kindergarten or Caitlyn but. I'm not. I'm not sure what they say there's no real plan for vs yet. So I mean I did just hear you guys say that teachers are. Noun to that have kids school which I understand. But if they're not for people like me who are essential workers and have to go into the office and they may not have full community full family here has to be some other options I do know I also look beds who Club they're offering for win for the they have. BP But they're charging for it. So I'm not. I don't I don't think it's fair to have to come to work and then paid for my son to go to school where he actually had the seat in another you know I'm not I don't have a plan yet. Well my I'll be thinking about you my Kurski, a single mom from Dorchester who works in homeless services. Thanks for taking the time to tell us your story I appreciate it. No problem. Thank you for having me. So Mara back to you. We're talking about serious issues around childcare and probably issues that have been structure for a long time in our exacerbated now, right? I mean, my kids storage just is everything to me as I've been doing this work My the kind of central protagonist in my mind is the essential workers single mother who really left on her own to patch things together for themselves. to provide you know the subsidy to our economies and our societies which has been. Invisible for so long and now try to figure it out through a patchwork of means, and it shouldn't be on my Kia Kia should be less to do her essential work and she should be supported by. Employers and politicians who make the tenable for her so that she hasn't put in the impossible position of choosing between earning an income or neglect potentially neglecting her child if she can't work it on her own, it's just completely unacceptable. Let's go to the phones here one, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five, eight, hundred, four to three talk to tell your story like my Kia. Told US hers. We've got Rebecca on the line from Cambridge Rebecca go ahead. I'm Rebecca Barry I'm an owner and a principal at a small architecture firm and I just want to add that I really think. That this conversation is needed because I think this is the untold story of the pandemic and that I fear that we may see setbacks to women in every line of work out of out of this whole thing, and that we really have to find a way to support women in every profession through this. Rebecca if it's not too personal to ask, do you feel like you're being set back in a way here? Well So from my perspective, it's really hard because I you know I worked my way up in an owner at a firm now and but I have two small children and I have women in the firm that I want to sponsor and I want to promote. and. It's really tough to watch all of us go through you know losing sleep you know restructuring things feeling like we're trying to be a half of a teacher or a whole teacher sometimes far children while we're still trying to do our jobs that we have spent so much time you know working on and devoting ourselves to to the profession. Rebecca thank you so much for the call I appreciate it and we'd like to hear more stories like Rebecca's like my Kia's one, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five that's eight, hundred, four to three talk Tanya I don't know about you but hearing Rebecca, talk about that struggle really resonated with me as a working mom sometimes I feel like I can do I can't do anything as well as I want to how to how to cities show up for women help with these networks women were about help someone like my Kia saw this problem and not have to pay sort of double. How do we do that? Yeah that's such. An important conversation I WANNA. Thank. Rebecca and my Kia for their calls I mean something that Rebecca brings up that this impact could last a lifetime and in it's true because the researchers found that if a woman steps out of the workforce reduces her her time in those part time, it reduces not only their earning potential for years to come but also their work opportunities it's been shown that it's hard for them to even come back and find a new job. So that's something we're watching so. As far as the city, the approach is multiplying like we're doing as much as possible I would start with our work with childcare providers who are those essential workers that are enabling kind of everybody else to do their work. So we launched last year at appropriate calling the Childcare Entrepreneur Fund where we provide cash grants, but also business skills workshop or for women and Boston, who are providing the service, and it's in this year we scaled up and we got the money out the door as fast as we could. For this program so that we could see we could maintain the supply of childcare slots that had been declining in the last years in Boston sharply. Thankfully at least for family childcare, we're seeing that slow but now with the pandemic were very worried about these. Small businesses about them even being able to survive. So we're scaling that work up also through the Boston Resiliency Fund It's raised thirty two million dollars by now in its awarded twenty five as a couple days ago, and that fun directly provided Boston's emergency childcare programs money to ensure that families of essential workers in hospitals, grocery shops, all of those people who will we really needed to keep our society going hand free childcare the to them through the quarantine, and so it's just a it's just a taste of of what we've been doing. Earnest reason, it's a sector in crisis. And just to clarify that the resiliency fund is a fund that the city of Boston started early on in the pandemic things for that Tanya I want I want to turn back tomorrow for a minute Mara recognizing there are fathers who are in the situation. There are single fathers who are struggling as well. But the data does show that this is a situation that disproportionately impacts women workers whether they have kids or not. So what demand need to do in this moment because this is this is going to have economic impact on all of us if we can't figure out how to fix the structures that are being exposed to so many other things are by this pandemic. Yeah, I wanted to bring in a little bit of my own personal is personal story for for illustrative purposes that you know we're two working parents with school age children they're older. So that makes it much easier And I think an aspect that's been absolutely critical is a the fact that we can work from home right and that's a privilege that isn't afforded to many Americans only twenty percent of black Americans less than twenty percent of black Americans. Hispanic Americans were even able to work from home. and another critical aspect is that our workplaces have been tremendously accommodating and understanding that both my husband and I are juggling or not I've never been made to feel that I'm under performing because I need to take time out to care for my children, and importantly neither has my husband. Right. What we've seen in the research that's done in by Prime Window, which is masculinity is organization nuts expert in masculine masculinity studies is that men often don't take the workplace accommodations that they're afforded because they're worried that they'll be. Penalized by their employers and made to feel that they're not serious about their jobs so men need to help but employers need to message the flexibility and the empathy that's so required during this time in order to allow them to do so and do so successfully. I'd like to grab one more call here one, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five that's one, eight, hundred, four to three talk. We've got Jennifer on the line and I'm sorry I'm working from home on my monitor small and I can't see where you're from Jennifer. So tell me as you start your your comment. Thanks. Thank you from South Hamilton. I'd like the conversation to include the effect on girls and boys, but especially on girls of watching their mother's struggle and likely fail on many fronts at how that may affect their decision making regarding careers in parenting in the future. Oh Jennifer that is a gut punch to think daughters. Perceiving this that way Tanya what's your reaction? Yeah I mean I'll start with the boys and then get to the girls. We do have research that shows that when a boy is. is part of a household wear. There's more equitable distribution of household tasks they do go on to be more likely to marry your form. Where that equitable distribution of tasks remains and so essentially that just shows that people are raised in a certain way and then they go on to replicate that when they grow up, which obviously is important with seeing some of that break breakdown, right because of Cogan, I just wanted to echo what Mara said earlier because it's such important question and if I'm not asked I, just try to answer it anyway in his what can men do? And so I I don't really like to say that we call on men who are heterosexual relationships to take on more work in the private sphere housework care for children care for elders because this frees up women to engage more fully in their pursuits, especially professional ones and how leadership at the institutional level is so important. So in our case at City Hall, we have Mayor Walsh. Making these explicit invitations, inviting their employees to take advantage of all the resources that are being made available to us from like mental health assistance through the employee assistance programs but also tools for managers to I'm led us to tell us that we need to adjust these expectations essentially act like the employers that were just talked about with understanding with compassion and understanding that this is an unprecedented situation and then just to conclude as far as the sorry. To cut you off there Tanya and I do apologize to do it. I know. You have a lot of important points to make but we do have one more caller voice I would like to bring in here I think it'll add to the conversation we've got Kathleen on the line from newburyport Kathleen go ahead. Hi I wanted to add the perspective of a former legislator and I chose pre code to step away from elected office. I served in the Massachusetts State Senate because I sincerely felt like I had to choose between doing my job as a legislator or being present for my young son, and viscerally at the core of our society, there is a systemic bias. Against women I don't care if they're nurses, teachers, dental hygienist or elected officials. We need more women in decision-making positions of collar because the whole idea that the daycare centers we're going to be left to scramble completely predictable and there was a vacuum when main street was lobbying and small businesses were lobbying and big business got subsidies. What about the daycare providers who? Funding because the cost of childcare was already unaffordable and they were already doing the good work. If you present, there was a convinced I'm sorry hair priority. I'm going to take back from from you there, and that was really helpful to the conversation. Mara we've got about two minutes. I want to give a minute to each of you and Tanya I heard you reacting there. Let me have you go I. I'm going to say that as as a nation, we undervalue care work and economic decision making this was evidenced by the fact that the entire childcare industry in this nation got less cares act funding than Delta Airlines. Well. That's kind of a drop. The MIC moment isn't it and Tonya. Tonya how about your parting thought I will follow it with the confere- action because we yes, we call on everybody value, the of women of color especially those who are new care worker contributions are so significant. I. Dare Say our economy rests on their backs and the compensation does not reflect the value they're creating. So we thank senators. Warren, and market for their support of critical legislation like the childcare is essential act that would right this wrong that Mara mentions and in Arctic passed the House. So it we urge. Congress. To to let the senators know that we support this and that we should provide fifty billion in funding for this industry urgently needs. Okay what a great conversation that's Tania del Rio Executive Director for the Mayor's Office of Women's advancement. Thank you. And Mara Bolles Associate Director of the women's economic rights gender. Justice and inclusion hub for Oxfam America. Thank you Mara. Thank you. 1937 Snow White and the seven dwarfs. What do you remember a local scholar says it's probably not snow white. The most compelling character according to a new book is actually the villain, the jealous wicked evil stepmother. Magic Mirror on the. Fan. Of. Did. Die, Beauty Majesty. Lovely may night see. Maria Tatar a professor emeritus of folklore and mythology Harvard and a senior fellow at Harvard, University Society of fellows says Fairy Tales, like Snow White helped shape a universal understanding of age and beauty and the unpacked tensions between mothers and daughters, and I gotta say with a daughter at home and another day approaching that ends in zero that really resonates with me. So let's talk to Maria Tatar author of the fairest of them all Snow White and twenty one tales of mothers and daughters Maria Welcome. Thanks for inviting me. So what a treat it was to read, you began this project on Snow White after stumbling across the south. African. Version of the story when researching for your last book with Henry Louis Gates Junior called the annotated, African? American folktales. Why do you find this story of Snow White? So fascinating? Well, that's part of the story, but also I listening to that clip. I was reminded taking my four year old daughter many years ago. To See A. Feature light the animated versions of Snow White Snow White and the seven course, and she fell under the spell of the Queen. Yes a charismatic figure that mirror and the servant in the mirror, and then this underground layer with skulls and crows and dusty tomes. A chemistry set a course she can work magic she can change herself from one state to another so that really grabbed her attention and and since then. We all use the story in some ways to work through our own mother daughter conflicts. And inner to figure out where we are and and also, of course, the cultural question of beauty and rivalry among women. This sort of competition. This beauty contest that is really part of patriarchy. So I want to I want to delve into all of that but I wanNA start with both the universality in the kind of specificity of the story when I when I got your book, I guess I thought there was only one story but you've got twenty one versions of the story from around the world with some very specific commonalities at the heart. You just talked about some of those jealous older woman who's maybe a mother or stepmother. You write about how there's this beauty component. There's the death component in the revenge. twenty-one why? Why do we have so many different versions of this story. Will first of all, I, think you've got to the heart of the matter, which is these stories which we think of as being for children. But actually once upon a time they were not they were told by adults to other adults they were the. Up that caused them the pornography in trash of the preliterate era. And these were stories at the simple expression of very complicated ideas, complex thought and you touched on some of them I mean the whole question of beauty aging and death regeneration resurrection, and then it'll the story is told all over the world and I was astonished by that becomes a didn't find you know clearly didn't just twenty-one versions. I. Found Hybrid subversions and I chose twenty one that I thought were representative and showed us how have different some of the stories are from the one that we know from Disney. So. Yes these are their extraordinary narratives, and of course, the important thing to keep in mind is the story is not usually called Snow White. It's usually called the beautiful girl at the skin color is completely irrelevant. It was really Disney more than grim their source who fetish us the white skin of snow. White. In that verse Skin White as snow. For the GRIMM's just so was white as snow and I. Think they meant you know she was innocent pure she was naive and so. But she's also then underscoring they are by choosing to make it skin as white as snow a very specific set of of myths or beliefs about what beautiful is an isn't in that had impact on us in UN Women in the twentieth century didn't. Oh for sure and I think we're always struggling with with the with the story in in part because we know the Disney version and we haven't. Reached the awareness of these stories that are circulating all over the world. Maria. Let's talk about aging for a minute to because one of the things that I found breathtaking and reading all of these stories is how cruel they are to women about aging aging means. It means being hag like it means being villainous. It means being cruel yourself I I wanNA take a moment and listen to when the Queen in the Disney movie transforms. Okay, not subtle. And this. Overwhelming, the cruelty about women aging what is going on there well, it s a spectacular scene because it's an allegory of aging assertive compressed into thirty seconds at her hair turns white her Hanson narrow act you know and so the film is is in the story itself this. This fantasy that we all have to stay fairest of the. But also the reality that we do age and that we aren't going to be replaced by the next generation. But the good news is you know there is sort of regeneration and renewal. Simple read the story is obtainable about seasonal change. I think something important to keep in mind is at these women, the women are. So the villain older women are demonized so powerfully and yet. If you think about silhouettes happily ever after what is going to happen, she will marry presumably she'll have children possibly a daughter and that daughter also become her ripe for the fairest of them all. So it. Is this you have this a message of hope and yet also a reminder. Yes we are all mortal we age and we are not the fairest of them all after a while. You know my daughter just just became an adult and I was really disturbed by this idea that there is a rivalry, an unsettled competitive ovary between mother and daughter is that meant to be disturbing? Did you find it disturbing and all these stories? Fairytale JSOC shocking and they start Oh us. The out. You know we're we're outraged content. We always react an thank. You know that's part of the billions of stories of they get us talking to each other and it may be that you don't feel that rivalry not every mother I think feels that kind of rivalry with a daughter, but it may they're subliminally and into this is a story that says, you know think about this this has been a problem on and it's it's something that you can talk about and try to come to terms with and recognize sort of recognize the beauty of your daughter becoming older and becoming you know on. The. Fairest of them, all the most beautiful or the most joust. Or the most compassionate which is the way that we might want to rewrite the story today. Maybe, it's time to switch up and instead of a beauty contest we have a different kind of contest one that has to do with has potala or compassion or empathy. Maria we have about a minute left I. told you. I. Was stunned. There were twenty one stores. You said there are actually hundreds you picked twenty one. So in our last minute or so do you have a favorite or one that had a twist or turn that? You didn't expect. Well my favorite is the death of the seven dwarves and I can I hope I can just capture is very short story. So no spoiler alert. Really. It's about an old woman, the maximum, the door of the cottage snow white denies her hospitality and what does the woman do but recruit a hit man to come back and Get rid of the doors and so why does never heard from again? So. I because this gun toting. Villain but you know a wonderful again, this is a reminder. These storms really work hard a part of an adult to. Culture. Well what a treat that's Maria Tatar she's a professor America of folklore and mythology at Harvard and a senior fellow at Harvard University's Society of fellows. The book is the fairest of them, all Snow White and twenty one tales of mothers and daughters Maria thank you so much. Thanks for inviting me.

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Boston Joins Somerville And Cambridge In Announcing No Full-Time, In-Person School This Fall

Radio Boston

47:07 min | 11 months ago

Boston Joins Somerville And Cambridge In Announcing No Full-Time, In-Person School This Fall

"And the countdown is on about one month ago until school starts in the fall. But with the corona virus pendant pandemic, still spiking across the country and a few troubling signs here in New England what our school districts, parents, teachers students to do Massachusetts Commissioner of Education Jeff. Riley is urging school districts to open in person in the fall and so far Somerville Cambridge, and Boston made their September plans. Public. So listeners, we wanna hear from you. What's your town planning? What would you like your town to plan? Are you concerned about the fall and the kids? Are you a student? What's your take? Call us at one eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five that's one eight, hundred, four to three talk and we want to kick this off with Wvu, our education reporter Max, Larkin Hello Max. I. Jamie. So yesterday Max on the show we heard from Boston city councillor, Kenzi Balk just as Boston. Public Schools was putting out their draft plan now that we've had time to read it, what does it actually say? and. Notably, Jamie does not say there's going to be the prompt return earn of all fifty three thousand EPS, students to classrooms. The report says either the district will begin fully remote meeting students at home or pursue a kind of hybrid model in other words, students sharing space coming in certain days of the week and learning partly online, and then beyond that, there's a good deal of uncertainty in. Plan the document we got was prominently labeled draft. One and I just want to give you a telling sentence I kind of flavor of IT students and staff. We'll be back in our school buildings in some manner on some schedule at some point during the twenty twenty one school year and then offering those two big options namely remote or hybrid for the start of the year bs administrators are doing just what a large majority of surveyed BBS. Families told them. They wanted to get two thirds of respondents including the vast majority of black and Latino respondents telling the district they wanted either online or a hybrid model this fall. Got It. So Max, I should note that you're joining us remotely because so much of what wr is doing is from home and and there's so much uncertainty in what you're saying here to about the about the plan. What does it say that the state's largest public school system is so uncertain? Well I think that they just don't Know what the Hell's going to look like? It you know we haven't apparently came to the virus even if we had, it could change quickly. We've got thousands of college students coming back to Greater Boston soon, for instance, and so I guess the implicit argument of this plan is that this whole community decision bound to be informed by a mayor and governor decide and the recommendations of the city's public. Health. Officials. Kimmy senior adviser to be Superintendent Brenda Caselli as she told reporters this morning that there just aren't really good options on offer right now, and she s for everyone's help as the plan takes shape. Please give us your better ideas so that we can incorporate those. And make make this plan better so that it's the best thing for this community when we get to the first day of school. So I I just want to note that's a real effort to reach out to the community. You know where there are tons of different concerns, housing health and food and work and disabilities, and that's something BPS has always done and yet at the same time I'm sure some people wanted a more concrete view of what's going to happen this fall. So speaking of concrete views, do we have more clarity on what Somerville announcing we're going to? We're going to hear in a moment from someone in Somerville as well as Cambridgeport are they doing? Yeah. In bill they have taken that more concrete route. They said we're just not going to open buildings for any student on the first day of school you had city and district officials say they're just not yet confident in. The ventilation systems and our buildings, and also that they want to get this virus program up and running reliably before they reopened I spoke to rummy bridge. WHO's the president of the Somerville Teachers Association, the Union there. He told me there's some relief among his educator members that there is a plan for the wall even if it's not. WHAT THEY FOR ACT and. You know one of these meetings one of the teacher said, you know every day we don't make decision I`Ma worst teacher in the fall that you know people need time to plan to figure out what the year is going to look like most educators didn't WanNa return to a remote model they want that. Recognition of reality that that's likely where we're going to end. Up. So meanwhile, you've got Cambridge's superintendent proposing a slightly more nuanced approach under that plan students from grades four to twelve will stay home Jamie, but then plan to reopen buildings kind of on an individual basis, safer students with disabilities, as well as for younger kids who might get a whole lot more out of being in a classroom and get a lot less out of online learning and Cambridge's school committee will vote on that plan I think tomorrow night. So I mentioned at the top there that commissioner Riley was urging schools yesterday to get back in person what what's his argument? What's his case for that? Yeah Riley told this panel put on by the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce? Bet He does still want in person learning to happen. As soon as possible. He was relying on the guidance of the American Academy of Pediatricians and that group said in late June that schools ought to find a way to get kids physically back in schools because schools are in effect more than schools we have. You know almost twelve million children in America with limited access to food. They might get meals or snacks at at school many others rely on schools for help or support in cases of disability, and then there's all this learning time that can easily be lost when teachers aren't laying eyes on kids directly. So Riley. Is still saying best is to go back in person, but I do think that's going. To depend on the public health picture to Jamie cases, suddenly surged when teachers and parents might start worrying so much that that advice might no longer seem practical or sensible. So we're obviously waiting on a number of districts When will we have every single town plan and what are you hearing about this decision by the commissioner to really have each city and town make their own choice? Yeah on the first part, there's a deadline here, Desi Department of Elementary and secondary education of which Riley is in charge. They've asked for comprehensive plans to be submitted by August tenth and I think that's this coming. Monday if I'm not mistaken as for the local decision making element here, obviously, you do have the counter example California where Governor Gavin newsom created a pretty strict system that will limit how schools can physically reopened. Last month I think many teachers would love it. If Governor Charlie Baker took a stronger line against physical reopening here. But then again, we have a time honored tradition of. Local decision making on schools in. Massachusetts. So I. Don't think it's extremely surprising. That's been the case on this issue as well. Obviously, that might look a lot worse in hindsight if schools became an apparent vector for the virus this all so max, you mentioned some of the many many issues that face parents, teachers, administrators, students in the fall. We're GONNA take some calls here coming up but but how our schools that are having some in-person presence dealing with safety Yes something I hear again and again from teachers and administrators is that they want students and parents to understand that even if schools do physically reopen, this will not be a return to normal save a social distancing will start at the bus stop and officials. Hope it will continue throughout the day people will be spaced out soon, it'll be asked to wear masks or face shields in class, and then I think of the buildings Jamie when BBS did a survey of its physical plant a few years ago dozens of schools scored moderate problems with their ventilation systems and A. Dozen more needed the wholesale replacement of those systems dozens more had problems with their windows were supposed to remain open this fall if that's possible. So I think there's going to be a lot of Jerry rigging and a lot of concern about the physical plant that students will be in fiscal. As you said, that's every was long before the pandemic right WBZ education reporter Max Larkin standby only take a couple of calls here one, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five is the phone number Jack is calling from Jamaica, Plain Jack what's on your mind. Oh. Yeah. Hi. Thanks for taking my call I'm just I'm having some concerns as an after school teacher. I've been an after school educated for ten years. In Brookline and. I'm Mike Concerned more votes. He's a hybrid model. How does that? You know kind of play into the after school programming that parents rely on for care and then the kind of as the safety model goes is like if I'm GonNa we're using the kindergarten classroom and they're in there all day in the turnover how do you go from the daytime to the after school in? In such a short time with a proper cleaning and ventilation. Are you worried about safety check? I am worried about safety I have a partner on you know obviously, it affects teachers and kids and families but you know the my household, my partner has parents that she sees for vulnerable and so then it kind of you know this going to make me not be able to see my family for the holiday. Am I gonNA, be liability. Thank you, Jack thanks for the call there. I also want to go to Donna she's calling from Brockton. Donna what's on your mind? How. Yes I just wanted to find out the study that came up in South Korea the large study that says that children under ten don't spend the virus as much as old children over ten, and maybe we can just concentrate on a different plan for those kids to get them to school sooner just because they spread it less and Other concern is in the schools in the school systems that have a lot of blessing that would also be another consideration to take into account like. Maybe parents can bring their kids to school versus on the bus But I have a step stepson who's four years old in Boston and It's very hard to teach him at home and he does have a disability. So to get these kids younger kids in school with disabilities and and things like that I think we should prioritize them over the older kid. Thank you done yet. Let's those are the issues that we're talking about here Max, and actually I want to turn to someone who's grappling with these. Issues as we speak joining us on the line is the chair of the Somerville School Committee carry a carry. Norman, carry welcome to Radio Boston. Thank you for having me so we. Just, I just want to get your initial thoughts and reactions to what we heard from Jack and Donna there. Those are real concerns that I understand there folks outside, of Somerville but that I'm sure folks in Somerville are facing. well, I pr- to say this is complex and unprecedented is an understatement it. It is not just rethinking and looking at. district wide considerations, ventilation, but someone talked about buses. The Minutia of this is I cannot be overstated. So if a student is at the bus stop and we're going to take their temperature do is there someone at the bus stop taking the temperature of the student before they get on the bus and if they have a fever or they turned around who is where I mean there's so many decisions and so much procedural work that needs to be done to do this safely and and I know foremost this is a health crisis in safety is in in Somerville and I'm sure and every other district, the number one concern it is insanely complex and we are working hard to sort it out but. I hear I'm a parent as well. parent teachers concerned. Students. Concerns too about going back I it's enormous and yet we're all working toward how do you deliver the best education you can. During a pandemic well listeners, the phone number is one, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five that's one, eight, hundred, four to three talk. How are you thinking about half schooling in the fall where you worried about? What are your concerns? What do you think your city or town should be doing give us a ring Carey Carey Norman from Somerville. So it is complex at the same time. There is this concern about an entire lost generation of students. How how do you counter? How do you balance those two things as a as a public official and as you said as a parent? I I wish I had the magic answer right every decision what we know is school kids learn best in person we know our teachers want to be in schools with our our students and we know parents need they need to work and and and we also need to consider the health concerns first and foremost of it is It. It's mind boggling and yet we need to move forward. So in Summerville, we were initially starting remote with a planning working towards a phased in in person hybrid hybrid model. We will always have remote for our teachers and students who are unable or are uncomfortable coming back in person, but we need to also prioritize our younger students who we know remote learning hasn't gone well for the pre K. to second to third grade. Our special education students are English language learners, students, specialized programming they as we as we were able to open buildings and come back into faced in. We will also need to prioritize our most vulnerable students and also have a more robust. remote learning experience for all of our students. So WBZ. Reporter Max and I want to bring you back in here. What are we hearing about remote learning? You know we know that there have been challenges from March on through the end of the school year. So so what what are you seeing in your reporting about remote learning and how how that will impact students in the fall? IAEA. Flavor of it and Romney bridges, comments earlier, and certainly we've heard a little bit about it and it's nobody's idea of a good time but I think the one thing that can really make remote learning a struggle is if you're learning how to do it on the fly reassuringly was case in the spring I think one of the virtues of the plan in Somerville is now you've told teachers with a you know a monk and more. To Prep that they will be doing this modality or paradigm is sometimes called, and at least then you can craft your curriculum and programming to work in that way that being said I. You know I spoke to parents of students with disabilities and parents of really young kids. Remote learning is is next to impossible in in some of those families and that that's involved some really heroic adaptation on behalf of Edgy. Caters and families so I think it will work better this fall it seems to me talking to. Some teachers, but it's imperfect to be sure. Got It and carry Norman Chair of the Somerville School Committee I do want to ask you what happens if a student gets sick or a teacher gets sick or class needs to be quarantined. Things that some of weighing. Oh. Yes. Absolutely and so intolerable the schools are working closely with our city health department's our city, our health community partners we're working closely with. Community health came shelf. Alliance. We don't have yet exactly what those protocols will be Those are all scenarios we need to. You know what happens if one student is how do you keep the the wants your in person the smallest number of kids in a in a cohort so that if someone does test by visited, it minimizes at all I mean. Going back to school, there is no perfect answer. The goal is to to mitigate the risk as as much as we possibly can and to be prepared. One of the reasons we're going remote initially is because we want to have all of those safety protocols, all of those health protocols in place beforehand because these are inevitable situations that are are going to arise We're GONNA do everything we can not to, but we need to be prepared I mean I. I've been talking with a lot of parents and a lot of The upside of of Covid is these online school committee meetings. We had over three hundred people. Nine Ninety people were able to do public comment on Monday night, and so there is a lot of listening and a lot of the community, how to form these plans. But is You have to really take into every. Possible configuration cove is teaching us that our lives are Wiley, intertwined in that the needs of each individual student and family is also unique, and so we need to there isn't one plan that's going to answer all the questions I keep saying we need to prepared with the most resources and flexibility to be able to respond to however the the. The virus whatever form it takes and whatever the needs are our community, our teachers in our students. Well, that's carry Norman. She's chair of the. Somerville. School Committee Carrie thank you so much for joining us. Thank you so much. I want to go back to the phones now have got becky calling from Newton becky welcome to radio. Boston what's on your mind? Thank. You very much I am a longtime middle school teacher in Newton. I'm also a parent in and I talking to a few parents this morning just informally on the street and people were talking about how much we want the hybrid model you know thinking that's bull in person is not even a possibility at this point although the district hasn't made a formal announcement but the thought of hybrid meaning some kids go Monday Tuesday, other kids go Thursday Friday and what I pointed out to. Maybe leaning day or something wouldn't Wednesday would be cleaning right? I would assume cleaning at school and more remote learning at home I really don't know. I haven't been told but with parents didn't understand which I pointed out is that you know in the spring one of the largest challenges of teaching remotely for me at least I teach eighth grade with that you know I, it was hard for me to. Give, the support that I wanted to give both to general. Ed and Special Ed students with the remote curriculum. So you know you can put something online, but you can try to be as clear with the pedagogy as you can. But it doesn't mean kids won't need support just like if they were in school and you presented something, then you go around and you support. Individually. So doing that at school is difficult. My thought to the parents. This morning was when half of the cohort is at home and the doing the remote assignment that we posted and the other half is with me in the classroom, I am not physically able to support the kids doing the remote learning at home at all. So that will be a shift for less support. It's A. Real challenge and thank you for the call Becky and I want to bring in another voice someone who's dealing with a maybe A. Higher. Age. Group right. We have Joel Persad. She's an inclusion moderate disabilities physics teacher at Madison Park Technical Vocational High School in Boston welcome to Radio Boston. Joylin neither. Hi I'm here. Thank you for having me. Thanks for joining us We just heard from becky there in Newton. She's a middle school teacher and she has some concerns. What are your concerns? Yeah. You know as a mater disabilities teacher myself I am always thinking about how am I providing accommodation to my students and how they may not be getting that what they need and Entirety, and she mentioned the hybrid model and. People do not know is that yes during those times. They, are not where they're engaging as SAGREN's learning. Basically they said to curb the amount of hours we shouldn't really be engaging with them like tell you every teacher is not going to do that. We're going to end up doing the extra work to make sure the students are getting what they need, but the truth is, yeah you're only getting half of the crime whereas even though we are remote I, am with you all the time. I am able to see you. I am able to have conversations with you can see my assets right Bertha's two days on and then two days off three days off actually I. think that we need to really be thinking about how really the remote learning although difficult. Does allow for more interaction and more assistance and more accommodation than this hybrid model. and. So then what is your response to Commissioner Riley who who really is pushing for getting students back person I mean first and foremost we all I want to be very clear teachers want to be with our students desperately we agree that Almost, unanimously, I would say that this way of teaching of being together. An excellent is what we want to be doing. How do we need to be thinking about their hope? Not just their health but also the community. Who they go back to thinking about transportation, and we need to remember that the association PD pediatrician she said that. We. Really needed to have focus on reopening fools in a way that maximizes safety learning and the wellbeing of children, and it would require new investments and we did not invest in a way that would allow us to reopen an equitable and Safeway. So yeah, I agree we all want to be there but unfortunately, we didn't put in the work necessary to make it so as safe equitable. So Joel and finally what's your message to your students to the parents to the folks who are calling in who are just as frustrated perhaps as you are. I would say that we need to make sure that we are making our heard that we are saying, let's not have a one-size-fits-all approach when we're thinking about people speaking about elementary middle versus high school let spend about them individually, and know that teachers truly do want to do our best work and we just need the support of the district because this is a lot of work and we have not been given a full brand. So we be expected to have a perfect plans. Let's all be patient with one another, but also make it very clear what our desires our and that health and safety are at the forefront in. In tandem and they are tantamount education. Joylin Persad is a teacher at Madison Park Technical Vocational High School in Boston. Joylin. Thank you. Thank you and W our education reporter Max Larkin. If I still have you just just to wrap up here, we've heard a lot and we have a number of callers who who, unfortunately we're out of time and won't get to including someone who's noting that you know this study about students and children being less. Susceptible to corona viruses is just is perhaps one study and there's a lot. We don't know about the virus but Max in hearing all of our guest today our callers. How are you thinking about where we're headed in the fall? Yeah. Jamie I. Think you hear some resignation particularly as Gary Norman speaks that that none of this feels good. We all would have hoped that we were passed this Finau You know that we you know the virus was was sort of totally under control in the United States but that's not the situation and then you know I can't help. But look at the example of Israel where schools reopened here they had virus under control and then schools became vector. That's something we should all be trying to avoid You know pretty ardent lay even as we rushed to serve the educational social and. Emotional needs of students you know in the interim while we wait for a happier time. He that seems to be the message year of two, thousand, twenty while we wait for happier time Wvu, our education reporter Max. Larkin. Thank you so much Max Anki. As America's reckoning with racial injustice continues after the killing of George Floyd at the hands of police black people across the country in the Commonwealth are coming forward with their stories of racism among them are sisters, Emily and Caroline. Joyner who wrote about their experiences growing up in predominantly white southborough they want challenge small towns like self borrow to acknowledge and confront local issues with race wr's Kyri Thompson spoke with the two sisters and brings us this report. Caroline joyner say they're not activists or experts on combating systemic racism, but they do know what? It's like to grow up black in a place like southborough a town that's over eighty percent white and less than two percent black according to recent US census estimates. I. Tried to Mute my blackness and a lot of ways just sort of gap by as a way of survival and not something that I'm getting closer to understanding that sort of on learning that's Caroline who's now twenty seven years old and performing arts publicist in. Brooklyn. Emily's two years older and is working on a doctorate in psychology at Boston College outweight centered perspective can get so internalized as a black person who grows up there it's like you learn. Yeah. Right I'm other the sisters are by racial but caroline says they're lighter skin tones didn't shield them from white high school classmates using racial slurs around them and mocking their natural hairstyles while also appropriating black culture air member kids being like, do you know how to teach me how to Dougie? Like dance music like I don't know I've grown up in the same environment as you or this one girl just like Tower Carolina my right or something like that was like wait what and Emily says the environment in the classroom wasn't much better as teachers avoided broader conversations about race seeing black culture modified and held up while also feeling like my own blackness was shameful defense embarrassing and don't bring it up because it's rude it was just such a lot of contradictions to hold. The joiners are processing these memories again after the killings of George Floyd and other black people by police. For the sisters, the police shooting of Ray Chard Brooks in Atlanta. Especially, it's home one of the to Atlanta, police officers involved in the deadly shooting of a black man and a Wendy's parking lot is a Massachusetts Native Devon. Brosnan grew up in Southborough. He was not the shooter in the high profile death, but he has been placed on administrative leave emily and caroline say they rode the school bus with Brosnan as kids Three years ago another of their old schoolmates, Matt, Colligan, with spotted marching the unite the right rally alongside white supremacists in Charlottesville Caroline says she sees a connection between these two incidents and the unconscious racism she and her sister experienced growing up. It was more just like not to personalize it around these two people on individualized racism it was like Oh of course, their product of towns like this. It wasn't surprising us the joiners stories resonate with me because I lived the myself as a biracial black boy in the white suburbs of Hobart Indiana. I still remember the humiliation of being called the N. Word when I was eight years old and the terror I felt at age seventeen when a Hobart police officer put his hand on his gun, his he approached me and my own driveway one night. and Emily says from South Bro took notice after the sisters wrote a blog post about their childhoods white people I grew up where you know send me messages like Oh, my gosh, your article really woke me up. It was such a Gut Punch but caroline says they aren't speaking out now to help people achieve some personal racial enlightenment. They want to target the systemic racism at the root of the problem in order to dismantle that you have to realize how you've been benefiting the system actively try to dismantle it not just peace in live like unity. What is my place on this and what am I doing allergy? The joyner says Southborough isn't the only place in need of soul-searching about. Race. They say it's time for every community to think about how they perpetuate those systems and unlearn them. Just as we've had to. That report from WBZ. Kyri Thompson. So for me, it's those little salty pretzel nuggets the ones with the soft peanut butter core. They literally come in a bucket and it makes the mindless shoveling of sugar salt and carbs just so easy and I'm sure we all have our own food weaknesses especially during such a spur stressful time as the pandemic and the data bears it out in the. First few weeks following the shutdowns packaged food sales spiked anywhere from thirty to sixty percent. But while the stress of the pandemic might have US turning to junk food new research is showing a strong connection between what we eat and our mental health doctor. Houma Naidoo writes about the ways in which we can help our own mental health by changing what we eat she's A. Professional Chef, the director of nutritional lifestyle psychiatry at mass, General Hospital, and the author of a new book. This is your food. This is your brain on food Dr Naidoo. Welcome to radio. Boston. Thank you so much. I'm having to be here. Thanks for joining US and listeners. We want to invite you to the kitchen table here. So to speak what foods have you been Gravity gravitating toward during the stressful times. What foods you find yourself eating that you just didn't eat before the pandemic or only at once in a while and now you can't stop shoveling say have you stayed? How have you stayed mentally and physically healthy call us at one, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five that's one, eight, hundred, four to three talk. Okay. So doctor and I do I wanNA start with just the simple question, which is, how are you holding up in this pandemic? Given that we are launching my my first book during the pandemic I have I, myself have had some stressful times. So I definitely understand how people are feeling and when I speak to pitch in. So I mean I think some people Are Doing worse than others. So it's it's been an unusual time for for many. Myself. So I know, this is your area of expertise, but you have food weakness like those. Peanut butter pretzels I've been going yet. So it's not necessarily pretzels me usually kind of salty cracker salty snack just because i. like that crunch factor and you know. So I've learned to make some roasted oven roasted Kale chips and been practicing some recipes with healthy in the oven. Associate Keeney is a good one because they still low calorie and when you don't deep fry them using infra, you can get a really tasted kind of replaced the crunch factor that you're looking for. So doctrine I do I hear you but my you know my brain is saying one thing my stomach assaying another thing like I. Think he'll chips. Were killed chips I want the pretzels the science behind that. So it's interesting. You know because when we're stressed out, brain becomes hypersensitive to the to the rewards of tasty high fat and high sugar foods and it gets reinforced. So we feel we feel supplement and be feel good. When we eat those things, the problem is over the long term they do impact our brain. The second thing is that. Because of how stressor could work and some studies have also shown that you know the way that the reward system through sugar works in the brain is very similar to the reward system of how cocaine works. So there is this ruled cycle that gets set up and we have to sort of step back from it and figure out. It's great to have a treat once in a while. But if we eat that all of the time, it is going to add up because when we eat these sort of processed whether it's high fat or high salt. Foods that have unofficial dies stabilizes in and things like that. They aren't good for brain. They just make us feel good in the short term but ultimately, studies of even showed that the high sugar levels that get caused when we have a spike in sugar lead to problems in the brain such as even atrophy and dementia over time. Well. On on on that may be sad note I just want to bring in a color here we have George he's calling from I ninety five George. What what have you been turning to during the BANDAK? Scary to hear because every George George. Unfortunately, we we really can't hear you there maybe if we can get you on a better line there but I think the point George was going to make was that they you know he's turning to ice cream and That's that's totally understandable right? A is I guess my question coming out of George there is. Is there a problem with from time to time turning to these to these comfort foods is I'll call them absolutely. So I I, the way that I work with with in my sort of nutritional psychiatry can plan I feel that people should have treat day every week and I don't call it a cheat day because psychologically you feel badly if you think cheating on something, so call it a treat day. So whether fields salted pretzels, for George, SEIS cream enjoyed on that day appropriate portion control you know so not the whole. You know joy then at the next meal, the next morning or whatever it might be for you. Continue a healthier diet that you don't feel deprived. Maybe, if someone's eating ice cream every night, they need to cut back to a few days and time just tried to replace that with the you know a healthy recipe that that almost tricks your brain into feeling it's getting that sweet taste. But with healthy ingredients, you know the sudden sudden ice creams that you could make from fruit and certain food definitely have. A high glycemic index than others. So again, this is not an every night treatment, but it's still something i. i. made a delicious Chocolate Mousse the other day using vade Ripe Bananas Super Doc Cacao which is actually good for your brain because the flavonoids and a natural in other words a natural cocoa powder and added it's little bit of Avocado Knit and creamy. If you tasted it without be telling you what was in it. You would have thought you were having a dark chocolate Mousse. Thing. You know exactly that it's almost like, i. do think that we have to find ways to replace those delicious foods not feel deprived. So I, just WANNA throw the number out here again, one, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five, what foods of you've turning to during the pandemic how have you been coping? Do you have any food nutritional mental health questions here for Dr Knight? Who Call us? One? Eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five we've another George calling from Lawrence George what have you been turning to? I mean drinking. S Moody made of Avocado. Up dosing just in case Avocado. So what else you put in Davy? Where I have a Ellum? have I kind of On two different kind of lyrics. Together with. A little bit of to item use you. But some people suggest to put. Dave resort has been fantastic. Great thanks for the call. George Dr. Knight. Who how about that? How about? Fruit SMOOTHIES, Avocado smoothies but then also maybe a little trigger or are they do have sugar Ideas focusing. So I think the judges onto a healthier option I would give some suggestions about that rather than actually just using pure cane sugar I would suggest maybe using a small drizzle of honey in into Sweden. I would also recommend about a quarter of a medium of Avocado a day, which is the portion of sort of the healthy fat from Avocado that you want. You can add creamy nece by putting a little bit of almond butter which you know brings you back some protein and creaming ascended. Great Flavor and also sweetness. So they they. The one thing I would say is trying to get rid of the sugar in that and replace it with a different way to sweeten it. But otherwise I think his during wild berries. Good choice you can throw in some green says well, because it gives you some great veggies which view natural fiber for your gut also important. So you write in your book about this connection between the gut and the brain sort of important line of communication microbiome. Can you explain the new research that we're that we're finding out that you're finding out about about that connection? So you know the microbiome has been studied for a long time, but over over, I would say the last few decades we understanding a little bit more about the connection between the the gut in the brain in relation to mental health, and even though in the body, they anatomically not close by connected by by the vague this Nov and the Vegas is something I like to to call the bidirectional superhighway with with. The Gut to the brain, and it also means that this communication think about it as a as a mass pike it in your body you know and it's it's it's pretty much traveling and it's Fast Alderman. Mass Pike. And so and then another thing people need to understand is is number one connection number two. So tone in is known as the happy hormone a more than ninety percent of serotonin receptors in the gut. So that should help people understand that when you eat something you, you might immediately over I should say have an impact on how you feel. So the several reasons for that, and then there are micro by is made up of at least thirty nine, trillion bacter- that love there, and our goal is to on most most times and. Most. Meals to try to grow and support the healthy bucks and not the unhealthy ones I. Sure I. Don't need to tell you that the unhealthy bugs love processed foods, sugar, salty snacks, and all the stuff that's bad for us and mandates start to drive over time is when we start to set up inflammation in the body and you share conditions like leaky gut and other things like that. Well, the the another component of that is people present with mental health symptoms as well depression anxiety, etc. so and what about the effect of of? So many of these substitute products that you see out there splendor aspartame or just artificial -ness of all of that you write about book but but tell us what that does to the brain and for your mental health. Exactly. So many of them are. Super Sweet and they all got most of them are got disrupters the two that are healthier than others. So if you really struggling with sugar and you're trying to you're trying to. Brace healthy lifestyle and move nothing can be done overnight. But move towards healthy options you might want to consider a small amounts of Stevia or ruth tall. Have Sixty zero coffee in the morning and you know you want to start cutting back those might be good ways to start. But in general, the sweetness have a pretty high profile of being vectis. Raptors and they've by disrupting the gut meaning that they change that imbalance. They start to create a problem in that way and others that we described in the book you know. It's just easier to avoid them a for your mental health because I know that in anxiety, for example, they actually listening. SIDOTI. So, Kellen is calling from Ashbourne Kellyn what's on your mind? High on. Call, I. Go And I'm very passionate about eating recovery. Here. If there's I would put some more nuance into the conversation and think about people's relationship with food and how it might be affected by all this talk about sugar and replacing things like chips with kill chips because Thanks kind of I. Just. Really curious to hear her thoughts about. Killing him I was having a little bit of trouble hearing you. But I think you said you're a registered Dietitian how about that and I do? Actually some the question I'm sorry. Could you could you repeat it for me? So chores she's calling for some some nuance. Know for folks who might have eating disorders. In thinking about replacing foods and shelter I think that's a great question. We thank you for calling in. I would say that you know with eating disorders as a psychiatrist having practiced for a few decades. Now, they are particularly difficult diagnosis to treat and wjm important to offer well rounded. So you my approach is always sort of been holistic. Mind Body approach that is integrated and functional, and in terms of in terms of that, what I mean is always look, for course, with eating disorders, it may be more complicated than just about what someone is eating and when they're eighteen often psychological factors that go on and something that we need to understand. So you know there are components of different types of talking therapy that involved some type. Sometimes, it's a program that needs to be involved. So the individual can really be helped to ease from the more difficult behaviors that they are struggling with to. A healthier way to embrace food their relationship with food in other words is much more complicated than you know saying you know you you. You'd like a salty snack have Kale trips and said I agree with that it's much more complicated and nuanced, and we have to have the conversation with an individual patient understand where they're at what sort of helping they need and it may might be that they need much more than just a conversation around the food because in my experience in working with eating disorder individuals, it is much deeper than that and I. Fully agree with that. So we are you know the clock is ticking down here side you want to get to a couple of other things here. I was struck in your book by Your Support of Mediterranean style food plan. I could just hear my dad yelling in my ear, you gotta eat fresh vegetables, whole grains, fresh fruit, and olive oil and everything. But but why does this the style of eating? Again and again proves so healthy. Absolutely so it it does a good amount of research data that the Mediterranean at each patting Mediterranean died actually has been has been shown to improve mood disorders. So I think that that is one one really good data point, Fresno and understand the other is that many of those things that you know we share doctors and Dietitians in nutritious talk about like myself and the greatest meaning chaired. Feeding, our our the bugs in out got with the right types of food helps them thrive and you can only get fiber from fruit vegetables. Beans not states legumes and healthy hold grants. You can get it from seafood protein, how healthy it is or lean or lean meats. So when we say that one of the WJM important reasons in mental health is that it's feeding a fiber to the bugs and the the fiber helps them produce the healthiest substances that really helped balanced on mood help out gut function properly, and actually fend off information, which is the basis of many different diseases. So. There are other other factors such as olive oil having anti inflammatory and antioxidant fettes effects on you can have a good source of protein from beans, nuts, legumes, and seeds. There is additional five minutes, some of those other nutrients. So that's really the impetus behind that data than it's been been proven to help move. So I I think it's It's an it's an easy way to go and wetzlar having your treat day. I'm also reminded that you wrote about the the power of blueberries and PTSD and I'm just wondering You know what other foods would you suggest that actively support good mental health. Absolutely. So the things that antioxidant and anti-inflammatory anti-inflammatory support, good mental health. Some things that one should think about which is unusual, and you may not yet be including in your diet and some people may a things like the Spice Choon rake with a pinch of black pepper. There several randomized control trials that have shown improvement in depression and alluring exiled he as well as other symptoms because of the powerful antioxidant anti-inflammatory and other effects. If it's not something you cook with added Super. smoothie. And would you had Trips new doesn't use regularly show a quota teaspoon with a pinch of black pepper. You can put it into smoothie promise. You won't even taste it and the reason to add like peppers. It makes the cocoon intrinsic bioactive, which makes it helpful to your brain. Secondly you could use it in a stir fry if you do cook with it but some other things that you could add a just foods rich in prebiotic fiber and probiotics probiotics things like yogurt with active cultures or. Foods. Kefir an usually if I'm nice suggest Yoga Kefir always say the unpolluted kind because the added triggers just don't do us any good by the plaintiffs style yogurt and at berries cinnamon to make sweet for you. And then sorry. No just just because I'm aware that the clock is ticking by and so just final thirty seconds here doctor night who've perhaps you folks listening who are feeling anxious feeling worried hearing all these suggestions and and maybe even that is giving them a little bit of anxiety. Just what's your one one-sentence tip for folks? Show include a mega three foods such as salmon fatty, efficient salmon in Q. An include spices like the pinch of black pepper and avoid sugar processed vegetable oils not officials sweetness. That will that will start you off on a good path that sounds great. Dr Houma Naidoo. She's a professional chef director of nutritional and lifestyle psychiatry at mass general, and she's the author of the new book. This is your brain on food Dr Naidoo thanks so much for joining us. Thank you so much for having me just wonderful.

