8 Burst results for "Department Of Economics"

"department economics" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

04:38 min | Last month

"department economics" Discussed on EconTalk

"That say to the sale take places fifties early sixties sixty to sixty six we those years just alive just the crazy thing about it. Is that in those years. There were three famous economists. Really three and a half right. You had proven and samson because they were in a in a national news magazine newsweek. Every every other week you had galbraith is books were popular and after that you kind of had canes an adam smith they were gone. It's around that as with long before of course but but that was it in other words. It's not like today. Where because of blogging. And the internet and podcasts and medium and sub stack dozens of economists that not all you know wildly famous but the opportunity to have a platform is so different and in those days they were they were kind of it. This is true. I one of the things i surprised about. I should have to deal with galbraith some late but actually as histories moved on calibrates been washed up. Of course he was was rather secretly despised by economists because he really wasn't an economist who was an agricultural economist. Whatever that is and he's also canadian so he was sort of quite right. There's something i used to hang out with him as the kennedy school harvard. And there's nothing nicer you know. Legs like being with a spider speaks lost and he was very generous and helpful. In biography. i read by margaret thatcher. When he gave me absolutely crispin wonderful quit so that high her economic policies made no sense to tea at the ritz. So he's a very nice to hang out with permanent influence. Galbraith's has gone liberty. reads and i think. The the lack of respect among the the tribe of economists was that he never pretended to try to play the jargon and equation game that that other colleagues did and so he was looked down on. I think fairly or not. But that is i think accuracy also company that had a very high opinion of itself which is why he didn't become the keynesian fighting with friedman newsweek. She'd been smarter about it. He would have realized that that was the way to maintain his reputation but instead to crammed. Well it's interesting to me that both of those men samuelson. Friedman took the job. You write something about their back and forth and they're wavering about a diverse dot. Sure whether it was a good idea. There is something tawdry. I think in academic circles particularly then less so now but particularly then that you would try to pop the riser ideas that was seen as sort of beneath a really first rate scholar. It's true it's true. That came out of britain. Knox's in cambridge would always very intellectually snobbish. They they didn't like i knew knew hadn't been talks cambridge facade which she's customized to design so samuelsson sorta played that game because he was a reject from harvard. The work you were talking about fantasia economic started off his phd thesis which stunned his supervisors. Who realized that he was way beyond them. I mean they look at each other then said i guess he's right. I mean seems plausible to me. Wonder kid yeah. But you would think that harvard grab it with both hands so this is the way that harvard's changed. I suppose if it has changed because he was jewish because there was an anti semitic head of the economics department. You wasn't offered a full lectureship. Which is why walked across the charles river and became the key star attend mitee when mit was just an engineering school. He transformed mit. He should be just statue of him at the entrance. That they know is important. But it's just shock academic worlds because they logic and it doesn't really fit reality. Most everyone put mitt in the top five academic departments economics departments in the world. It wasn't then it was a bold actually quite risky move at the time. I'm sure he was uneasy about it on. Tv eight thousand economics textbook. Of course four mit 's introduction to undergraduates. It's absolutely it's sort of eighteen year. Olds which is when he would have received.

galbraith kennedy school harvard friedman newsweek adam smith samson newsweek margaret thatcher crispin Galbraith harvard cambridge samuelson Friedman samuelsson Knox mitee britain economics department charles river mit
"department economics" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