Boston reporter Somerville Max Larkin Commissioner Riley Max Jamie I. school teacher Massachusetts George George Somerville School Committee United States Caroline joyner Wvu Dr Houma Naidoo Jack Carey Carey Norman America Newton Becky
BPR Full Show 8/19/20: Even Sharks Need Friends

Boston Public Radio Podcast

2:45:35 hr | 10 months ago

BPR Full Show 8/19/20: Even Sharks Need Friends

"Support for Boston public radio comes from DC you offering a checking account with three levels of benefits. You can visit one of their twenty two locations throughout Massachusetts and New Hampshire to learn more. What will dc you mean to you insured by NCUA. Membership required head on Boston public radio president trump is not a fan of doctor foul chest say he's become persona non grata, the White House instead the president has turned to close friend and CEO of my pillow Mike. Lindell in July La Belle reportedly told the president to look into only Andrew as a possible treatment for the coronavirus. Courting some infectious disease experts using oleanders not just nonsensical it's dangerous in a few minutes would be joined by medical. Start. Kaplan. You hear what he thinks of the pillow titans cure jared dawn killing margery EAGAN. When California experienced a spate of horrendous wildfires governor Gavin newsom turn to the federal government for help but according to one former department of Homeland Security official the president wanted to withhold aid from California because the state went to Hillary Clinton in two thousand sixteen. Later, we'll hear the whole story from Juliet Cayenne when she joins US and she'll be followed by an hour of ask g with Attorney General Maura Healey moorhead on Boston public. Radio. Going to Boston public radio I'm Jim Rowdy and you're right Marjorie has the day off and you're also right if you're guessing Hopi sitting in that would be jared bone executive arts editor at W. G.. B. H. Jared Nice to be back with you again it's like groundhog day we need. For. Monsters something incredible. It's great to have you. So the trump administration is really pushing the envelope with its postal service slowdown ballots aren't the only thing. Americans aren't getting prescription drugs have been delayed to with some people going weeks without medications joining us thought about this America can sleepeasy. This is unbelievable. Now that Mr Pillow are pardon me my pillow CEO Mike Lindell has found a supplement to protect us from the crow virus and other medical headlines Art Caplan. Doctors William Athen Virginia, Collie midday chair, and director of the division of Medical Ethics at Nyu School of Medicine Hole there are Kaplan. A what is this? I'm back to. Week. After week after. Week. You just change your shirt. So that's how you. Speak Yourself. I'm GONNA miss that we're in short though me too. Well Art. Let's talk. Let's go back and we'll talk about my pillow in a moment. But. Let's talk about the US Postal Service and about medications I guess I didn't realize. I. Knew this was done but I didn't realize how prevalent. Oh many huge. a lot of the Middlemen in prescription business, the care mark, the express scripts those guys have been urging people to use direct mail for many many years get your prescription mailed. I think it saves them money. They don't have to deal with the walmarts and the CVS pharmacies. So they like Vat approach much better and I think they also feel like you know the there a customer relationships in any event they've been pushing pushing it. I don't know the percentage, but I'll bet you. At least thirty to forty percent of people get their prescriptions by mail. Yeah. But I have another number that I think is even more relevant. That's much higher which I learned last night eighty percent of the medications provided by the Va, and of course, you know all politicians care about veterans more than the about anybody else eighty percent of those medications are delivered by mail. So when The postmaster even though denies it. Now, he says we're back to normal. We'll talk to the attorney general about that in about an hour and trump say they're not trying to slow it down. Forget voting, which is the next problem. They are putting the lives of veterans at great risk I mean it's it's. That's the thank you I'm GonNa. Make you a bet when trump went on his Let's kill the post office thing before he decided he didn't know tweeting that he didn't know I see right? Yeah. I bet he had no idea I'm not saying it would have stopped him. But petty didn't know. That's one of those. You know two am well What am I gonNA do about absentee balloting I'll slow down the post office. Yeah. He didn't know but it really is criminal that that is just. Beyond, unethical over into you know. What do you call it? A homicide I mean you can't rob people of their vital prescriptions. It's crazy and I can't believe there's not a bigger backlash about this. Well, again, we'll talk to the attorney general and so about whether or not the new post ministers promised to to undo their. BOXES BACK OUT IN MIND? So I've actually WanNa talk to you for a couple of days which I'm sure thrills you. After the FDA gave whatever it's called the emergency approval of the saliva test and it's cheap ten bucks. You get a quick turnaround all good things and obviously make testing much more available than it currently is which I don't think we need to explain why that's critical particularly with schools on the horizon and that sort of thing I have to say and I'm not being exaggerate I. Probably read fifteen articles trying to find one sentence that explained when this test would be available. To anybody. And I couldn't find it one. You're generally a cynic about A. Newfound, quick things. Are you cynical about this and if you're now when he's going to be available? Pretty fast and I'm not cynical. It's a good thing. Enron. Let's commend Yale University, where I discovered this and made it available free of charge to anybody wants trying out that part, right? Yeah. That's that's really good thing and you know I, basically this attest that doesn't require a no swab. It just requires spit and that requires you know you don't need the swabs which was one roadblock. You also have to extract DNA out of the sample with the no swabs, which is a whole song and dance that flows labs damn. You can just analyze the. Saliva directly much faster much easier cheaper better doesn't choir all the and I forgot to say it's just as accurate they're suggesting right yeah I. It's pretty close if it's not just as so was pretty close good enough as they say and we need it you know if you're going to reopen schools, it would be it's just vital to be able to test who in a classroom might be infected and get them quarantine teacher student if you're going to really see people moving indoors again and employers may start to call back the workforce got a test so you can make sure you isolate anybody's infected there. Even. Useful. Just if you're planning to go to a trump rally, maybe wouldn't go. If you could get a cheap test, they can put the tests out. So, what soon mean? I'm going to say two months really. Yeah. I got an FDA emergency use waiver. Yeah. So the doors open and it's just a matter of making the during things and this is always something that will be administered. Right we're in. We're not heading to the point where somebody could get something out of retail on CVs or something like that test themselves no no. Still lab tests what they call a diagnostic test. It's not a home test kit and you do see those up on the Internet. Forget them they're not any good. So our Catholic we're. In the pandemic were all stuck at home realizing this this probably could be very consequential for a lot of kids to. Find out some more about the obesity levels among adolescents. I don't even understand why we weren't alert to this before it's well known that body mass influences the ability of medicines to be absorbed vaccines to be taken If you find a medicine to treat cove it or you get a vaccine, it is pretty likely that people who are very obese are not going to be able to build the same response as somebody who's Thinner and I think we're talking here particularly about what's called the morbidly obese really really heavy you aside from the obesity there usually are diseases associated with that diabetes being a key but you know what the research just found was it doesn't even matter. It's not the diseases. It's literally your size and I, guess it makes sense if you inject something in your arm. The ability to get around your body in into all your cells is just less more of you. There is. So it's something else we have to take into account which lets me. harangue a little bit about something. I know we're all waiting for that vaccine and I know all kinds of politicians not just the White House but scientists say. Back scenes coming soon into the year but. We're not GONNA vaccinate our way out of this Cova thing anytime before way into next year if ever and I say that because the elderly don't do well with vaccination the obese to well, some people aren't gonNA. Take it newborns don't do well, people have cancer not do. There's a whole slew of folks that aren't GonNa Respond to vaccines that are still going to require protection by others wearing half and doing social distancing. We're going to be doing all this stuff for a while. You're one last thing about this. The obese in one of the most obese nations on Earth United States. Doing poorly with vaccines and that sort of stuff when I was most shocked out the articles I read was that there was A. So since they don't do historically well as well. The vaccines we've got to go out of our way now to ensure that they're included in these trials and I'm saying to myself, you needed this revelation to understand that any group whether it's old people are obese people who have problems with vaccines need to be included in a trial. My overreacting or is this insane? So you're you're reasonable but I'm going to counter with this. I didn't know how many people are obese people are going to sign up for these trials if you're sitting at home and you're thinking. Maybe I don't do as well with vaccines and somebody else, and if the vaccine is new and it's risky, why would I want to be first in line to get it? You know we've talked before about my little plan of challenge trials where you give somebody a weakened virus to see if the right experimental vaccine works. But. Even if you're just being recruited to try experimental vaccine mask, right I mean Verte. You. and. Second maybe it's going to do something screwy and the heavy you are in the sicker you are in the you are I think you started to get nervous maybe that's not for me. So I'm GONNA predict we don't see a bunch of those folks recruited into these thirty thousand person trials. And we really won't found out what's going on until we start to push it out to the public. You. Know I have to say I. Hope you take this the right way. Thank God. Considering you're so negative that we have people like my pillow Mr my pillow to sort of counter your negatively if I said to you five years ago. Hey Art. The Guy. Who's the founder of my pillow who does television commercials for pillows and sheets is going to be in the Oval Office, consulting with the. President had states about using a toxic shrug that apparently helped some animal. In one case, get rid of some virus. He is going to be an adviser of the United. States. What would you said? Oh it's better than the doctor who doesn't want her to have sex with enes. Never. Advisable. Forgot about her or Dr Atlas last week, the radiologist, all of a sudden, the number one epidemiologist. Hook Leandra in. Yemen about he claimed that there were studies on. TV He kept saying you know we proved we studies I think it was Anderson Cooper or somebody challenge them. And said, show me the studies where the study's. We'll go read the studies, family studies they were. You're right there was one study what they did. This is even better than animals they put some of the virus in a dish. And then they poured an extract whatever this plant is on it and the virus did like it. That's true. By the way for bleach probably is true for pouring anything. Dish randomly things you know don't like to grow in weird chemicals are oddball things. So that was the evidence don't use this stuff. It's got her side effects that damage I feel like we have to do this like once a month now it's not A. Demon doctor it's the don't drink please. You know whatever. So or hydrochloric queen, our favorite HD Q. Additive. So it's bad and what I would have said five years ago is you're crazy to be honest that's never going to happen. We're not gonNA have kooks advising the White House about you know what drugs the FDA should approve. Here we are. We are in this situation where people like this have access to the president. That they start to tell the these ideas they get covered as we're talking about right now, and then there there are people we know this there are there's a sizable population of people who are taking availing themselves of these so-called remedies, how much damage is doing and how much is this clogging up the medical system? Will I know people died drinking bleach and I know people have died in South America drinking pool disinfectant. So I know. It's at a cost. I don't know what it is. Exactly here. You know it's sort of lost because those people are gonNA wind up at the poison centre kind of E R admission we probably don't know. Who took the latest drivel that was suggested by somebody to the president but I have Cunanan moment here. I think the president uses these folks like, Mr? Pillow. To undermine. Credibility and scientists in other words I I don't think it's Mr. Pillow. Listen to ideas and hey, that's Kinda clever in a way. The answer to Jim's question about five years ago and listening to experts. This is the assault on experts. This is the southern `expertise Mr Pillow, crazy Dr who warning about Sex with demons, the drinking bleach all of it I think it's his war on science. So I'M GONNA be conspiratorial here and say, I, don't think this is an accident. Why does he have one of these people every month touting something saying Yep so he has to know that his own authorities don't agree his own experts but I think he's saying you know the experts say this Kobe thing is going to be around for well I say it isn't an icee things good. Don't listen to the experts and by the way here's Mr Pillow by the way you and I both incorrectly said, my pillow is Mr Pillow and when I heard. What about? No don't excuse yourself because I heard you say it I'm much more likely to buy it if it was called Mr Pillow. Pillow. It's actually my got it already. Yeah. We're talking a medical ethicist art caplan. So our last week when JIM was out, we had this conversation about fetal tissue research grants, and we were having that conversation because I don't remember any of this depressed. I'll try to remember to the best of my ability we're talking about the fetal tissue research grants because advisory board Ultimately overseen by or reporting to health and Human Services was going to be meeting. Could you just remind us about how tissue is used especially in an age of a pandemic, and now that the board has met seem to what are the results? So, this is an issue it's been around forever I. Mean Many many many years should we use fetal tissue from abortions? The opponents of using the tissue have long maintained that it had dignity or gives more licensed to abortion if you use the tissues after the abortions over. The proponents of using fetal tissue and I'm one of them say look it's tragic. Sad No one really wants to rely on abortion to get tissue. Don't bring it up or talk about it with the woman. If it doesn't influence the decision in any way, then you're just GonNa throw something away that might be an is of scientific value. So fourteen projects get approved by the NIH to get funded some of them by the way, involve speeding along deck scenes just to talk about warp speed but anyway, the appointed a committee. What was jared maybe. Two or three months ago. It stacked with anti fetal tissue critics. They reported either yesterday the day before that they don't approve of it that all this research stop they don't care what the NIH says by the way it's advisory. So normally the NIH could ignore that advice and go forward. But in this case, the president wants his health and Human Services Secretary as to make the decision but I think Politically, that was timed absolutely to bring his. Religious Rights Support in line has evangelical to Catholic and say, you know we're blocking this and we're not gonNA. Let it happen Scientifically there's a lot of value in using the tissue and let me let me add something else who listeners understand. You know ideal a lot. One of the areas I ideal and his transplant. So we get transplants from people who die. Let me tell you people are murdered. There's shaken baby syndrome. There's people who beat their own child to death. We use those organs to save lives. I'm not happy about where they come from a often find it almost impossible to accept or. Talk about it. There are many things. That happen in medicine not to speak in life where you know you may not like the origins of how they came to be but you still want to try and do the best you can to save others and that's where I am on this Speaking of where you are in this, you've probably been among the most outspoken people saying that I'm mischaracterizing position I know you'll correct me other than bubble sports where there's really a bubble which should appear to be pretty successful in terms of protecting health so far. That you got to be out of your mind to be going ahead with things like even baseball football you just co wrote a piece about college football. Are you kidding me where some of the conferences have already shut down? Si- read that I'm nodding in agreement I'm totally with you on this Russian torture listeners about. High School. Sports K. through twelve sports through in a couple of minutes. But then I see this headline Art Caplan in the Washington Post this is only forty percent of US adolescence aerobically fit and I say well, that's troubling and then going to see all the diseases from heart stuff too high blood pressure to diabetes to poor academic performance. So this is not going to be a permanent condition but so you read this piece and say if there's any group of people who need sports, it's adolescence, and at the same time you read our Kaplan who says you gotta be crazy engaging a lot of these sports because their risk to life and limb. So Be Solomonic here. How do you reconcile these? Part part of this is we're talking about sports where you travel. Travel City to city. Expect young athletes. Not to meet and greet others wander about a few of them in the evening. And that's certainly true for college kids watching the colleges closed down as fast as they open up I, see Michigan State and Notre Dame you in. China. Starting to. Trip back down because. Much to the amazement of I'm sure everyone kids and begin to in the. Toilet hours so. That's my main gripe is you know I'm not against recess and I'm not against having kids take a run. There's nothing to stop that we could be encouraging online school and remote learning particularly in schools with crummy ventilation no protective gear in by the way not yet saliva testing we gotta get that there too. But. Presuming, we don't have that yet. So are we going to encourage exercising remotely? Why don't we do that? You know last time I looked on TV. There were plenty of ads for people sitting on bikes jumping around in front of these weird mirrors. You've seen those things. Where you get a respond by a coach. But that's not where are we have one of the? We just discusses one of the fattest nations on earth with people like Michelle. Obama. Widely admired with her let's move. That's what it was called. Suggesting you. You do exactly what you're suggesting and we all virtually all of US ignored it. Why would we not ignore now? Oh, I think we probably will. What I'm saying is when I hear people talk about. Remote School for Adolescents and younger kids they're not building any exercise and we should. What are we GONNA do about. Their. Diet. I don't know I mean a lot of kids when we get lunch at school. So that's separate problem in a lot of neighborhoods in food desert and they're gonNA eat junk. And that's a problem and you know mental health would tell you that eating is one way to relieve anxiety and stress. So. I don't know. The best we could do is build into our plans for remote educationalist fall. Let's talk recess and visit as well as math and English. So what does that mean that you don't even low contact sports A. M. I., A. The Masters Interscholastic Athletic Association just put out guidelines yesterday assume most states are doing that and they include some lower sports where there's less contact, some high risk sports or is your position that the safest route is no sports of any kind in the fall Where we that the virus is gonNA come back in the big issue the reason I'm so obsessed with travel is. That what you're doing on the field so much to protect another what's happening outside of building if you're in a hot spot and if Massachusetts Connecticut We get a rebound of cove it. then. You know the kids are going to be bringing it to the field. It's not that they get it there. It's that they track it in. So to speak so. You're playing in a low virus non hotspot. Okay. I can imagine some of those things going forward but I, worry that's not going to be this fall. There are a lot of kids are going to be upset about that. I was I was watching some news reports over the weekend. They are so enthusiastic about it but I think it's the reality that they have to accept work. On with our and. You know I'm not delighted about it. I sound a little too enthusiastic i. you know even just for socializing and. Poor kids been locked up what five months ratings yeah. Yeah, and that's social activity but. I I was going to call you and say this before you go. But since Oh, have you now is you know starting next week instead of weekly, you'll be moving to bi weekly because Mr Pillow will be with us every other week. So it doesn't mean we don't respect your point of view, but we feel we need a little diversity. So we hope you I'm sure you. One thing I would accept as if you'd like to add my sponsors. Oh my gosh. This world we thought Dr Oz was bad. Yeah that was God. Lethal. Art It's good to talk to you. Thanks so much your time. Thank you Kaplan joins US every week. He's the Doctors Lima in Virginia, Committee Chair and Director of the division of Medical Ethics at Nyu School of Medicine four coming up we are opening up the lines and asking you about your kids and are they being more active during the pandemic lockdown or less could suspending sports make things even worse in conversation continues next on eighty nine, seven W. G. B. H. Boston public radio. Welcome back to Boston Public Radio Jim. Brownie jerry bone sitting in for Marjorie. And we were talking a medical ethicist cap on about an epidemic in the United States inactive kids a new report from the American. Heart Association finds it only forty percent forty percent about lessons are aerobically fit and as I mentioned for the sixty percent who are not the means they're at higher risk for heart disease high blood pressure type two diabetes diabetes. Poorer performance in academics they also don't get the mental. Psychological and emotional benefits that come from being active. So during the pandemic, it seems like being active could go one of two ways either lockdown means more time to be outside active or it means more time for screen time. So we're taking your calls asking are your kids more active or less during the pandemic, and if school sports was one way for your kids to be active, how do you feel about returning them to sports during Corona virus? Are you comfortable with your? Kids participating. Let's say in team sports however modified, they might be to be safe or not eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eight, hundred, nine, seventy. I'll tell you know equivocating from art his view is the risk is too high as I mentioned, the MEA is rated low risk sports for the full things like cross country golf gymnastics where there's not a lot of contact high risk sports like football, cheer and unified basketball. I've no idea unified basketball is but whatever it is. And his view is don't do any of them. It is just too risky because it's not just what happens on the field or the court, but what you bring to it. Yeah, they're context I what I was referring to art i. saw over the weekend. News report where all of these kids were just talking about being excited to give to their team sports and you understand that there's so much that's wrapped up into this and a lot of it is just the social aspect to be back into be. Exercising again to be with your team to be building toward that. And the reality is for a lot of people they can although this organization is saying that a lot of these sports can be done as long as they're not contact sports and as long as you're not in one of the red so-called red communities in Massachusetts where there are a number of positive corona tests right and you know I guess. Makes Sense but again, you know whereas the kid who's on the cord who lives in the non high risk community where was he or she yesterday afternoon where they in one of the higher risk. Communities where that have been identified by Governor Baker that you know, were there spreading test whatever that thing is called where they're increasing capacity? It's just a really complicated thing. You know the calls you and I have taken you in Margaret, an taken or any school related thing the most tortured once I on last night I had the superintendent of the Boston Schools Brenda Cassius and Marty Walsh on they're gonNA. Be On on. Friday with us through to take calls from parents and non-parents just anybody wants to talk to them about schools and while there's a there's a wide divide between what they in for example, the Boston Teacher's Union are the most teachers association thing who think it should be one hundred percent remote in the fall it's one of those things for which there is no. Right answer so to speak and I feel sports is sort of the same mess I assume the MIA trying to split the baby as responsibly as possible as you say, low conduct sports. Okay. Hi Context sports not okay. At least for now they have something called floaters get to that later spring sports but you know there's no there's no right answer where I think a parent or kid can feel totally comfortable that they made the right decision I mean yeah. If you think about it in practice if. if if you're out fielder especially, if you're outdoors I, mean it kind of adheres to a lot of what we've been told that you can be about six feet or even twelve feet away from people maybe perhaps not even wearing a mask at least that's what we're told in the beginning because of the droplets don't stay in the air as much. But of course, what do you do after that? You go back to the locker room. There's still geology there for the contact sports you do come closer. So. It just seems pretty fraud and then you wonder about the rest of the country, the whole Friday night lights. Culture that exists throughout this country it's hard to believe that that's going to be shut down their plan, Texas. Let me tell you if every kid dies on the football field they're playing they're not giving up their Friday and at high school football by the way one of the best television shows in the last decade to I should say the numbers eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seven, yet another corona virus conundrum. We'll see if you guys have better answers than we do. Let's start with Carol in Sudbury Hi Carol Although Carol. Hi Hi I was calling because I. Guess I disagreed with Art because I. My son is on team sports swimming. And they've really you know I don't think we're GONNA do many meats or anything but at least he's practicing because if he weren't. You know the online hasn't worked. You know schooling has not worked. He's a you know. I can't get him pick up a book and he's just on the screens and chatting with friends all day long. So at least he's doing something productive. You know right now practicing two hours. and. You know I think I I can't imagine if he didn't that I totally get that and what's Carol what's the? Jared said a minute ago. What's the locker room situation when your kid is done practicing does he just go home? Does he go shower and Locker Room? What does he do? No. No they they won't even let them in the locker room unless it's an emergency bathroom call they wear masks thinning out of the pool. He gets in the car I'm waiting and he gets in the car dripping wet. Suit that doesn't sound like a horrible compromise. Your kid gets the exercise I guess. He gets the see as friends and colleagues and he's segregated from them too. So yeah, well, that sounds pretty reasonable to me carol. Thanks. Wish them luck. Wish you luck as well and may has included swimming on their list of which on the list of sports that are deemed low risk or moderate risks. Actually competition more than caroline sudbury threatening exactly so far. They're saying the only sports that they really WANNA see practice. No. nope. Actual playing football cheer and as you said unified, what is Going to say the I have no idea really know. Eric when you need her, I love. The cheer is on that list because there was this whole debate about whether or not that was a sport and my you watch these athletes doing this. It's essentially gymnastics by another name who wants to be flipped upside down and caught by I dunno Megan saw you're next on Boston public radio city that's taking great precaution under Mayor Occur Tony. Hi Meg. Aloma. Hello, make. Can you hear me now? That's why I said Hello Meg high now are you? Hit The mute button. I am I have a sixteen year old who's Extent, but he rediscovered his bicycle. And and his skateboard this summer and has really enjoyed bicycling. But I have to say I'm in Somerville Right now and I was really impressed with the number of people wearing masks just walking around and even jogging however down on Endicott street and there's a high school softball team and they're out there tag each other high fiving each other in sliding into bases and the coaches they're none of them are wearing now. That is really. Well, that's really true. Again, you come from a city where you have a mayor who has been as cautious about any level of reopening as I think any mayor in Massachusetts. So that's that's a really troubling. Here he made before you go is your kid decided to the cycling thing alternative to the things he would ordinarily do in non corona virus time or is that what he does anyway. He hadn't been biking. before. He just really wanted to get out and burn off some energy. So he's a drummer to so he gets a lot of exercise. And so cycling doing it for a meg I mean is he feeling good? Is it doing for him? He's yeah. He's really enjoying that and the skateboarding, but he has decided to go remote with school. He's just too nervous to go back in the classroom and he had a choice of hybrid or remote. So even though he's kind of dreading doing school from home again, he just he was more nervous about going back into the classroom. Make thanks in by the way that that giving the families. Individual. Choice of hybrid versus remote is exactly what the current state of affairs is in. Boston. I haven't locked things in yet because they're waiting for you know his latest public health report as possible. The Superintendent. Told me last night she hopes within a week. They'll make the final verdict but that's exactly we're Boston stance as as well. Eight, seven, seven, three, zero one, eighty, nine, seventy. Let's going to Beth New Hampshire. Hi. Beth low beth. Hi Hi I have two college age athletic ghastly. All one of my sons is a runner His season has been canceled because he goes to school in. Pennsylvania. and they're not allowing any false sports to happen So he is. Currently, running with teammates. which I think is sort of a moderate risk on their outside. Know you be in each other's. Elections. I. Suppose. my youngest son goes to school New Hampshire. actually talked before. Or Lose Beth. Say That again, we lost you. After you said, we've talked to you guys before finish. That's okay. It's okay. New Hampshire the universities in New Hampshire or requiring all kids to be tested negative before they arrive on camping they're tested again a week. Later they're tested again two weeks later. And all athletes are tested every week. and. So my younger son plays ultimate Frisbee and he's the captain of the team. And I met last night to discuss how to do this safely and I have to say that I'm impressed with a bunch of twenty and twenty one year old. Who are? Going above and beyond what the school which. By, the way before you go before you bet your older kid who's doing the cross country thing sort of an informal sort of way I assumed it was obvious from what you said when they're running together. They're not wearing masks. I. Know. How you feel about that. You know my son typically runs eighteen miles at a time. I think that wearing a math to let that length of time is pretty impractical at this. Point in the season I just don't think that that's that would be practical and I have to say that this particular child not speaking any other child. He is a completely unbearable human being. Unless he can get that info running in, it has to happen it just has to happen. Finish the sentence. He's an unbearable human being period as opposed to unless he's getting his exercise. Beth. Thanks for the thanks for the call you. It is good to hear his bet said her younger kid when kids on their own are going above and beyond because the primary a. Objection, to a lot of the college sports were allegedly all the rules are in place by the universities who are primarily worried about the big money sports. Obviously. Kids I mean. Think yourself at nineteen years old are you gonNa play by the rules and the answer for most of us is no because we're the exceptions were invincible. You know hear that too because. Obviously, we keep hearing about all of these colleges, Notre Dame most recently and UNC you're sending kids back home or kids are deciding some of the smaller kids deciding I don't want to be a part of this going back home and I was thinking there have to be some really good stories out of this too. They're not everybody not all college students are completely irresponsible. So that's so that's so great to hear about hurricane in their team being responsible before we take a break by the way, I will not name the station which I heard that I was listening to a news account. On another station this morning and the newscaster said and at the University of North Carolina they opened up they had a shutdown and they're going through a similar experience at the University of Notre. Our. Boy. During the break. I think we are. All right we are talking about the United States of inertia asking you is the pandemic making it harder for your kids to be active or not. The conversation continues on eighty nine. Point Seven W. G. B., H. Boston public radio. And Welcome to Boston Public Radio Ajar, both sitting in for Marci I'm Jim Brad if you're just tuning in, we're talking about new report out of the American Heart Association that finds it just forty percent of adolescence in the US aerobically fit, which has these huge Arba consequences we're taking your calls asking pandemic. This problem for your kid and. Is One of the solutions going back to. School sports and other one of those impossible school conversations which by the way, this is really close I. Mean it is not what does it take nine hundred or something like that? I think nineteenth th. Yeah. I mean school openings even though they've been delight I guess in Massachusetts for this professional development whatever it's called the additional days for is really right around the corner. The sports athletes usually come back early. And by the way, as we said a minute ago, if you miss this the not that they're binding not they're obviously not binding for parents much list the schools I guess was last night is today Wednesday. It is last night, the MIA, the Masters interscholastic Athletic Association. Put Out I. Guess Guidelines a roadmap or something what low risk sports where the high risk sports. For the fall. What makes sense in the winter makes sense in the spring then there's some floaters as they call them depending upon what the public health conditions are and again. It's good to have some guidelines but ultimately, as we've heard from every single caller, individual families making individual choices let's stay in Cambridge, which is where I am and Beth's on the phone. Beth. Taking my call. I have a I have a rising senior in high school who is it? An athlete she is has managed to stay very active. This summer she's working as a camp counselor so that definitely has helped but it's interesting because she she plays field hockey in Oh. I. Believe has classified moderate risk and no decision has been made yet about that but what I wanted. To say was that you know we always humble about some of the differences in gender rules for the same sports versus boys versus girls, and she plays ice hockey winter and because girls ice hockey is no contact they're actually looking at potentially getting to go back before the boy. So all of these things that we definitely are you know not happy about it as feminist Kinda like maybe this is not such a bad thing right now because of the lack of contact. Will. You know by the way I'm looking at this MIA? Stuff after you said, you said there are very few sports that are played by a girls and boys that were there is a distinction one that's in a low risk categories, girls volleyball. I assume that means that DAN MA considers boys volleyball to be higher risk and girls golf is in the spring season. What does it mean? Boys can't play golf and girls I don't know but but for the most part whatever sports are played by both. Boys and girls are considered the same Beth, are you how are you with the State of affairs as your head on this? Oh now. I'm caused that might that might be major is acting her own because it definitely helps her a lot I'm glad that she's been keeping up with workout than going running and doing stuff, and again her job is keeping her busy but I've actually her in charge of helping her. Other who is a total slug He has just he's usually back on energy but since pandemic, he has really let down. So she's been trying to take him out on bike rides. With him. So that's been really but I have to look like it's junior year you know. To see again for so. To what the school and so she good big sister, Beth thanks for the call. You know the thing we have mentioned that aren't mentioned a minute ago which I hadn't thought about until he said it is for kids who are doing remote learning, which is going to be a huge percentage either all remote or this hybrid partially remote learning here in Massachusetts and I'm assuming around the country as well I haven't heard. School people whether they are teachers, nurses, administrators talked about remote exercising. I was going to say mandates or prescriptions at least as arted but that really is important because. To begin with and I was sort of like that woman's eight year old unfortunately for much of my. Youth. You become even more sedentary. So exercise becomes even more important. And it's important to be formally in integrated into the curriculum. Don't you think I do and it's harder to get out of that cycle. We all know that when you get that cycle, it's. Becomes more and more challenging to get outside and get exercise and start moving. I'm stuck in that comment about the girls hockey versus boys I didn't know there is a distinction about no context. Anti see if the boys remove the contact for element from their sports. So they can play if I wonder if you can even if they can conduct themselves but but it's interesting you say that because there's a there's a quote here in this Boston Globe account of what am I a a did and I don't know I'm sorry department of Elementary and secondary education is who said this there's a quote from their statement most sports can be played in ways that minimize those risks in many cases that will mean that interscholastic competitions May. Not, look the same and they need to be played under fairly stringent restrictions with modified rules. So I'll make a leap and obviously we're speaking for nobody and we're not sure even right. But the implication of that statement what you're saying and what that caller said is the boys hockey may be non contact or they obviously can't make football on contact but whatever you can do to mitigate the or eliminate the contact. I assume that's what the Department of Elementary and secondary education is talking about I. Guess just that you know one of the th-. It's really hard for me. You're the world changed in early. March like overnight and teachers and other educators who never had to do remote stuff were expected to be able to teach everybody's kids remotely as if they've been doing it their whole lives this the same sort of thing he's been playing hockey for example, since you're a six year old little boy or girl and all of a sudden, the rules change overnight intellectually makes total sense to have. Done more safely, but it's not the same sport can can a kid a comment? You know acclimate him her so I I don't know. I mean this whole th-. Every part of this is so incredibly difficult I read on this was. Such disciplined in most athletes that I think they did if it'd be right for you to play or at least gathering some capacity, the drive will be there to do it in such a way that it keeps you on the field or keeps you in practice. Yeah Chris in Boston. Hi? By Chris. Yes. Yeah I have kind of. Realize. I've Kinda complex. Story of. A. College student son who was doing indoor rock climbing and switched to going back to riding his bike on long distances and he's loving that. So He's find found in alternative I'm also A director on the directors of a youth soccer organization and and a person with a his. I. Broke Spinal Cord Injury to for my great losses that I can't keep playing soccer and I love for kids to play soccer But the State Association was not requiring mask wearing for the younger kids to play. and it seems and they reciting not research that doesn't exist about that being dangerous for kids to wear masks. first of all. They'll there isn't any danger other than maybe some fatigue and it's kids if they if they're in trouble, they can come off the field and pull their mask off but and there's also the whole transportation you're putting kids in cars. I'm where there and carpooling. where while there's an alternative most kids in the world play soccer in their communities. And we. Until we've decided. Not Participate in this travel but to Back, to doing stuff in where we can control everyone's wearing masks and. Safety. but it was really disheartening. to see. This such a push to getting back to. To form that's. Very, adult directed And and getting, we can return who just having kids enjoy the game I have not seen the latest. From the state so maybe they're GONNA CHANGE THAT Well. I. If you said I, wish you were in charge I'll tell you I think if the exact right attitude Chris thank you for the Call your ordinarily I say in situations like this, I assume everybody has the best interests of. Whoever they're dealing with at heart even if isn't good faith disagreement, I said at the Marty Walsh last night you in the Union in Boston have a disagreement but I assume they honestly believe it's unsafe to go back. You honestly believe it is safe for some kids and some educators to go back but I'll tell you when it comes athletics even on low levels, there are some coaches. And leaders some of whom were parents by the way who so totally out of control and living. So vicariously through these kids the knowledge that unhealthy. But they ended up putting a kid in an unhealthy positions I hope grownups like Chris get to make decisions both as administrators end as. Parents there. Let's go to Matt Matt I'm not sure where you're calling from actually it says Berry. High Barrier you from. Barry Massachusetts Arab Barry. We got. That is sorry. What's up man. I wanted to explain unified BASCO please. Yeah. or or any unified sport is is fairly new it's about. Ten years old as a concept it's where regular students. play together with special needs kids. So it's A little bit less competitive, perhaps but you know for kids who cannot otherwise make a competitive sports team this allows them to interact. in a more inclusive approach. That's great. How long has that been going on again? About ten years. Tends to be only in the larger schools their field. you know that that have the gym facilities for one thing and also enough kids to field. both kinds of student. Well, you know it's interesting though describe it Matt as sort of a lower intensity. Even, though I think the inclusivity is fabulous, it's listed as a higher risk sport by the way at long with football and cheer and will only be allowed to practice enlist in the fall. So it's obviously a little more intense but I that's great i. wish I had embarrassed I didn't know the term and embarrassed knows going on. So thanks for shedding some light on. Appreciate it. Thank you so much Matt I know that it's going to be a huge decision for for all these these parents and the kids to make. But at least we have a few more months where can get outside and get on your bikes on your skateboards you get out your running shoes. So are people out there though I, mean I. Do Most of the Times I'm out in the world maybe I've off hours it's like a ghost town I mean it's just now now. Every most mornings and speak my paths has become like a freeway in some cases. Now run earlier 'cause I'm coming in earlier when I'm with you guys So there are fewer people but of bicycles. And I also see lots of yoga groups in other exercise groups socially distant south they're together. Maybe if I was while you're running if I was on the couch or anything coffee and eating breakfast with three hours, maybe I'd be saying the same thing your. Harding and by the way, as we said every time, we're GONNA