Reasons to be Cheerful

05:54 min | 6 months ago

"department economics" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

"Kids going to visit. My mom and i left the chat and i thought the release of historic seed. I really wish. I'd taken a photo. But i didn't want to be too do anyway. Then love sunday full by this law. Lost somehow visit my mom who should be sitting on the executive said bench bennett's and minis not been there ever since z eavesdropping. Since i didn't really notice chat with him and just was with me. Talked a lot about this. And that what whatever you take folks and i was with the children. We take we taking somebody please ago. Vegetation alabama was lovely song. And i've been translated walkout. Wyatt is the i l. but it's great. Yeah you know the but why do i think it's to do with the thought i'd had was not really with. I was keen to have the photo but for my kids later in life will be a great photo to yes and then it reminded. This is a long long a story which my father told me. And i'd be without. Was this story's true. I've missed remember that but you see. He didn't interview with russell. Famous set up. You know it's a lot of his naval or et cetera et cetera. He didn't interview the nineteen sixties with bertrand russell and before i was born and a butter also died in nineteen seventy. I remember him saying to me. I think the stories right but be certain but it seems to date seems to check out that he said he thinks it was amazing about that interview was he felt. He was reaching back two hundred years because jones chew up mill. The famous philosopher had dangled the baby bucks russell on his knee. And i've i've worked out of what the dates do just about match. Jones journal died a year after bertrand. Russell was bored. he died eighteen. Seventy three about russell. Seventy two. But i suspect that was probably the k. Wow that jones. Joe mil- dangled bushell except to and my dad was talking to nineteen the nineteen sixties and. It's this thing of reach. Nine hundred fifty years is degrees of separation but into history as well. Yeah yeah. I'm out what you do apart from the united federal down better than why would say he'll miss and i think that specify historical roots of it. I've got two words for you for the next time it happens. And you don't get the photo. Madame toussaud's reasons to be cheerful with ed miliband and lloyd. I'm delighted to say that we are joined by the man. Who is the i would say. They'll world or thirty on working from home now. Classified as a friend of the podcast. He's professor in the department economics at stanford university. He is nick bloom. Thank you so much for joining us. Nick and jeff lafi to be back. Thank you now you on the show about nine months ago talking about working from home when we were at the right at the beginning really as it turns out of of down. I guess. I'm sort of interested to notice the starting whereas you've been working on this area for many years. How your views on this change. During the course of this pandemic experience you know my views before the pandemic house ikea fervently. In favour of working from home. I loved working from home and i had researched productive. It was is not the. I've changed my views. It feels like the world has gone from one side of may to the other. So right now i spend a huge amount of time telling companies like working. Him is great so just to be clear post pandemic. i'm suggesting that which most companies are looking at doing. Actually that will be doing it two days a week but the other three days a week in the office Like important and that we can't just permit they were from having five days a week even post zoom in our pajamas. So you've sort of As say you've you've stayed where you were but you feel the world sort of past slightly kind of passed you know. Pass you by but sort of moved from one extreme to the other. It used to be. Because i remember you saying first time we interviewed you. That working from home was seen shocking from a home. All of those stereotypes. Now you feel like we've people have flipped slightly the opposite way. Yes definitely know. I get i mean i i worry about like mac claim gives you know in politics claims the motor so this kind of like everyone thinks they're in the center from working from home sunday and survey data. I've been collecting a lotta saturday in both the us and the uk. It looks like people's views of working from home have become dramatically mo- positive so that shirking from high completely disappeared. It's anything that's been thrown up in practice that you didn't preempt in the theory of when it happened at scale in the white house. There's definitely being you know more than teething issues on the covid with covid really hard has lots of have kids have and you know about half. The workforce has kids under the age of eighteen. And then there's another issue about spouses not having enough space with kids. Zoom schooling at home isolation. Covid is really hard as you think normally would go out in the evenings on the weekends. Even if you work from home five days a week then trapped in your house. I was going to say one thing. That's unexpected to me that since we last spoke Is we've been collecting surveys. And how many days a week people want to work from home post pandemic and you'd think that number would be going down because it'd be getting fed up with this but it turns out that number's going up so back in may last year. Most people said post pandemic. They want to work from home two days a week. Gun office three now. that's cracked up to. They wanna walk home three days a week and not. She only been office so on average getting happier and more relaxed a more comfortable with working from home..