continue to have school related conversations where you guys can participate in almost nonstop through now in September. So thanks for calling in. I'm just like that at caller said, if don't run a little grumpier. So I think everybody around me is happier same with me if I don't get the couch in the morning. Grumpy all day and all night. All, right Coming up president trump is fighting fire with I R-. It turns out he tried to withhold relief money for California's wildfires because voters in the state don't support him released didn't in the last election national security expert. Juliette. Cayenne joins us for that and more on eighty nine. Seven W. G. B. H.. Boston public radio. Boston public radio in California experienced a elliptic wildfires decimated entire towns governor governor newsom look to a frequent foe for help calling on the federal government for help newsom hope the president politics aside and provide aid to Californians who lost their homes but according to former homeland security official when the call came in the present, instead sought to punish Californians because the State Win for Hillary Clinton Twenty Sixteen. Later, we'll hear more from national security expert Juliette. Cayenne I'm Jared Bowen. Filling in for Margery EAGAN, president trump wants to wage a war on the United States Postal Service and mail in voting but once again, Attorney General Maura. Healey's standing in his way after learning of several reforms instituted by the trump administration that could hamper the postal service and harm the election Yuli and other State Attorneys General are taking the administration to court later will hear more about that when she joins us to answer our questions and yours four ask the AG Hour number two Boston, Public Radio Marjorie, and as the day off I'm Jim Brady Jared. Bowen. Sitting in for her Logan Jared. Joining US along over latest national security headlines. Is Julius. Julius analyst for CNN former Assistant Secretary the Department of Homeland Security and Faculty Chair of the Homeland Security Program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of. Hello Juliet. Hello to both of you could talk to you. Say. This is pretty incredible. It may be an end note to the investigation into Russian interference in the twenty sixteen election but the report, the latest report from the Senate Intelligence Committee is pretty thunderous in the in the ways that had echos, the Muller report in the ways that talks about the White House efforts to hamper their efforts. The Senate Committees efforts. What's the significance here in this latest volume? It's the latest and the last volume apparently, I think it's incredibly significant. I want separate the substance of it with the rollout of it, which is just a very interesting story. The substance of it is more damaging than the mullahs report because it shows it shows in and more than implies the direct relationship between Manafort and senior member senior leaders of in Russia, and the Russian Intelligence Agency is documents in the first page something I had never seen documented before and you both know I I've been following this a bit too much which is essentially The night of the of the tape. So infamous tapes, the grabbed them tapes, phone calls essentially going from Manafort to You know basically operator to get the Russians to have wikileaks release, the Podesta emails I had never seen that in real time, which shows that this wasn't just an issue around. Well, the trump people wanted Russia's help and they didn't stop it. This is true direction So manafort comes off as one would expect him to come off I think the open question which I've always wondered and sort of wondered out loud on twitter yesterday is which has never been answered is not answered by this report. Which is hundred manafort end up in the trump campaign I am I am quite serious. You know I you know I'm not a conspiracy theorist but I think that's the story that still needs to be told we we tend to think of Manafort's there and then begins to collude with Russia Maybe. There's a prelude because manafort never made sense as campaign manager had not been involved with them with Republican politics for. Thirty years and so I'm. Reading the Synopsis Of is it's a long report. With that, just quickly on the roll out, the rollout was interesting obviously, it comes at a time when people are focused on the Democratic convention Mark Warner the. Democratic had was SORTA drowned out I think that safe to say by a sort of you know very strong effort by the Republicans to say case closed no collusion I don't know what happened there. I don't know if there was you know I don't know how these things work but this was more damning than molar and it's certainly not getting the attention that it that it that it should maybe we all know maybe at this stage, we all know it to be true and are sort of like yeah. Tell me something new. Well, tell you something new is that it's bipartisan I mean the this. Is Republican controlled. So it becomes much more impossible not that they won't do it for people like the president's personal attorney a bar to continue say this is some Obama conspiracy. It should become more difficult for the president of the United States to say nothing was going on because again, this is while it was bipartisan, the Republicans could killed this because they control. The the committee I'm with you it is so such a reflection on the state of this country that report of this significance even though it does pretty much echo the muller report gets virtually no oxygen because we assume I think the worst about what's going on this just confirms it. What's the big deal I had your colleague Jeffrey Toobin he has great new book. On TV with me last week and both in his book on on TV, he said. I'm paraphrasing maybe there was formerly no collusion, but it isn't because they didn't try meaning there may not have been a formal agreement but from reading summaries of this report A, there couldn't have been closer contact between trump campaign officials and Russians including Russian intelligence people like Manafort. Handing over this inside information to this. Intelligence Guy. The one thing I don't understand though about this is what you said a minute ago. Juliette you know the goal was this is it It's done goodbye. Let's move on in terms of the Republicans. They allowed it to be released just what is it? How many weeks seventy, five days or whatever it is till an election and so while I think it was predictable that wouldn't get much play. It's also a pretty dramatic indictment of the trump campaign and Russia's role in the campaign to be putting out. So close to election. Don't you think I do do I think and maybe that was why you got the bipartisanship is that it was you know maybe in some ways. A warning to the Russians on the trump campaign. Stuff did come out. They did make it clear that they believe people like jared did lie regarding some information. I think one of the most important aspects that. Just, upon reflection is you know I never anticipated anyone but Romney would vote against would vote for the articles of impeachment in the Senate but you but but go go to the Senate Intelligence Committee, which includes you know people that are not viewed as firebrands, all the time and So they're they're this is a multi year investigation. So they are well aware in their Senate Intel role that the trump campaign tried at least to collude to quote Jackie to then and and all sorts of nefarious people were essentially colluding as we know from Roger Stone and what we know about Manafort. and then now they're asked to say to to do judgment on whether trump is doing the same thing with Ukraine and I. You know to me. They're related in other words. What trump the articles impeaching around Ukraine basically show that this was not an aberration that this was standard operating procedure that from Russia to Ukraine this this family whatever you want to go on this this criminal enterprise is working with foreign entities to try to to win an election and so that to me is one of the amazing things that you could have had those Senate Republicans knowing what they knew about what had happened in twenty sixteen still still think still saying well, Ukraine. Didn't rise to the level of of concern and they should be held accountable that includes our Maine senator. Event One more thing about this. Is Not helpful at all help me, and that's my primary concern here. Let's assume this was a totally blank slate and we hadn't lived through this incredibly chaotic. Deceit filled. Dysfunctional three and three quarter years. If on a blank slate, a report came out bipartisan fashion from a Republican dominated Senate committee. About the campaign of a Republican. President. Republican president that said his campaign manager amongst many other things was meeting with an handing over internal information from the campaign to a member of the Russian intelligence apparatus. Would there can you imagine the explosion the the? Four. But again, as I said a while ago, it's just another day in the life of Donald Trump and the American political scene it really shows how. How far we have all fallen I think yes. I think that's right. I mean I think that's maybe the appeal of what's going on this week with the Democrats but that that the yeah, it's like I don't know if we're GONNA get to the story but this I think we do but I'll fast or something but you know the the this the guy he'd been the homeland. Security. Chief of staff one of came out with Yeah my my thank you miles Taylor saying you know this man is not fit and he's an and Taylor. It's not that I'm not voting for trump. I'm actually from voting for Biden now, which is a step further than say even Romney has gone and so but you know. One of the interesting things about these videos coming out right is they they show just how bad things have been since the beginning I mean I think we are so like I don't I mean you know for three and a half years this madness in some in some way, there's like lack of stability because when you see that video, he's essentially goes through everything from day one, the Muslim. The Muslim ban we have been on this ride for a very long time will enjoy at that point in my last. Question for you on the issue of this report is is it seems it goes further than a lot of what we have seen in terms of White House intervention for the investigation you know people like miles were saying that the the White House has been more concerned with image and controlling issue its own issues rather than policy and wildfires at a raging throughout the country. But is that your sense to that? We understand more about the lengths to which you mentioned jared Kushner lying the lengths to which the White House. Administration officials went for some to to hide something where they argued didn't exist anyway that there was never collusion. So why are they? All of these efforts to stop the investigation. Right I. think that's right I mean I think that I think that's the story line has not changed, and if you notice trump's language lately has changed from has really changed to To, use the language of spine I just read something that you said they were spying on me and that's the that's the continuing not that I didn't do it right because I, think that's clear that he did. But that you know that this is this is part of the deep state. This term spine right makes it seem quite illegal voting no that minus you know and I don't mean to say that it was right but just you know minus maybe some crossing the TS and dotting of the is even bars justice. Department their original investigation shows that this was a totally legitimate. Use of law enforcement and surveillance powers. Now bar you know has this for people listening there's everyone sort of waiting for this thing called the Durham report, which is a separate investigation of how the twenty sixteen case began i. think it's going to be big test for the media about whether they treat the Durham report as real or as something that bar as consistent with what bar did when he when he gave his four page report on the Muller report, a bar is. Compromised why or how but I hope that the media treats the the Durham report, which which everyone is calling the September October surprise which may implicate the Biden family as essentially just lies I. Mean I will. I've already I've already told CNN like I I'm I'm not doing this again. Right is you know this is this is this is when the media has to say bar wants. To use the authorities of the Department of Justice to make sure Biden is not president everything he says is painted rather than durum came out with a with a report. Well, she's told CNN she won't do with them, but she obviously will do with us now. Since you mentioned miles Taylor here's a little bit of sound. I, soon, people have seen the spot. This is the former chief of staff to the Department of Homeland, security in an ad saying the president trump withheld fema from Californians for political purposes on a phone call with the Federal Emergency Management Agency Fema to cut off the money and the no longer give individual assistance to cal. told us to stop giving money to people whose houses have burned down from a wildfire because he was so rage that people in the state of California didn't support him and that politically it wasn't a base. is almost nothing you can say. Just. unconscionable. Again that's his assertion we don't know but. I haven't seen any evidence to suggest that this guy is making it up of you. Know and they're you know I mean trump called a kid or whatever chief of staff of the Department of Homeland. Security is a not insignificant job. It's the second largest federal agency just like chief of staff at the Pentagon when they jump everyone says how high because they speak for the secretary? He's not someone that you have to like. He's not the one that you have a beer with. He's not someone who even claims to be a democrat. He is his his his opinions on things and you know are are You know very inconsistent with where I think Biden supporters generally are but this I I think it shows the strategy of the never trumpers but also the strategy of the Biden campaign that that if they can keep energy with A. Kamla appointment which is great and then they they keep the suburban women in who they clearly have captured from the date I've seen, and then if they can get these people who either won't vote because they don't want to vote for trump again or do these stupid Ryan and things that they can capture enough of them. Then that's a significant growing of the tent and look I. Mean I know people have set to Castro doesn't have a speaking role. At the Convention or AFC had a limited role or whatever I know John Casick he gives the darn. We the truth is, is that a party that can have John Casick and Bernie Sanders on the same night? Right? That is that is a party that exists solely for the functions dating America at this stage I believe that. The democratic. Party now is just simply we'll figure out what it is and they'll be feis again but the Democratic Party ought to be we're just saving America from its out and that's what I thought. That's what I thought. It has been so interesting about all of these Republicans now coming out, he also just wanted to he hinted on Good Morning America that he's the first if you figure a chief of staff. Is The staff will you sort of wonder whether John Kelly and Madison all these guys that we've been waiting have been somewhat wimpy might not come forward. Well, there are other I mean the other question is, will there is some day be a uniform group of Republican and Democratic former presidents WHO say they're voting for the same person? We shall see your a California kid in staying California this miles, Taylor thing. Or junior colleague gave me some information this morning furnace creek in Death Valley, which is always hot recorded one hundred and thirty degrees I guess yesterday. They're still they still need to verify arguably the hottest temperature on earth ever California's having a heatwave unlike anything they've seen. In almost twenty years first time as a rolling blackout in nineteen years is there I mean often what happens in California's what is about to happen elsewhere? Are there St- lessons or morals of this latest horror in California other than the fact that climate change is real Well, climate change is real. What's happening in California just to distinguish it from the fires. So a lot of times people will say wait I heard about rolling blackouts last year those are based on fire concerns because the lines are so weak. That's what started the paradise fire. A lot of times we you know pg me and some of the other electrical companies will will will do a blackout because the winds are too high. So we had was covering hatching rolling blackouts. This one is different. This is a supply issue we seem to me just poor management. I. You know this is there's no reason that the supply should not have redundancies in it, and I think part of it is, is that a lot of these companies their numbers may be off right that they just might not be anticipating what the demand is going to be in an age of climate change. This is going to be true of of you know Whether, it's fires or drought and so part of. What you're seeing the transformation of thinking about climate change as a as a as not just as a given. But as as the sort of way we live is Y is California not able to satisfy and they go back in an age in which there is not there's no. We're not dependent on Saudi Arabia for oil. Why are we? Why are we experiencing and this is the political debate that's going on the governor is very, very angry at the energy companies for not having anticipated this they're blaming ten thousand other people. So this will this will play out as a fight and I bet you will get regulations about you know about supply and satisfying to play because you can't have Californians I, mean you can have. A major state not able to have electricity for nights on and know people it's also unhealthy and uncomfortable and to not have electricity. Is through history to in California not a recent history of in the last twenty years of of of I. I don't know if you can go so far as a call it Paktis by by some of these energy companies of of suggesting I've kind of manipulating perceived shortages when actually that aren't tasting I know that some of those questions are being raised rate now is, yeah. What is the legitimate reason for having blackouts because we're not finding the evidence for it? Right I think that's in this case. So those big house break in this case you know just taking it fake value what what the companies are saying now maybe I shouldn't, but they are they are heavily regulated now and remember like pg. Knee is under criminal investigation. So hopefully, they're they're not playing games again and but it is unclear why we are at the stage, but it's a it's a, it's a valuable lesson. About sort of surge capacity in a country that is going to be living with these climate extreme moments indefinitely as it. We how does it? Does. What once was you know this country on earth? I don't know how we feel about it. Now in terms of covert, but it's you know to we have the supply that we need and it's it's actually related to covert. Similar to cove it which is, why are we? Still deprived I just don't I don't get it. I. Mean Five months later why or why are declarations and gloves and masks and I? It just boggles the mind we're now download by BUBBA DONALD, trump hours before the FDA the put it that short-list thing saying what we don't have the president literally hours before said, we have a glut of all these things whether they're PP ventilators and all at once again, just a total denial of reality I mean isn't the answer to that question is that that the unwilling or part of the answer the unwillingness to use the defense production act to get what we needed who? Is continues to homeless. That from the beginning. So imagine if you had a serious the defensive action in January so we're now eight months later. So I'm so you would have. As I've explained before on this show, you would've either you know. Pay Fair market values for stuff already on the market so that these private markets that are paying the price with on exist or you compel manufacturer or you get it from foreign countries through third parties or whatever in a in a meaningful way none of his happened in a meaningful way and so for people like me who who you know, I'm very forgiving the first couple of days of any disaster it's just A. It's a mess. People are trying to figure their way whatever I. I don't even know how to claim rationally how in on August whatever twentieth whatever this is you you're you're the we have A. Basic supply change chain challenge that is easily solved rate who supply logistics is what do I have? What do I need? How do I get stuff here to fill the gap? It is not It's not I'm making evacuate, right but Kenya the thing that I think I've asked you this before maybe John King. Chuck somebody the thing I never understood about the defense production act I understand that the mode the trump operates in the donald trump is president as opposed to the former Donald trump is we don't believe in government mandating anything. But he also believes in vengeance and I i. don't mean this as a joke by the way as as I think I've said before on the air why doesn't he pick companies that he has a beef with and force them under the defense production AC to produce swabs I'm totally serious by the way. Yeah go ahead mean. There's two things going on to one is it's he gets more by giving money to companies where he thinks that you know he'll he'll benefit or his friends benefiting. So I believe that find becomes president. One of the biggest things that that is going to have to be reviewed is this Kodak deal This is you know this this deal with a company that has never been in pharmaceuticals and you who stock? Went up one hundred, thousand times after the deal was announced what was going on there and who knew beforehand, a lot of people got super rich including the CEO and it's not even critic and satisfy the contract. They've never done bio you know or or farm manufacturing distribution. So so that trump happier because he makes other people rich through these contracts, the other. Is A it's it's it's it's not that much of a punishment. How to work because. So he thought okay by Disney go after his enemies because defense production. Act That's fair. Market value most companies aren't there. They're not miserable being told to they might be miserable but but if you say we're to. You the the good thing about the defense deduction act is that it it provides a market. a demand or to the suppliers. So in some ways, these companies benefit because they know if they make three million masks they. Million Math. As compared to and so one of the one of the things I remember from early on in this is a bunch of companies saying you'll remember these articles we want to help. We just need to be directed because we don't want to make something that we won't get paid for that's legitimate for company. But if I feel the company and said, I've got a federal check under the defense deduction I am blind five, million you know math from you in two weeks. Can you do it and and I'm paying Sarah Market Value You tell me what company is going to be upset with that no company is got to be that. Good Answer Juliet. Thanks so much good to talk to you always be will. By. Julia joins us. Every week. She's an analyst for CNN former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and Faculty Chair of the Homeland Security Program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of government well, coming up Attorney General Maura. Healey is here for this month's edition of ask the AG taking our questions and your calls keep your dial on eighty nine, seven W. G. B. H. Boston public radio. A. A. The Boston Public Radio Jim Brady gyrated bonus sitting in for Marjorie journalists on line is Attorney General Maura Healey she's here for ask the attorney general should take our questions and your goals. You can tweet her at B. O. S. public radio, send her an email it'd be pr W. H., Dot Org but the preferred route is the caller eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seventy more hilly. Thank you so much for joining us. Hey tammy cared out you by the way more healy. Before we start I, I usually don't like this spring this on elected officials from A. Brief, quiz for you. During the break I was I checked my twitter account and one of my favorite sites is rate my skype room, and here's how the Guy who I've had on my show. A describes a particular room. Great Kitchen. Love the colors cabinetry plates are art that grinder perfect natural light ten out of ten who's kitchen where they describing please. As my kitchen about is your kitchen and let me tell you it is lovely. I've never been there, but it is really a fine looking kitchen attorney general congratulates. I'm taking credit for something that actually isn't mine to be honest I'm at my my parents. And Yeah, no I am with you know is right over the right over the border New Hampshire. And so they I grew up I'm in seventeen, fifty, three farmhouse, and so it's a it's a it's a kitchen to that decorated in the style of that time. So yeah, I give I, give credit to my mom actually on that one Her forgetting. She I rated nine on my own or for something else. But clearly, it's mom you know. There torture torture more hill. I'm going to go from making this about you to making this about me I've been giving these ballot update says I fight my way to get my ballot for the primary I live in Boston. So this is all happening within Boston I did some sleuthing this morning I mailed my ballot on August sixth I found out today was processed on my form request form. August sixth it was processed on the eleventh and it was mailed on the seventeenth. I'm hoping I'll have it today or tomorrow, which would be a three week process that's taken me to get my primary ballot. Now, we've all been talking about the united. States. Postal Service I know that you have been paying very much attention to this and are considering a lawsuit obviously A. Lot has changed the postal services back down, with Louis, joy not executing the a lot of the measures he was taking to reconstruct the way the service operates but what are you seeing right now? Are you hearing what you ought to be hearing from the postal service because of so many people like me who are finding a really difficult to even get a ballot? Yeah boy. There's a lot in that question jared and let me give you my perspective First of all, I have tremendous faith and confidence in the men and women are letter carriers and the Postal Service here in Massachusetts I've talked to a number of them you know I and they're going to do their job and deliver the mail rain sleet snow or or fascism, which is a tweet that I saw. That actually come from some of the postal workers in their union because that's frankly what's going on with with the trumpet and his tactics and Joyce tactics as for delays right now or the time it takes for the actual processing I'm not sure that that the postal service issue. I would just encourage people though here you know the key is vote. Vote early in person go do it. If you can vote by mail, go do it but don't be deterred by the confusion or alarmist effort. You know like what's happening here in part is trump no doubt he ended joy are tinkering with things thought about those things tried to tinker things for certain extent because they actually don't want people voting by mail because that is not to their electoral advantage now, what the also are trying to do so there's that but I just say in the face of that, let's make sure that people aren't scared away from from Neyland voting. And did you work in their my apologies? My my my headset checked off from. Did you discuss litigation in that answer there? Did you not? I didn't I didn't get to it but. Jared mentioned. So the status is going to be joining tomorrow. We announced the other day that a number of SAG's we're to be suing Donald Trump to joy in the post office really to protect the post office to protect the functioning of the post office a number states are filing we anticipate filing tomorrow, but I've already announced it because I wanted to be clear with the public that that's where this is going. Now as soon as we announced that, we were going to file the next day. The joy comes out and issued a statement saying that they're going to actually not do certain things that there were sending policies but I'm not going to believe that in to. That, and until we are absolutely certain that bad things that were done to hinder operations of the post office have been rescinded you know and and fixed, and that going forward, they're not gonNA do anything to to undermine the operation of the postal service. I'm you know like you never ceases to amaze me how low this guy goes right but commence with first off to create concerning people's has the postal services problem and Then to try to mess with it. When you've got Americans who depend on that for prescription drugs and social security checks and you know everything, it's the postal service. So you know to me, we've got a support are letter carriers in the Postal Service but we gotta make sure that Donald Trump and the guy he's put in by the way this to joy who I mean, give me a break this argument they're going to make. It leaner more efficient stopped leading fiscally give me a break and by the way, nobody's talking about the fact that the joy has so many ethical issues should shouldn't even be in this position. He should absolutely resign and step down because he's still got a company that does business with a very small entity, the postal service that he he works with. So you know we're in court but but really, I think a lot of. The action here hopefully is going to happen in Congress Tomorrow to joy is going to have to appear at that hearing and you know I think will work with Congress and and we'll just push to make sure that there's absolute integrity in the elections because if there's anything regardless of what party you're in right I, don't care who you're voting for I. Just Want Your Vote to count and I don't want anybody mucking with. With your right to do that, and unfortunately that's what we've seen. So you know we're fired up about it and you know I think, will ultimately be successful in getting getting the right things done getting this reversed and having the assurance going forward. We started to see some of that yesterday with Joyce announcement but we can't take our foot off the gas I mean people are voting right now. Turning General. One of only one of the for get to the Coles 'cause lines filled up in a nanosecond. Alert to small businesses about the rent moratorium. Explaining to moratorium, it doesn't excuse the rent and the the more. The the moratorium in Massachusetts is through October seventeenth. There's a consensus that what Donald Trump did with an executive order provides virtually no protection. and. Hopefully, if necessary, the governor will extend the moratorium for foreclosures in addictions again beyond October seventeenth. But at some point, the rent the payments are going to become. Do we've all read that there could be as many as thirty million fictions around the country. We talk to Linda Downing from the Pine Street in yesterday about what the future holds with more homeless people. How are you preparing for this likely onslaught of? Addictions of small businesses and Renter's who've been understandably unable to save up their back rent during this pandemic. And you know one other small point on small businesses though it's not small to them. So, many small businesses depend on the operation of the mail for the deliberates business services to people. So another way that trump is doing a disservice to you know both business and also you know ordinary citizens. And residents so yet. The huge issue right I mean small businesses This has been such a tough time for so many small businesses and we've been out there advocating for funding for them relief from Congress and support, and we want to put together a this advisory for small businesses. Because you're right. This moratorium eventually is going to be up and the numbers are potentially. Helming right now, my office has been having a conversation directly with variety of stakeholders from housing advocates to the business community to the courts about how to manage and handle what will be on. of of addictions and and foreclosure filings Important to remember right now that the moratorium does not relieve a small business tenant from the obligation to pay rent it It's simply you know restricts the landlord's ability to evict that small business for failing to pay rent. But eventually, as you say, you know rent's GonNa be become do and so. We're part of this initiative. It's a public private initiative called small business strong could find it on our website. If you're a small business, you'll get provided free guidance and business support. Like accounting HR and operations help as well as legal help through the covid release coalition, which were a part of there's a a way to get pro bono legal assistance to. Small businesses. So small business owners out there take note to entities small business strong on. You think about the fact that so many small businesses weren't able to get those P P loans early on in part because they didn't have the lawyers and accountants CON staff to get those applications in quickly I come for Sir. So this is I think a response to that making sure that they have a better access to to support now, and then there is this legal partnership covid relief coalition providing pro bono legal assistance to our most vulnerable small businesses. The people were just have a families who are tenants doing on that front they're in the same. Way Are and you know for a long time I mean we were working hard to get word out to communities. Especially, I remember being Chelsea and in a food pantry line over there. Gladys Vegas Chelsea Collaborative And You know we're handing out supplies during your earlier days of the pandemic, and there was a gentleman in line who told me that his landlord was trying to lock them out doing a self help eviction essentially, and we were immediately able to intervene and stop that from happening. So we continue Jim Right now to fight this unlawful evictions, call my office if you're you know facing that but again, we're looking at right now what is going to happen come October come November come December and working with the courts working with Advocates would we working with the administration and? Local. Officials as well on how we best protect families from becoming homeless as we head into into the winter You know this is this why is this corona viruses? You know it's not just a a twenty twenty, one problem it's it's a twenty twenty, two problem There's a lot of There's a lot of consequence to what's happened for sure and a Lotta hurt. But call my office. If you're if you're feeling that you're the subject of an unlawful eviction for closure effort. Return a more healy she's the attorney general. She's here for the next forty five minutes. Take a Kohl's let's start with Andrew and Cambridge I andrew, you're on with more healy. Good. Morning. I am a big fan of both the Attorney General in the show Sensei question is simply With. Universities I live in Cambridge as you mentioned and I checked each of the universities. and. Each of them has their own contingency plan. Their own fiefdoms and check with this office of the city manager in Cambridge Cambridge Public Health Department. even Governor Bakers Office who's responsible for when these twenty year olds which I too. So I can speak with some authority. How does he trust these kids given that they? Get back to campus and have lived through a summer covert what they're gonNA do. Respond in the state. For. Watching what happens at universities? well, Andrew best human to your family. This is the big issue and you know I sort of see it right now it's been left to individual colleges and universities to come up with plans and different ones have taken different approaches. I think no Baker Administration continues to monitor this and We'll be working with them and I know certainly within municipalities for those that have colleges and universities within their a city or town either ongoing conversations there So that's why I know about things. It's not like there is a single uniform prescriptive plan or guidance as to what should happen I know there are some schools you know that are deciding that they're located in areas where there's more space more space within their buildings and. Therefore kids are coming back back on campus and that's obviously very different for some of the schools in the in the Boston area. Tough situation. I can't underscore though you know you're right. The caller does point to you know the specter of kids coming back and Kids kids are contracting co fit young people. I should say it will true. The kids are contracting Cova and also college students and college students are contracting covert, and so we cannot continue with a an attitude that I think I've seen through the summer. As you know, it's summertime people are outside We've got used to co- bid. We have this idea that people who are familiar to us in our bubble not necessarily. So unfortunately we. Seen spread, you know more in social sciences where people have gotten together for birthday parties for other events We really haven't seen it within the restaurant setting or the business setting off problem continues to be sort of winded win in social situations and you know I just like that to to what we're going to see in terms of behavior from students and the need to be really really vigilant and hammering home the message to. To not let up. Whom are healy next online line is Carol calling from Ipswich Carol. Well good afternoon. Carol scale born and brought up in. Springfield Massachusetts. So my question, more pertains to Springfield into the article on the front page of the Boston Globe Sunday July Twenty six where the headline read rain of brutality brings a reckoning. And then it on the next page takes a full page and discusses. Ultimately, Springfield has been found by the ACLU is one of the worst police departments in the country. What kind of priority is that Police Department have in your office and under the governor's? Watch. Yeah, well, I can't speak to under the governor's watch You know really the the city has oversight of its own police department but I can tell you what my office is done, and that is to indict thirteen springfield police officers and we're going to continue to be aggressive here. I have no tolerance for unconstitutional abuses or behaviors that frankly discredit and undermine the the honor of those who serve Then obviously, there have been any number of high profile. Incidents of. Our around the country and we've had some in Massachusetts including the the very one that my office is prosecuting now so That's what that's what I'm doing I. think that you know more broadly speaking we're in a moment. Of Opportunity really when it comes to reimagining public safety and what we need to do and I've been a strong supporter of legislation to provide uniform standards uniform. You know accountability measures really important because just training isn't enough. You need to have the ability to hold officers accountable who violate important policies and practices and the chief need that ability as well a lot you know. Still the to be worked out there. But obviously, I think new George Ford's murder and the murder of any number of innocent black lives in in recent history have rightly 'cause many including state legislatures to focus on this as well as a prosecutor's offices and you know I am certainly very much committed to ensuring that the law is followed and that people's. Rights are protected and that. kind of reforms be adopted to. Really Neat you know and serve the needs of community. Carl. Thanks have a couple of follow up questions about police if I may attorney general. Are, you. Troubled by the fact that it's now August whatever it is nineteenth, and we still don't have a reform bill out of the legislature. There was such a an alleged sense of urgency. Trouble Worrier. Well, I'd like to see it happen I think the sooner it happens the better that's that it's important to get it right to, and you know I think this has been a challenging time on a number of fronts Particularly with with what we've seen through the pandemic But I. Certainly am in in close touch with and my team is with a staff and legislators and. Stakeholders and you know I'm hoping that we can see something soon. On qualified immunity, which was a litmus test for a lot of people, the conventional wisdom is the Senate version is much stronger much tougher than the house. Do you have a preference? Well you know I think on that I'll say a few things. There are certain things that are just there that are really. Important and and that are included on in both proposals. Banning chokehold said use of force standards and creating a duty for police officers to intervene and this system which is important for certifying decertify police officers is important in terms of qualified immunity. You know I, think it's really important that we have some reform to are qualified immunity statute for police officers and both branches have. Now, as you say, pass laws to do that it's critical that something be to the governor's desk and I. Think the moment is now of for that to happen but you know I I'm glad that both the House and the Senate have included that I think though different versions. Much. Different versions. Well, I think you know you term his weaker but let's look at what is the problem that we're trying to address right I. Think this argument comes about because for a long time, there has been a feeling that win a police officer. Does something you know really bad and someone is is really hurt or even killed. Far too up in through the courts, we were seen the qualified immunity statute, the principle, a rule that basically shield certain government officials. from being sued when they break the law resulting in no accountability or Less, accountability for police officers and I think that's you know that should be the focus here rather than something that in broad strokes in ends or shields. Immunity, actually. Provides immunity. In maybe instances that Eliminates immunity maybe instances where it's not gonNa send were be helpful. So I just say that to Jim that I think it's important that we focus on what it is that that we're really trying to address here, and that's why I the change to focusing particularly on abuses by police officers Is is is the right focus you know? Very, quickly, if we can, we'll get back to the calls speaking of police in different kind of setting. I'm reading the story in the globe about this latest case on overtime pay fraud and reading. This is just a couple of days ago and reading yet again, tens of thousands of emails have mysteriously disappeared because of the switch and email programs in two thousand eighteen and by my reading and Mike Chronological Analysis I. Think I'm right about this all of this disappearance happened after. These cops were under. Investigation. Is this The emails mysteriously disappear and these cases are going to disappear. Within what's what's going to happen here? This is my case I mean know the Prosecution. So we had a vested interest in getting to the bottom of this you know. But, are you buying this notion that they just disappeared because the the software program changed in twenty? Eighteen. Well, let me let me be clear. Okay. What was reported comes from a recent filing in emotion to dismiss by. Our target by that defendants council right and so he is saying that his client who worked for the State Police believes that the state of police remember he's being prosecuted for fraud and he's now saint through his defense counsel that you know Oh, it's m. s. p. screwed up a bunch of emails have gone missing emails by the way which may absolve me of my alleged. Crimes. So just remember it's an advocacy piece by a defense attorney WHO's trying to get his client off the hook I understand that my office will be responding to these claims shortly with a filing court but for the record, my office has every interesting getting these emails from MSG as well. If they existed early on, actually it was my office that led the effort to identify any additional email. So we'll see what we find, but either way you know I'm GONNA always look to hold those accountable who need to be held held accountable. In this case it's with respect to to Mr Keith and certainly if there were problems within procedures, you know we identify that and and address it But that's the state of things there. And there's also a separate MSP matter folks probably saw reported There's a report of a top burner who was a twenty seven year veteran force, and he retired after initial probe into allegations that he schedule himself for assignment without getting authorization, and so this was the subject of an. Internal. Investigation ongoing investigation by MSP and my office for the record stands ready and willing to look into any referrals from MSP as we have in the past I mean as you know we've gone after any number of police members for alleged the fry there's overtime or in other realms attorney general returning to our calls. Now next is Gary from switch hi Gary a little gory. It's what you get. Heavy north. Switch. Guy. General Helium calling about Massachusetts open, meaning form of municipal government. Mass General Chapter Thirty nine section ten requires select boards to place articles submitted by citizen petitions on posted town meeting warrants. To my knowledge there's no state law. That says select boards can deny articles submitted by duly elected and appointed town officers, boards, and committees from posted. Town meeting warrant. So my question is. Would select board right to deny articles require a town meeting approved charter or Bylaw amendment. So, what have you do on this in is on the line. The good news is we have a division of open government that regularly answers and handles these kinds of questions also complaints about open meeting law violations, which is folks no law that was passed a few years ago and