Nick jeff lafi nick bloom Russell lloyd russell two words toussaud ed miliband two hundred years uk saturday both thirty Jones two days a week bertrand three days a week may last year nine months ago
"department economics" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"department economics" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"So incentives matter and into and incentives don't matter. Then we need to throw away economics. We just needed to go over to the department economics and say you guys are a bunch of UNICORNS and mermaids and we're we're done you know. So so do you think that insurance companies should maybe reevaluate the reimbursement of some of these conservative things because that might be tipping the edge for a lot of people I definitely do think. So just with my experiences insurance companies, they're usually not as worried about the dentist or the patients you know compared to what they're worried about themselves. So I, guess it has to be worth it for them. I definitely do think that the less invasive techniques are build out less and you know when I was speaking to my wife about it, they told her, you know I work dollas long double is hard to do half the billing, but at the same time you know feel. What I should be doing so I, definitely think it should be addressed. I. Don't know if it's ever. GonNa Change what are the same time as my practice has evolved with these less invasive techniques even though I'm doing less work were less time also, I can do to crowns on a patient in five minutes versus if I had to number them put rubber him on in practice conventionally into a pulp. If I was going to do that. You know that's GonNa take me a half hour to forty minutes. So I can do those two crowns and five minutes and that patient has done clean and we can see the next patient. So I don't think he's given me a major cut in automaking I probably don't make as much as other pediatric dentists that are doing a lot more sedation full mouth pulsing grounds. But I'm I'm making us to live. As happily as I want to so for me is fine. Yeah you also or A. You are a noted expert on health tap dot Com tell them what health tap dot Com is, and why are you a noted expert on health tap dot Com actually slowed down a little with it just because I've been so busy but it was a website started really a medical website just to help people who didn't have access to care. The Ans-, ask questions online and have. Medical professionals kind of guide. So it wasn't really a diagnosis or treatment recommendation. It was sort of like what direction you can go. You know if a patient says, this is what's happening with my child's tooth. What should I do you know? You can give them sort of idea junior dentist right now do not need to see this. This is something that you can look into you know, and maybe something that can be helping you know just for the time being until you see a dentist so. When they opened I actually spend a lot more time answering questions recently, I haven't for a while. But that was pretty much the goal of that. Website to guide and get a lot of different medical professionals together in the same place and be able to help you know just people at home get answers where they wouldn't be able to get them otherwise. Guy Hope I'm not throwing any your friends under a bus because I know you're pediatric communities are really tight community and all that. But I'm just going after these are big names Richard Baxter. He put online. See Course that's another one. That's real controversial king. What's at tongue ties? Yeah and in fact, I felt so bad. I had bothered Jeanette McLean one time on the weekend because my own friend she just had a baby and she was crying and she called me because after I guess now when you have a baby guess for the last one, million years, you just start nursing on your mom. But now after one million years since mighty conrail, even one hundred, twenty, billion humans have lived and died a person's GonNa come in and help you. Learn how to breastfeed and and dropped the bomb that she thought. She needed to have. You know this tongue thing and she was crying and he called me because I'm a dentist I'm like, yeah, I'm a dentist I I've never nursed. And I'm not. I don't even. So so tongue tied. So tell you my take on it. I'm definitely not an expert I actually went to the first symposium with Dr Baxter at same time, we were sitting at the same table for part of it. I feel like my opinion is actually that within at least the dental world at sometimes. They don't think this is the case with him, but I do think that in some cases. When somebody becomes expert in something you know it's always done by for instance I have sent patients for evaluations to experts in tongue-tied and I don't remember ever having one come back. You know being told Oh you don't need it it just pretty much done. So my opinion is is that there's people on one extreme where everything that is tied including buckle freedoms, tongues, and lips and everything has to be released and I've gone to lectures that said it's not going to have you know nick issues back issues and behavioral issues. And then you know when I was in school, it wasn't discussed at all. So I feel like there's a really really wide spectrum there and I try to be in the middle I do feel like there are times where it's definitely indicated. But I don't feel like I know enough to tell you if he's being treated or under treated. In some South American countries I think it's mandated earth. take a look at the. There are theories that possibly the use of folic acid now more with pregnant women. Makes it more likely that kids are having these things that. Really embryonic. We should kind of go by themselves and they're not going away. And so I definitely think that it is something that probably should be taught more dental schools, but there's no real consensus even within the sort of tongue tie world. There's different opinions of how it should be done how it should be done. If it should be done, you know how to classify it. So my take on that, I don't know enough to be able to tell you sort of a real opinion other than I do think it is necessary at times and we do in our office we don't advertise it at all. It's really just word of mouth. But most of the time parents who have been having a really hard time in a lot of pain, my wife actually worked with me and she's also a labor and delivery nurse so she has. No she's my associate, but my wife works in the front desk. She's Oh runs erectus, but she's also Lebron. Delivery nurse. So after I do the releases, she helps the MOMS with breastfeeding and most MOMS say that there's an immediate change in how it feels in terms of the pain and how well the baby's eating. So it does seem like it does work well. If you get rid of the tongue die the your wife's not. They're saying it's a lot easier and better. A lot of parents say that it is a lot better. Now there are cases where it's not better at all and I've had cases where I said parents home and I said listen there's plenty of mobility of this maybe your. Child is not lashing a little bit. It's because of their tongue. And then you know there Arkansas take a little while longer to learn how to nurse. So it's definitely a possibility that just something that they have to learn in terms of you know why now suddenly became this big thing. I don't know if it's because anatomy has changed in any way who knows. Or people are just you know learning about it and saying, Hey, you know what? I nursed three kids on the barely nurse. I have to change the vital with my kid I heard about tie our released it in his nursing so much better. So it could be you know a little of everything. I think. It's a lot of it is sad because like okay. So there were seven kids. My Mom's handling right the first three we were born Mary Kay Jim Marine me were born when. That the milk, you buy in the store was better and fortified with vitamins and minerals, and who would nurse naturally, and if you ever got sick or cold, they just immediately to get your tonsils adenoids though the first three babies no breastfeed all Wasser tonsils and Adenoids, and then the next four kids all breastfed and have their tonsils and Adenoids. So that's so when I say something A. Fad I mean hell I lived through a fad and I lost my tonsils and Adenoids and didn't get to breastfeed, which is bad because the first twenty four hours is the cost ram where you get all the antibodies and all that stuff and at the time the marketing and advertising people convinced my mother that it was better to buy something out of a boxer a package so. So. So when people just blindly follow doctors and fads there are not a student of history just.

Richard Baxter Jeanette McLean Dr Baxter Mary Kay Jim Marine nick Lebron Arkansas
"department economics" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

16:30 min | 1 year ago

"department economics" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"My brothers all my siblings went to university so it was what people did in my family. I mean it was open to us. My mother had been in university. She I think she back in the guess it would have been the thirty so she was unusual for women back in the United States. She studied for two years in verse. My father's university graduate and so they've deemed it important that we go to university so it was never a question that I wouldn't go to university so I did but I thought I wanted to study the law but in the United States legal studies are supposed graduate discipline undergraduate school. They they had what they call the pre law society where people who were maybe preparing to be lawyers are thinking about it so I joined the society and I didn't find anybody in their likable so I gave that idea and I began studying economics for my father was in business. Maybe I wasn't thinking very deeply about all these things. Then after I I. I had a military commitment In the early nineteen seventies and I went back to graduate school and we were drinking beer one nine and I thought you know I said You know. I really don't know what I WANNA do. And one of my colleagues said graduate student friends said well you like were you doing now said yeah you know where you know learning interesting things and interacting and solving interesting problems and he said well. Then it's a no brainer. Become a professor I will. I guess because now unpaid to learn when I was a student I paid someone to teach me and now I'm paid to learn so in order to be a professor you have to learn new things and you compensate you for doing your awarded for doing it so I guess I would credit one of my my friends for sort pointing out. What should have been the obvious to me? This was my destiny that I would Become a professor and I have no regrets. I mean I've had. I really had a charmed life. I can't imagine my life could have been any better than than it has been doing anything else. That's a really lovely way of putting it be paid to learn. How did you find free market economics while starts something you stumbled Abo- nor was it clear? From the beginning I was born in the late forties so I began my mature years in the nineteen sixties. And of course in the nineteen sixties. There was a great deal of social change going on. I suppose what I think about it. With hindsight I turned a personality defect into a career. I suppose it away. My personality defect was A resistance of authority something. I always challenge door. Dude is Something that need to be challenged and so of course that made authoritarian regimes out of the question in terms of my looking at the world around me and realizing that countries that relied upon extensive coercion. Such as the Soviet Union at that time then Red China and then over time we begin to see other countries zone as well and I was. I was really lucky that again that I had some interesting. Professors Abet taught economics free market perspective. That Where those were my resistance to the idea of authority mesh very well with the idea of free markets and then again. I was lucky in graduate school that I was influenced by some very bright fellow graduate students that gave me some. You know support we. We all pretty much followed a a very similar track. I mean although they were other other people that were less sympathetic to the ideas of human liberty than we were but I guess I found a great deal of support and I think part of what I discovered in my life is that Libertarians are deeply humanistic. People the sense set all the professors. I hat we're very warm. Engaging urging of my ideas and so this sort of reinforced I suppose that again that sort of human contact reinforced my My interest in these these ideas again in some ways I was. I was lucky to have good and support people around me. That helped me develop my career. I again I. I've led a charmed and blessed life. I've I've been surrounded by good people And I allow people to help me. You know I think this is something you need to learn perhaps Not to be suspicious of other people that don't Perhaps seek out people that can help you And be open to what they offer to do. You have any favorite philosopher. All the saw thinkers audience to know who are also I Dunno favorite people. Law Comeback agreed mostly in terms of our authors and so on I read mostly historical or biographical works some theoretical. I just of just finished a book by Eric. Larsen on The war years of Winston Churchill The Eric. Larsen is is someone who'd work. I I enjoy very much but The in terms