that my office has enforcement over. So if you want to if you stay on the line and leave your number, I'll have my chief give you a callback. Do that please show that sort of. Leader would be the municipal law unit, but I'm happy to speak with the folks that you. Tend me to. Dr Don't go. Away. Losers. Together so we'll make sure you get get you the answer. Attorney General One more thing before we take a break and then we'll continue at eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, I guess it's the monthly question. What's the status and expected drop date of your investigation into the? Deaths and more at the holyoke soldiers home. Yeah. We've made a lot of progress over the last month team continues to work incredibly hard my team prosecutors, investigators, warriors, and You know we just continue to work through it. Jim so I hope to be out with something soon, and I'm sorry I can't report more than that I. also want folks to know that we continue to be in touch with those who are operating the home right now because ongoing safety is. Really important to me, and you know I just want folks to know we're looking at what happened before. But also making sure that we're following closely what's happening now because we want this folks to be protected staff as well as a course. the men who were there in the home. One last thing about this I assume this can probably disclose answer. I was really troubled by the fact that said this on the air before we made a request here on television and I know we're not alone in the media to speak to Mr Perlstein who conducted the investigation, which is the only one that's been completed by the governor's office Mr Perlstein said he could only appear with permission of the governor's office and we have not been able to get permission I've never heard anything quite like this. The investigator cannot answer questions he wasn't the press conference when the governor. Summarize the report have your people spoken to Pearl thing is he at least available to your investigators even if he isn't available to the breast? Absolutely Okay. Your prostate has been We've had multiple conversations with having and have had access to to what he had as well. So that is all working as it as it should. Attorney General Maura Healey's with us taking our questions and yours the conversation continues on eighty nine seven W. G.. B. H.. Boston public radio. Back to Boston public radio, JIM rally jarred bones sitting in for Marjorie. If you're just doing an Attorney General Maura Healey's here for ask the G. she'll be with us to the bottom of the hour you well, you can't give her a call right now the lines are full but when one opens up, it's Eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seventy email is be pr. At W. G. B. H. Dot Org Attorney General, a lot of people are looking back right now at the two thousand eleven police killing of Yuri stamps in Framingham. He was a sixty eight year old black man who was killed inside his home by a member of a Swat team they had been looking for his son who it seems was outside he was shot in the head. In light of what we've seen across the country people are now taking a second look at this This event at the investigation that ensued and are asking for more to be done that maybe this investigation should be reopened. What is your stance on that case? Well I, just WANNA say at the outset there is. NO DOUBT THAT MR stamps died under? Tragic. And devastating circumstances I mean he was the father I think he was a grandfather to. Fifteen and a great grandfather my heart goes out to his family I've I've spoken to Middlesex, district attorney, Marian Ryan who was not the district attorney at the time. Of His death she has pledged to take a look at this case and I know that she is as dedicated as I am to ensuring transparency and public confidence around these investigations. So I have full confidence that she'll do that. In this case why is she doing it? Well, District Attorney's office has have the statutory authority to investigate deaths and so I think appropriate for her to do. So now and I certainly will continue to talk with her We've talked to those who are rightly and understandably organizing in protest to bring attention to Mr Stamps's death, and we're gonNA continue to talk to them You know in some of what some of what we see you know is is is playing out right now through the policing reform legislation that and we were talking about earlier. So we go back to the calls Aaron, you're in Maldon, your attorney, General Maura Healey. Welcome to the show. Hi. Hi. Thank you for taking my call I'm taking a long shot by asking. Like they can get. Also. all question regarding dependent care flexible spending account. And maybe there is something to be done on a state level people don't families freezing. Upper hundreds of dollars that have all that's already been crude and they are dependent your accounts. And dependent care accounts would cover things like how account or actual Dan's. My India on. canceled. With learning on The summer camp but. Back in April or maybe we're in a very different place and where we are now where we believe that are typically going back to school or. Something to see. But now that s all gone so. My family and I can't believe I received. Mine the only family predicament where we'd say not with the hope of getting reimbursed for programs that would still go ahead. All but now have nothing and. We can to. Leave a lot of money because. There's nothing to. GET REIMBURSED FOR I earn if I may you're calling about dependent care which I think it's a fabulous question because obviously forfeit the money, I. Think we all know and flexible spending accounts. We can expand it to healthcare attorney general. That's okay with you are and because a lot of people aren't feeling comfortable to go to their doctors or nurses or whatever healthcare providers, which means they may not spend that full amount either which would under normal circumstances before. That's a great question what what's The answer? Yeah so Yeah. Definitely. How Healthcare? Like, the healthcare goal posts have been moved with more to be more flexible than depending care. About Journal the Yeah I. Mean I think I think this is. This is something that we can take a look at maybe as a matter of advocacy advocacy right I think that you know I think that would errands talking about so many families are. Under so much pressure right now and just barely hanging on you know with kids at home and work from home and aging parents, and you know so much worry and seems to me that as a policy matter we state ought to be looking to do as much as we can to provide that flexibility protect people's pocketbooks as best we can, and certainly you know. We spent a lot of time over the last several months on pocketbook issues, right where people were Couldn't get refunds back for trips that were canceled or school programs that were canceled or. Even, gym memberships right I mean today we're working a lot on on weddings. People who who are out a lot of money on wedding deposit. and this is similar. I mean, what are the ways that we can and should use this time right now given what we know to change policies to better support families economically and provide them with the flexibility that they need. The point about people going to healthcare. Jim is also something that I just WanNa. Again, show my support for Telehealth I think that we have found new ways of doing things and I support legislation now to make telehealth permanent because I think a lot of people whether it's through, you know senior therapist or behavioral health needs war you know getting a medical consultation people have been actually able to access healthcare and it's worked out. Well not for everything in every instance but. That's just something that I think we really gotTa make make permanent and I know that our hospitals and healthcare centres and community health care centers are working very hard to get people feeling comfortable to come back and you know I really encourage people if you're feeling sick if you feeling like you have an issue, don't wait. You know you don't WanNa wait until it's too late I can assure you the safety of of the healthcare facilities and it'll be at the many conversations that I've had and Aaron. That was the F. A.. I? Didn't mean to get on a soapbox and take that in a few directions. But I, guess, the topic you know if I may I applaud, the problem that earned has I'm assuming attorney general is one that tons of parents have that they're you know under the user, lose it provision in these things they're going to lose it because the services just aren't available to spend money on within the finite time period seems to me that whether. It's legislatively or in some fashion, the ability of your office legislature to protect probably thousands of people like Aaron is I. Think it's a great topic Jim. I. Just it hadn't. You know of all the things that it just hadn't come on my screen yet. So I'm really glad she raised it. As you say I don't know that I can just you know but but we have a one and make that happen or is it just a matter of a regulatory? Changer. All this is that we gotta make us. You know we gotta do all. We can to provide families with flexibility that they need in in these difficult times, and that may be a really good thing to do more. He'll let me ask you list a little bit actually. I, feel like a here growing concern over the last couple of weeks especially with this return to school of students and families wondering why they're paying the full amount what they were paying before if they don't have access to facilities if they're not living on campus I got an email from an art student not too long ago. Asking me look into that for him that he's paying full tuition, but he doesn't have access to the equipment He doesn't have access to studio space. Is that something that you're? Comes under your purview or the you're starting to consider as well. I think you know we're starting to look at that I mean to be honest. It's very fact dependent and I'm not sure that you know there's anything illegal or unlawful about what in. Are Doing institutions who you know as we know many are are financially stretched themselves So it's just a really it's really difficult and complicated issue and one where there aren't any great answers but I certainly understand that predicament you know that that that person feels he's in Because the experiences obviously. It's it's it's a different qualitatively different I i. don't know it depends on. The particular circumstances, school and program that one is in but. I I hear you. Go back to your calls in Margaret Calling from Weymouth. Hi Margaret Margaret. Hello Monterey you've talked to me before but this time I have a question We have sources that have indicated that enbridge gas will turn on the ninety nine percent built compressor station before they get their air quality permit as you know, it was vacated on June third. Will Your Office responded in any way if enbridge goes ahead, turns this thing on without an air permit. Yeah let me go back and talk to my team about that Margaret You know I assume lead have real concerns about that. But let me go back and speak with them. Mortgage. Thank you. So much for the call eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eight, nine, seven we're gonNA Wilburn we're Rachel's on the phone I. Rachel should. Oh. Hi I appreciate all of you. Hi, I'm calling about housing assistance and specifically the raft program I'm wondering what the status is of that I submitted my. July first, which was the first the very first day and I included all the documents. Anyway I've been emailing back and forth with them the last time a month ago and I don't I don't know what's going. This is the homelessness. Prevention. Program right is that what rift is the homelessness prevention programs for assistance with with mortgages and rents pandemic related? General Yeah. No. I you know what? The actual current amount of funds in that account is I don't know the answer to that. It's not an. Ag Office run program that said it's an important program. If you WANNA stay on the line because we're happy to take your number and I can have somebody on my team follow up with the program and find out you know and their. Family. This is a profoundly in. Program Initiative because people. People are hurting and we cannot have Massachusetts families made homeless as a result of CO FIT You know related -ly my office. Announced last week or really significant effort where we were down on the exceeding the south shore, and this is a housing discrimination investigation and basically revealed through testing that there were a number of real estate agents and brokers and property managers who were discriminating against. Those who held housing vouchers whether a section eight or other vouchers and no. This is exactly why we do the work in the Attorney General's office because those doctors are there for a reason to help families keep from becoming homeless, and so that was a big announcement last week where we were able to reach. A resolution that's going to end those practices results in a payments to tenants and voucher holders who are discriminated against. But more than anything I'm just raising it as an issue that is an example of the kind of work that we need to do in the office and certainly support the efforts of folks like the caller who were just trying to access much-needed funding during this time. Rachel please stay on hold one of our producers will get your information, give it to the Attorney General's office. Thank you from us. Thanks Rachel. Right next is polly calling from Somerville High Pauley Pauley. Thank you attorney general. Thank you everybody for all that you're doing during the terrible. the reason I actually called a year ago when my house in Somerville I burned, it was a major fire, a lot of structural damage and the everything in the house, which was a lot of airlines and antics and other artwork was declared a total loss. And the Insurance Company has paid dumb. But not by all means O of what is owed to me and it's a very expensive has to rebuild because large and complicated. and now they are doing me which is just so mind boggling. Understand how that's even possible for them to sue their own insured person their own client, but they're doing me to force me to go to what the hell, the records, which kind of. very highly structured arbitration and it enclosed a huge of money. And work on my part. To get ready and it's kind of all consuming and hugely time consuming and takes away from the time I need to put into actually rebuilding a house and trying to. Salvage what's left is my family heirlooms and so on. So just wondering if there are any recourse in the situation, have you ever heard of such a thing before and is there anything else that can be done? Well, policy Glad you called again and It, the good news is I. Haven't Insurance Division in my office and they regularly take calls from people who are having difficulties. Challenges with their insurance company and yes, I you can believe it. They have been instances where insurers have sued insured. So stand the line, polly will get your number and I'll make sure that our insurance a division follows up. With you we can see if we can. Give you some give you some help or their. A police stick around attorney general. I'm. Fiction do you have what oversight of nonprofits is the Attorney General's office. We have a nonprofit. Charities Division. So we have oversight. So a couple of questions about things recently in the news that I'm sure you and most of our listeners read about the head to bring him in women's we read in some terrific reporting the globe. Made millions of stock in Maderno. We've all learned about Moderna at the same time that she's running the hospital ultimately stepped down from the board. We read that she was warned about potential conflicts of interest as long ago two, thousand, fourteen, she writes an op. And in several newspapers arguing against drug controls pricing and fails to disclose that. She sits on the board. Of a such companies do have either jurisdiction or interest. In To into that issue and what power would you have if you did look? into her continued tenure. Jim We look at issues of of corporate of aboard governance right and the behavior board members behavior of it is on nonprofits. That's part of the work that we do. We also regularly receive filings from not for profits and you know make sure that that people aren't stealing. If we hear examples of people embezzling funds, for example, from a football program, we'll we'll get after that here you. Know this is something that we certainly looked into you know as as as as far as so just for background to for callers lated to the some of the the trials for Covid vaccine right and I think there were eighty seven sites or more chosen all over the country understand those which isn't blindly the Brigham did end up as one of those safe and based on on Based on that there were immediately protocols put into place that completely cut off the Brigham President and CEO from having anything to do with the operation of the trial including the award of the trial is one of those was eighty seven sight. So That's you know we feel like we've done our review there were satisfied with. The positions taken and the way. Releasing numerous races. Oh, you're back stand AMAC okay okay. I understand you know the importance of making sure that people have confidence that there is a proper governance happening within the Board of a nonprofit and that there's no undue influence either way. But on this one, we're we're satisfied. Enough. Let's go back to the goals. Go to row calling from native Cairo they wrote. Well. Hi, thanks for taking my call. Sure. So I'm a real estate agent out and. Metro West in Greater. Boston and I understand everybody's wanting to protect the tenants from fiction etc I know this is a very consumer friendly state Attorney General. My problem is with dealing with landlords that I work with they are pretty upset they're not getting their rent's they're afraid of renting to people that are maybe going to come into their properties and stop paying for whatever reason, and I'm wondering what protections I can assure them with so that they move forward with what I feel are viable strong tenants so that they don't get birds of the other random. They're telling me they were afraid. Yeah and what's the alternative I mean they don't. I mean. They obviously need the run I would think they'd want to take people on, but they don't want to run a risk. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Exactly. It is a risk for them. We all know it well row. This is a tough situation I mean I. Don't I think that the moratorium was put in place I had I strongly supported it because you didn't want people. You know who were laid off who who had hours cut back who got sick and who weren't able to pay the rent or make them mortgage find themselves out on the streets, right? What the will run. Right, and you know I realized that puts a hurt landlords right many of whom need those rent payments just to pay their on mortgages on the property. brightness in their income as well. Exactly, what I don't think he's right is Extent, anybody who's come in who can pay and who isn't paying or is overstaying a short term rental or rental, for example, to take advantage and try to hide behind the protection of the Moratorium Law That's you know that's hurt unfairly some landlords. So I don't have a good answer for you row except to say we are going to be through this soon in terms of the the end of the moratorium period and I think that you know you're just going to have to work individually with with those landlords to you know tell them that it is. There are tenants. who need housing who will pay and it's just the risk calculus that they're going to have to make as to how much they need that that rent versus you know forgoing rentals at all at this point. So it's not a great answer for you row, but it's the best. I'm just being honest with with the state of play, and again, this is why we need Congress to act. We still need more stimulus funds. You know we still need help in our state for families for small businesses on housing and for a local and state governments. So I wish you the best in. In what what you're trying to do Row Thank you. Sorry. I'm sorry. We ended it's our fault. We inadvertently cut her off my apologies row. It's on US giving my realm right anymore. Make sure she if she's got a follow question, she can get it to me off. If you emailed US right. I'm sorry she hung up actually so it wasn't our fault, but so we don't need to give it out. So, Attorney General Let's ask you about the convention that's underway right now obviously, this is a very different time. It's a virtual convention. We've seen two nights so far launching with a major speech that people are still talking about from Michelle. Obama. How is this feeling to you this moment the Democratic Party has to shore up its base bring people together but in a way that we've not seen before. You know I think it's great and of all the announcement of Harris, on the ticket I thought was just so positively. By a real cross section of people I, know Kamla I worked with her when she was Attorney General I worked with her actually when I was working in the Attorney General's office before I became attorney general and you know we're friends I've let respect for her I. think she is a perfect choice and I think you know it's understandable I people are just Going into this virtual convention week, I actually was like. House is going to be i. mean you know aren't we all tired of zoom calls in this world we live in at some point it's like are people really GonNa Watch, but I have to say I've found it a heck of a lot more entertaining watching it engaging you know watching it this way I thought last night when they're doing the roll call that was cool down within their faith. And shut out to representative Claire Cronin. Right you know. Who you know put put Biden forward from Massachusetts I just thought that was cool. You know when you see Guam and you see Montana and you see somebody in a field in Kansas and you know that was cool. I think the way they've kept things short like less is more and you're not just looking at the same convention room which is exciting having been. There's an air of electricity it's exciting. I think it gets old for people at home and I think that being able to see people to in their homes you know it just it just makes makes a to me a much better product. What do I know but I, actually think it's first off a much better way to show the democratic policy, the platform who we are, who are the people we fight for you know what we're trying to represent and I think it's a way to Also, you know get people get people excited, which is sort of the point of this whole exercise I mean I have no idea what the Republicans are going to do I. Can't wait for that We just have about a minute. Left but I it just occurred to me that I realized that you're the first person we've spoken to on air at least who knows Kamala Harris personally and has spent time with her. What can you tell us that we say about her date that the people haven't talked about publicly. I think people should know she's a real person. She's super warm She's a great colleague got along well with Republicans and Democrats actually people know about her relationship with Bo Biden You know we we joke around like a couple a month ago we were doing a women, lawyers, women, lawyers for Biden event together, and you know she just is is a really real person. Also. You know. Yes. She was a prosecutor, d. a. g., but she did a lot of really progressive criminal justice reform. I've heard her in rooms I've learned from her I've talked to her about you know her initiatives within the state of California. So extent there folks in are pretty for example, concerned about that you know I people have have no worry and. In, she'll bring a wealth of experience particularly because she was an ag you know we're the ones fighting the the big Pharma out there on the OPIOID crisis we're the ones that went after the investment banks when the meltdown started with subprime mortgages years ago, we're the ones who've been there Freddie for immigrant immigrants in Dhaka and you know defending the affordable care act and You know you get the kind of calls it I get right on your show like Carmela is somebody who has lived in the the. Real world and I think she's a class act and I think it's really exciting for for the party. So but before we go is interesting, you say that you endorse her in the what you do in terms of criminal justice reform because one of the few criticisms I've read about her was that she was not nearly as progressive on some of these polices shoes as attorney general when she had the power as she has been as a senator, we're all she has is a vote you think the criticism is unwarranted. I think that people that I know there's more to it. First of all, when you're a DA orangey with criminal prosecution responsibility, you gotta carry that out. You know it's not a political job and I. also specifically raise that Jim because me as somebody who's been a progressive prosecutor as an attorney general I think in in the positions I've taken I. Just want people to know that I am vouching for for her on that and that you know I I think that also it is true that through time you learn more we've learned more a lot over the last ten to fifteen years about policing and what really makes sense. In terms of serving public safety. So much of it is around substance use disorder mental health. You know, how do you really care for those Boehner community? So she gets that she's the one I remember being in a room with her six years ago small room we were talking we were talking about the tie between she was making the connection between literacy rates of third graders right and whether or not they were going to end up in jail or onto college, and you know the way she talked about those things the way she sees connections you know she gets it and she's the one I worked with most recently along with Senator Warren This whole idea about giving attorneys-general the authority to do investigations of police departments right because you've got bill bar and justice. Department. That isn't doing a guy thing except undermining all constitutional norms and values certainly not doing their job. So we went to senator. Harris to say, can you give us a Jesus forty on investigating and prosecuting police brutality and other abuses? So you know that's old old story from Kamla and then my most recent conversations that I've had with her you know about. Six weeks ago. What was that about? No that was on police. Would you take a job with administration if it was offered to you if it was the right one? Oh God I you know I live. Let that be the problem right let that be an issue We gotta do everything. We can make sure that Joe Biden Nicola Harrison are in the White House that we take back the Senate and get rid of Mitch, McConnell's leadership and that we hold onto the house and I say that, yes, is a Democrat but I said if somebody really is concerned about all the damage that has been done the last four years and the need to take this country back and take it forward. Attorney General thanks for your time. Very generous. We'll talk to you again soon. Thanks. Great. Great to be with you. Both take care of your mother. She's got a great pitch and by the way to. I our? Inside the way I. Hope So. Attorney General Maura Healey joins US every month, for ask the AG coming out. We're talking about Zombie CICADAS A- poly-amorous frog, and lobsters who socially distance could only mean one thing. It's time for the afternoon with Simon Gumri. She's next on eighty nine, seven WGC Boston public radio. pull. Welcome back to Boston public radio jared bowing from artery. I'm Jim Brown every time this next guest joins us. I say, thank goodness. US Line the leader, a monthly edition of the afternoon zoo conversation at the intersection of animal and human animal behavior sign Montgomery. Of Courses Journalists naturalists, and it'd be pure contributor. Latest Grade Book is Condor Comeback Side. It's great to talk to. Great with you. So we decided that we were so much bad news. We would start with the good news we'll save the murder Hornet. and. So last night actually, I was having a socially distanced dinner with a couple of friends and your email came through with your picture of pictures of baby turtles. He stopped the table because we can't we just had to I held up the phone didn't pass the phone around just to show that the friends your turtles that you're working with with a turtle rescue league. The baby turtles tell us about this, oh man. Well this is really great news 'cause baby turtles of lots of different species are hatching right now all over New England and each one of these guys is literally a little miracle because they've already beaten such incredible. Hans, just to be born a lot of people don't know but everything turtle eggs, raccoons and skunks and dogs and aunts and trees even turtle eggs, they'll send their roots into the drink their fluids. So. Just getting out of your Ekg, which can take up to three days and isn't exhausting process. You have beaten so many odds, but there's a lot ahead for these baby turtles. They are so strong and brave and with out their parents anywhere near to help them, they know just what to do and they have often very long treks to get water, and this is where we can help them. Because if you see a baby turtle crossing the road, you just pick up and take him across but do not take him home i. know they're so adorable but I want to remind people that nature is not just a free pet. Store, and these guys need very very specific things to grow healthy and strong, and it's difficult for a person to be able to raise a healthy and and happy baby turtle. We get a lot of them at the Turtle Rescue League who were kidnapped essentially from the wild and have all kinds of health problems. Even you know people who love them and wanted to help them but they have sheldon formulas and they have also like some kind of mental disabilities because they didn't get to learn stuff they needed to learn in their food was not right but they are starling babies I actually I had one hatch in my hand yesterday. I feel like. Oh Gosh. It's really great Hair is somebody who. I was having snappers hatching in my hand and they're round those eggs around they're not egg-shaped. In, the little guy comes out and he's shaped like the egg. He's cut this tall dome of a of a of a show which flattens out within hours and I when they start to hatch. Hole for their nose and their little eye peeks out and some of them look out and they think, oh, I don't like what I see they stopped for awhile. But some of them just rip out of the eggs like rockets and this little guy after he got the little hole where he could breathe and he looked out one hand came out and then another hand came out and then he's kind of sitting there with the back end of the shell on like kind of a big diaper and then you shut out right across my hand and you know this guy can live to be if everything's perfect one, hundred, seventy, five years old. So you are holding future in your hand. He Simon country what's an egg tooth? Oh. Isn't this cool well, there as rare as hen's teeth. The only tooth that a baby turtle that a turtle will ever have his whole life and it's this little bump that they use to hammer they way out of the inside of the egg and eventually it goes away within just a couple of days of hatching but you can see on an infant this little tiny white like Dada thing that they use their born with that tool that then disappears. People be mentioned the turtle rescue. My kid my kid actually went to cause the Rica a couple years ago to do something on beaches with. Turtles Hatching in the. were. Guard like helping them get to the C.. Backwards to the way, the hotel lights were. Whatever was. Exultant it was just it great but can real people particularly in the middle of pandemic. Volunteer. See this or is this off limits for people except like you right now they're not having people inside the building but they desperately need runners. Because when a turtle is injured or when a baby turtle is discovered and the person realizes, Oh, I can't raise this but I've had it for a couple of weeks and I don't know what to do they. They need people who will get in their car and pick up that injured or stolen turtle and bring it to the Turtle Hospital and they really need people to do that yesterday while it was there, we had no fewer than three calls. About. The turtles one two of them had fish looks in one of them had been hit by a car. and. If it's not just right next to the trail rescue league and somebody who's there can't run out and get it. This serves like. Much of New England all of Massachusetts and even into New Hampshire. So. Why are they gonNA, live one hundred seventy five years. Cy Montgomery. I think they know how to take life as low? As we. GonNa. Be I'm assuming you or your colleagues have written volumes about the longevity of these creatures. What's the secret? And is it transferable? I it's not transferable that we know I'm sure that all the rich people would have done it. But. I give a lot of thought to to the passage of of time in organisms and how they experience it and why some animals live for a really long time I mean not all turtles can live that long some can live longer some can live. Hundreds of years but it it has to do with how fast your cell metabolize. Now, part of the reason that many turtles can live such a long time is that they spend a lot of time hibernating. A lot of time under the under the earth. In fact, baby painted turtles the ones that most people call son turtles you know because they're sitting out sunning on logs are the most common ones that you'll see. Those guys are hatching now. They will spend all of fall and winter underground. The minute they hatch they don't come up out of the earth they stay down there usually for awhile species it takes a year off like maybe twenty twenty off to underneath. A good idea we should do that yeah. Yeah. And I also wonder you know is their experience of the world like. This is really dragging for me with octopuses. You know they only live three to five years and that just seems insanely fast and there's little animals like like shrews who's an and hummingbirds with really fast heartbeats and they generally don't live all that long shrews definitely don't live that long hummingbirds can live for a little bit decent time but every to everything there is a season, right? So. I hope that you know for for these creatures who have short lives that they still feel finished in incomplete. What's GONNA sign Montgomery sounds like there's a Brazilian frog that's making the most of its time. Whatever time it has. Isn't this great I I love. I love. My poor husband I. He often comes in and sees me watching sex videos of animals but it's my job you know Yeah this is. Jim. Do I ever. Do you turn on the sound and I'm like I know what that is those are paying as meaning. That sound had been wafting up until my husband's office one day wondering what that was anyway. Yeah. This this this discovery was just reported of this Brazilian frog who does this thing hasn't never before been seen in into begins. And he's a loyal husband and father, but two or three females who all live nearby. And I love the story. I love all of these stories just because it it shows us that there's of perfectly good ways to mate. Maybe, we haven't even thought about yet. Is there actually didn't you in your note to US mentioned I hope I got this right? There's some sort of male fish that actually lives inside the body. Of the female is that right? Yeah. It's an anglerfish and they they this particular species of Anglerfish, which is the large group of fishes many species. This particular group lives in really deep dark water and you know how hard it is fun to date during the pandemic. Well, if you live in the depths of the darkest see, it's really hard to find a mate. So what the male has done to solve the problem is he boroughs into the female skin and for the longest time scientists kept pulling these things out of the depths of the sea and saying, Oh, there's nothing but females, but they have some horrible parasite attached to the well at horrible parasite is their husband. and. So, he gets his nutrients from her bloodstream. But in return when it's time for her lay eggs, she doesn't have to search around for a male to fertilize them. So can we before we leave this topic because I know that the sexual mores of animals or particular interest to U. N. actually by extension to me and maybe jared. Frog thing that you were talking about. How Housing WHO decides that? I'm going to go study the sexual. Adventurous nece for lack of better expression diversity of I'm serious about this of a frog in Brazil, and then is able to discern based on some level of observation that it's got multiple female. Partners I mean it is rather odd. Does it non well I? It's certainly interesting as you know being an accountant with me. And you know slogs frogs have very interesting. Sex Lives. They have seven known mating positions. Including, one that female reaches backwards with her legs to grasp on the males in this other while you don't want WanNa. Well, maybe you do. But they they're they're really interesting for that reason and to be able to sit in a beautiful rain-forest, these particular Brazilian frogs they live in seeps which are what's Rocky, habitats. And they're they're they're hard to come by I. Think which is probably why the the this meeting system has developed because the females. Kind of have to share and the males will defend the their habitat. They have these these spine studded. Thumbs in these big. Forearms and they jab their thumbs at rivals to poke them away when they've found a really good rocky habitat lay eggs in. So this is this is why you would consent to having a co wife or or even to co wives, and frequently one of the female frogs is the dominant one like the favored life but. Because, the CPS are so hard to come by lay eggs in. It's it's worth it. Having to share your. Your your mate with one or two other females. Apparently it is. Interesting, she's she's kind of in control the through the whole thing anyway that she's she's she kind of identifies did I read that correctly that she gets? She certainly knows who were made is yeah absolutely and she knows who the CO wives are. I mean of course they do it's hard for people you know looking at frogs looking at many species, people may have trouble. Recognizing individuals because they say, Oh, they all look alike. But recognizing individuals which used to be discouraged in. Sciences in each solidarity in the behavioral sciences used to be discouraged. But it's essential because without. Who We'd never discover behaviors like this. Second. Why was it discouraged? Why was it discouraged? So for the longest time, this is like prior to well nineteen sixty basically when Jane Goodall. Went into the field study the chimpanzees Gumby. People wanted to find out the animal behavior. So first of all, you never named your study animals. You did not look at individual differences. Jane's first papers were rejected because she named the chimps instead of numbering them like rocks because it was thought that you just wanted to find out. How does HMO behavior? How did the V. Chip Behave? Not? It really matters that this one is dominant and that one is is submissive and this one is is bossy and this one is kind that this one is so successful at raising babies because she's so gentle. So but where does that come from because if you distinguish, you're giving too much respect to what? The big boys considered to be lesser species is that what came from or what get might have come from it and it also may have come from. an attempt to be seen as objective. So if you look at animals like they were objects. You could be objective view would not fall in love with them and you wouldn't be accused of for more fighting. But of course, you know we're anthropoids. all of our behaviors arose from our ancestors who were. Chimps I mean basically were we're fellow eight Suicide Montgomery moving deeper into the water. They might not be poly amorous but sharks like to have friends. It seems then got some buddies. I thought that was so cool These this. Chart you know people. Think that they're these cold-blooded. UNFEELING creatures. They're smart. They do have a social arrangement. It's been shown in other studies that sharks get depressed. Now I'm they can be happy. This particular study just came out it was done at the Predator Ecology and conservation lab at Florida International University and they studied Grey Reef Sharks in this eight toll in the Pacific between Hawaii and Fuji, and they put transmitters on forty-one sharks and two of them had like video shark camps, and they tracked these animals for four years and they found that the same groups of sharks. which could be from two to twenty individuals would return to the same part of the same reef over and over again together. And that they stayed friends for the whole four years. And Gosh. There's there's a lot of Americans who don't keep. And they're not sure. What all they're getting out of this I mean friendship. Helps. Survival and this is why you know. We have friends and why apes and monkeys and horses and elephants in Wales and candles and hyenas all have friends is why humpback whale females have friends and remained friends for years? They've they've found with humpbacks that the humpbacks who stay with their besties. Raise more young successfully because when you hang out together and help each other, you can find food and care for your babies together and so they think that these. Sharks have friends that might help them. Find Food. By the way you're choosing not to tell us how many sexual positions they use them for years together. Are. You figuring save that for next for Nice well, say that I actually sharks have a hard time meeting because when you don't have any hands and you have to hold onto your mate and they're all slippery, you know you kind of have to bite them. So, That's why females sharks actually a lot of them have thicker skin or around the areas where the males will bite them to hold on. They make. It really is true. Yeah Unbelievable. So Simon were. So Cy only because jared let the something out of the bag I I read the same thing about what are they called Murder Hornets or whatever these Asian giant Hornets I read that they found seventy one and why do I care I mean? Who cares that they're seven on Mizzou's because if their seven of them, they could be seven million over them at some point is that Could be a lot more of them It's so interesting when they found this, this was the first male seventh one. They said Yeah and they set up eighteen hundred traps and this is I mean with eighteen hundred traps they found. This guy and. They were there. Yeah. Okay. Right around puget sound and the guy of course was delighted. because once you once. You got to find these guys you WanNa, find a live one, and you want to put a tracker on it and it will go to the nest, and then you can wipe out the nest and the the reason that we don't like them. Is there an alien species from southeast? Asia. They're called Yak killers. And Yeah can two thousand pounds. So that does make it sound kind of scary. They kill honeybees, they decapitate them they're not particularly aggressive like the. Bees that everybody was really afraid of but if they do sting you, it's extremely serious and they can sting over and over and over. But I should tell people that there's a and they're very large two inches long So they were delighted to find it because this gives them a better chance to track them back to the nest. so that they can eradicate that nest before this spring's babies grow up to breed into spurs in the fall but we do have in New England something that a lot of people see and they think Oh my God the murder weren't at their here. And it's not a Hornet it's a wasp. It's big and I don't know if you've ever seen this thing but. Oh, it's over an inch over niche laws and in a lot of bees to our is a lot of members of the you know. Hyman after family they look similar if you see a really big. Be Washed for Horny. It makes people very nervous but this thing is called the CICADA killer wasp and it hurts no one except for the Kedah and it's a harmless though sil- digger wasp. If you picked it up or stepped on it, it would sting you but it's no worse than honeybee but we don't have to worry in New England about murder Hornets. If you see something that you think looks like Oh my God that is one giant be that's probably what it is. Enough size always loved every minute. Of. Your time. Great talking with you. See you soon. Signed Montgomery is journalists naturalist and a beef contributor. She joins US every month for the afternoon zoo and her latest book is Condor. Comeback Well thank you for listening to another edition of Boston public radio. Of course, you can keep us up with US twenty, four seven by way of our podcast on itunes tune in tomorrow. For Senator, Elizabeth Warren Andrea Cabral for an order and Paul revel on all things education. Our crew is Chelsea merged June sings matthews. Hannah usually Aidan Connolly. Our engineers, John Cloth Parker or off site engineers are miles smith and Dave Goldstein with coming up on. Greater. Boston Tonight Governor Deval Patrick is going to join me about all the obvious things I wanNA can lay out the list but he'll be with will nell. You're Rivera was the chief strategist very unimpressed these congressional campaign and she's got a great segment in this new collection of essays called turnout mobilizing voters in an emergency to makes pretty strong case that the coronavirus. Crisis presents this almost once in a lifetime opportunity to dramatically change American politics expand the Progressive Base. So she will lay out her case. We're also going to talk about how minority owned businesses really got the short end of the stick how when it came to these federal lung programs for small businesses sets ninety seven. Well. He's been great to be with you yet again to have. Yeah again I'm Jerry. Jim Bradley. We'll be back tomorrow. We hope you are to have a great afternoon by.