of intellectual development. I started off as what is known as the Chicago. School economists influenced by George Stigler and Milton Friedman on Gary. Becker I took courses under many of the graduates of Department economics in the University of Chicago but also they regina school which is the beginning of the public choice. Economics students have Buchanan until like Were some of my professors many of my colleagues eventually so And then I stumbled onto what is known as the Austrian School of Economics so My Intellectual Development has always been in the direction of humanistic economics that is human beings being at the heart of economic analysis. What is called human action being the really the issue of economics not these Official aggregates these Macroeconomic concepts that these. These false is of of economic Aggregates so the Austrian School Mason. Hayek I often say that I am. I developed a deeper interest in social and political philosophy from Hayek and then I developed a deeper understanding of economics from Maecenas so I began to see some weaknesses as some problems in the Chicago school. Which were there identified with three market economics? But I think their model really doesn't hold up and in fact has been utilized by the worst offenders and the biggest enemies of the I think of Of Human Liberty is central bankers who have really created havoc in the financial in economic world because of an ignorance of the wisdom of Austrian economics and by using the intellectual cover of the Monitor's thinking that came out of the Chicago School Milton. Friedman was one of the great he was one of the most brilliant men I've ever met or heard speak met him on numerous occasion studied up under be blue studied under him of course Read his works. He did a great service to the idea of making human liberty a respectable discussion topic but unfortunately the modern quantity theory of money has contributed to the disastrous unconventional monetary policy. That we're living under today. All the central bankers are pretending that That they are operating under the guidance of Milton. Friedman's insights. I would think that. Were he alive today? He would have much to criticize and he might even rethink some of his Early contributions which were at the time but they at the moment we We're really laboring unto some Terrible Monetary Policies. That go against human nature. Don't go against economic logic that goes against human nature of the idea of negative interest. Rates VIOLATES HUMAN. Nature is not just a quirk. I mean it is. It's an absurdity but his passing for wisdom and insight in this crazy world of central bankers one thing for someone who is in the public school at the moment. What would you say you need to understand the importance of incentives and how incentives influence people's behavior? That is probably one of the one of the key. Insights of economics is importance of incentives. Because it would then influence your understanding of public policy and And what makes politicians make public policy. What makes economists promote a certain Public Policy So all of the I think in. I think it's IT'S A. It's a key to understanding politics economics and and and human life so I think that would be the single thing. I tried to to put into to their mind and thinking woke. You recommend or someplace to start with easily led the basics. I think in many ways any of the work by Boston are very accessible. And deeply insightful. You made for example. Ty- law the law economics. Sofas on what fiend and brought his not seen yeah and Henry Hazlitt Book Economics in one lesson is a very straightforward actually. Ken School on Published a book which contains many of the deep insights of boss John in almost comic book form which I found that people around the world that I've met who engage the dentist themselves libertarian. Many of them were attracted to it by school onze book. Jonathan Gullible is called Where do I get could coffee? What's the best in the world? You've been sampling. Guatemalan coffee shops crimes there to conditions that make good coffee high altitude volcanic soil so that means Java which gives the Word Java or Sumatra in Jamaica. They have good coffee. Guatemala has excellent coughing. But you'll notice it all those places high altitude volcanic soil. So that's a guy. Terms of brands easily is my favorite brand and starbucks least favourite Brian starbucks for some reason makes I think because most people who go to starbucks don't drink espresso regrettable espresso blend. I'm on a Ketogenic Diet at for the last two years Morning began with a usually a mock jato and espresso with a little bit of foam mixed in with butter and mcat oil which is a refined coconut oil that I would blend with the little battery powered hand blender. What is your favorite word? Well.