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BPR Full Show 9/8/20: Suspension and Disbelief

Boston Public Radio Podcast

2:45:41 hr | 10 months ago

BPR Full Show 9/8/20: Suspension and Disbelief

"Support for Boston public radio comes from literally farms committed to transforming the way food is grown in New England fresh lettuce harvested daily in Massachusetts all year round. It's the local lettuce locals love learn more at little league farms dot Com. Ahead on Boston Public Radio Star with a national story from Huntington, Avenue Eleven kids kicked out of northeasterner thirty, six, thousand dollars tuition forfeited for Covid nineteen violations. We'll get your reaction then when Anna's Kanter hits the Court with the Celtics he's thinking about more than Basketball Kenneth Jerseys Lazy were freedom, and this year the NBA playoffs isn't just about winning but sending a message few minutes we'll talk NBC sports reported trenches Merrick about. Now listen tresor out. Sandra Lukashenko is desperately trying to think power as the opposition's admit, grows with thousands taking to the streets Lushenko resorting to common tropes of strongman's play books, mass arrests, a tight control, the media, and a promise to trample on protesters while the people Belarus arising out president trump is staying silent with here more with joined by Wbz News analyst Charlie Senate that Moore's ahead on Boston public radio eighty, nine, seven. GP. A. Mature you can you're listening to? Boston. Public radio eighty nine seven W. G. B.. H.. Good. Morning Jim Jared what are you doing here? Party's over. Party. It is back to work. We should thank Jerry by the way who Virtually all of August thing was terrific. Conscious, he is. Sort of like me actually. I know was your point so I. Think it was Charlie Baker issued a statewide order mandating that everybody in Massachusetts where a mask those who don't comply could face a fine up to three hundred dollars. Well, northeastern university decided that more effective deterrent to breaking mask mandates and physical distancing rules would be a thirty, six, thousand, five, hundred, dollar fine. It was a risk that eleven freshman took by violating. All of the university's Corona Virus Safety Protocols and other parents or they are paying. The price is students as I'm sure you know it's a huge national story students have been suspended tuition for the first semester will not be reimbursed today th. These are the harshest punishments by far against students or anybody else for violating corona. Virus Safety Protocol. So we're taking your calls Eight seven seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seventy, asking you did northeastern get it right or is it too harsh? Should they have even invited students to be on campus this semester or will this be one of the most valuable and expensive lessons? College freshmen could get him by the way northeastern says that it warns Students Multiple Times they'd practice physical distancing Ford crowds were mass that the students. Had to sign saying the understood what the rules were and they're paying a thirty six thousand five, hundred dollar price is it too steep or is this the kind of scared straight message that's got to be sent? So that people get with the program eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seventy dollars amazing. You're I I, read this story and then your times and the Washington Post. Big, this thing was national news. Yeah. So what do you think doesn't full around your generally more moderate kind of person when it comes to these kinds of things. But before you even say speak, it is very rare are June pulled some examples of some communities. In Massachusetts, a pastor in Worcester was fine three hundred for holding an in person service with more than forty people the Gardner Board of Public Health issue to six hundred dollar fine to. A hotel but this really stands out most people are always talking about this young men in South Boston I don't think any of them standing at bars have been a bar restaurants whatever you wanna call them had been find three hundred dollars and all of a sudden these kids lose or their families thirty, six, thousand dollars was the right message. Well, you know I I'm going to be disappointed Jim because I'm kind of on both sides on this. I do think it's it's an awful lot of money thirty, six, thousand dollars to lose. On the other hand you know we expect a lot of eighteen year olds you know we expect them to be able to. Join the service you commit a crime at sixteen, seventeen, eighteen, you're you're going to be doing jail time for a long time. So. Part of me thinks if you wanted to come, you could've stayed home. You could've done your courses online you didn't have to come. So if you WANNA come. Then play by the rules I understand how about all the other people don't play by the rules don't even get a dollar fine much less thirty six by the way if everybody was treated harshly I'm fine with harsh treatment. This is a life and death kind of thing. How many real people do you know in Massachusetts who've suffered the three hundred dollars fine for This University University I understand that there's been problems at other Universities University of Texas. CETERA I'm not necessarily saying extreme it is extreme but on the other hand they they lay down the law they sent out no doubt one hundred and fifteen moats both. Pulled, that social media they plan to come to your own party I get, it's really hard to tell eighteen year olds is sitting there room and only hang around with their little pot of ten people and what's the point college if you can't go to parties and drink too much I mean some people would say, but the other hand. you know they lay down the law. If I guess I, guess what kind of surprises me is that we're not asked to do that much. This is hard I get it but you're asked to kind of play by the rules not to infect your teachers not to infect people at the CVS or wherever you might go to go buy your groceries if you come back. Northeastern not to impact the neighbors So maybe maybe he's thirty six grand is too much but I think you if you can't make a go of it, stay home take a gap year don't come don't come with the idea of I'm going to come and I'm just going to cheat the first day on their sort of be just totally clear before we get calls seventy seven. One Eighty, nine, seventy well, I want to summarize where you are I think it was well said. So you both totally foreign and totally against the correct is that understand northeastern position? Okay. I understand northeastern position but a thirty, six, thousand dollar forfeit. I mean, by the way I cheered northeast I heard this at somebody's finally taking this seriously but at thirty six, thousand dollar fitted tuition can be a life changing event i. don't just mean you lose thirty, six thousand dollars and you don't get to go to school for semester by the way there are other schools that have suspended people like Are Are who violating Ohio state purdue is a couple of examples but they're allowing the kids when they sent home to take classes online have having ceased is different Jim because you have the co op program at northeastern where well, if you WANNA take an extra six months off to work or you WanNa work this six months to earn some money back. He's going to be hard to learn earn thirty, six thousand dollars in just a few months for. College. I do but I think nonetheless, it's a little bit different the way they structure themselves there unless something has changed I'm not aware of their. They're always been a five year school take five years to get your degree because you do the Co ops and you can take even longer to get your degree taking longer co op. Dollars is a huge. Amount what you number ten ten grand. I'm coming down on both sides of the issue as well. I've been the one thing I will say though I have to give it to northeastern for having the courage to. It. Issuing a threat they wouldn't call it a threat, a warning for lack of better expression and then when the warning was not heeded. Essentially enforcing it part of the problem with these masks manner whether to problems. Then we'll get to the calls one. There are a lot of governors who as far as I'm concerned should be removed the governor of Iowa, which is one of the worst hit states in last week will not do a mass mandate. That's the first kind of problem. No courage at all the second absence of courage is if you if you have a mask mandate, enforce the Damn Mandate, the reason people don't do it. Those irresponsible people who don't is because they know there's no consequence there's a consequence even the people who think they're making some grand moronic political statement by not wearing a mask will probably end up wearing one. So again I, I admire them for their northeastern for the courage of their convictions. I just also think is I guess you do that thirty, six, thousand dollars a really steep price to pay for what I'm guessing or eighteen year old kids or their parents eight, seven, seven, three, zero one. Eight hundred seventy dawn in Boston your I on Boston public radio with Marjorie. GonNa Jim Brady. Thank you for calling hi. There Hi. Can you hear me? Yeah, you're, on welcome. Thank you so I'm a member at northeastern when we lost you where we lost you did you say your faculty member there? Correct. Oh, great. Go ahead. Yup What do you think? So I mean my personal health and safety is at risk interim. Teaching I'm going to be one of the faculty members that. person. And I have you know I mean I've reduced. Capacities so that I only have you know the right number of students in my class at a time, but that doesn't matter. In. My opinion is kids aren't following the rules. So the fact that northeastern decided that those kids needed to go home I think was the right decision well, going home I I don't think I hope there's very little dispute you don't play by the rules you can't be there the issue for me Don at least is not just a sending them home. The issue is a thirty six thousand dollar penalty. Do you think that's appropriate? The university to send a message and that's the message based. Thirty six thousand dollars is pretty clear message. Loose Can you imagine parents on the phone now saying you do this heart you're going to be you're going to be working for six years to put me back thirty six grand dawn before you go. Are you nervous about doing a person teaching? I'm not actually because honestly I feel like with the the amount of testing that students are going through the amount of testing that faculty and staff or you know. You know with that amount of information in place, and all of the other things that the university has done like updating h VAC systems and all of those things honestly I feel safer going into the classroom and I do at the grocery store we wish dorm we talked to us. Yeah. Northeastern Hispanic money to to. To, deal with the chronic, US? Yeah. So so the thirty six, thousand dollars you know you'd have to give that money back to all these kids. Right, if you or I mean maybe And Ten thousand dollars that of these colleges. Spent, a fortune to accommodate. Corona virus. Thank you. I'm sorry. Go ahead you. Thank you know. The. Number of of in other universities that have had to shut down is. You know speaks a lot to why university why he is doing what it's doing gone. Thanks very much for the call. Yeah. There are places like UNC UNC was that opened then had a close just a matter of days more than one thousand cases there. I think more than a thousand gazes at the University of South Carolina. Well, that's a pretty impressive of voice or vote from somebody who actually teaching in an in person classroom eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eight, hundred, seventy. I can see your intently reading the emails are you I am I try to intently immigration site or no? Obviously, not greg. Here. Every person who died caught covert nineteen from someone not wearing a mask. He's good people paying much. Much greater price than tuition bill. They cow well yeah. But I again, there's an equity issue here and I I think I am with on by the way on this even though I don't have to put myself at risk by being in the front of a classroom there. Then if a kid is going to lose thirty, six thousand dollars for violating the rules that here she was made aware of and signed off on then a kitten South Boston who is not wearing a mask. Standing on the street outside a restaurant is GONNA get a three hundred dollar fine don't understand and and I got Governor Vegas lots of high marks for how he's handled this whole thing. But I don't understand from him or from municipal leaders is why they're not enforcing this why they're not going to places that are full of college kids or full of the FRAT party, which is kind of what South Boston has. Now never ending rooftop get together. Since people over the. Air. With. US on Friday at noon to one, we should ask the mayor. Police. heavy-handedness over reacting in part of me, thanks did to the police really need to do this, but somebody needs to. By the way I don't consider this to be in that a category. This is a life or death kind of thing. We know what you feel bad about feel bad about the older people that live south, Boston, all their lives or anybody that's. That is a person with any kind of. Pre-. Pre existing condition or health concerns touch go out the street every day these kids walking up and down debut of our kids. Greg, in Framingham you're on with Marjorie GonNa meet Jim Brady. Thanks calling. Hi. Hey guys love this show. College. and Greg loss to there. Can you say what you said at the beginning one more time please Yeah. So I never freshman in college. Great and and I have to say and I just think that. Way took punitively punished kids without making them pay thirty, five thousand dollars and you can't make that all of these kids who got suspended and are having to split this bill or the children. Bill Gates. You know some of these kids have wounds horse kids probably come from blue collar families that are scratching and clawing. Got Money. So I, think you know you can do this, but you can also just say you're not allowed to do. Everything online and you can't come back to campus until there's a vaccine and I gotta tell you this social just pariente. You'll be covering when those are two options. You know. What makes that much worse in my opinion than the money? By the way my understanding here is well, I don't think re entry was tied to a vaccine. Margaret correct me if I'm wrong I think these kids are able to is it reapply for admission in the spring semester but there's no indication that thirty six grand would be credited to that. That's right. Right. Greg. Thank you. They can come back in the spring. I'm not sure if they have to play a reply apply comeback spring but I would try to double check that while you're talking but we're gonNA take a break. We're gonNA take a break. We're talking about the kids at northeastern university refined thirty, six, thousand dollars lost their basically the tuition for the first semester when they were partying disobeying the rules at Artesian Setup, we're GONNA. Keep talking about that eighty, nine, Seventy H. Boston pepper. Welcome back in. Boston. Public radio shocking as it is Maureen are both here I'm Jim Brady you're. Talking about North's Eastern University enforcing I, think the harshest punishment for students who violate crony buyer safety rule or a set of rules eleven freshmen were suspended. Thrown off campus, they cannot learn this semester release remotely in their tuition three, six, thousand, five, hundred dollars for the fall semester. was forfeited as college campuses across the country contribute to rise in corona virus turning many college towns as you read in hot spots. Was this the right thing for northeastern? Do Eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eight, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy. Okay. So the question is answered they are allowed to come back in the spring they don't have to reapply according to the Boston Globe they're not allowed to take courses this semester but can come back by the way. These kids were all the Western hotel, which is being used as a temporary dorm to. Keep. Social social distancing easier, and they were part of this special program at northeastern allows first year kids to study abroad during the first semester college. You know it was Kinda crazy 'cause it was there was supposed to be studying abroad during their first semester in the program is modified to take place in Boston because of course, we're not allowed to enter if that they would be able to study which doing much better than the United States and getting this thing under control and the glaucous onto point out that they were notified numerous times. Particularly kids in these program this program notified multiple occasions that they had a practice practice social distancing where mass cetera. But it doesn't say that they were informed that they would lose their thirty six grand a really interesting point marguerite what the consequence would be what the penalty would be fun. There'd be suspended they. Unsafe, an unsafe gathering. But again, a lot of these colleges I mean you're you're testing people constantly you're beginning rooms in the Western hotel doing all these special accommodations and classrooms. Pay For all this. So that's another thing too. That may have just. Made them think, Hey, you know what? That's it. We told you multiple times. You get here. You've you've hardly here for a couple of days and you're already breaking the rules you're in Gloucester you're on Boston public radio. Thanks Colon high. I. Hope You can hear me 'cause I'm running around my front yard trying desperately. Reception is working quite well as. Just. Anywhere. And I apologize for my geese screaming in the background. So I actually North Eastern is is my Law School Alma, Mater, and as I would love to say something horrendous about the main university. I think they got it exactly right and in. Well and I would just I would just prefaces to I did read something I believe in the Guardian that said that there is an appeals process. There is yes. Correct. I think it's even expedited I think northeastern. Appeal process and honestly as somebody who appealed her financial aid award every single time I think probably the been. Beaten with the stick that they will be you know scared within an inch of their life maybe they'll have to pay for some sort of something rather extra. But I I. I, honestly can't see the university thing in for the for the whole whole nugget. And I think also. It has this great. You know this great. You Know Holy Moly, we're in trouble if we don't do what they what we were told, they were given so much advanced warning I mean. So those kids are going to have to go back to mom and dad. and say Jeez, this is what happened and you know that their lives are going to be miserable. This is probably the very expensive, very expensive lesson cheaply gotten. You know ask for it I I. Think I agree with virtually everything you said the only. Pause that this gives me. Several things. Is What I've said repeatedly to Marjorie is I don't know one other university and I'm sure they're all giving notice to their students about what the rules are enforced in this kind of penalty people on the street who are violating the rules in huge numbers for the most part with very few exceptions are are are not facing financial penalty. So there seems to be inequity even if northeastern did the right thing in those circumstances no. No and I I agree with you. However, the problem that northeastern has is they can only control what they can control. They can come point simple. And you know maybe maybe they will. You know fortify the spine of of many others. Hey Estra. Before you go how vicious of the geese in your front yard because in Cambridge they are they are really brutal. Let's just say that Having the name. Many members of the neighborhood door them but the Gloucester police do kind of troll up and down and I I'm on a first name basis with the Animal Control Officer. Question Astra thanks for the call. We appreciate our here's an interesting suggestion from joy in Marian. If these students return in January and told aligns with the rest of their college career of last semester prior to graduation, they could be charged on the cost of the thirty six grand. So in other words, they can recoup some of their money. They behave themselves I'm going forward. That's an interesting interesting suggestion I think. I'm sorry I was just GonNa say you know what's what's scary about this? You read these stories we talked about this I don't think you were here I think I was with Jeff? Bowen about the wedding up at the old Moosehead Lodge in in. Maine. Are was here. We did this last week during primer. A. Sixty five people came to this wedding and so far. Eighty seven people have been infected who. died who didn't even wasn't even at the wedding even at the wedding. So I guess that's part of it is that it's not just about your partying and how much fun it is to party, first day. But well, I recall those days we all recall those. A lot of kids are having a really tough time now because isolated. And that is hard I get it but. It's not just you know it's it's the people that you could make sick or even. Die But you even commented on the thing I just asked astronaut you don't think you're not troubled by the inequity thing here is even if you and I am obviously Astra think that northeastern is doing the right thing. The fact that other colleges I think without exception are doing nothing close to this seems to be eastern may inspire the world champion. Northeastern goes talk everybody everybody else Bob in reading your in Boston public radio welcome. Hi. Thank you. Thank you for taking my call. A Freshman I'm sorry I have a sophomore at northeastern now. You know we of course have read him the riot act and one of my complaint is that yes, I know our eighteen year olds in nineteen year olds are gone now but we are the ones that are paying for their education. Okay. Now all students and and yeah, maybe they have some small government loan. So I think it would be very much helpful under these circumstances to make extremely clear to the patrons as well. Because if my son is caught up into a an incident like this, he knows he will not be returning to not say, Bob, bob is apparent. Did you get a communication from northeastern about the COVID nineteen rules are only your son? You know that I and my wife and I have had this discussion, you get so many. Times between my two kids in college now. And that's that's something that we've but I don't recall seeing anything that you know it should be transparent and they're going to be expelled and you're going to want to pay monthly thankfully on our payment plan so. If he was expelled, we would not pay the remaining of standing months you know and he would not return to northeastern I. Think it's I am kind of old school. Be Accountable and I and I give it northeastern credit for being. Very firm but I do think it's a little direct draconian look at how much the rest of our country and world does not comply with laws including the guy who runs the country by the way most notably. Hey Bob. Bob Have you spoken to your son since this since by the way they were suspended, they were not expelled but if you spoken to your son since this, all happened. We were driving to get daring, Gloucester, and we were on the phone immediately. What's his? What's his? What does he think of the the sanctioned by the school? Well, he he basically I think he was he's in a suite apartment with three other roommates. And I think he was you know he was basically pushing back a little bit and he said you don't trust me I said Buddy. Trust you when I was eighteen years old once myself. Pancer PARENTI and being very clear is what my job is to make sure you know that if this happens in your involved dead. And you'll be returning. You will not be going back to northeastern. You'll be doing online education at a state school and and that's just the way it's going to pick saw. Thanks. And he he got it. Thank you. Good luck with your son. So here's an email From Anna, who says she's on the staff at risk either Knowledge School of design. She says, I'm usually a software with students, but for stuff nope, she said we're all making sacrifices to keep things going not just in higher ed but in many other aspects of our lives like not being able to see friends. Or not being in the family and she said, she she many students did take leaves even defer. So she thinks kids who decide to opt into going to school in person with their absolute best keep everybody safe. She thinks that they may have an edge at wristy because the wristy kids according to Anna are not that big into parties mostly like to hang around the studio and smoke a lot pot. Well by the way, you know dawn the first colour, who's a faculty member northeastern made the I mean she's put at risk by kids who don't play by the rules as our fellow students, and again I agree with all that it's just then everybody should have to play by the same rules not just northeastern. P. We have time at least for I think for one more Cheryl Your Newton your own with Marjorie GonNa meet Jim Brady. Hi. High A quick point about Chelsea I I go there quite frequently I just drive in I. Have My bike I have my book. If you go from pleasure bay down to Castle Island. You can socially distance very. But the beach, there is much less crowded. So that's what I do. But if you go over to L. Street, you've got problems with with groups of kids so I've managed to. Stay Kosher distance there. the second point is. The northeastern thing? For me I, think the money is excessive. And I think they should. Be suspended. But when they go back next term, they shouldn't have to pay tuition again, and that's because there are a lot of working class kids over there. They're on the co-op program, all that kind of stuff but also I'd like to see what? Houston endowment is because. To me. You know colleges too much in the first place. And these private universities get a lot of twins. I, just wonder if they're all carry a motive is they don't WanNa lose the money. Well, it's great caller. I'm sure that's part of it. On the grand scheme northeastern, a huge school and I think losing eleven thirty, six, thousand dollar tuitions would not be into the world for them. But Cheryl, you made the point that I tried to make earlier for a lot of low and moderate income kids and families. Thirty six thousand dollars losing is a life changing event. When you go back assuming these kids are some of them go back in the spring semester they gotta start all over again, which means they afford college plus thirty, six thousand to pay for, which is an immense amount of money but. The rules were I like to think that jury who e mailed earlier have point and that that. Of Kids, do they come back? They forfeited this money they're they're towing the line they're doing well, that part of this appeal process might involve some kind of accommodation down the road but you hear what? Bob Said, the father of a Sophomore Northeast School, right? He said that my son if he violated, the rules would not even have the opportunity to go back and see if there's some refunding of the thirty six thousand dollar fine. So you may not have that opportunity if you're one of these eleven. Kids right or their parents. That is correct. Okay we're moving on. We Are we are going to talk to our sports authority training, 'cause Nerik up next up next disorder. On the court, we'll talk about Novak Djokovic US Open. OUSTER WHY NS Kanter won't shut up and more on the basketball court. She's next eight nine seven boss method earnings. Ns Cadres. Sorry about that training Kushner at coming up. Welcome back to Boston Publicradio Jim Brady in March Reagan join US online overlays headlines at the intersection of sports and societies trending because narrow trainings, an anchor reporter for NBC Sports Boston and be PR contributor. Hey, there treaning. Guys, we're jared I've got really elegant. So. I said before. And who's who isn't Janet Marjorie xactly. More Oh. Okay. All right, trendy very funny. Very funny true. Do you take any vacation? This summer attorney I. Did I did I took a couple I just got back from ten days off. So I also back to the grind. Okay. Okay. So so trying to just talking about whether or not kids at northeastern that disobey the rules and went to a party should get stuck with thirty, six, thousand dollar lose their tuition for the first semester. So we have the story about Novak Djokovic hitting a A. Line judge with a tennis ball in her throat. was what happened to him too tough tells the story. So what happened was Novak? A fiery competitor. And a bit of a temper. And he? was having a bad first game in a match the other day. And in frustration, which tennis players often do after losing a point takes the ball in just wax it off court kind of often be out of bounds area but unfortunately went be smacked the ball in that direction it hit a line Judge Square in her throat she immediately dropped. To the ground. In. Pain in obvious pain and discomfort joke of reaction shows that it was no way shape or form intentional. He was just as shocked as anyone else at that happened he went over to check on the line judge see if she was okay. But he was disqualified from the US Open a major Grand Slam, major tournament he was the only one of the top three male tennis players of Rafael Nadal. Roger Federer Djokovic to even be playing in the US Open. And they disqualified him it's never happened to a number one arraigning number one tennis player in the world. It was also subsequently find guys about the price of a semester at northeastern. She. was. She. Can forward he has one hundred and forty million dollars in career earnings. So for him I, think he was finally twenty five thousand dollars for misconduct seventy, five, hundred for missing press. There was another find in there that literally did get it till I thirty five or thirty, six, thousand dollars, which by the way blows my mind that is what kids have to pay for college sending. Thousand dollars a year highs anyone do it you know it Trendy Marci made the comparison at the top here between the rules you know they knew what the rules were. Northeastern Juggle Mitch knew what the rules were in the US. Open. What exactly is the rule I mean what are you? Can't attack, people with tennis rackets. Do Unintentionally. To me the disqualification that to me the fine don't have a problem with have had an issue with him losing a point this actually happen and I forget the tennis player that this happened to. But it happened to a lesser known player, a similar situation where they smacked ball out of bounds and it hit a camera guy and the camera guy was unhurt. He said I'm fine and find worry about it and they assessed that player a penalty to me assessing Jovovich a penalty, and then maybe then subsequently finding him, you know would have been. Would have been. Sufficient. Location. I can't help. But think is that because he does have a temper, he is known for sometimes losing that temper on the court that this was their way of saying enough is enough but it also makes me wonder and this is not fair. To articles about Jovovich. Yes. You know he's done some questionable things during this pandemic slash offseason. He had a charity tournament in which they were having parties and him and his wife, and all these people tested positive for coronavirus he came out as I can ANTIBAC- CER- you've tried to start a separate new players union I. Don't know if any of those you know those actions led to their reaction but if they did shame on the US Open because it should only be what's taking place on the court unless it was like the fourth. Time that match that he had you know smacked the ball out of bounds and nearly took off somebody's head to me. I, think the punishment didn't fit the crime but just one thing I wonder 'cause you know a lot more about tennis and I do it does seem even though he didn't mean to hit this woman in the throat he did pick up a racket and smashed the ball toward the back of the court and those tennis balls. Handpicked going to dangerous weapons in a sense. Part Yeah, these are players you know Cheer Point Marjorie these are players who are serving at one, hundred, twenty, thirty, forty, one, hundred, forty miles an hour. Now the ball isn't going one hundred and forty miles an hour we snacked it up bounds but yes, even a casual smack of the tennis fall is much more powerful awesome aren racket of a Novak Djokovic. Then it is also you know one of us come and so I think they were trying to teach him a lesson and say an you know enough is enough you lose your temper you do this all the time he has in a lot of players to be to be. Fair do these kinds of things you know they out of frustration they throw their racket, they smashed their racket they you know they hit a ball out of balance out of frustration and I think maybe tennis is saying, this is not you know this is what happens we're going. We're going to make an example out of you so that maybe we curb this behavior across sport let me say something good about him because I don't know I didn't know about the stuff that you were mentioning in terms of his off the court behavior which I agree should be irrelevant and hopefully is in terms of his being kicked out of his tournament. Some of the sick supporters of Jovovich have been threatening the lines person who of course did nothing except Stan there get hit in the throat some Serbian newspaper apparently published her name she's been harassed. She has gotten death threats and to his credit I mean, obviously, this is what you should do but to his credit, he has stood by her and criticize these losers. Yes, so borrow phrase from somebody else. But in this case, it's appropriate these losers. Who are threatening this woman's life and so in light of the fact that this is a guy who I assume. Was Pretty invested in winning one of the Grand Slam tournaments since what does he of seventeen championships already? So it's not like just getting kicked out of Roger Federer is that three. So. It's a big deal and the fact that he was willing and rushed to the defense of this woman as should to me he gets some points for for acting like a grown up more than up in. My my interactions I cover him at the Olympics in Rio and teen yet. He was really polite really lost yeah. When he lost for for Croatia in the Olympics in two thousand sixteen he was in tears like means the world to him to representatives. He was very comedy to the media when we were there and also give him credit. You know after he didn't the media, he left it speaking to the media which she was done subsequently ten thousand or seven, thousand, five, hundred dollars. But he then went on his instagram page which a lot of people do now and he actually gave a heartfelt apology and took responsibility for his actions as opposed to you. Know we see this all the time with famous people where they do something and they go if I offended someone. You know it's something like roundabout circular apology he was contrite. He did feel bad about it and I. To me. Listen I. I've never been in a competitive situation like that I I have to imagine that when you're that good at something similar to Serena and I defended Serena Williams. The same way when she lost her cool a couple of years ago that match against Naomi Osaka. Shortly after coming back after giving birth to her daughter. These competitors and their knee while they need to control their emotions I think sometimes also needs to be some leeway of understanding that you're in the heat of the moment and if you don't completely cross the line, you know maybe we. Situation. Speaking. Sokha kind of one thing. Yeah. I was watching during the one minute break CNN and you know what the headline was or the Chiron the bottom of the screen on. CNN for the first time ever three mothers. Have made the quarterfinals of the US, which is pretty special I thought of it when you mentioned Serena Williams. So that's pretty great. She is one of them. Of the quarter. So she's still trying to catch leaves. She's still trying to catch Margaret Court. The. Best of my knowledge she has not yet won a major since returning from giving birth. Margaret's. Naomi Asaka trying to Krizner at that was being just just mentioned her There's a story about her speaking out about. Joining in the Protests Falling George, Lloyd's death and other things but I just wanted to mention before we talk about her. Taking up these social causes is story mentions how she's twenty two and she says, the coronavirus shutdown was the first time. She had taken any real time off since she started playing tennis under a father's instruction at the age of three. So isn't that great? Well, that's part of the problem with these young gymnasts but do you know what did she do during taking time off? She flew in Minneapolis? Part of the demonstrations trone. Yeah. This is a really great story that actually a friend Diane pointed out to me in the Wall Street Journal. This weekend about Naomi. Oh I had no idea that she has quietly. Quietly, not quietly she's used her influence in her social media platform, but also her means to really take a stand against social injustices her father's Haitian. So she's half black half Japanese her mother she was born in. Japan for Mother's Japanese and she's always straddled is just thought it was really really interesting article to read about how she's always straddle these two worlds and felt the discrimination from both ends. She talks about how I think she was in a class or in a tennis like. A tennis academy or something, and there were three Japanese girls that were. Just denault Denault. How to speak to her didn't understand how to react to her talk to her because they didn't believe that she was Japanese because she was too dark skinned yet. She's never been fully embraced by the black community because she's also half Japanese, and I think for a lot of mixed race individuals. That's a real challenge for her to openly talk about that I. Think Takes especially just twenty two years old and when you're just starting your career. And your really learning how to be a competitor to also use her voice for social issues and I was also really impressed Marjorie with the fact that when the George Floyd protests happened, she flew from California with her boyfriend to the protest young 'cause she didn't she didn't bring attention to. Draw sh she went because she wanted to understand the fight and she wanted to talk to people and she wanted to be there and she wanted to do something in show her support and she did it without drawing attention yet. She that so much praise and not article from Serena Williams for using it. As an activist and again at twenty two years old to me that's she's so impressive. Yeah. No and she mentioned she went without telling her agent manager or coach Yeah. So she kinda snuck out of town because she thought she needs to be there. Working not taking a break with nineteen years I suppose. You imagine how it's amazing that you don't just break your shoulders by the time you actually get legal, they should prosecute these parents but that's all top. No I'm serious. It's insane. A topic for another. Fill out of these kids love what they do. But like this is also why there's burnt out. Right I mean my God. I can't I can't imagine doing something day in day out for nine teen years. I've been on the radio for twenty years but who's counting? Starting. Pay Trendy you know in the spirit of Zarqa. Ns Cantor wrote this piece that he's not going to shut up in dribble as the. To paraphrase the obnoxious common from Laura Ingram, I think about Lebron. James I had him on TV with me. I. Don't know six months ago. Obviously, he's been really outspoken in terms of Irwan the the leader of his country has been cracking down on activism and that sort of stuff. This guy is a really impressed I mean I loved in the Boston Globe after his piece. It said he is a something like a pro baseball player of the Boston Celtics and human rights activist because he really takes the latter incredibly seriously incredibly seriously, I mean his father. You know and you know this from interviewing and Jim was basically a political prisoner. And KANTER is not allowed back us not heavy Turkish passport. So this is someone you know we are all the time. What are these guys in fact I don't even know why I do this. You should just like slap my hand away and You know if you're sitting next to me but I look at the comment sometimes. To See what people say on these articles and you know somebody is like you donate money. Sky Played better defense and I don't understand why talks about this stuff you know what is he really putting at risk? He can't go to was home-country right? This is family has not seen his family in years because he has spoken out against the injustices taking place in Turkey, his father was imprisoned for his act for cantors for NS KANTER's actions. So this is someone who deeply understands what happens when you allow. Certain. People dissenters in democracy because Turkey is technically a democracy I would call it that so much anymore. But what happens when you turn away and pretend it's not happening I mean this is someone who lived injustices day in and day out uses his platform for for good and I love when he says in that that you know he gets so tired of people saying, oh well, you should just play basketball and. Famous of money. He's like we're human beings I and I think unfortunately because we hold athletes and actors and you know politicians anyone who's on. A larger global stage and WHO's WHO's visible to a large amount of people. It's almost like they'd become not real people to us because we can't begin to wrap your brain around that lifestyle that talent. And then in turn, we expect them to act the way we want them to which is so detrimental because they have a platform and they have an opportunity to really an actual change I- ns cancer to me is so fascinating and I just. I. I keep begging everybody at work. Just let me sit down with them and bike do a podcast you something that's like political with him because I think we have such a great conversation because everything gets the I'm so interested in all the things that he's interested by the way just as an aside even though we're not doing the street sports thing after suffering what I thought was one of the most embarrassing losses I've ever seen in pro. For in game three, then game three shot with zero point five seconds left they were spectacular yesterday. So the Celtics are up three to two and potentially on the verge of moving to the. Wisconsin. They had to the conference finals against the winner of the Miami Milwaukee Series Miami leads that series three games to one So yeah, the Celtics are. Jason Tatum I don't talk too much takes. Tatum said it best last night he said it's obviously we have the talent and it's frustrating we all played at this level every night because capable of doing it. So you know you know they're human beings that are going to have off nights hopefully last night's game really sorta lights a fire under them and realize like, Hey, he's gotta bring 'cause they're I know you hated game three game Florida me was a disgrace. Game three when they got blown out, they had no energy a Ra- missing every shot they were letting. Toronto shoot at will especially Serge Ibaka off the bench and that was really frustrating and then yesterday I was like boy wonder how they're gonNA come out and day came out firing on all cylinders first. wire-to-wire it was great. It was really fun to watch. So go. Quick aside, how the the bubbles thing for the NBA seems to be working fairly well. Yes. They haven't had any positive test now, this is going to be tested. Not tested in the literal sense but in this sort of metaphorical sense and that they're going to allow. Family members to now. Coming to the bubble as of the Eastern Conference finals yet but actually age Morgan honesty from Espn just reported that I saw the alert this morning on my watch. They're going to allow families to come into the bubble I. Think each player will be allowed four guests on. There are very strict rules about who those deaths can be. Gemmill than Mario Laugh about this. One of the stipulations is cannot be a casual acquaintance in which you'll meet online. About is. Like. A person can do you. Can't just hit up timber tender. And Basically like you can't bring in ranchos like they have. They have to be an actual significant other. There's some funny comments from GM's about how like basically saying you know if it's just so many casual acquaintance. Things they were worried about is that some of these casual acquaintances have a number of casual acquaintance? That crossover team, the team, and it could cause infighting among players in the bubble and one of them saw the by casual acquaintance all the more reason they should let them in we're talking to try to. Trendy. A patriots start their season almost everybody except for the champions the chiefs play on Thursday real starts Sunday my inexpert analysis is Tom. Brady may remember Margaret used to be the quarterback for the Patriots. Has a fabulous team and the Patriots other than Cam Newton who's this former huge star their quarterback but has been injured a lot are so so is that a fair preseason analysis of the teams? Yeah I mean there's just You look at the Patriots and Tommy Current. One of our two patriots insiders like wrote a great column. Say Are Patriots Fans Ready. To Accept Mediocrity because right now. Just, to give you an idea of how I don't want to say insignificant the Patriots are this year they're never insignificant but how much people are a little bit tuned out more than usual I was just reading some and watching some videos this morning to kind of get refreshed after vacation and I watched like a game preview and the person was voicing the game preview was like well, Cam, Newton from after he finds Julian settlement. What other options will he go to on the field and the Keel Harry Mohamed Sanu so Labrador said I was like Bahamas newest cut two days ago and sold Drissa hasn't been on teams in the off season NFL podcasting didn't even know that you don't even know the receivers on the team It to me to me that was like a microcosm of the names. You don't know I. Mean this is a different genome. We've ever seen Jim not just quarterback Cam Newton. But you know because of covid nineteen and but also just. Players going elsewhere in free agency. Wada your big playmakers on defense the Patriots of the you know one of the best. If not the best defense in the NFL last year, they've lost some big playmaker lose more. Actor. Players who? Voluntarily. Opted out because of Covid nineteen concerns on any team and yeah. Yeah they lost eight number a little bit older defensive players. You know who just I mean to be fair. Didn't feel that the risk was worth the reward of this point in their career I mean, we have no idea what this offense is GonNa look like they've got to kickers on their practice squad. They don't do any kickers on their active roster right now I mean, it's just it really is amazing to. Me that you don't go into this season thinking it's a slam dunk that they're GonNa Win The AFC East and come unlike challenge the chiefs for the AFC title again, this year because to me if they're like five hundred, they're probably they probably had a pretty good season. We should make clear for those following unlike the NBA than you and Marty retain. Here. So far knock on wood. Music so far so good no positive test last couple around. So they try to hit great talking to you. Thank you Chinese. Youtube traffic is America's an anchor reporter for NBC Sports Boston and Boston public radio contributor coming up the masked men of Minsk who abducted Belarus opposition leader. Charlie Senate joins for that the latest on Brexit and much more keep your down eighty nine seven Gbh Boston public radio. I had him Boston Public Radio One many in the nation are undertaking critical look at how systemic racism is embedded in America's institutions. President trump is demanding the opposite after finding out the California schools are incorporating your time sixteen nineteen project into the curriculum he threatened to cut off federal funding also instructed federal agencies in racial sensitivity, training, trump and sissies committed to racial equity. How are we supposed interpret these actions? A COUPLE OF MINUTES WE'LL ASK THE REVEREND IRENE ROW and Emmett Price. Claims that President Trump referred to dead American soldiers as losers during a trip to Europe has