professor Milton Friedman Austrian School of Economics Henry Hazlitt Book Economics United States Hayek starbucks graduate student Chicago school Austrian School Mason Larsen Chicago Soviet Union Jamaica Guatemala University of Chicago Jonathan Gullible Winston Churchill
"department economics" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"department economics" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"In the sky America we have a country to say now here's Larry elder you know look this is in a a total sham from the beginning everybody knows it I've never seen the Republican Party so United far less about is you know we got a hundred percent of the vote I believe the Senate is equally as well United I watch Mitch McConnell this morning I watched it numerous people last night senators and I think were equally well United they know it's a hoax to which I think is just a continuation sweet going on now for almost three years that it probably started before even won the election based on what we're finding out with the insurance policy quotes and other things so it's a disgrace now for a future Q. right when she came I don't doubt the president trump is has a high IQ right these well educated triple eight nine seven one S. A. G. E. triple eight nine seven one seven two four three Larry elder Willie secular calm studio seven people shot in Baltimore Baltimore has a much higher per capita homicide rate than the Chicago Chicago gets a lot of the headlines because it's the largest and because in absolute numbers got more on the site in any other city in America capital bases Saint Louis and Baltimore three times more deadly in Chicago speaking of Baltimore I was reading you from an article written by professor named Richard box but in July of twenty seventeen headline blame Baltimore violence on lack of fathers in the home this conversation to taking place a long time ago we must use the progressive devil term and stigmatize having children without present father's success in this persuasive endeavor will take ten years or more but if it had been affected ten twenty or thirty years ago we would already have wreaked gets good consequences why we put it off because it is hard and it entails the political risk of upsetting voters many if not most of whom are in dysfunctional families or no good friends who are yep the stakes are too high to ignore the issue fatherlessness is highly correlated with crime poverty social pathologies and psychological problems according to the US census bureau for example children living without fathers have a four hundred percent increased chance of being poor only about one tenth of children living with both parents are living in poverty US department of health and Human Services also says that drug and alcohol abuse is far greater among children living without file this this is not a mystery when children have no parental control as is often no not always the case in fatherless families they frequently look to older children for guidance they may also find that gang soon revise the protection the only two parents can give it is illusory of course but that's how it seems a professor in the department economics at university of Maryland said earlier this month quote research consistently shows the kids who live with two married parents have lower rates of poverty have higher cognitive test scores in childhood have fewer behavioral problems they seem to have better health outcomes they're less likely live in poverty when the twenty five the more likely to complete college less likely to become young unmarried parents themselves end of quote said the economist the article continues incidently for those who think that money is destiny here is a particularly interesting statistics from the Charles F. Kettering foundation quote children from low income two parent families outperform students from high income single parent homes almost twice as many high achievers come from two parent homes have come from one parent homes in the quote that from the Charles F. Kettering foundation the article continues quote some who read this will insist they know many good mothers without a husband in the home who have been wonderfully productive and law abiding children who have wonderfully productive and law abiding children and that is undoubtedly true I know some myself but that is a relevant to understanding that the difficulties of raising children by a single parent yield and sadistic indicate that over seventy percent of families in many major cities are fatherless a permanent dysfunctional and criminal Cass class that ignoring this will not make it go away Baltimore officials should consider this as they grapple with the city's rising homicide rate he concludes adding officers to the street well not undo the damage done by growing up without a father in a quote and the author of this is Richard the vox V. A. T. Z. he teaches at Towson university teaches rhetoric and communications to send your letters you're angry letters to him I did write this piece Amy coe which are made an interesting observation about peer about mayor booted judge claims that given health in his resume is if you're a woman he wouldn't be taken seriously because of the two midwesterners you've actually done so many things you it's it's actually it takes a long time to get through your whole list he we all of P. but he's basically won an election sort of military do you think it's a gender issue here in terms of people not seeing you as a person get done okay well I have said this clearly in that last debate the the CNN debate that I do think there's a double standard now that doesn't mean that he is not qualified he is but do I think that a woman who had lost the statewide race lost the race for the DNC with the mayor of a small town would be able to be the candidate to had ever taken I don't okay let's talk about that she doesn't believe that if mayor Pete were a woman he be taken seriously after all he's mayor of a small town he ran for state office in Indiana loss he ran for the chairman of the DNC he lost and now he's being taken seriously she says as a candidate it wouldn't happen if he were she well with the arena the former CEO of Hewlett Packard got fired ran for Senate against Barbara boxer here in California lost by ten points and then ran for president twenty sixteen and there she was up there on the base on the debate stage being taken seriously so I'm not quite sure ms Cole shar but that's not my problem my problem is convincing America that I can't be that person it is my cakes what your problem is that people do judge is running ahead of you and I that is what that that is above and you would be you know using the same from the same song book you both moderates you're both saying you're not don't live in flyover country is yeah you're in the middle so he is he is standing in your way well such is life in areas that but for him being a male he would not be taken seriously but Carly Fiorina was a female who lost a statewide office who never ran before at all unlike me repeat at least he was mayor of something and she was fired for H. B. there she is a credible candidate for president so I'm not quite sure the arguments working maybe culture now here's something you need to know about Steph tell but the father son owners of really factor there on a mission to help as many people as possible get out of pain in the first step is to order the three week quickstart for just nineteen dollars and ninety five cents and when you order it make sure you do what the doctors crater really factor recommended three.