created an opening for Joe Biden, destroy his support with veterans. But while the trump team denies the claim many are wondering if these accusations on like so many others approve true will stick Latina's John King about that and more coming up in Boston public radio eighty, nine, seven GP H. Your body I am module, you're listening to public radio eighty, nine, seven, w. g. b., H. Logan, Jim, your we made it through an hour I'm ready for another vacation but this. Is really tough for. To, work unbelievable. So they're already projections about how can cast of the US election will be let's hope trump is too busy warp speeding the vaccine to take notes on how Belarus's Lukashenko and Vladimir Putin are responding top position joining US line this and other international headlines Charlie Charlie News analysts here GmbH real heads up Ground Truth Project Charlie good to talk to you. Jim Marjorie hokey. Hey We are. Charlie so so you read these really frightening stories about what's going on in in Belarus bring our listeners up to date. Sure No, this is this is a story that is. When pressed to really watch carefully because you've got, you've got the real rise of kind of populist authoritarianism creeping up and it is it is just getting more and more in. Hanson. More and more apparent that this this leader in Belarus is really going by an old school playbook. That is You know that's frankly really really scary in terms of what it could mean. For the whole region, right because if if he starts to. Shangqiu the authoritarian leader who's there starts to really react to the uprisings that are happening in a very genuine way there there's a real peace moving. He starts to really bring in more and more Russian pressure that becomes a real regional issue that starts to really. Unfold in dramatic ways and the thing I'm I'm watching really carefully I'm sure you guys are to is this crackdown on journalists? This is really Another trend around the country that's really serious of of a rising authoritarianism in which a free press has taken it on the nose in. So many corners of the world and and Belarus is definitely one of them where you see the state run. Television is just being more and more beefed up in the independent practice being gutted where what's the status of Putin's support. I know there's verbal support but is gone beyond that or I know they've had a rocky relationship in the past, but apparently, these protests are solidifying their relationship. Yeah I. Mean I think it's it's it's a complex relationship one in which. Putin doesn't really totally trust with the SHANECO but Lukashenko Needing Putin is deepening the trust of each other. So kind of riding alignment I think is the way I would analyze it and that the protests in the street, the pro democracy protests are just erupting. And continually. So are are forging them together and that's the regional You know that's the real worry in the region about what would this mean? What would it mean if Russia starts to really? get into Belarus they don't necessarily have to ground invasion could take it over through a sort of kinship. With the authoritarian government there you don't one of the great parts of this story which I was unaware of I I knew that the leader. Of the opposition was a woman who was in exile I think in Lithuania but I didn't notice over the weekend that essentially there are three women who are leading the charge two of whom are out of the country now, and this third woman Kolesnikova I think is how you pronounce it linen who won't leave right young women has been kidnapped by some Lukashenko forces. Is that what? Is the likely scenario here Charlie. Apparently taken right off the street. It's it's the most horrifying image if you read the Guardians Coverage of how she was just literally snatched off the streets. While people were watching you happen. Please don't ask me to pronounce her name I did the best but we know who we're talking about cleft Cova Maria Kolesnikova is this very strong opposition figure I think I got that pronunciation right? If I didn't forgive me but I I think the the key here is yes. Powerful voices of opposition many of them women all of them right now under. Under intense scrutiny and fear they live in fear that they're going to get picked up and this is This is there's no secret why they're doing this in public. It's to send a message to these protesters that you're going to end up in prison if you do this. I love this photograph that the Guardian. Describe it. Is. Beautiful. Go. Ahead. Just the symbols of these three, these three women at a at a press conference displaying these signature gestures, they have a peace sign power sign at heart. The three of them lined up he's like sort of. I don't know just just strong women with great courage being part of the leadership of this movement, and it really makes you feel just how genuine it is and how serious it is and how much courage they have to be really truly putting their lives on the line in a pro-democracy display and I can't help but wonder like. Where's our government? Where's the White House on putting this movement in the street? Why are we so timid when it comes to Putin and Russia why aren't we more strident? Behind this democracy movement isn't that what we believe in free and Fair Elections I. Think. I. Hope. that. You mentioned before about the the journalists being thrown out in the state TV is so forth and that includes of course. From these stores in Washington Post International Journalists Reuters BBC and stuff. I'm wondering now in the agent everybody having a cellphone if worse comes to worse than there is a real blocking of of reporting there Know the cell phones does sort of change everything in terms of the opportunity may still have to see he's pretty horrible pictures of people being dragged into vans and stuff I would think. Well they've always they the government there and they the government in. Russia. have been very sophisticated in trying to crack down and block. The Internet and try to control the Internet the the the thing we can all be thankful of is there's a lot of a lot more smart people who are digital natives who know how to. How to counter those efforts to block freedom of speech and I think we see truth has a way of always finding a way out. No matter how many efforts are made to suppress it I really believe in that. We have to believe in that we want to be journalists right and I think the The idea that it will that truth will come out I. Think in the Digital Age is still it's still a great possibility and I would say the thing. To worry about is this fear of governments from on high cracking down on journalists I mean not really new to us either right Nixon et his enemies list and we now have trump doing things like calling for the firing of the Pentagon correspondent at Fox News. Jennifer Griffin who's a colleague who I know from Jerusalem. One of the best ones fair reporters have ever met. She's amazing this because by the way for those who've employers because she confirm the reporting of the Atlantic at least part of the reporting and the Atlantic about what trump actually said about troops both alive and those who lost their lives but good Julie Yeah basically describing them as suckers as loser. These other references to the military, which of course, could could. Could really hurt trump politically in this election of course, but it's also it's not it's A. Right right. But it's a cumulative evidence around his sort of contempt for anyone who does public service because they're suckers 'cause there's no personal financial gain for them in it that theme that she confirmed with her sources who are pretty impeccable. Incredible. But here's the president night states calling for her to be fired seemingly publicly threatening the leadership at Fox if you want your access to this presidency. You know directly targeting one of the journalists struck me as as a new line we've crossed now whereas the presence concrete journalists to be fired from networks that are cozy with him. This is really getting into you know the territory of the former Soviet satellite states like where they actually did this stuff they would. They would a restaurant let's they would crack down on them. I don't WanNa. See US ever take any even small steps in that direction, and I think some of the reaction to Jennifer's solid and great reporting literally is a small step in that direction I also would hasten to add I. Am with those who say these journalists should be on the record I should be putting their sources out there on the record they should be pushing for the officials who say this if they're high ranking military absolutely inside the Pentagon where are they on the record? That's a patriotic duty and a journalistic responsibility of the reporters to convince their sources of that so. I'd I'd had both those things in our own context. I just wanted to a that we're GONNA be talking with Brian. Stelter just wrote the book about really questioning who's running the country is that the president or is it Fox? News? This really unhealthy thing between between the two of them so good for the Fox turns coming tomorrow we should say stelter tomorrow there are a lot of Fox journals. That'll be very. Very upset with what they're station is doing another before we leave this though before another thing one thing we left out on the journalism discussion is my understanding is while Putin hasn't sent troops yet to Belarus he has sent quote reporters to replace. The exiled reporters and they're doing the quote reporting on what's actually happening there. But I interrupted you WanNa talk about what happened to Nevada Well. As many people know yet another our opposition leader to Putin this time election devante has been poison. So tell us what happened to him how he's doing now and what's the latest Sure the. Navan these poisoning. and. Hope hopefully his recovery right? He he's. He's out of a common now they say. Hopefully going to pull through I mean it's it's just so dastardly this use of of these toxins to take people out and do this systemically is. To put it mildly incredibly worrisome soap. So Brad Stevens New York Times columnist had a really good piece. About how Congress should pass what he calls in the Vanni Act and he's referencing their enact. That was that was passed earlier in Congress that dealt with the Magnitsky Act I guarantee you none of our listeners know about that act, but it had to do with a big heist that happened inside. Of The Russian government where they basically took two hundred, thirty million dollars out in a scam government officials and it was just so blazing and so terrible and they were trying to repatriate the money into big mansions yachts in the United States. And, this act stopped those Russian officials from doing that by putting their names on lists, and then they were blocked in that really hit them where it hurts, which is their wallet. So it was coming at the the autocratic state and it's an it's corrupt officials by really coming after them individually. So the Navan, the act would be looking at the efforts to poison people to silence opposition by Russia. If you know if we're going to actually come at them, why don't we have legislation that would name the people responsible for this and make sure they never travelled to the country and go after any assets they might have here. You know by the way when you said people would never heard of the Magnitsky Act I beg to differ the reason we. Charlie is because that was the purported reason for the June meeting in trump tower. Remember that was the cover for that. Your? Your listeners are very impressive. If they put together the Magnitsky Act with that history with this moment. Then they get an a plus. Okay, that's. Okay. The couple things here about this poisoning of Nevada you criticize the trump administration for being a so. So. Willing to do so little about what's happening Belarus at least they're Kaley mcenaney and some assistant secretary of state said something that democracy was important here trump is like essentially Vladimir Putin's own Kaley mcenaney. He's saying I think he said on Friday we have no idea how it happened. We have no idea how it happened except for the fact that every opposition leaders either murdered poison or some such thing margie remember the interview. Of course you remember the one of the most thrilling times we've had in the twenty years on the air is when we had Anthony Bourdain on with us one of the things. We talked to Bourdain about at the time was charged. You remember when he was supposed to have dinner with Nemtsov who was a obviously an opponent think Boris Nemtsov who was an opponent of Putin's and they had a reservation at a restaurant and right before in Moscow right before the dinner, the restaurant called either Nem soffer board and can't remember to say we're cancelling because we're scared that Nemtsov here we're going to be in really big trouble and obviously he was leg executed the notion the president nited States can say I think it was the Friday press availability we really don't know who poisoned him. It he's unbelievable. Well, the. That he is willing to provide Putin I'm sorry I'm. Just GonNa, say I mean I hope someday God willing we will know the history we will Y Y. Three more books coming out the just. President. Ever GonNA find out. When I see all of these signs like stop socialism and you have the president who is I, won't use I won't use an offensive word, but I will say poodle of, yeah, couldn't remember when they used to call. Tony. Blair Bush's Odal. Sure slow. He's Putin's poodle and he is he he trump has become. Such. An apologist for Putin that any anyone with rational thinking has to start asking hard questions around why and you know windy we finally get this history out. I think it's GonNa. Take. Years. But I think I think we should never stop asking this question because if they succeeded in finding, you know there's this this new book, right? The mentioned the words Manchurian candidate was it possible? They had the FBI and the CIA had to literally investigate the possibility that Russia was controlling. The White, house. That is just so outrageous so far fetched. None of us can really believe that could have actually happened. But when you see this this pattern consistently of his behavior of being an apologist to Putin. It's a fair question to ask an history is going to have to stay on it because it's not going to be exposed to journalism. It's going to get the historians are going to have to go after this and we're GONNA have to really dig for for a long time but every time I hear trump or someone else on the far right? Trash the Democratic Party is socialist. Think is here's the you know the one of the former heads of the KGB is dear, friend of the president he's. Dizzying she's very, you know I. It's it's important. I think for us to step back and state the obvious here. But it bears stating we're talking about Belarus three women, leaders of the opposition, the protestors in the tens of thousands in the streets even though the students are getting beaten with clubs by Lukashenko's people we talked about Navan in Nemtsov and all these other the courage of these people standing up whether their rank and file leaders knowing what the likely consequences are for their exhibition of courage is just other worldly great. It's not just that it's that we can't even get. A handful of Republicans to stand up and oppose the president right? We can't even get these people that have talked about the president calling. Soldiers lose their lives in wars losers we can't even get them I mean other countries you're going to the you're going to be tortured. You're going to be put to jail you're never disappear. We're not going to see you again what we what in the United States are you risking losing your job? and. These are people who have a lot of money that could get another job. It puts in stark contrast. Among art leaders with these regular Joe and Jane on the street and other countries, it's really humiliating. I well said, well said, Marjorie I agree and I think the. The thing that just sharpen the point is that Lukashenko and Putin represent the ugliest face. Of Communism and socialism and what what it's tyranny can produce, which is authoritarian governments that control your lives practice, extrajudicial killing arrest, or kill the opposition lockup journalists, and if that's what what these Republicans are trying to say, they really fear with a rise of what they would call Bernie? Sanders. Style Socialism why aren't they? Why aren't they grappling with the? History of this president trump in his soft pedaling with the face of that tyranny. So Charlie for months and months you complain on our show that we kept asking you every single week to describe the latest on Brexit. So we're going to do one more time because we've given you the summer off, you have to do a primer in three minutes or less. What exactly is going on between Boris Johnson. And Northern Ireland vis-a-vis brexit take away from IT I. Here's the deal I promise. I'll wake you up when saw. The. This this is this is the incremental story in the world we all have a reason to be confused and annoyed. This week one of the one of the real sharp edge Sharp edge of the debate this week and going forward will be this collision course with the EU and Ireland over. Our dear, dear, friend Boris Johnson's efforts to make sure that that there are almost unilateral powers for British ministers. which is not gonna fly for the Irish for the United. States are signatories to the Irish peace agreement, the Good Friday Agreement and to the EU, which is also you know. Determined to Uphold International Law and that treaty which was signed. And I feel like the the or agreement which was signed and I feel like the protocols as they call them in. Northern Ireland. Are on the line right now, and that's that's the sharpest edge of this thing and it's about the best I can do to get you updated at. The. End Of, October looms. As as the big decision time I think because Boston has always followed the troubles in Northern Ireland so closely because of the Boston. Irish. Of. Of following that I. Think this is a moment to to to tune in to really tune in for the next couple of weeks and to see what? Whoops. Luke's Charlie obviously didn't WANNA discuss brexit all hung up on. I mean. It's a little rude to say you don't want to talk about the hang up. Get. Was An unintentional disconnection. Okay. Charlie sentence back. What excuse the my thesis was you were embarrassed that he didn't know more about Brexit Northern Ireland's he just hung up on us is that accurate or no? No just a strange power outage out here. Is that true? Really. Charlie win last we talk about this down bars Johnson for a second count Jim. Now, I don't know about all of said. Okay I don't know if you know this but you know we've talked a lot. No I'm sure everybody listening is read a lot about the after effects of those who contracted covid nineteen in a serious way Boris Johnson did contract it in a serious way do we have any there been any reports about how he? I mean I know he is quote recovered whatever recovered means obviously he's not in horrible shape. Do we have any idea about what the after effects of his corona virus experience have been for Bars Johnson? From everything, I've read he's recovered, but I'll check on it and I'll come back with even more brexit update than more detailed knowledge on where the drama turns neck. Serrano wanted monty python to lead our coverage. I think it'd be so much more refreshing and entertaining. Hey Charlie. Thanks for your time. We appreciate it. Thanks Jim thanks. Marjorie, thank you, Charlie Senate joins US every week. He's a news analyst here Gbh where he also had the ground truth project. Thanks again Charlie have you ever hung up on anybody when you're doing television in a telephone interview not as an interviewer? Interviewee, when you were stopped I'm sorry I can't hear you. Might be a good strategy. Many. Many disconnections. oops. Sorry. Something happened phone line are. Answer very good. Okay. up next president trump's insensitive comments about anti-racist sensitivity training. The Reverend's Iron Munro and price join us that more than allred up. Listened to eighty nine seven Gbh Boston public radio. Welcome back to Boston public radio I'm Jim Brady she's more Gregan join US online take on the Mark Levin of the day Reverend's Irene Monroe in Emmett price they join us every week for web up Reverend Monroe's a syndicated religion columnist, the Boston voice for detours. American heritage trail and a visiting researcher and the religion and Conflict Transformation Program Abuse School of Theology. Reverend price is a professor and executive director of the through for the study of the Black Christian experience at Gordon Conwell theological seminary, and of course, they're both hosts of the. podcast season two episode, two drops I believe tomorrow they'll correct me if I'm wrong. They're gonNA tell us more about that a little bit later in the show, Irene? Emmett could talk to you both. Glad. To be here he creates a touch you. there. Hello. A tick. And EMMETT. With him. You there. He's yeah he's here. Did Irene Mute Line or what she do? I'M NOT GONNA. Do it again. Okay. Let's start with this very upsetting story from the global about. Black Girls in Massachusetts nearly four times more likely to face school disciplined than white girls. It's a new report that just came out fines. I just want to give an example. It's not from this reports from an earlier report, but to give people what understanding what. kind of things going on. This educated talk a lawyer talks about the seventeen year old black girl in Boston helping plan her school prom in two thousand and nineteen. She got upset because she learned the budget was slashed. He walked out of the classroom to talk to her counselor. The Hall Monitor told to go back to class or go to the Dean's office. Then, four cops ups showed up b-actor into the lockers. She's panicking and crying, and she got a ten day pension four cops because a kid walks out of the classroom. So that's just an example. What do you make of the Senate? Well this this shows we've always known that many teachers and teacher the great people. So I'm not trying to spare seats to the mini teachers who are tweet usually are white women in their fifties or whatnot are intimidated by black girls and they're intimidated and and they they feel threatened in so many different ways. So unfortunately, we spent so much time focused on black boys that we have we've neglected are black young ladies and so This is what we've always melt. It's horrible. We need to it we need to change it. So it's it's great that we have the demographics and the study the statistics here to prove that we've always know. I see. Yeah I couldn't agree more and I think was just really disheartening to learn is that the state meeting Massachusetts disparity it's slightly higher if you can believe this of. Alabama. So I mean what what we see very glad that image brought this up. We're seeing now you know the that it doesn't matter what gender you are if you are black male or black girl, you have a higher. Propensity of being suspended. It's the whole notion that black children as is black people as black people were inherently dangerous. But what we really see that early version now of school to pipeline prison line is part of mass incarceration, but it's too early form of criminalising black children and you know this particular example that you you gave Marjorie or Jim. You know was a young kid that was upset about. Being, you know you know suspended or whatever, and leaves her room but Lee remember an incident just recently with these twins Dina and I think me I think cook and they were at Mystic Valley Gulia. Charter school and they were demonized and suspended. If you could believe, these will honor students by virtue of the fact that they were. They were their head hair in braids and it was committed a distraction. But what we also see that this reliance on suspensions, I, mean, they do a a number of things here I mean academically and socially. Then our fall behind it leads to certainly drop out it's threatened is a threat to the parents because parents you know are told that their children will be reported to the Department of Children and families. So you know I, it's it's just constantly constantly a kind of you know me on how neck Well you know the one bright spot in this piece better with let me step back from this I don't think in the globe report on this. It said what prior comparable reports have said, which is that the the was apples to apples meaning that what some people respond to studies like this by saying is, well, how do you know that the black kids didn't commit? Acts that were more serious every report prior to this one that did a comparison that came up with comparable results. We're talking about black and white kids who had done the exact same thing and I'm assuming that's the case here. The one positive note is they say late in the stories by Naomi Martin I think by the way, the State Department of Elementary and Secondary Education started the rethinking disciplined initiative in twenty sixteen to work with schools to reduce inappropriate or excessive use of long-term suspension expulsion between two, thousand, thirteen, and twenty eighteen. And August report from the Education Trust Fund found the rate of out of school suspensions of black. Girls. Masters, fell from sixteen hundred to nine one hundred. So it's still out of whack and it's still there is A. A this there's clearly still disparate treatment, but it appears that the gap is less thing I guess that's not I guess I mean. Obviously is good news but there's still a long way to go so. I mean I guess that suggestion you just we won't. We won't have as many black girls in. The prison pipeline you know but I think another thing that we need to look at these teachers need cultural training as well. But we also need higher black and Brown teachers from from kindergarten to to the rate up i. mean there's just a positive way of just black teachers in general and particularly black male teachers. Well I. also think we need to stop using police officers for the sort of discipline that a teacher or Someone more police officers cases. Four. I mean well. Let me. Ask Black bodies. To black bodies and that's unfortunate that that stereotypical you know kind of approach to life would lead all we down to our young kids. I mean we've seen examples of middle schoolers being. We've seen. Horrific and it has. It has to stop. That is the point was made with Marjorie, was by the law professor that you cited, who said if it was a white kid that had a problem with the prom budget being cut and she was walking down the whole, the lawyer said the likelihood of her being stopped by four cops and pushed up against the law happened it wouldn't happen obviously thing. Yes and you think of this poor kid, she's seventeen years old I mean again, this did not happen right now this happened a couple years ago but with all this I mean you hear people on TV her people in their own lives talking about how fred they offer their black kids and the cops. And and I can't imagine this young woman might have thought she was about to get shot. You know he's just he's lucky. Lucky that she walked away with her life, but but the but the real issue Emmett hit on it see our existence is a threat. That's the problem because when you look at the twins that were from Mystic Valley regional school and these again, these were honor students you would think that okay if anything you know. They defile of the negative reasons why we need to incarcerate or criminalize black school kids the kids were honor students and then they went to something as an ending as saying your hair is a distraction come on now. Well, you know for looking for some good news in this story, obviously, all we have to do is look at the White House because. What they're doing in response to situations like this is doing things like one off, they're threatening funding to California schools. If they use the New York, times project, the focused on slavery and the contributions of black Americans, and also what does it all agencies now are to and all federal agencies are to end trainings on what they call white privilege and critical. Race. Theory I call it propaganda. Yeah, and it. It's one of these things where I I hate to sound naive is I'm gonNA sound. But just like we say when Donald Trump does something abominable like coal veterans, some of whom lost their lives losers in suckers for fighting in in war will that change will cause them to lose any votes ask John King that in a few minutes I assume the answer is likely not does he gain any votes for this racist? Behaviour I mean what is the I mean other than pure racism what is the possible motivation for a threatening? Let's stay in California your home state there Emmett a threatening federal funding if they have the temerity to treat to. Teach, a curriculum that includes some history of slavery and the contributions of African Americans of. What I mean if you think about the trajectory of president, trump's outlandish behavior just in the last couple of weeks just seems to go from worse to worst worst two worst. To Kitchen. From would many places called racial sensitivity training or with other folks call Cultural Competency Training you know? Put Fine but simply in a place like California, which is one of the you know the the most diverse states you know in in the in the in the nation with tons of not just Latin Nixon's Hispanics but Mexicans, right not just southern transplant blacks but but you know you have Polynesian you have you know folks from a whole host of various places with a very complicated history you know the the war. Happened on the Pacific coast and so there's a very complicated history that happens there even with the indigenous their mission scam down in southern California. It's a complicated history. So for for us not to tell the whole band with of the history, particularly in California is absolutely insane and to make their minds from the from the government I mean I think this is this is just horrible. It's horrible. Yeah. Yeah. I. You know the very interesting thing is that we were hoping that George Floyd. Death that. This was an inflection point that even your heart, your hardcore race is like Donald Trump because we saw this lynching and full time here. But when I think one is thank you have to always remember here there's always been pushed back about American racist and we've always been we went from a colorblind society to a Post Racial Society? With I remember Mitch. McConnell saying that we didn't have a racial problem because we will give him the voting rights act of nineteen, sixty five then affirmative action. Then of course, you know President Barack Obama here. So what so one of the things that we have to realize is I think sometimes when we talk about doing training, we have to be very sensitive about how worked up. So a lot of folks whether they're liberal or or not or whether they're in red states or or are blue states don't like when you say all white people contribute. Racism now they do but they don't understand but they don't understand that it's similarly when we say the fund police was we really mean reallocating the police. So when we say black lives matter, we're saying no less than other lives the certainly no more than others. So they don't get caught up in that and then Donald Folks Love was used the Martin. Luther. King. Quotes you know to judge someone by the content what their character versus the color of their skin. But what I think what we're trying to do here is that You know being an anti-racist is different from simply not being racist and and and you know ten days book a bream tended is is trying to massage that stand that yes. When I think all white people are racist but you definitely benefit from a racist, society? So. Arena and Emmett a hate to move on but Marjorie has been waiting for years to discuss the intersection of pornography and religion with you. And she finally has a vehicle to do it. So take take it away. Marjory I'm dying to know what you both think about this because for. News is reporting. This guy who's studied the influence of pornography on Americans lives for years has discovered that the negative outcomes from watching a lot of pornography are much worse than those who are the most religious especially committed Christians. So. This is a good thing. Or a bad thing. I'm not a big. Fan. I Corporate Niagara Fee. So I don't know you're the reverend, take it away Emmett we'll start with you. I'M GONNA actually defer to Irena. Hey don't you think Irene? Is. Good for the Christians are not good for the Christians well. There's definitely a correlation between pornography and religion, and I'm not surprised simply because there's just this litany of do's and don'ts I mean I think that when you got this resounding message that original sin was between Adam and Eve, and you know you're talking about, you know celibacy among among men than this notion of the Jesus was know. Of Virgin, you do get into this kind of Kaga dissidents or what they call the moral incongruency. But the point is, is that you know because what it does here is that we're not surprised like Gospel Great. You know Kirk Franklin then he was addicted to pornography and it started you know when he was eight years old, it's the risk we have an e, we need an embodied theology and right now what we have is a sexual theology I mean we understand that. Is really essential part of being humid I. It really to me is an expression of who we are and it's and it's a language in a means to communicate our will need really in my opinion out intimate need both human and Dubai. So until we have an invite theology, we will get folks who do extramarital affairs, like, Jerry, Falwell and his zipper. Down with whoever woman that was. Yeah. Photo Wenham you know and it's the same thing I mean is that you know you know growing up you know where it said whole notion that I'm sitting by virtue of my being but you know sexual desire is for real. You know and and so we we got we need a more embody theology that having. Bodies Okay are healthy and you know and and there's an unholy. How about that? Well. Go, ahead, real quick because there are some issues that are being Irene us on a few of them. First of all be the There are many studies that show that viewers pornography are just about fifty percent men and fifty percent women. So to make this in the Christian World Eight A. Issue is issue in itself. I think the second thing is that pornography really much about sex as it is about power addictive occasion of human bodies, and so Irene is Reid. David needed a a a a embodied a theology so that we can understand the importance in the value of the whole. and not just this kind of quote unquote a sexual being but morality around particularly the Christian beliefs purity culture have done a really really big damage to human sensuality. wholeness and the notion of what what you know sharing of our bodies is and I think we need to have a bigger understanding that so that we don't demonize people push them in any direction. Right is I really do need to have a more spiritualized kind of education about human sexuality but have to I have to say that that you absolutely right that pornography. When we when we think about it in the commercial sense about domination but point is, is that in the bedroom though these these men are coming up flaccid. So that's the problem. Just one aside. Well it's actually not on the religious aspect. Okay. which will not surprise you. But we've spoken to Gail Dines a lot of times is probably the lead anti-pornography person and it and she's had a real impact on me but you had the most impact. At. The beginning. About sixteen or seventeen years ago we had frank rich. Yes. I phone. Yeah and frank had written a piece for the New York Times magazine and this was a revelation to me at the time. I. Think to you to. This is again, this is in the early days of the Internet do you remember him saying that the revenue raised by online pornography even in the early stage days at least at the movie store when there were still movies? The combined revenue of all major sports, all major film, all major entertainment combined. So you know I it that laid the foundation for me poor choice of words and then Gayle dine sort of took it home. So I mean this is. I, mean, you remember the incident at Harvard Divinity School and pornography no I was a student there. Yeah. Absolutely. The Dean at that time there was the whole idea that the it folks were We had new computers at at at Harvard and they were give installing new computers and what they find out what the team we had at that time that he had a whole stash. And He lost the position. Don't you remember this big scandal at? Anyone who was the absolute? It was absolute Ronald theme is his name. I didn't remember I just looked it up as you're speaking go ahead. Yeah. Ding theme it and the whole idea we were you know it was a hoot because the whole idea about will he could have used that that stash of pornography to say, Oh, I'm just letting church and society. This marine research. Desk. It really did. Usually I remember the sex scandals. I can't believe I forgot about this one. This is not the. Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety nine twenty years ago. And what they did clean up Harvard. Divinity. School's image. because. What he did then the following Dean was free. So it's like, okay, we're holy again. Interrupt one say this is unbelievable. The explicit material was allegedly found is the Boston Globe last fall after theme in requested more disk space on his. Way. To. Hear this on a school own computer his office at the Harvard, own resonance. The theme allegedly asked the Computer Department to transfer the images to the new district of theme in wouldn't comment. The Glove said, actually you know who is lawyer was The Great Charles Ogle, tree. Obviously. Self Rice. And it was it was it was a who is not a scare to sit in class and you know he's talking about the Bible of whatever and you say who? That's an interesting. Off Yeah. You mentioned Jerry Fowler. Junior before I mean big big born again, Christian who allegedly watching his wife have sex with a pool boy. Oh, boy I mean. Well like surtees, boys coming up, flashing, looking at pornography. So I mean we don't know that in case. Can we we only done extensive? She said it four times already so We only have a two minutes handle not note the. Emmett starting with you these two. Presidents of these black Christians schools who have volunteered to be part of the COVID nineteen trials. Can you briefly want to get to your your podcast very briefly just tell us about that can. Be I thought that it was up no chin. So President I, think it is. Yeah. and Kimbrough University both in New Orleans have basically signed on to be a part of phase three trial of injections and monitoring of vaccines. That is overseen by Auch Nur Health System in the vaccine being created by Pfizer Biotech and they're in. Louisiana a state that has a belief thirty, three percent. African American state, but forty eight percent of the death toll for Kobe is acclimate maker African American and so they're trying to diversify the trials. Here's why I don't necessarily see as up note because I remember the Tuskegee. Study that's right. that was not that was not done by consent exiling and these two. Are. Actually, asking students to join them to be a part of this and so I, just can't my oldest son seventeen I just can't imagine having a freshman at college and getting an email from college president asking him to pretend catering to study. The world I didn't know. About that and I agree with that however, I think what's really important that I've learned during the whole vaccine trial is that it not that it that it that those participating in the trial be as diverse across section of the population so that we know that it works for everybody who is facing particularly that part of the population. That's that's facing the most serious conscript trust and it's not to be trusted. I mean, if yellow light doesn't go off a red light, we'll certainly because I bodies have always been. Within the medical contact I go number one. Hey career. I mean, we have a heart out in. Sorry sorry to interrupt you but chance I see great podcasts on Comma Harris. What are you guys doing tomorrow. oops. We're losing the Irene you WANNA. Tell us what you're doing tomorrow connection. Well, let's dropping is about black agency and what we look at is three particular areas athleticism. Certainly we've seen. Lebron James and what they're doing Po politics and we looked at certainly the march on Washington and entertainment, and and what we're talking about is that what we have a critical mass now that W- we didn't have you know if you look at the nineteen, sixty, three march on Washington in terms of using our our agency like Colin tapping it is the catalyst for athletes coming out and how we can really stop the clock monetarily as well as the game. Well. Terrific. I'm looking forward to it. congratulations. You've got the first one cameras great and I'm sure this one will be great too and thanks a lot. Appreciate. It. Okay I'm price to and it's every week for all revved up revenue ironman roses syndicated religion calmness, the Boston voice for detours. African American heritage trail, and a visiting researcher in the religion and Conflict Transformation Program Lease School of Theology and what you price a third professor and Executive Director of the Institute for the study. The Black Person Experience at Gordon Conwell theological seminary and they have a host of the aforementioned all revved up podcast subscribe to all red. Dot Org. You'RE GONNA love it up next TV thorny Bob Thompson is here for his best and worst moments of the week listened to eighty nine seven j whoops eighty, nine, seven Gbh walking public radio. The back to Boston public radio MARGERY EAGAN and Jim Breath turns out Gil Scott was right when he said the revolution will not be televised. That's because it will likely be streamed instead netflixing other streaming services continue to dominate network TV and after decades of publishing TV Lewis things in your time says, they're not no longer fit to print a Nielsen is now releasing a weekly ranking in the most. Popular shows on streaming platforms joining US align talk about this and other developments is Bob Thomsen Bob is the founding director of the BLEIER CENTER FOR TV and popular culture and a trustee professor television and popular culture the Newhouse School of public communications at Syracuse hello other Bob Thomson. Hello, how are you to? We're excellent. Thank you. Great. Bob Thomsen. So let let's start with Nielsen finally releasing its streaming numbers. Is a big deal or why should regular people be excited or Noxitril? excited. Visit Nielsen is kind of slouched toward streaming numbers. Now, it's included in its top ten rankings among them are The top ten things stream now was just released but was for quite a bit earlier. It's the I think August third through nine and I guess nobody should be surprised that all ten of the top ten are all streaming programs offered on Netflix Netflix. took away a ten of ten in the beginning not a surprise got two times more users the next subscriber Still it indicates how much networks is dominating this field. But before we get to much how streaming has taken over, we should look at that list. Indeed the top one is a netflix original, the umbrella academy, but that's the only one that's a Netflix's. All, the rest of them have played elsewhere seventy percent of them. In fact, seven out of the top ten are old broadcast network shows the office which ended what back in two, thousand, thirteen parks and recreation from NBC, which ended a few years couple years after that things like criminal minds and ncis from CBS two of the top ten are cw shows for Heaven Sakes. The office also ran network that came out of. UPN and WBZ when they when they folded. So it demonstrates how still in this transition period old broadcast programmes programming are supplying an awful lot of what people are streaming. Can we get back to the underlying story for a second bob? Is this happening? Are these rankings happening because the streaming services agreed to cooperate with Nielsen? Is that how it's you know I'm not sure what the methodology of this is. netflix still holds its own data very close to Post to its best, and I'm not sure of NEAT, Nielsen is just doing this through surveys. I mean there other ways to get that data BA besides getting it from Netflix's that I think that's what we're getting from Nielsen and they're they're streaming data is still considerably less. filled with details. have. With their. You're the recent things that they get the black blackbox reason I bring that up as you remember when we were discussing the absolutely atrocious movie. Byrd bath or whatever the Bath. And they said that seventy five million people allegedly watch this horrible Sandra bullock movie I watched it too. By the way is part of the alleged seventy, five, million in three or four days, and there was no way for anybody to check to see whether or not that was cooked or not particularly from service the never released numbers I remember that correct other than the name of the movie. Net netflix's been very. Careful about releasing that kind of data I think partially because they don't want to have it compared to other things, they they they want to make these big splash stories about programs at how they arrived at that seventy five million was never never claimed. More thing I think you guys discussed the I think it's thirty bucks you pay on. Disney. Plus in addition to the monthly fee to watch Milan. So will we be able to as I assume people listening know that the democracy forces in Hong Kong are Urging, a boycott of the movie because of a tweet from the star when she will, it isn't tweet. It's on something called W-e-b-o, which is twitter like Chinese social media platforms I support the Hong Kong Police is in August I. Think you can all attack me now what a shame For Hong Kong I'd say what a shame that she's so naive, but it will we be able to know whether this proposed boycott is having any impact on how many people watch Moulin now that their ratings or or or no? Well, that's I mean part part of it will be with Disney releases to us but I think we're going to get some indication and Malone's problems just keep mounting I. Mean you point out at first big scandal we Lon was that even though you're paying Disney plus you still have to pay thirty bucks to get Milan which. Is Course still the case unless you wait till December fourth in which case will be on Disney pluses part of the service. So that was the the big scandal the beginning then came the comments from the stars supporting the Hong Kong Police and that started the boycott Milan and now that's developed even further Now they're complaining about something that makes those comments seem like nothing that portions at this were shot in with the cooperation of shot in Jin Jiang with the cooperation of forces who are apparently keeping these Demographic. Genocide Reeducation. Camps, going and everything. So this story just keeps getting. Kind of more and more complicated in ugly and of course, it just was released. Talking, to Bob Thomsen our TV man. So tell us about the near times ditching TV listings I. Frankly was kind of surprised they they still had always. They're ditching him in the print edition, right? Right and not even I mean they've been ditched in the print editions in most of their. Print editions. quietly. This is though the New York edition which was still kind of the you know the flagship of the Times which had continued to do television listings, and their argument now is that So many people are streaming. It gets back to that again, which don't need to be done with listings because they're not done in specific time and that people have got electronic listings through their. Cable or satellite or that they can get on the Internet and that this was just actually a waste of paper and space that they could do covering elsewhere, and for most people, they are probably right about that. As you point out, you didn't even know they still had them. TV Guide still still has listings, but it's in the back of the magazine is opposed to most of the magazine the. TV. I was just going to ask you about TV KAZ TV guide us to be. Influential was. The most highly circulated magazine in the country furniture was designed with special holsters shape that little