Larry elder
"department economics" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

07:21 min | 2 years ago

"department economics" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"But I. I was in New York yesterday. And I wanna thank Marc Davis for doing a splendid job. I did Fox News all day or FOX business or FOX nation. And I was on the outnumbered show. And I pointed out that I thought it was bizarre that the Democrats have called their green thing the green new deal gone considering how disastrously the old new deal worked out. So I found myself greeted with this big headline from media matters. Media matters is a quote, progressive tax exempt nonprofit organization with the mission of comprehensively monitoring analyzing and correcting conservative misinformation in the media in the quote. So apparently, they thought this was misinformation John Anthony democratic pollster who worked for about Hillary Clinton and President Obama's tweeting. My main gripe about AO see while I respect her voice in the party. I don't think she respects mine or anyone else's who differs with her on policy or comes from a different political electoral reality, that's a really good point because she is demanding allegiance to these socialistic ideals, but really doesn't have any curiosity or tolerance for anyone who thinks about a different way problematic is that or any real understanding about how bad the original new deal new deal. I'm starting to say a moment ago and economists named Leo Haney, and he teaches at UCLA has probably done more work on anybody else. The new deal that FDR did. And he says it deepened and lengthened. The recession was a severe recession. The new deal turned into a depression. And Alexandria, Cossio Cortez, and the Democrats who using this expression apparently have no idea of what the new deal did. And then of course, there's the issue of cost. Once you start putting polls together and ask people about the cost for the green new deal support for it goes down dramatically. Fox News guests hosts guest co hosts, by the way, I listen to guest. I suppose you can call it that Fox News guest co hosts claims the word claims and the headline that FDR's new DO created the great depression. Did I created the great depression? I said it lengthened and deepened a recession and turned it into a great depression. But my point is this is shocking to these people. Remember the time I was on CNN. And I said government in one thousand nine hundred at all three levels took less than ten percent away. From the American people. I got a phone call from when the fact check people. A source for that. I said I'm shocked that you're shocked. You had no idea how little government took from people in one thousand nine hundred. And he said, I was right. People on the left have no idea. How disastrous the new deal was. They were taught in high school as I was FDR got on a white horse rode into town and rescued capitalism from its sailings. I want to give you some stats. I'm gonna give you the information. We give you information about what the I implant was at one point. And then what happened when FDR went in and all that. But. How about we start here? FDR's Treasury Secretary Henry Morgenthau, he wrote in his diary in nineteen thirty nine. This is six years into the FDR administration. The great depression started in one thousand nine hundred twenty nine. Here's what he said in may of nineteen thirty nine FDR's Treasury Secretary, forget all the studies forget all the reports the surveys what economists saying that saying, quote, now gentlemen, we have tried spending money. We are spending more than we ever have spent before. And it does not work. I say after eight years of this administration and its six year, we have just as much unemployment as when we started and an enormous debt to boot. This FDR Treasury Secretary. Can you imagine if Timothy Geithner under Obama said, hey, you know, this this stimulus plan is it's real expensive seven hundred eighty billion dollars. And it's not working. Can you imagine? What would have happened? Well, here is this guy saying we have. Nobody cares. August ten two thousand four UCLA newsroom. Headline FDR's policies prolonged depression by seven years UCLA, economists, plural calculate. One of them is Leo Haney. And of course, the other guy named Harold L coal new study says the new deal policies signed into law seventy one years ago ported economic recovery for seven long years, quote, why the great depression lasted so long as always been a great mystery. And because we never really knew the reason we always worried whether we could have another ten to fifteen year economic slump said Hainian vice chair of UCLA's department economics. We found that a relapse isn't likely unless lawmakers come up a recovery with ill-conceived stimulus policies into quote talked about raising taxes talked about allowing business to collude to raise salaries and raise prices. And as a result, generally. And there's a recession salary salaries. Go down prices, go down. This was the opposite salaries went up and prices went up because they were artificially boosted up by FDR policies. Prices around nineteen industries, they say average substantially higher than they should have been given the state of the economy. Policies enacted by FDR. Account for according to these researchers sixty percent of the week recovery without the policies. They contend that. The depression would have ended in nineteen thirty six. Instead of the year that the slump actually ended nineteen forty three. Roosevelt's role in lifting us out of the great depression or allegedly doing so with so revered the time magazine readers cited it in nineteen ninety nine naming him the twentieth. Century's second most influential figure. Another economists named Robert Lucas, he wanted no bail in one thousand nine hundred five. Said about the research that Colino Haney. And did this is exciting invaluable research the prevention and cure of depressions is a central mission of macroeconomics. And if we can't understand what happened in the nineteen thirties. How can we be sure it won't happen again end of quote? Calling this the green new deal shows profound historical ignorance..