format that they used to have that he. went to a regular size for Matt. It's never been the same it's. material which used to be quite important. Once upon a time is now you know just another thing like people and entertainment weekly's at its weakest and all that kind of thing. But they still do have these think and I have to say I actually use TV listings in one place, and that is whenever I stay in a hotel I get the Free USA Today the am in the hotel I can either not or they don't. Have the electronic grid on the TV, and I used to actually turn to the back pages of the life section of USA. Today to to use those grid, I have not been in a hotel since March so I'm not sure that they're still doing that but they were back then any well, maybe you should stay in a place better than motel six. Bob. And then you'd have the grid on the television screen you know what I mean. Motel. Six is when I'm when I'm going luxury. So, what's the? May strict red roof in residence. Okay bye-bye Johnson, what's your best this week I. I'm sorry. Okay. Best a magnificent new documentary fourteen parts fourteen hours long debuted on Tuesday on T- TMC turner movie classics, and It's called women make film and it is really like nothing. We've we've seen before you. Normally. Think of these things is starting chronologically and saying Oh there was a two women that made film in the silent era and then going up to the present day and then you have a bunch of talking heads and experts and all the rest of it. This is neither of those it's it's narrated and it's not quite logical. It takes films from all six continents and it's divided into categories. The first chapter is it's called our openings of films, and we see all these films from the USA and France and Africa all over the place In someone shows us these shots openings or they show these shots of openings in the narrator explains the the shots, and it's not just about women and film. It's about just films that are made by women couple of interesting things. One is I'm pretty sure that you will have seen very few matter of fact, I'd go so far as to say, practically none of the films that they that they show these are movies that simply. Have not been made available or easily available to most viewers, and that's one of the things that's exciting about this. It's not another shot from hitchcock. It's not another scene from citizen. Kane. The usual suspects, the most frustrating thing about this very wonderful theories is that every single shot you see throughout it, you want to then go and watch the movie which is easier said than done plus it's made by a man that's worth mentioning. But. That is. Ten Jim big tent. He we clip some sound from this. This is. This is a clip from. This nineteen, ninety, six film which I had never heard of the watermelon woman is featured on this episode we're talking about tonight's women make film here director Cheryl do Dounia. I hope I'm pronouncing that correctly dounia plays a character modeled on herself an aspiring filmmaker working in a video rental store here she is introducing the fictional subject documentary. So in this one film that came into the store plantation memories. I saw the most beautiful black. Mammy. Her name, the watermelon woman. That's right. Watermelon. Is Watermelon woman who first name her last name or is it a whole name? I don't know, but girlfriend has a going on and I think I've figured out what my projects going to be on I'm GonNa, make a movie about her own going to find out what her real name is who she was and is everything I can find out a better because something in her face something in the way she looks and moves is is serious is interesting and I'm going to tell you all about. Is this fourteen hours or some incredible darted plays every Tuesday on pm see I'm sorry TC M I'm confusing it with AMC Turner Classic Movies not. One of the great cable channels of all time it plays every Tuesday episode to is on is on tonight and I'm glad you played the clip from the documentary about water melon woman because TC is also playing a number of films on Tuesday after this documentary. Every Tuesdays well into the early morning hours that have been featured on the documentary and tonight it so happens or I think it'll be tomorrow morning in the morning hours. Watermelon woman is one of them they're playing. So if ever a DVR was useful, it's it's with. The stuff that play some of their best stuff they play in the in the wee hours of the of the morning. That sounds fabulous. What's the worst bump? Oh you might have missed this because a lot of people did but David Blaine is up to his Didn't miss it again after having been Not doing a lot lately and I guess this wasn't magic wasn't even a stunt so far as I can see, he got attached to what they didn't like twenty seven. Fifty two or whatever weather balloons. And he went up to twenty, four, thousand, nine, hundred feet about a third of the way up. He put on a parachute when he got to about twenty, five, thousand feet, he skydived off the balloons and he landed that was the extensive it did break youtube live event records, but it broke you to live event records. et about I. Think Seven hundred, seventy thousand. So hardly you know hardly something that everybody was watching with bated breath and You watched it live. I. Watched the entire thing three hours plus. Hours of him kind of getting ready, and then about an hour little less I think of actually launching, going up jumping and landing, and then it ended quite quite a abruptly you know what I'm saying. I can't have made this association but when there was a story when Muhammad Ali fought Sonny. liston were everybody thought he was going to be totally killed somewhere in Maine. I can't remember where A. What was the name of the down in any case they lose agent what Lewiston right they talked about how one of the doctors who took his his heart rate said it was so slow. The fact that he was calm was unbelievable and I'm watching I only watch a three minute version not a three hour version of the blame thing he's talking on some sort of walkie talkie thing or whatever. He's walking down the street to get a pack of cigarettes I mean the calm in this and I'm not trying to promote it because I'm not into this either I. Think it's ridiculous I? mean. You can die kind of thing the calm when he's what is it for plus miles up in the air and he's talking to his daughter and he's talking to his handlers I mean, didn't you find that surreal? Well, I guess. Yes. Now that you mentioned it although this is a guy that. Once. Stood on a column I think in what was it times square and got electrocuted while he stood there every couple of minutes he's been buried alive. He held his breath for seventeen minutes He spent sixty two hours frozen in an ice cube. In public. So this is a little ride on some balloons. It's like being in a children's. Story, by the way, trump has been involved in some of this I think. When he was buried alive it was on trump property in New York I. Think he helped in the process when he announced that he was going to be on upside down for I. Don't know how long that was announced where he came down upside down and trump was at the podium when he did it. So there's been that relationship But he was pretty calm. I'm glad you brought up the fact that his daughter was there to give you a sense of the sheer excitement of all of this at one point points actually they give her the walkie talkie and she gets to. Talk to him and here was one of the exchanges she gets on and David. Blaine says, how are you and the daughter Desa says good and you? That was the highlight of the three hours. Out when she said no miles up in the air. You lucked out when she said her father and where's the will dad I think that was. If he was calm, she certainly was. Following suit. In that in that lovely grammar of the way and when she's responding to his grieving. So Bob Thompson I know you wanted to speak a little bit about the impact and importance Of Chadwick Bozeman these star of the black. Panther and other. Movies who died prematurely of colon cancer just a few years I mean this was a big surprise to to so many people he had been in not only working, but actively working on big projects when he was now we know in in the midst of therapy and all of this. Kind of thing and. I think it was extraordinarily how quickly we got some of the responses, ABC probably the most. Significant where they I think very nicely played. Black. Panther two days after his death I think he died on the twenty eighth of I'm not mistaken and by the thirtieth they played the entire film commercial free. But then they followed it with an hour long special that they had to really put together quickly. It's not like people had prepared obituary pieces ready for Chad with Bozeman and among. CAST members, friends, all these people Kamala. Harris was. In it Oprah. Winfrey. was in it. It was a very nice high production value production which they clearly had to really slapped together and it is extorting in his short life as you point out, he dies it forty-three. And everybody has been listing that he played Jackie Robinson and James Brown and Thurgood Marshall's less people are mentioning that he played Syracuse University three time. All American Floyd little on that Ernie Davis Movie The Express and very few mentioned that he also played very briefly on Saturday night live R. Kelly so go that. So we have a little sound from the especially you mentioned in tribute to King Herod His. He triumphantly returned to his Alma Mater University delivering the speech at the Schools One hundred fiftieth commencement. The fact that you have struggled with his university that you love is a sign that you can use your education to approve the world that you are entering. He's final post on social media the day Senator Comma Harris Othello Howard University graduate, and friend was named the Democratic vice presidential nominee. That, his last tweet was encourage people to. Exercise their rights as citizens to vote to participate in their democracy. Born out of love of country. Just. It's so reflective of Chadwick. Knows he's dying, which is really is just what it's. It's incredible and we can claim him for television. He'd be had his one of his earlier jobs was on all my children many people start on soap operas. You know the one thing and we've talked about this many times before one of the bright spots of whenever someone. Passes, that's famous is that you get all of these history lessons that you may not have other I've seen I think more people saw portions of that speech at Howard. University. Then have probably ever seen it combined since it happened the first time around and it's really quite a lovely speech citizen. So what are we this week Bob Thompson well I would normally not put a installment of the ancient eighty biography on my list of what to watch tonight a two hour special called I want my MTV, which is about the early years of MTV when they played music videos twenty four hours a day and they had VJ's, and they got some of the original VJ's Martha Quinn Alan Hunter. Nina Blackwood who else JJ Jackson's in it Mark Goodman and they talk about those early days when MTV was I getting launched and of course, it made stars of people like Boy George and Madonna and Cyndi lauper eventually started showing a black guard is and Michael Jackson went to super duper stardom on MTV But also that this was a really significant moment if Milton Berle and the Texaco Texaco. Star. Theater gets credited for lighting the fuse of television getting people go out and buy a TV I. Think MTV should get credit. For Lighting, the fuse of cable most people didn't WanNA bring this stranger into the house to drill holes they never showed up on time. There wasn't that much new to watch and when MTV started in August eighty one, if you had anybody in the house between about eight and twenty four, it was easier to just call the cable company to shut them up because here was something they couldn't see elsewhere and even though what ESPN starts in seventy nine CNN starts in eighty I think it was MTV and eighty one that really got. Going and tonight will see two hours of those like a any documentary about those early years we've got a clip from this but before we just want to mention one of the producers. Has a great line here when he talks about, it wasn't just watching these videos. MTV. As he put, it taught us how to dress how to talk. It taught us what was cool. It was it was kind of a real cultural lesson for a lot of teenagers and those really. Awkward. Years. As well, anyway here's a clip from. I want my MTV, which is Bob said premieres tonight at nine PM on a an e. Heralded, fresh and innovative and decide for being shallow when MTV I hit. This was the biggest talk in the universe. MTV dropped a grenade into our world. MTV People Online radio. International Stars almost overnight. We had no idea what was going to happen because MTV gave a visual representation to the artists that they did not have before. We should say I. Don't know if you just said this a minute ago the phrase comes from the notion that did you say this that the that the a lot of the cable systems are at least that people bought into didn't include. MTV and I want my MTV was the calling card of people wanted right and all sting said for them once a Mick Jagger Sohn. TV based on by the way for the older viewers on I want my maypole. Advertising campaign from way back hearing that clip reminds me of how much I love by the way Turner Classic Movies Documentary Series Women Film because it doesn't have one after another of people making these hyperbolic of statements however, all that hyperbole most of it. Was True. MTV did become not just a channel lifestyle by the way the only time we've ever named we called for a while a certain group of people the MTV generation I don't think any other channel it was never CBS generation. It was never a golf channel generation, but we called the MTA vs generation it helps stimulate getting television to have a decent sound system helped bring Stereo into TV it changed the way movies were made. They had a musical montage after this so. Yes that all sides south hyperbolic, but I think we can't underestimate how significant that was to the history of television than in many ways to culture general. Thanks for your time. Thank you very much is always bob great to talk to you you. Bob Thompson joins every week. He's the founding director of the Pliers Center for TV in Popular Culture, a trustee professor of TV and popular culture the Newhouse School of public communications at Syracuse. University. Up Next. It's Labor Day. Labor Day, Labor of loathing with President trump lashing out at Joe Biden the Pentagon reporters wearing mass GINA's John King joins us for that and other political headlines Keeper John Eighty nine seven G.. P. H. Boston public radio. Looking at Boston public radio. I'm Jim Brady where's MARGERY EAGAN? I mean maybe after much of August though of three hours just too much for in case she's gone shake. She did have a pre existing thing but join us a line over the latest headlines I think with fifty six days to go is John King John CNN's chief national correspondent Anchor Binsar Baltics, which you can catch weekdays and Sunday, mornings at eight am I right. John is at six days. Aided indeed eight weeks from tonight we count votes, Jim Eight weeks from tonight we count them people voting a lot earlier than that. But we actually start to count of start to count them. That is the key word. So John, King, we all remember maybe the most famous room from his line from citizen trump was I could shoot somebody in Fifth Avenue and wouldn't lose vote Can he allegedly have said what he said losers and suckers about veterans foam gave their lives for the country and not lose a vote. I you know I think we learned from two thousand sixteen to not try to apply logic or the normal rules of gravity to Donald Trump If if it is said and he and veterans in any any Americans but especially people from a military family, our military community believed that he said those things you have to assume that it would affect them adversely it's reprehensible. It's reprehensible and I WANNA point out, you know the Atlantic was first report this a number of news organizations including mine CNN notably, Fox News confirmed the gist of this and the president when after Fox when one of its a very corresponds national security correspondent for Griffin. said that she had confirmed the gist of this that the president has spoken disparagingly about those who their lives in combat or who volunteered for. Not, volunteer was a draft at that time, but who were in part of the Vietnam War so the gist of it is true does it hurt president trump? One of the hard parts Jim is remember now especially that he's been in office for four years if you look at most polling anywhere from like ninety two to ninety, five percent of the people say they've made up their mind. and so does he lose somebody? Does he lose a small percentage? He cannot afford to his path to reelection is very narrow. He can get there. He has a couple of viable paths but it's very narrow especially now as we get eight weeks in the racist been so stable for so long it's competitive I can give you a couple of scenarios where he wins, but he can't afford to lose people when you when you when you know you're most likely to lose the popular vote anyway and you can only win with this electoral college put together the past to seventy. So it's one of those things that you would think You would think you would think all these disparaging insider books coming out from people who've worked closely with him. Hurt Him we learned in two thousand sixteen sometimes he defies gravity. So. It's the interesting part for me is the Democrat Biden jumped on that right Biden is deciding to get into the character story. If you will Hillary Clinton made the end of the campaign in two thousand sixteen, almost all about character and she lost so I think Democrats are a little nervous. They WanNa make sure that they focus on the bigger issues of the pandemic and the economy, and then try to tie that part of the disparaging part into the crassness part into just that's not what you want in a leader. Do you make draw the same conclusion that people like David Fromm do about the silence of people like John Kelly, one piece of this story was about trump in. General Kelly who I think was head of homeland security at the time standing by the graveside of his son Kelly's son and trump questioning I. don't know why people do this those runners, exact words but some dismissive a notion to silence means something to you, John? King. Yes, it does it does because look. I again, you got to be careful because there was a falling out between the two of them and trump is insulted general Kelly who's himself a hero who son paid the ultimate sacrifice Afghanistan So there's bad blood between the two of them but John Kelly also a man of honor and decency also happens to be a sign of Brighton and If you know he could in a word, he could in one sentence click clear this up you know the president and I never had that conversation the president never said such thing he could put out a very short statement. And clear this up and he knows that and he has been silent. The other issue is another son message uses his General Dunford. Who If you notice from Boston Globe the? and. He said I don't talk about this stuff he to. He too could have said something because he was the one who went to to the cemetery with his friend John Kelly when the president could not go did not go they got in the car and drove there because they view it as so much of their moral obligation you know to the fallen So those two gentlemen, the two generals two men who just have given their lives to public service in the most frisky public service Could. Could clear this up and they have not read into that. Yes. The thing I know. This is incredibly. Naive I have to say when you get to the point when you're saying this about people who have given their lives for their country and then your next strategy is the trash, the individuals who you appointed but who are no longer with you, and then you trash the leaders of the Pentagon the fact. That Republicans in high places have not spoken out here is a a again I've said this two thousand times in the last four years. I'm in a stunning to me that there is not more backbone our principal in people who have ascended to the highest offices in the Land I. Guess you're not surprised anymore well, I am and I'm not I guess and I know there's a there's an inherent conflict and enter a contradiction in that But the especially for those I've known for twenty five thirty years who have taken principle stance in the past I think you could view those and you say it's disappointing on the hand you do see. That they are bell quote him politically the Republican Party has so changed underneath their feet that if they criticize him, then they lose the trump base without the trump base, they cannot win So this is about power. This is about power, and so you very few who are willing to do it consistently and the former governor of Massachusetts senator from Utah Mitt. Romney is one of them who has consistently just spoken out and spoken his mind others pick their moments but don't do it consistently and we're GONNA. WIN OR LOSE JIM WE'RE GONNA be having really interesting conversations win or lose for president trump. We're going to be very interesting conversations in January. If this president loses, you're GONNA have all these Republicans who velcro themselves to him for four years Try to you know break and say, no I'm from the Chamber of Commerce. Republican Party I'm from the suburban Republican Party from George, W Bush's Republican Party. I doubt they'll say Bush but that kind of a Republican Party I'm not a trumpy and it's going to be just the you know their contortions. You see after some elections are pretty big I. Think this one if the president loses in the Republican. Party are GONNA to be both laughable inconsequential if you understand what I mean. So we're talking to John King from CNN fifty six days to go if we get closer and closer and the numbers continue to hold where I know you don't take a national polls nearly as seriously or should you as polls in key battleground states from the battleground states continues to trail what do you worry about John in terms of? How This president attempts to mobilize people who he has been preparing for what he calls the most rigged election in American history. Well as an I'm fascinated by this both from the rhetoric and the president trying to undermine faith in the institution of voting, and then be just the logistics of watching states pull this off with an unprecedented number of people to vote by mail or vote early Some of the early voting that'll be important to vote in person where you just you know you, there's not going to be a line I can stop by wherever it is. The point of election whatever. So I back to the undermining part the look they. Oh, there's this so-called Red Mirage theory right that. Republicans tend to vote more at election day. So we get to midnight on election night and the president he's leading leading me. Oh. They're not certified. It's unofficial leading in Michigan and North Carolina and Florida and he declares victory. and. Then the next day he says, I'm sending in my lawyers rig system where these ballots come from, they're bringing them in now China sent demand they're not being secure or just whatever you WanNa, do and he then decides to challenge the validity of any count you know. Starts on a win starts from Wednesday on I. think that's a possibility. Listen. Listen to the interview as Attorney General gave to Wolf Blitzer the. Talks about the credibility in the legitimacy of the election. These are the people who are supposed to be upholding the law and upholding the institutions of our government questioning the legitimacy of our government. I think the secretaries of state You just had this experience in Massachusetts with the Kennedy Marquee Race. I'm wasn't perfect. You had some hiccups in some glitches and they go back and check those but that's generally nonpartisan and they're all working together to make clear and to signal to people on their websites on the literature you get with your mail in ballot that you know the count, the Countess, the election night count is not official until somebody says it is certified ratified but I. Do think our business is going to have to do this. The secretaries of state are going to have to do this, and we'll see what maybe it won't happen. Maybe the you know maybe this is all just bluffed by the president and blustered try to gin up by his people but I to me it's a legitimate concern because I believe it is possible. If Joe Biden keeps an eight point lead in the national polls he we will know on election night we want he'll be leading by so he'll be leading in those states election I if the national poll lead down to two or three, then you're in Hillary Clinton range and then we're in a state by state thing. I do think it's possible that we we may go till Thursday or Friday before some of those states are done. John John be patient you when you say if his lead holds is in national polls, eight percent will know on election night did nice. See on your station yesterday and this morning or something, and I spoke to David Peleg logos the other day from Suffolk University, the pollster there his polls showed that Republicans were twice as. To vote in person and Democrats were twice as likely to vote by mail and I thought I saw the number on your station on your screen there was even more dramatic or something like four to one or forty seven eleven or some such thing. If there's a huge disparity between those who choose to vote in person Republicans predominantly and those who choose the vote by mail many more Democrats There's a huge mountain for Biden climb on election night even if he does end up winning and even if he does have a significant national lead no. Yes yes and and thank you for articulating it much more clearly than I did. I. Know you know you did actually it's very important what you said because I think if the if the National League is still above five points, especially, if it's closer to seven or eight points you are. That at midnight on election night, it is still possible that Donald Trump is leading in Michigan leading North Carolina with the votes counted so far that day especially, states are different in North Carolina they tabulate ballots before Election Day. The release them. But they can tabulate them and start in going to know that they can verify that they're legitimate so that they can put them into so that they can check the signature and do all that so that then they have to run them through the counters on election day in other states in Michigan is one of them they can't touch them. Know they can't. They can't do anything with them until election day. So they cannot begin with can become especially if you start sending lawyers into the room to challenge ballots the. Process of the signature matched will said that one aside doesn't signature matchup. Okay. That one's good You know this can take hours and hours and hours especially if you're contesting ballots and we expect the Republicans to do this and so different states count in different ways. But I do think I do think it's possible though my point was if Biden hope that big of a national lead, the margins in the states where we do get results are gonNA. Tell us things yes. I will have to say on television and you will have to say on your program you know. By by the counting so far the president is behind in Michigan and he's behind in Wisconsin but look at all this going on around them, and this is how many millions of ballots are tens of thousands of ballots we know they have in Michigan. Here's what the polling tells us about who requested those ballots in what they said we will have to lay out the factual case. Now, we still need to count them. We shouldn't jump the gun either but we should. We should everybody in my business should put together a very strong fact sheet how many ballots requested do we? Know How many ballots returned? Where are we here which states can count you know contaminate early and give you most of those votes election day which dates can't touch them until election day therefore, it could take two or three days. We have to do a lot of homework that'd be very prepared because I think we need to be very careful in what we say because we will be under attack from you know WHO and others we're talking to John King from CNN. So John King I hear this morning that Mitch McConnell this is another one of these please explain this to me. You know I spent the last handful of days in my vacation reading story after story after story seeing story after story on your station about the pain that real people small business owners workers are living through because the federal government abandoned them after last relief package So Mitch McConnell says, they're finally going to vote on their version I. Guess that's a trillion dollar version versus the houses three, trillion, dollar a version. This is another I guess my second naive question in fifteen minutes. Are there. Not, enough Republicans who are going to have either the courage or self preservation in. Enough to not vote for a package that they know is grotesquely inadequate including for their local state and city governments know. It great question because right now I just had Lauren Fox one of our Capitol Hill reporters and she's a very good one on the end of my program at one o'clock. Just before one o'clock and she says the Republican pack is going to build today's closer to five hundred. Not even it's not even a trillion, it's five hundred billion closer to that, and we'll see what the final numbers they're still McConnell still working the math here look he's got a tough job and I respect that that he's got some Republicans who are saying we've spent enough. We can. The deficit can't afford this Let's give it more time. Let's see. What happens let's give the economy a few months. Now, most of the Republican saying that are not on the ballot this year remember the Senate you know senator staggered. So if you're Cory Gardner Susan Collins and you're on the ballot this year and you're in a state where you're at great risk I'm yeah you would like more and you would like it now. So. Let's see what happens and let's take a deep breath and say that the Republicans advance their bill today. And the Democrats have already said it's too small. It's just inconsequential Let's see if Washington work its way and the White House could responsibly get involved in it. And maybe they figure something out, I see no evidence that's going to happen. So then I think the challenge is do. Do the Democrats decide okay. The Republicans are willing to do X. Y. and Z. Right more small business money more testing money some other things for the economy should they should they accept that right now the democratic position is no we want a much bigger bill that does the state and local government stuff you talk to the does more education stuff. It's just a much more comprehensive package do the Democrats feel any pressure? To do that's McConnell counting on pressure among enough or honorable Democrats to say, you know at least meet US halfway I think the if the Senate Republicans come out smaller than you smaller than they were, they were a couple of weeks ago. That's a bargaining ploy. The question is today's Tuesday So checking on Thursday, is this an old fashioned negotiation or is it just stubborn politics today it stubborn politics, but let's see. So does the average person out there who is suffering, which is I guess almost everybody who's the middle class or blow? Who Do they blame for the federal government not? Coming to their. Aid. Tough one everybody has their own political perspective correct, and so look you should blame you should blame years of dysfunction in Washington number one it's not all trump It's on steroids and exacerbated by trump. The fact that the President United States is not even involved in the negotiations he has to send his treasury secretary and now as chief of staff up to Capitol Hill and he sends his. Chief of staff up because the treasury secretary gets along too well with the Democrats but nobody trusts president even the Republicans here don't trust the president, which is nuts but the town is broken and it's been broken for a long time and it is more broken. It's it's more raw in the trump years. So you you I think everybody should be mad at everybody in a nonpartisan way. Everybody will run it through their filter and I get the democratic argument that we want this big sweeping for steel states or laying off teachers and firefighters. Exactly I get it. It's a it's a good argument and so but you know but you also need to respect the conservative who says, okay. But we can't agree on that right now. So why don't we do these three things today and we'll talk. About the rest tomorrow for the Democrats point is you'll never give that you know if we give you that today, we'll never get to those conversations. So there are there are if you're in debate class, you could come up with a legitimate strategy to to debate both positions What do you think is what are you politically or personally think it's the best thing well, that depends on where you live. Hey. John. King. Last thing for me and I haven't had a chance to read about this because we've been on the air since eleven o'clock. We all know that the major pharmaceutical companies are involved in a vaccine a research banded together to say don't worry. We're going to do this safely. You don't have anything to fear and that was in the face of. This October surprise announcement, our notion that's coming from the White House that we may have something for you before Election Day But then I guess this happened while we're on the air right before I think I actually saw it on your show what we were on the air that Pfizer is now saying that it is possible that safe and effective vaccine could be ready for. Fairly broad distribution by election day that I get that right or did I miss an element? That exactly right five doing some research with a German biotech company and they think it's possible. They'll be ready by the middle of October They also say there are a few more questions they need to answer I get very nervous about this all the time because I think a lot of these companies are trying to boost their stock prices. And so I get really nervous about these conversations because you see wild fluctuation in the stock prices of these companies when they make these press release announcements that you know, we're going to feed all the children and the waters turn the Red Sox are GonNa have a pitching staff. And people call run out and but no one believes that one. That one but I think that there I, there are a lot of hiccups. So I think again, the fact that these nine companies part of the joints, David, this is like the Red Sox and the Yankees putting out a joint statement. You know these are competitors in an incredibly competitive business, their rivals in a free market putting out a statement saying we're all GonNa try to abide by the same rules we need to keep an eye on them because they are businesses they are trying to move their stock and they're trying to make a profit and they're trying to win. A race and for the right reasons, right if they do follow safety good for them about the president puts his on the scale every day which when you create nerves now they say they're gonNA follow the process and all the rules I. I'm going to spend a Lotta time on this in the next several weeks and the. FDA. Again, we talked about this about voting before the institutions of our government or having their credibility questioned all the time and the source of a lot of those questions happens to be the president, United States because of what he says and does. For that's an upbeat note don. So at least the red sox are going to break a record. That's something anyway. Hey. There's always next year John King. It's great to talk to you as always smarter you I'm sure miss you. But she's probably listening Tortilla next week John. Thanks. I'll be your thanks chip that of course is C. N. N.'s John King. He CNN's chief national correspondent anchor of inside politics which you can catch weekdays and Sunday mornings at and coming up. Trump. Show trump a war hero and they'll show you a loser. Open. The lines not terribly long. So if you WANNA get into it quickly ask you about his track record disparaging the men and women who serve in the military that's next on eighty nine, seven vh. Boston public. Welcome back to Boston public radio I'm Jim Geraghty marginally earlier back tomorrow if you're just tuning in, we were talking to C. N. N.'s John King About Donald Trump and reporting by the Atlantic that in twenty eighteen. When trump went to France the commemorate the hundredth anniversary of the armistice that ended World War Wani re he referred to the US servicemembers buried there as quote losers and suckers this of course was in the first time trump has the P. demeaned members of the military. He's on tape you've heard these but these are Incredible, disparaging the late John McCain. And Hugh Mine Chon who died serving in Iraq in two thousand four just listen that war hero he's war. He's a war hero presumes captured back. I like people that weren't captured. Okay. I hate to say. That I saw him he was you know very emotional and probably look like a nice guy to me his wife If you look at his wife, she was standing there she had nothing to say she probably maybe she wasn't allowed to have anything to say you tell me plenty of people have written that that of course is the Khan family that are gold star parents even though trump is denying the reporting the Atlantic despite the fact that even Fox News as you heard from Shirley Senate and John King has confirmed parts. Of the reporting you went on escalators attack on the military during a press briefing yesterday saying it's leaders meeting the Pentagon. Leaders quote want to do nothing but fight wars. So weapon makers can be happy. We're taking your calls an awful lot of time at eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seventy will this cost donald trump like his attack on John McCain and the family did not, and if you're a member of the military or fear in a military family, what is your reaction to this? Eight seven, seven, three, zero one? Eighty nine I. I am incredulous and I guess I am one who did believe when he despaired John McCain, it was over for him. I also believe when he disparaged the Kahn family and I've interviewed accuser con several times is actually going to be with me on Greater Boston Thursday night again, one of the most decent honorable principle people I've ever met in my whole life I. Assume that was the end for him. But nothing hurts him as we said before the Fifth Avenue, line, which was almost like a joke at the time has proven to be for the most part true the. Numbers Eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seventy, seventy does anybody have any doubt in light of what he said in the past Does anybody have any doubt that he did say what the Atlantic suggests he said when he was in France and when he was at the graveside of John Kelly's son, and if you don't have any doubt, what's the consequence of these kinds of disgusting comments by the President States again, not much time. So if you want to get in eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, thousand, nine, seventy marker in pawtucket your first on Boston public radio hey there. Hi. Jim. I'm good. I'm a I'm a veteran. My Dad would retired Navy. My brothers have been in the military. The first time I heard trump talk about McCain John McCain is not being. You know he likes his war heroes weren't captured. I said, my brothers, my father I said, how's he? How's he gonNa win the thing about veteran that's why cerebral. you know, and and of course, the further things that he's done. Hardening Eddie Gallagher. The navy seal and celebration fearing with the Pentagon. Oh Yeah. You know and then I read I think it was in a very stable genius when he was visiting the Arizona he was with Kelly John Kelly and on the way out on nestled boat he's Pulled him aside and tell me what this is about. You know why are we going to this? You know what I mean the guy. I just. I lost it. You know the minute he talked against veterans and nothing he would have ever done would've changed my mind because I. Mean He's The guy that was a draft dodger I just I didn't even know what to say to him and I don't understand how it is that there hasn't been turmoil within the military about a guy who supposedly the commander in chief and you're supposed to respect who does this and disparages generals in public talks about them I don't get it. Well, what are you bought by the way I guess the consequences been he is. Gotten the deserves silence and his John King said a few minutes ago. The silence of people like General Kelly speaks volumes because Kelly could quote exonerate Donald Trump in terms of what he said at the grave of his son but chooses not to so there are consequences and there obviously on your family forum to mark. Thank you very much for the call eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eight, hundred, seventy. It's also one of these things where you think if you are a Republican senator sort of the the givens, United States senator is you will not tolerate any cozying up to Russia. Obviously they tolerate that and you will not tolerate any disparagement of somebody who is chosen voluntarily to serve their country particularly if they have given their life to their country and they are apparently willing to tolerate that is well because you know what do you stand for that great line? What do they stand for reelection? Tom and Cambridge you're next on Boston public radio. Hey, there. I I'll be quick as usual. Yeah. I think trump is going to be the first Republican candidate in ages to lose significant military support over this loser Gates Sucker Gate thing and for me as you know, I don't like him but it's much more personal for me. Now, my father served with honor in World War Two he he he was a civilian in Washington you'd like to say he he served in a wooden navy 'cause they say the desk in Washington dc but I feel like he just defecated where am I? We scattered DADS ashes and that's personal for me. Now. Thanks very much charm. Don't go away I have a question for you. Do, you think that people who have served their country who don't have any additional places to go? Why did the Kelly's? Who could either corroborate these stories or blown away? Why do they not have the? I. Think this is the right word here the patriotic sense to tell the American people what they know and what they don't know I. Get. Not sure. I. Think it's some kind of cognitive dissonance where they feel that he's delivering for them in some ways so that they can put up with his faults in others I I think he's giving a lot of people in a license now to be. Racist and intolerant, but it's you know. If I could figure this out maybe we'd all be in a better place anyway thanks very much. Thanks for your call and thanks brevity. You always honor your commitment at the beginning of the call eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seventy. We're talking about the reporting and the Atlantic confirmed by a number of outlets including most notably a Fox News. least part of it was confirmed by Fox News about Donald Trump disparaging members of the military is particularly those who lost their lives, losers and suckers and that. Sort of thing I. I again as I say I, I don't understand how based upon what he said in the past about members of the military why anybody would think that this was not true and if it wasn't true, why aren't some of the people? who were there these moments coming to the defense of the commander and chief joy in your in. Leuenberger in Boston public radio hey there. Hi. for taking my car My father was a World War Two veteran my brother was killed Kobe? Room? As It's funny that even family members I've talked to well, they don't WanNa. Talk about it and they just don't believe that. But we've heard from his lips as you were saying earlier about Senator McCain and Fox News and other news. Outlets have confirmed it I think it's it has to hurt him I. Pray at Hartson. Change for sure join. Thank you for the call. We appreciate eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seventy also really interesting piece in the Washington, post and in fact, the guy who wrote it is with me tonight on television Michael Kranish who wrote not about the comments that we're talking about so much what he said about McCain and the family but about citizen Donald. Trump long before. He ran for president will actually one time when it was almost running for president on the reform? Party. Ticket twenty plus years ago about what he said about the draft what he said about people who volunteered to serve what he said about members of the military what he said about wars it I mean to me it fits a pattern Janice here in Cambridge in Boston public radio. Hey. Hey Thank you. Say That what what trump does and says is terrible but what really worries me? Is. Why. So many people. vote for him anyway and I'm wondering about Why so many people have such a lack of the ability to think critically. And That's GONNA sink. Not, just one person saying these horrible things. But first of all the Republicans who obviously. CARE. More about what goes into their pocketbooks senators I'm talking about and about the people who elected them, and then the people who lack the education to judge this why don't know about I? Think I was with the until the lack the education I don't think. It's really about that. I think the loyalty to trump the disruptor is so intense that it does matter who disrespects I'm so glad you call Janis because you're singing the same tune that I think I've been singing here for a long time is even if Donald trump is not a re elected come November third or whenever the votes are finally. Up those who have supported this approach to life and our relationship with our fellow humans in this country are not going away and are not going to change anytime soon and so the issue that I hope people focus on. Cultural divide in this country that that again, that is not just in our leaders, but in this incredibly deep fissure between. Those is sport Donald Trump in those who don't so Janice, I think you made the point well, sadly, we are out of time here. Now, this is a point at which Marjorie tournament maybe a little later say what are you doing tonight on television I'll be glad to tell you a couple of things. One is I say Michael Kranish Washington Post ran a terrific wrote a terrific piece the other day about the earlier part of Donald Trump's life and I making a pretty compelling case that trump the citizen said. Many of the same kinds of things the trump the president is reported have said in the Atlantic so that it's all part of a pattern. We're going to have a debate tonight about what margin I debated in the first hour, which is the decision by northeastern to suspend eleven of their students who've violated the Covid nineteen rules and regulations, which is not that unusual. What is really unusual is that they told them that are thirty, six, thousand, five, hundred dollars of tuition would not be coming back and finally we're GONNA interview young. Man. speaking of college, who is a freshman at BC which is not that unusual. But what is unusual as he walked all the way to be see over sixteen days from his home state he was formerly homeless and he wanted to highlight the plight of homeless people in this country. So that's what's happening tonight at seven o'clock Marjorie will be back tomorrow morning to thank you for listening to another edition of Boston Public Radio Tomorrow, we'll have medical ethicist art, Caplan national security expert, Juliet Cayenne, and I am really excited about this. Really is CNN media analyst Brian Stelter in his new book about trump's incestuous relationship with Fox News I've read most of it is really powerful and I think you're GonNa WanNa hear that our crews Chelsea. Mars. Are June sings Matthews Hannah you believe Asian, connelly our engineers, John Parker, our offsite engineers are miles smith and Dave. Goldstein I'm Jim Brady. She is Marta. Regan. She had to leave early today but this is we're back for good election day is fifty six days away. We'll be with the every one of those days and we hope you'll join us as well. Thanks for listening to see you tomorrow bike.

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BPR Full Show 6/26/20: 'Several Drops in the Bucket'

Boston Public Radio Podcast

2:52:53 hr | 1 year ago

BPR Full Show 6/26/20: 'Several Drops in the Bucket'

"Support for Boston. Public radio comes from DC YOU offering auto loans on new and used cars, trucks and SUV's you can talk your perspective monthly loan payment, and learn more at C. You dot org. What will dc you mean to you insured by NCUA membership required. Ahead on Boston public radio whether in Boston Cambridge even Worcester, you may have actually absolutely have heard fireworks mayor. Walsh's confirmed has been at twenty three hundred percent increase over the past couple of weeks left some literally screaming. Please stop them awhile. Fireworks Fun for some. They also rekindle traumatic memories for other. So, what should the city do? Couple minutes will Asu O'CONNELL about that and Donald Trump's nieces, new towel book, and then thirty will cover the. The Governor Charlie Baker's press conference live then after mass demonstration faulted. Lisa, Foreign Mayor Marty Walsh offered an olive branch to activists, said he cut twelve million dollars from the police departments overtime funds and declared racism, a public health emergency, but several members of the city council, so the cut about three percent of the police budget is nowhere near what they need or expect the merit. Join us to discuss that then answer questions in yours for asking. That Moore's up on Boston, public radio. Eighty nine seven G. He's Rowdy Margarita. Listen to Boston. Public Radio Eighty nine seven W., G. B. H. Good Morning Jen you here that thing Governor Abbott and Texas the first state in the country to roll back to. Things that have been open bars and reducing capacity in restaurants. That's huge. Yeah, it is Utah apparently. He's been a big fight to with a lot of his. The mayor's in Texas. Who've been saying much more dire consequences up close, and a lot of them are Democrats, so it's been like a a pitch battle, but the hospital workers really afraid of being overrun like they were in New York. City, in Italy, what's the big deal? Because he's a trump guide to? But any case speaking of trump so I the. The trump administration fails the block. John Bolton's book from being released now. The trump family is failed to thwart eight towel yesterday. A judge dismissed. Trump's brothers attempt to block the publication of awards and all book by Mary trump the president's niece. Joining US online to revel in this. I'm sorry to discuss this and other norms that abnormalities a day from the band, formerly known as the dixie chicks to the ire of illegal fireworks as media Maven Sue O'CONNELL sues the CO Publisher Bay, Windows in the South End News Chief and political commentator hello sue. Day I've just been shaped by Turkey's intended. Move my location, but I'm okay. Oh no warrior! Me So I had to. Marjorie ordinarily you start these discussions, can I? Because I wasn't there yesterday. And I heard your conversation with Chuck Todd at the top of the show, and you ask them a question and I loved, which was when it's clear. The country's going in what direction? What is the strategy for Donald Trump to be going in the exact opposite direction on things like corona virus. Racial Equity and since you had that discussion, this is for you, so maybe you can answer. This will yesterday in Wisconsin. He embraces stop and Frisk a last night. They file a brief to repeal obamacare. We don't need healthcare in the middle of this crisis and Mike. Pence is doing happy talk that things are improving while a majority of the states are seeing cases increase. Is there a method to this madness that we're all missing, or what is it? Well if you're talking about reelection, I don't think so, but if you're talking about his future earning abilities. Yeah, I? Mean you have to remember that even when Eugene. McCarthy left office when Richard, Nixon left office, they still had somewhere between twenty and thirty percent approval rating right so if we work under the assumption that Donald Trump's gonna have a hard time getting reelected. Then what his next play! What's this con man? Next revenue revenue stream and you know I believe that he had planned all along not to win, and we were going to have Donald Trump's facebook TV and we'd. We'd still have things. Rolling rallies everywhere and nothing very much would be different in the world of Donald, trump getting people to express some things that we are surprised, but not shocked that people will say out loud, so I mean there's a part of me. That thinks you know. There's really something seriously wrong with Donald Trump, but the people around him are hoping that this will continue to keep his base at twenty to thirty percents so that when he leaves off, it can continue barnstorming around the country if we ever get back to to to being in buildings to go okay. What did? He didn't understand. I listen carefully. He didn't get all the grief Marjorie analysis. I guess the thing is if he still does think and he could i. mean you don't know where we're months away from election, things could around people's support him on the economy. You'd think that if he wanted to. At least give a shot at winning, then he would pick up the pace on corona virus and race relations, because that's where he seems to have taken the huge hits in the polls, not an economy on the virus and race stuff, so you'd think he could give you know. But. Maybe he just can't admit he's wrong or maybe I've always thought there was something wrong with him. Hinge. That the million times. If he were a member of my family, I would take him to the hospital I would have them in the emergency room. I'm not kidding. I would've called the you know. The the the chief of M. G. H. and get a an expert con consult on his behavior I. I'm not kidding about that and I you know. Just continue to think that we we joke about the word salad. You know interview the other night with the. Call Center last I? It's just a Sean Sean. Hannity thing last night. It was. Yeah. It was very. Scary it's scary for those who are around him who may love him and certainly not as niece, but they they certainly i. think should be concerned about his health. Let's talk about. Let's talk about his niece so I think people are lining up for the. For the Mary trump expose. US about it so. Yeah, so the book is called too much and never enough, which is a brilliant title how my family to the world's most dangerous man now the thing about Mary trump. Is that he is in actual trained clinical psychologist exactly. Right now. Imagine what it must be like. To be in a family where the idea that many of us would have to sign nondisclosures is just part of day-to-day like hey. Exactly alert alert what contracts were when he was in fourth grade, started going around, just collecting my signature, she go. Hey, can you? Sign a blank paper, and then she would right above it what what I had agreed to which I thought. You know I keep telling her. She should be lost forever. Yeah, but I mean so. Mary has signed a nondisclosure around. You know there's a whole lot of complex issues regarding The estate of her dad and the grandfather and trump's dad, and apparently she signed a non disclosure, and she's publishing this book and not only Donald. Trump is one of his siblings have food to stop her from being able to publish this book and they failed so far, but you know I'm I'm I'm learning so much about the use of nondisclosures I. I mean I think I've signed honestly three nondisclosure in my entire professional career, and it was about business deal. You know not so that you could talk about buying or getting bought and not go share those secrets with other people. Apparently, everybody wants you make over a certain amount of money as nondisclosures so so far, it's going to be published. We'll see what happens if there's more more to do in in in court to see if they can stop it. You know what I thought was a really telling little tidbit from this book, I if it's Mary Trump's brother or child, somebody cerebral palsy, we'd. It's her brother's. Thank you. which is a which is a devastating disease? And requires a lot of extra help and stuff that our president wanted to cut off the help for him with his with his. Healthcare stuff. In your party. Why why don't we have to pay for him? Yeah right that they that they a family member. Argue one way or another weather about all this inheritance wealth, but this young person this was. Would need medical assistance for his entire life and rice seating Donald trump the I guess the uncle or the great uncle said. Why would we need to support him? When you know if trump is richest, he says he is. It would have been a drop in the bucket to get for its whole life by the way just as an update when you said they may go back to court my what I read. This is a great piece in the. Washington Post about the book by the way. The content, but they the after losing with some level judge in New York City, they are now going to spring court, which is not the highest court. It's the trial court. New York State and So there's still going to be in. The book is scheduled for July release. You said the title was great. As you said that I was thinking wouldn't a better title been the family where it happened? What do you think about that one? That thank you very much. Good. When did you ever hear this woman? Before? By the way either of you before the book thing I? Never even heard of her of you. Know I know. Actually name, trump siblings I know to a sister who is a federal judge I. Think of all the presidential siblings kids have been the most quiet I can't recall and not being able to name the family members of other president. So I think that's that's an interesting like. Keep brother gets elected president and immediately go underground. What's up? Well no brother says a big Fan. I think I. Mean in all that Donald sister brothers big. The judge. We know resigned shortly after the New York Times at that big story about the family cheating on their taxes, she she resigned from position, but I told the story of Jim before I was in New York City for Easter couple of years ago and we. We went to this this Jesuit. Church and there was a person on the program. Whose last whose middle name was trump? Who Given all this money to the for the Easter services like I, think three thousand dollars or five thousand dollars. Most people would give him twenty five Bucks Fifty Bucks so I thought wow I wonder if that's the sister and the priest gets up at Easter mass and gives a scathing anti-trumps You can't be a Catholic if you're in favor of building a wall, you can't be a Catholic. In favor of screwing poor people in favor of Tyson while the all the stuff I'm thinking I, wonder and sure enough. She gave money that Church that trashed her. Brother so always made me wonder about what the relationship is now between her and him. If, she's supporting a place. That's trash and having. A relationship is in the other direction I'll tell the story that I told before too I. Think we've told you this Su- when we interviewed Donald Trump on the radio during the New Hampshire primary for years ago, we were I. Think the first people to ask him the question. Do you have litmus test for spring? Court justices and without missing a beat? He said yeah to one. They gotta be bright okay, and to they have to be pro-life and we didn't get to do any. Follow up, and as you know. Those radio interviews are usually lined up and the next interviewer. I. Don't remember where it was a woman where she was from said we just heard. You say you have a litmus test. One of them is pro-life. Can you tell us give us a name of a pro-life judge who meets your criterion without missing a beat? He said Yeah my sister. WHO's a federal court judge and the next day when we're Google we learn that sister is not pro life. Pro Choice so either didn't know, or you can give a damn. He just throws out that name. We're talking to sue O'CONNELL. So. Let's talk about the supreme. Court ruling about Discrimination Employment Against Lgbtq people what this could mean for healthcare for Trans People and obviously people getting fired because they're gay or trans. Last year, last June I think the trump administration. issued a rollback. On affordable care act ruling that the Obama Administration had done I think back in two thousand sixteen, and you know folks. They not know this, but in government policy and inlaws if you're not necessarily on the laundry list of things. It means that you can be discriminated against. That's why when we look at like housing protections it lists. You know. Gender veteran status age. You know whether you're married, not because without it being on the list that allows the loophole for someone and say well. You didn't say I can't rent to so and so because they're not on the list. So what the Obama Administration did around Obamacare was make sure that they identified in the protection language. You know that you cannot discriminate against people based on this and that and sex, and was identified as being your sexual orientation, your gender your your gender expression whether you were male or female. It was that was supposed to be covered, and the trump administration is moving to roll that back and there are a number of health clinics across the country. LGBTQ health clinics who are now suing the trump administration to make sure that that coverage remains in place for the affordable care act now we talked last time about the Supreme Court ruling about. About Protections how you know titles seven protect you. Gender is part of sexual orientation, and this would be one of those conversations about whether or not this expand to other things other than the workplace, and if thinking is, that does cover a gender identity when it comes to the affordable care act, but let me just say I. Don't know if we had this discussion with you right after the decision, or if it was cow rose, it was somebody it seems to me and I hate to be feel confident about something that's important is the the the ruling in the employment? Case was based on a broad interpretation of the word sex. Statue just like the OBAMAS did, and it seems, and that's the exact same issue in the ruling, the the rule was promulgated around. Healthcare for Trans People, so I have to say I think that's a fairly clear case. I hope it's not as Clare's New York Times story the other day once again there's going to be one of these religious liberty challenges saying that you know which controls title seven and this. You're right not to be discriminated against in this Broadway as In that decision or religious liberty comes of all time, but I think it's in this case. Some Catholic diocese fired this longtime workers. Race graceful violation of morality clause. Violation was that she was actually married a woman. She was in love with and it worked there for what? Is once again. Just let me point out. This is why the Catholic Church has so much problems hypocrisy wise. Have, tolerated all these rapists priests and covered up for them and continue to do it, and then they are get on their high horses. Morality clauses about two women. There's a great quote in this story. I absolutely love it. They've quote from a parishioner. WHO's ninety seven? She's talking about this woman. That just got five. She's one of the nicest people ever WanNa know and Christie. Your wife is just a life. Oh, says this ninety seven year old woman, I am now looking to find a new church that aligns and my values. It's too bad because she's been at that church for forty years and. Seven. Compare liens are knocking on her door and come on over. This woman was in Michigan, her name. Terry Gonda and her wife Christie relieve. The thing about this that always gets me. You know to your point about the sexual abuse and rape in the church, but it's also the the hypocrisy of which laws church I'm using air quotes which church laws they want to enforce. Exactly! If you don't want hire. LGBTQ people to work in your religious facility fine, but then go by the letter of the law. Don't hire divorce. People don't hire people who. are having sex outside of marriage. Don't eat people who eat meat on Friday. A doting people don't fire people. Yeah but don't have gay priests. That would be a problem. With mention to get a listener test and say this, and then don't take federal funds for anything right, and then enjoy your religion and leave us alone, but don't don't pick and choose. Who you want to discriminate against based on what the public the feeling I mean it's. It's just so so bad, and you know something not to get too Catholic Biblical here, but the only thing you hear about Christ in the Bible which we're supposed to be following the Catholic Church. He's supposedly founded. Their church is divorce doesn't mention homosexuality doesn't mention abortion. You said you shouldn't get divorced, so it's ridiculous, isn't it? Mean doesn't that just show the ridiculousness of it and if the Catholic Church are going to get rid of Gay Prese. Got No priests. Now it would be, it would be. I hope that they're celebrate. Gay Pref- draws was to be solid, but he knows there's a lot of gay priests also wonder whether Neil Gorsuch. Who who was brought up as a Catholic, he went to a PISCOPO church, and I wondered about that when he ruled in favor of gay rights to Connell. Maybe he's changed his united with the episcopal aliens. Billions, are you know in my experience? I was raised by both the Protestant and we had a mixed marriage and mixed Irish marriage when I was growing up. Mom Was Protestant and my dad is Catholic and I'll never forget him third grade like in nineteen, sixty seven when I found out that Protestants made up the majority of Americans living in revere with Italian, Catholic? And Jewish Americans I was like where are these promises where I keep hearing all about? Of course. You Know Gorsuch has has been you know I I'm always hesitant to say this because I heard the same thing about capital on the same thing about bar. Course such has been. Indicated that he is a sort of letter of the law guy who is not going to be influenced by social social pushes. You know and I think that you know when you break it down and look sometimes If you just follow the logical path, it makes sense knocking discriminate against people. By the way speaking solicitous stuff that we're talking about, we should just mention I. Heard the NPR news. Today's the fifth anniversary of a Burger. It's the fifth anniversary of Supreme Court ruling on same sex marriage, so sue since you're the woman about town. We Have Marty Walsh noon and one of the things we're going to talk about a lot of email about this already. Is the fireworks all over the place? Traumatizing dogs traumatizing I don't mean to belittle that because I'm gonNA compare it chromatography in some people who are veterans, old people waking them up in the middle and I. Do you know what's going on with I? Don't get the whole thing what's going on. I. Live in Fort Hill in Roxbury and I live on a hill, so any fireworks happened in Roxbury Dorchester Jamaica plain or the south end we hear, and the and I I have a high tolerance for the fireworks. Generally because you know I, understand that kids and young adults are looking for something to do I know they're illegal in the state of Massachusetts. I know that I have a dog that I have to tranquilize usually all through the end of June and early July. Yeah, it's also started very very early. They started like three weeks ago. There was A. A one day I was recording segments for any in for my dining room and I had to stop at three o'clock in the afternoon Monday because they were so loud and not only are they. You know some people might think we'll do like the sparklers, firecrackers or the bottle rockets these are like like professional grade down. Yeah, fireworks and they shake the first time I heard when I thought actually something that had happened that we have been attacked in some way, and they're just out of control now at the same time you know, I'm hearing from some people. Well, you should call the COP. The said well. We're trying not to call the cops on activities of kids in urban settings that we might not call the cops if we lived in suburbs so. Then you call three one one, which is the service that is a constituency service. They tell you to call the cops and at the same time that he counselor Jillian ahead has has had a facebook meeting. They've been community signed up. Put around the ballpark like the Marcella ballpark where where I live from the neighborhood, saying look at black lives matter. Matter. Stop, setting off the fireworks. They there are people who are survivors of violence who are being disturbed by people veterans who are being old people, so you know I can leave right now from in front of my house and drive in by legal fireworks in New Hampshire and be back. What Times it I can be back by one thirty two and. So we have to find some way as the state to deal with the the border crossings of these illegal fireworks, I'm also hearing rumors, and these are complete rumors, but I'm hearing them for people who are getting saying. They're getting fireworks from people who usually set them on professionally, and since they've been canceled this year, there's a surplus of them that they ordered in advance, and some people are stealing them in and selling them I mean. Mean I don't know what the answer is except. I think that this is an opportunity for somewhat of community policing where the communities can can work to try and get the kids in the young people who are setting off the fireworks at least to reduce it because it really has been again. I have a really high tolerance for this, but it has been unbearable. We go through these periods where for a few days it's not so. but I'm just worried as we approach. The fourth of July week it. It's going to get worse so I again. Another day I'm happy. I'm not married because I'm not really sure what the answer to it and we're going to bring it up with the mayor of noon. So The, the Dixie chicks are now just the chicks. dixie chicks who are famous country pop ning stream sort of A. Who you might recall came out against George W Bush. And then yes, on country radio, they have been activists pointing out that most country music is sung by white men, not a lot of room for country, women on the airwaves, and They sort of had a moment where they realized that there was Dixie in their name, and they have officially changed their name to the chicks. There's there was a band or a personal already had that name, so they're? They've come to an agreement with them to take it over officially. and you know again. It's being met by some people who are happy that the term Dixie, which many. I think it's safe to say associated with the confederacy group of terrorists who wanted to leave our country to continue to enslave humans so I salute them for doing it, but they're also getting pushed back, but I don't really think they're getting pushed back by anybody. Who still sort of looks at them as their number one band, but it is a reckoning that's happening. Happening, done only in public with public statues, but also in the entertainment business, a number of people are entertainers and comics and content providers are recognizing things that they have done in the past that what that is now or was then racist. dixie chicks is certainly something I think that they looked at their their southern pride, and now have re re re. What, what Dixie means just like lady antebellum. Is that lady a There's a youtube broadcaster called Jenna Marbles. Who just brought down your entire hurt? channel She's been broadcasting I. Think almost for ten years on Youtube because of what she calls racist and problematic material that she did in the past. So I think I think we're having a moment where people are examining. Things they did without either knowing or thinking about or didn't understand the impact of it and I welcome it as a as a freshening and an example of how to take accountability for things. Even if you didn't know what to make it better I say three quick things. Then we go to break one. I know you didn't mean this. I don't consider the mainstream I. Think they are great and I think they're cutting edge and lots of ways, and is you touched on you? Mr, I love music. I love him and by the way I hope I got the title right? You mentioned the thing about Bush and the war and they. They essentially lost their careers, YEA! I'm not ready to step down I'm not ready to give us the documents on gender remember. The, number one after the fact, but there's documentary which I think is called. Shut up and saying I should have looked it up if I'm wrong, just google it, which is about how they almost lost everything because they had the courage to stand up to this war, it is, it is brilliant. Their new song on the new CD March march, which has a the CDs called gas lighting has great video the whole they are fabulous and good for them and watch the watch the documentary. If you haven't seen it about people willing to sacrifice greatly principal, these women were willing to do it and they. They paid a price a good for them. Yeah absolutely I didn't even mainstream as an insult. I see you or Whatever they. WanNa think he listens to mainstream music he. Listened to cutting edge music. How many times can you pledge? Bruce Springsteen is board of the USA. That's cutting edge I think, don't you think? Okay. We're both big thing. What did you say? Oh mean again I gotta go. Okay sewer Geezer. Ron Fast. Media Maven Suam Connell is the W. G. B. H. Contributor. She joins every week. She's the CO publisher of Bay Windows in the South End news any ends explainer in chief and political commentator. So Collins Great to talk to you. About the Turkeys I've said this before you sympathizer, sue, but if you're a man, every single wild turkeys head is exactly if you'll excuse the expression that crotch level and let me tell you. It's not ski NAM. Donate is what it is. It is fright for. We are bringing you live coverage of governor, Charlie Baker's a press conference, eighty nine seven W. G. B. H.. Boston public radio. Welcome back to Boston Public Radio Jim Brady and Marjorie begin any minute. The governor's GonNa. Be doing a press conference which we will bring you live as we do all of his events if they happen during our show in the interim, because we never know it scheduled for eleven thirty and we never know exactly where what time it's going to start. We're GONNA talk to you for a few minutes, and by the way just in terms of scheduling for the whole show we will stay with Governor Baker until noon, the mayor will join us, and we'll cut away from governor Baker. Baker and it will if you WanNa hear more of what he has to say, will be streaming it live. You can check it out there, but Mayor Walsh will be here. No matter how long the governor takes at his press conference to take our questions, and you're starting at noon until one o'clock I'd like to fill these few minutes with Martin I always feel bad about inviting calls, 'cause we may have to cut them off for the governor, but people may want to participate the thing you discuss with Chuck Todd yesterday. The thing we discuss was so yesterday. What is the trump? Strategy here go in the exact opposite direction from where the growing number of American voters are going. Wait a second. Here's the governor governor. Baker live at the state. House one twelfth budget. which was the amount recommended by the comptroller, and we'll make it possible for the treasurer to deliver local aid payments to cities and towns. We obviously look forward to working with our colleagues on the legislature during the month of July as some of the issues associated with fiscal twenty get a little clearer and fiscal twenty one get a little clear to finalize what I would call a budget for the go forward on the rest of the year, but I wanNA. Thank legislature for acting quickly on this one and providing some security and certainty to people with respect to how the New Year. We'll start here for the Commonwealth and for the Commonwealth cities and towns. Today Lieutenant. Governor and I and Mike conly secretary nearly are going to discuss our plans with respect to covid nineteen economic recovery, but I don't want to provide a quick update on Covid, nineteen testing cases and hospitalizations here in Massachusetts. As we continue to gradually reopened Massachusetts public health data continues to trend in the right direction. Yesterday over ten thousand cove. In one thousand nine hundred s were reported across the state which brings us to over one million tests administered in Massachusetts so far the level of testing we've been able to achieve makes us a national leader. I. Want to thank all of the labs, hospitals, community health centers and others who have made this possible. Yesterday there were two hundred and twenty six new covid. Positive cases reported the seven day average for positive tests. Here in Massachusetts is dropped one point eight percent. We also dropping covid nineteen patient hospitalized, which is down now to nine hundred and five that represents seventy five percent decrease since the middle of April hundred seventy, four covert positive patients remain in the ICU's. We'll continue to monitor these public health indicators as additional industries and businesses and employers reopen, and as we move through our phased re-opening plan, and as we said before we continue to courage everyone to wear face, coverings, practice, social distancing and stay home. If you feel sick, it's been working. It's worked well for the people in Massachusetts and we all need to keep it up cove in one thousand, nine hundred and will not be taking some vacation. As many people as seen other states have suffered massive spikes in new cases in hospitalizations, and we urge every resident in Massachusetts to continue to be vigilant and mindful during their daily activities that we can contain this city virus, but it's critically important for everybody to do their part. I think many people know earlier this year back before covert. We filed an economic development plan here in Massachusetts enact enabling partnerships for growth. The bill laid out targeted investments in housing community, development and business competitiveness, obviously due to the head that came with Covid, nineteen in the pandemic lots changed in the last few months. Our goal remains the same, however, which is to create regional partnerships, growth and opportunities for every community from Berkshires to Cape Cod. However COVID, one thousand nine hundred impact on so many aspects of our daily life here in Massachusetts has changed our economic landscape. The pandemic brought with it a massive disruption to our economy, cities and towns also incurred unexpected costs. We understand that the Commonwealth has a challenge before it is, we move toward recovery. In Secretary neely and the lieutenant, Governor have had conversations with many many many folks on the Economic Affairs Committee in the legislature, including conversations directly with House Chair, representative, and Margaret for and Senate. Chair Senator Eric Lesser. So today we're announcing a two hundred and seventy five million dollar cove in one, thousand, nine hundred and economic recovery package that's built upon the original legislation and based on conversations. We've had with our colleagues in the legislature to spur economic growth for every region of Massachusetts. Specifically, we're seeking changes to our original bill to invest more in low income communities, communities of color and minority owned businesses that have been particularly hard hit by covert. Our cities and towns across the Commonwealth need support to confront the economic challenges that have been brought on by this virus to address this. We're asking our partners in the legislature to consider amending the scope of several of our proposed programs targeted toward specific communities that have been hard hit by cove nineteen. Reallocating funding to tackle the significant economic impact of the virus, while outlining a path toward recovery is our key objective here and establishing new tools to promote equity and to drive economic growth and communities among businesses have faced longstanding barriers to entry in areas like steak contracting. In order to do this. We're proposing an additional fifteen million dollars for neighborhood stabilization, which brings that total to forty million. Increasing funding for community development financial institutions by twenty five million dollars for a record level of thirty, five million to assist small businesses and tripling funding for grants to support micro-businesses from a total of five million to fifteen million dollars. These proposals will bring safe affordable housing units back onto the market give women, minority, veteran and immigrant small business owners access to capital to grow their enterprises and support early stage businesses with grants and technical assistance. We're looking forward to working with our colleagues in the legislature to help us update this important legislation to provide relief and opportunity from the impact of Covid nineteen and to make progress in addressing long-standing equity issues here in Massachusetts. The original legislation was developed with input from public and private sector partners, local officials and many other experts, and we're deeply grateful for the legislatures commitment to moving forward on a recovery package during the last few days of the legislative session. Since the end of the formal session is right around the corner. We hope this bill can move quickly so that we can give communities. And small businesses across the Commonwealth the tools and the support. They need to recover and move forward. And now like to turn the podium over Lieutenant Governor Potato, who can talk a little more about some of the details? You're listening to governor. Charlie Baker live on eighty nine seven W. G. B.. H. Talking about an economic recovery plan. Here's Lieutenant Governor Circumstances. We held engagement sessions all across our Commonwealth which led to the development of our plan. And our legislation entitled an act, Enabling Partnership for Growth. Four goals came about as pillars of our plan. Responding to the housing crisis building vibrant communities, supporting business, competitiveness and training a skilled workforce. While, these goals remain the same the changes we're proposing. Will produce stronger legislation to assist our economic recovery. As residents face increase, economic insecurity and high housing costs, increasing state investment in distressed homes is critical to bring safe and foldable housing units back on the market. We are proposing to increase the plans funding for neighborhood stabilization to forty million an increase of fifteen million from our original legislation. Cities and towns also need additional tools and flexibilities to build vibrant communities and to make this possible legislation includes following. Forty, million in funding to prior art prioritize the redevelopment of utilized or abandoned properties. Five million to support local growth planning projects due to the pandemic municipalities need need for increased capacity and technical assistance is larger than ever, and as it will help. Communities find creative ways to plan and process permanent permanent hermits in this new environment. This support will help. Municipalities work on Housing and Economic Development Goals and unlocked potential in their downtown's main streets. And as we think about our communities. Are Small businesses are top of mind in a very high priority. Due to Kobe, nineteen gaps worsened for small businesses that were not able to take advantage of the federal, program. Today we propose increasing funding to community development, financial institutions or CDFI's to direct loans and assistance to small businesses. Increasing CD CD F. I funding to record levels of thirty, five million will allow the state to invest in more small businesses. Including minority owned businesses. We are also proposing to triple the Biz. 'em Power Program. With fifteen million dollars mass growth capital corporation. Will Grant. Grants and these grants will match. Crowd sourced funding raised by micro-businesses. In addition, our proposal gives preference to businesses that are low or moderate income. Area or owned by women veterans. Immigrants or minorities. The Commute the Commonwealth's dynamic and diverse business ecosystem is core to key to our continued success and to. Growing our economy as a whole. While we continue to battle. Cobra nineteen. We can't lose sight of our strengths and what makes Massachusetts AH leader in so many industries? Are Small businesses throughout the Commonwealth. have been very patient and cooperative as. have. Combated the covid nineteen and continue to do so, and they have certainly sacrificed a lot in the interest of our public health and our and our safety. We are grateful for their continued cooperation, and while we keep striving to grow and build our economy, we must first help. Many of our small businesses bridge the gap. To Reopening And reach recovery and to. Reach higher levels of stabilization in opportunity. All across our Commonwealth we will support our regional economies, and we will work together to reopen to rebound and grow stronger and better than ever. I would also like to join the governor and thanking our partners in the legislature. We spent a lot of time with chair. Woman for Onta- and Senator Lesser. To craft the original economic development bill. We appreciate. They're holding a hearing. How this afternoon! To listen to many of the stakeholders who helped craft the original bill and to consider updates that are really important. To this reopening and recovery process we thank them for their leadership for their important work for their partnership and the effort to produce a bill that will be responsive to both the near term needs of businesses as well as our longer term goals to strengthen and grow our Massachusetts economy with that I'd now like to turn it over to Secretary Kelly. As you heard Lieutenant governor she turning it over to the secretary of economic affairs. This is. Secretary. The legislature for their their collaboration and their commitment, and we look forward to further collaboration as we go forward here throughout the legislative session. Economic development legislation and the updates at all the gus with the legislature today we have a great opportunity to take a really good bill and targeted even more toward advancing equity, a challenge that long preceded Cova. As well as economic recovery from his devastating pandemic. We look to stabilize the neighborhoods that were hardest hit to support minority owned businesses with record levels of funding and to position the state for continued growth in emerging innovation sectors. We seek to fund even more affordable housing and develop more housing inner gateway, similar cities, many which which were hit extra hard by the pandemic. Kobe nineteen has really sharpened the need to address the housing crisis. The virus has demonstrated how important stable housing is to stain, safe, social distancing and continuing to work from home and teach our children. Are High cost of rent across Massachusetts creates enormous as many households in an effort to make rent live in crowded quarters, oftentimes includes multiple generations of families from newborns to the elderly. The Health Equity Advisory Group recently issued findings and recommendations on the disproportionate impact of Kobe, nineteen on communities of color by no surprise, housing identified in that report is a hugely important factor for better public health outcomes. Social and economic factors are known to be big contributors to what makes us healthy, but our current housing crisis forces families to sacrifice other priorities like food, clothes and healthcare. Zony. Laws around the country have been a tool used to exclude. The current system has produced harmful results for minority populations and communities before cove nineteen. And it now produces consequences that are outright dangerous to these communities during the outbreak. This is a chance for us to find new ways of encouraging housing production at the local level. The housing choice reforms still included in this legislation are designed to foster more production into to promote equitable access to opportunity. While respecting the local decision making process, it does this by enabling cities and towns to adopt certain best practices through a simple majority vote rather than the current two thirds supermajority. Without meaningful zony reform, we'll continue to see more of the same negative impacts on equity, housing, affordability and access to jobs. Massachusetts is one of just a few states that requires a supermajority to change local zoning, which which means even when a town meeting or city council forms a majority consensus around the need to increase housing. It only takes a small minority to stop it. To be clear, the housing crisis will not be solved by one piece of legislation, but this package today will put our state in a position to produce housing. We need to meet our current demands. Why should we continue to prevent a community from producing more housing? Especially multifamily housing in downtowns and near transit. and. We're optimistic that the time is ripe real lasting change that gives cities and towns the flexibility to do what they know to be best for their communities. Beyond these reforms, our proposal will continue to fund transit oriented housing as well as sustainable and climate, resistant affordable housing with new language that modifies income thresholds to increase affordability. The bill will also allow the housing. Development Incentive program or H, dip. To meet growing demand for market, rate, housing and Gateway cities in enable similar communities to use this tool. More housing creates more economic growth something we need as we transition from reopening to recovery. More housing benefits public health as we continue to fight the pandemic. More housing will help us to achieve greater equity something that we all must continue to fight for every day. Thank you. That was secretary of Housing and economic. Development And I think we taking questions now for the governor. For before. leaving. Define but maybe explain how the program year. Guess he's closer to. Well I'll start where secretary neely ended, which was the conversation about housing generally There's no question that covid nineteen has laid bare a number of significant issues and challenges for Urban Communities and especially urban communities of color. Many of which relate to the lack of. Affordable housing in those communities and We've been working for two years to try to get legislation passed. That would make it easier for communities to build more housing and. We signed the largest housing bond bill to support the development of affordable, moderate and transit oriented house housing. Two years ago three years ago now was it two years ago. We have a ton of dry powder in other words, and it's very hard to put it to work, because it's so hard to actually get housing projects approved especially in many of the communities. That we're most interested in seeing that development in and. I live got, but. My good friend Mayor Driscoll in Salem. which is a thriving community that has done extraordinarily well under her leadership. As suffered terribly because they can't create the housing that their community needs. To serve the people who currently live and work there and. She has an eleven member city council. Which means any housing project that she wants to move forward has to get an eight three vote out of that. City Council Over the course of the last several years I would say somewhere between five and ten times. She's gone before the city council with a variety of projects at every level of the housing, senior housing, affordable housing workforce housing, ancillary dwelling housing I, mean almost everything you can think of. That would be a part of trying to create more housing opportunities more affordable options for people in Salem. And she inevitably gets seven four vote. Now I think a seven four vote should be enough to move a housing project forward and most people I think would agree with that, but in Massachusetts, you need eight three. If you live in a smaller community way of five member, select board that five member select void can't vote three two and have that be a positive development with respect to moving forward on housing projects. You have to get the four one. Because three to is sixty forty and you gotta get the sixty six and a half sixty seven to move the project forward. Now, there's a lot of money and this bill is a lot of money in the housing bond bill to develop and support the creation of literally tens of thousands of units of affordable workforce transit, oriented and moderately priced housing and senior housing, and a lot of it would be built in places where we all know, we need it, and we're covid. Nineteen made absolutely clear it should be an imperative that it get developed. But until we change some of these rules around the process through which we actually develop housing, the process is going to continue to take too long, and in many cases, a small group of people will be able to say no to projects that more than half the people in the community, and more than half of it's elective representatives support so I. Really Hope that between now and the end of this session. We can get some of the money that's associated with this especially around neighborhood stabilization microbusiness lending in the. Community financial institution support, but we also need to get some changes in the rules of the game with respect to building housing, generally, if we want to solve for the problems that are right in front of us and start to make it possible for us to do two things get a lot of people back up on their feet, and at the same time create the kind of housing. We're going to need to deal with some of the stark issues. That secretary can you talked about with respect, zoning and housing production generally which. There are many terrific articles in great books that had been written about this. It's been a huge impediment. For many years to providing the kind of house access to housing that people of color deserve. Close it, says you are out. What is the push translated? That was way too yeah. Walking answer? I think the biggest pushback to it is. Change it's about change and. And in many cases. Changes, A. Is, a is a difficult topic. An in some cases kind of a scary concept, but But I. You know if there's one thing and I thought Secretary neely. Hit this this well. If there's one thing covert, everybody's talked about the fact, that covert has laid bare significant issues. That separate majority populations from minority populations, not just here in Massachusetts, but across the country. And housing is one of them. That's right up there. And most of the places where. Significant Percentages of our communities of color. Operate. The process to develop new housing and affordable housing is profoundly difficult. And that needs to get fixed. Sessions coming. Thirty days. This is a different kind. eurochecks recommend legislature that they consider extending the session is you don't know what's coming up in. Kobe. Bills! And august-september. All. On economic! Yeah I guess what I would say with respect to that. Is that The. The legislature established this. Eighteen nineteen. Nineteen months eighteen nineteen months. Twenty. Nineteen. They status in nineteen months session for very good reasons and And I am. Very supportive of why they did that in the first place, and why they thought it was appropriate and I'm certainly not gonNA. Tell them what to do between now and the and the thirty first of July. I certainly believe they and we have a lot of things that we need to work our way through. Over the next thirty days and covert is certainly an issue that. Creates challenges for them just in terms of their regular business and create challenges. For the rest of us, really did put in many respects on ice. A lot of the typical legislative work that would have been done in March and. Especially April but a little bit the back end of March. And I think that's something that they they should take up and discuss and make whatever decision they think makes the most sense, but I'm not I. Don't like it when they. Don't like it when they play in our world. They need to make whatever decision they think makes the most sense for them. At this restaurant. House step. Leads to low. Arm saying. Yeah I. We. We supported the restaurant relief was originally proposed and. And that's one of those elements that I would hope would make it through the process and and in fairness. Legislature despite the difficulty of the. Framework through which they have to operate now has passed a lot of legislation that's provided significant support and assistance to. Many businesses a lot of communities. Around Massachusetts over the course of the past ninety days or so. But we certainly support the the restaurant building. Think it would be a good thing. I don't I mean obviously. It's a disagreement of some sort. Between the branches. Question about testing. It. Is Time to loosen up. Some of the guidelines round testing for instance if you're coming from Florida through coming from a place like Texas, those places or seeing spikes, should you be able? Just to summarize if you just tune in from a second ago, the governor did address as he does every day. The latest corona virus numbers. They're good. Ten, more than ten thousand tests, two hundred twenty six positives yesterday seven day. Average of positives is one point eight percent, which is very good hospitalizations down to nine, hundred and five, which is I think seventy five percent lower than than mid April. What interestingly he failed dimension which I thought was odd. There's a group covert act now. That came out in the last twenty four hours rating only four states as having quote contained. Corona virus. They're not saying the battles over, but have contained in New York new. Jersey Connecticut and Massachusetts then the Gov-, Lieutenant. Governor and the Secretary of Economic and Housing Development Kenneally spoke about his two hundred and seventy five million dollar covert economic recovery package. It was also an opportunity for secretary can nearly to make a pitch for what the governor's pitched everywhere including art show a totally my opinion commonsense. Zoning change that would require only simple majorities rather than these supermajority two thirds in some communities. The only thing I'd say about this and I. Know This editorial so my apologies. The fact that the legislatures even contemplating going home on July thirty first in the middle of this pandemic, so that they can campaign for reelection when virtually none of them have opponents and that the governor will not intercede. Is Ridiculous having said that the governor said that their business will not get involved. That essentially is what the governor and his colleagues had to say again if you want to hear more. You can check out. It's streaming. Live on W. H. News Dot Org. What's coming up, Marjorie? Talk to the Mayor of Boston Marty Walsh. It's going to be here up next to take our questions in yours for our monthly edition of asks Mary Listing to eighty nine seven W. G. B. H. Boston public radio. Welcome back to Boston public. It's your job. I forgot all right okay. He's Jim Brady on March or Regan. And we're going to talk to mayor. Marty Walsh for our monthly segment of ask. The Mayor Marty watches with us. Thank you very much Mr Mayor for showing up. How are you? I'm video anyway we can. It may be I'm not a video I would've shown video. Ad It what? Something is that. There's no There's really nothing going on today to talk about so I was thinking. Of couple of minutes. I my budget. Crunch virus numbers down and I think that's a great report. Now talking good talk to you in any case if you want. If you still think there are things, talked to the mayor about you can call them, and we hope you do eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eight, hundred, nine seven. You can email. Maybe PR A. W. G. B. H. DOT ORG or tweet him at US public radio seriously. We really appreciate it John. Mr Mayor Thank you. Lot going on, it's a tough time right now. and you know what what's happened in in in the kind of backdrop, all this Cova is still very much front and center I know the governor gave his numbers not so set the agenda. Apologize. No sort of we're seeing good numbers here in Boston as well but. There's a lot of difficult decisions. We have moving forward right now. schools the big. as as offices thing about reopening, are they gonNA send their workers back We're seeing these spikes in. Just literally in seven days if you look at a map. Of the country was a sporadically. Texas Florida and in Arizona down the southern part of the state, in California that we're seeing these live spikes and not look at the map. It's like the whole southern part western part of this country, and ironically the northeast looks kind of good right now as far as. What we've done here, but these various I mean glue worldwide, nearly five hundred thousand people have lost their life dacoven nineteen in in the United States one, hundred, twenty, five, thousand, so. And it's still very much here, and that's why I just want people to know that as decisions are being made Let's not let our guy down You know we have an opportunity right now in Massachusetts in Boston to to keep these numbers down even as we reopen in these other states were when they reopened, they weren't as they didn't put safety precautions in place, and we're seeing and they didn't enforce the mask and things like that. You, know seeing these spikes and blatch hospitalization particularly around young people between the ages of thirty and forty in Arizona in Florida and that's different than what we saw here. We saw mostly older people here in Boston Massachusetts being being treated in the hospital younger as well so it's quite contrary to what we what we witnessed here. What's happening in the country? So. Mr a couple of things to start. Tell us about this equity fund. that. You've announced. If you don't mind, can I stop? Equity Inclusion Cabinet. Sure! It ties into the fun the cabinet. is going to the reason for the cabinet. is to bring existing departments together including resilience and racial equity Language in communication access women's advanced immigrant advancement human rights these are these are the committees that are the offices are going to be under this this person It's going to have an attention focused supporting our communities of color and marginalized groups because it in the in the name of equity and inclusion it will partner with in residents, community groups nonprofits businesses to build equity throughout our economy in some of the some of the groups that have been have kind been formed during this time. quite honestly a young people that don't don't feel that they have a voice at the table. And in some cases they they didn't have always a table. Because they you know, was it was it was the fact that you know they don't WanNa take the time and I'm not saying this negative way. This is very much on on government. We have let me rephrase that we haven't taken the time to reach out to those people and talk to them about what they're concerned about their issues and I'll say that in that case, chief of equity and inclusion. Is GonNa leave this work This cabinet chief will be at the table as refrain in decide the policy at the highest levels and I'll be introducing that person next week. and personal also be working cross cabinet to make sure that whether it's procurement in economic development whether it's in our culture whether it's in school department, all of those different departments working with a real real sense of urgency when when I, when I spoke the other day I'm a press conference. I said we're GONNA. Listen in some people say those we need action and I agree with that in this person is going to be. The highest level of government in this office will be at the highest level of governments to really look at what's going along with that. Is We. We established the Boston Racial Equity Fund. this fund will invest in local nonprofits that empower black and Brown residents and economic development public, Health Youth, Employment Education Arts in other areas, our goal is to raise ten million dollars a long-term goals to raise fifty million dollars and and we will enough steering committee Next Week. That's going to be made up of business leaders. Higher Education can development in this one and this this. is similar to. What we did with the bussers agency, find this. This is going to be working with the the new cabinet chief it making investments in equity work that we need to do in our city There's also talk of other funds being created by private nonprofits in and also by by business professionals and I. Think I think they're all good. I mean what's happening. Is People now hopefully will continue to focus on. How do we build? Build Wealth How do we create access to capital? Can't all be just city access to capital? It needs to be private sector access to capital So you know I welcome all the different folks in these different spaces that Wanna commit you it now and hopefully we can keep that this month close. One of the Black Economic Council of Massachusetts is trying to raise a million bucks to a similar vein. You know speaking of money. The money's different that money. I think is really well. Some it's going to. It's more of a state wide, but all that's also going to really target I. Think in some cases economic development. I think it's important. I mean listen Solving initial. The problem is not by throwing money out of. Solving a problem is not by creating a financing. I did a great now. solving a problem is by having many multiple opportunities whether it's economic opportunities and also quite honestly businesses, having conversations with their employees and having deep conversations. That's something that's really important. I've spent. Since, we spoke last time. On the phone here I've spent a lot of time talking to folks at work with me every day. in. Obviously their feelings and emotions, but spend a lot of time talking to white people to in saying to us that we have to recognize acknowledge that there there is a that there is a crisis that that racism does exist its stomach. Racism does exist in some of those conversations have been explaining what you I mean. What do we mean? and I think in a suggested to people to have conversations with your black colleagues asked him about their feelings, not about the job you're in today and what you do in roles, but ask them about their experiences, growing up asking them about their experiences with their children, and with their husbands and wives, and what what what they witnessed when they walk into a store, and and and oftentimes if I walked into a store with with. A black colleague of mine, and the was walking in the store. The salesclerk might follow that person on a little more like the does are settled teas that that that that we see a subtleties in some cases but it's really it's the imaging to somebody somebody's individual psyche, and in in in the feeling that there people always watching because of the color of their skin and we. We have to have conversations on this. So Mr Mayor as I started to say I think you've maybe partially answered what I'm going to address saying. You know money isn't the only Solution D. A couple of weeks ago, you just cleared racism, a public health emergency in the city announce your GonNa divert twenty percent of the overtime budget of the of the police to variety of youth and community services. The budget city budget passed the day. I think it was eight to five. Five knows obviously an eight yeses. Since then you've well in that time. Both then and subsequently I had a ANA presley. Congressperson on TV with me tonight. Show her reference to the twelve million dollars diverted was it was quoted? Drop in the bucket I'm sure you've heard people like Andrea. Campbell former city council president counselor, saying the budget failed to address systemic racism and inequity wire They wrong Mr Mayor. On I, it's. It's a drop in the bucket, but we will test drops in the bucket is not just the investment twelve million dollar investment. We've been doing it. throughout the entire budget in different areas around housing around the economic development. Around policing around youth engagement, all of those different places we also meet the federal government quite honestly to help us. It's not just come on congresswoman. Presley. The entire you know. Federal government has abandoned helping US funding. Housing for low-income families in in in. we need more more that does racism and that and we need? We need partners there, too. We need more partners at the states where collectively with us all, it's not I'm not picking on any level of government. We have to do more the the way I heard a little bit of the clip I mean the question was phrased about twelve million. Million dollars, but we have a three point six billion dollar budget that we passed that many of that with eighty million dollars additionally into schools new spending this year. That's another drop in the bucket there there's lots of drops in the bucket here that we're doing doing things, and and it quite honestly I in going through this exercise timing of the budget. In under normal circumstances, the budget starts in January. We start putting it together. February we we we. We started to really shape it. In March we go through our departments. April the beginning April. We send it over to the city council. They have hearings on it. then and then they take vote in in in some time. I believe in May they generally reject the budget and then what we do is we do a resubmission to the budget, and then the votes on it initiates particularly year the first obstacle that we had to deal with was from the time I put the budget together to the time that we. Presented to the council we were seeing shortfalls from the time that the council had it giving back to us. We had to cut sixty five million dollars out of it, and we also you know it's. It's the start of this was really around the murder. George Floyd, and then having real deep conversations around move forward You know you don't have the time. the ability in some ways to be able to make the some of the changes that we that that might be that people are for deep deep deep changes. What has forced me to do as mayor. Really start to think about as we as we enter into the next budget season, and that literally starts July, second. How do we think about presenting our budget? How do we think about more engaged with not budget? How do we think about the investments will making in our budget so that it's not just about the investment dollar wise, but it's also about the investment in in creating in collecting opportunities for ideas and things like that. That's what some of the council been asking for which which I support in agree with You know when they had the. The hearings. No one brought it up at that point. It wasn't until George Floyd got married once. We a lot of us that we need to look at his different, so we do have to get a different. I'm not saying that that everything's perfect, but this is something that that I've heard loud and clear from from from the community from people to to look at. How do we re look at the budget? I would say jess that. Congresswoman Presi take that same same same suggestion in Washington is they think about putting together for next year in the same state legislature and they put the budget together. A. Let's go to the calls Mr Mayor. Let's start with Bruyneel from high park. Hyper near Brunner. Why are you guys could? Forgive me an advance going to be able to impertinent. I feel like. The Sitcom so in the mayor's offices throughout the country new for the longest time. What was happening and it is just now that you guys are. Doing things that are very positive in music to my ears and I'm wondering why it took so long. Why does it have to take people marching braving the streets with covid nineteen for something to be done when you as I'm sure you're very wonderful person. You knew that things like that were happening before. I'm curious. I. Appreciate that and I would probably say to you months ago. That We had look through the Lens of equity. And Racial Equity and putting a budget together in the past but the world change after when I say the world changed the the the the way we look at things change because there was a you know a a an undercurrent group of people that hadn't been engaged in the past, and they mentioned that earlier a little earlier that the young folks that are coming out and looking for. For change the changes, necessarily an elective office, the changes in the process and the way we do things, and and and unfortunately you know I could sit here point, tell you that we've made investments in housing and made investments in in different areas of society, but clearly those investments in those those programs that we put in place have not made an impact. PEOP- enough and we have to. To start thinking about how does how do these impacts really get to change in clearly all of us elected officials in office. Need to take a good long look in the mirror and think about what we've been doing what we've been pushing for him. I talk about my agenda and what I've done for the last twenty two years in politics, and I've had a very progressive agenda progressive. Progressive voting record of flaws of pushed all the programs and support all these programs but I. don't think that these programs are giving enough people. -tunities I think that it's incumbent upon us now in in in in the twenty twenty in in the next quarter of the twenty first century to really dig down deep and make substantial change. Bruyneel, thank you for your call. Always be appreciative. Can't three with you. Mr, you may think I'm impertinent to but I have been usually upset reading these stories this week about the Boston Police, union. Particularly one today you know it seems to me like it's a when you take all these things together. This is kind of a big drop dead from these unions to the tax, payers of Boston to the black community. To police commissioners tried to fire bad actors, and even to you in Marino before you, because the power seems to reside with the Union and everybody else has to Kinda. Count just a couple of examples. I did not know that that. Police, officers in Boston don't have to wear cameras. When they're during time. I'll clarify that. Okay you clap that that's what they negotiated. Though is that not? They didn't negotiate it. Th they they they wearing cameras, and all the time. What it is equipment issue and we have ordered more equipment to fix that problem. what happens is that camera has a life span of eight hours. oftentimes won't win. An officer does overtime They don't necessarily do it in their home home home home Home Office and we. We're working on getting more equipment. That camera offices. Cameras assigned science that they'll have them that was that was clarified in that story today and also just. Have to have the cameras in overtime because you had your second. Yeah. Go you finish I. Like anything if you're instituting a program. TO WE WANNA. Make sure we get the technology. We have to order technology, and also that body camera proposal cost the city of Boston cost the taxpayers of Boston nothing. So this is the program. This is a program that we implemented it. So we implement, we implemented the cameras and you know less than a year after we implemented the cameras just so to put in context, the department is more than a thousand offices that are trained and equipped with body