FDR depression Colino Haney UCLA New York Fox News President Obama FOX Marc Davis Treasury Secretary Henry Morge Hillary Clinton John Anthony CNN Robert Lucas
"department economics" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

07:53 min | 2 years ago

"department economics" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"Twenty twenty. Probably heard my show, which I went after him for saying that voter ID was pernicious racism, but I. I was in New York yesterday. And I wanna thank Marc Davis for doing a splendid job. I did Fox News all day or FOX business or FOX nation. And I was on the outnumbered show. And I pointed out that I thought it was bizarre that the Democrats have called their green thing the green new deal considering how does Astra slowly the old new deal worked out? So I found myself read it with this big headline from media matters media matters is a progressive tax exempt nonprofit organization with the mission of comprehensively monitoring analyzing and correcting conservative misinformation in the media into quote. So apparently, they thought this was misinformation John Anthony democratic pollster who worked for about Hillary Clinton and President Obama's tweeting. My main gripe about AFC while I respect her voice in the party. I don't think she respects mine or anyone else's who differs with her on policy or comes from a different political electoral reality, that's a really good point because she is demanding allegiance to these socialistic ideals, but really doesn't have any curiosity or tolerance for anyone who thinks or votes at different way problematic is that or any real understanding about how bad the original new deal new deal? Since I've started to say a moment ago and economists named Leo Haney, and he teaches at UCLA has probably done more work on the end of the nobody else the the the new deal that FDR did. And he says it deepened and lengthened the recession. It was a severe recession. The new deal turned into a depression, and Alexandra Cossio Cortez, and the Democrats are using this expression. Apparently have no idea of what the old new deal did. And then of course, there's the issue of cost. Once you start putting polls together and ask people about the cost for the green new deal support for it goes down dramatically thoughts. News guest hosts guest co host, by the way. I wasn't. They guests. So you can call it that Fox News guest co host claims the word claims headline FDR's new DO created the great depression. Did I say it created the great depression? Lincoln and deepened a recession and turn it into a great depression. But my point is this is shocking to these people. Remember the time I was on CNN. And I said government in one thousand nine hundred at all three levels took less than ten percent away. From the American people. I got a phone call from one of the fact check people. Source for that. I said I'm shocked that you're shocked. You had no idea how little government took some people in one thousand nine hundred. And he said, I was right. People on the left have no idea. How does Astra's the new deal was? They were taught in high school as I was FDR got on a white horse rode into town and rescued capitalism from its failings. I'm gonna to give you some stats information. We give you information about what the employment was at one point. And then what happened when FDR went in and all that. But. How about we start here? FDR's Treasury Secretary Henry Morgenthau, he wrote in his diary in nineteen thirty nine. This is six years into the FDR administration. The great depression started in one thousand nine hundred twenty nine. Here's what he said in may of nineteen thirty nine FDR's Treasury Secretary, forget all the studies. If you get all the reports, the surveys what economists are saying and that saying, quote, now, gentlemen, we've tried spending money we're spending more than we ever have spent before. And it does not work. I say after eight years of this administration in its year. We have just as much unemployment as when we started and an enormous debt to boot. This is FDR Treasury Secretary. Can you imagine if Timothy Geithner under Obama said, hey, you know, is this stimulus plan is it's real expensive seven hundred eighty some Bill billion dollars. And it's not working. Can you imagine? What would have happened? Well, here's this guy saying we haven't had more. Nobody cares. August ten two thousand four UCLA newsroom. Headline FDR's policies prolonged depression by seven years UCLA, economists, plural calculate. One of them's Leo Haney. And of course, the other guy named Harold L coal new study says the new deal policy signed into law seventy one years ago Ford it economic recovery for seven long years, quote, why the great depression lasted so long. It's always been a great mystery. And because we never really knew the reason we always worried whether we could have another ten to fifteen year economic slump said Owen. Vice chair of UCLA's department economics. We found that a relapse isn't likely unless lawmakers come up a recovery with ill-conceived stimulus policies into quote talked about raising taxes talked about allowing businesses to collude to raise salaries and raise prices, and as a result, generally. And there's a recession salary salaries. Go down prices, go down. This was the opposite salaries went up and prices went up because they were artificially boosted up by FDR policies. Prices around one thousand nine industries, they say average substantially higher than they should have been given the state of the economy. Policies enacted by FDR. Account for according to these researchers sixty percent of the week recovery without the policies. They contend that. The depression would have ended in one thousand nine thirty six. Instead of the year that the slump actually ended nineteen forty three. Roosevelt's role in lifting us out of the great depression or allegedly doing so was so revered the time magazine readers cited it in nineteen ninety nine naming him the twentieth. Century's second most influential figure. Another economist named Robert Lucas. He won a Nobel in one thousand nine hundred five. Said about the research that cold and rainy, and did this is exciting invaluable research the prevention and cure of depressions is a central mission of macroeconomics. And if we can't understand what happened in the nineteen thirties. How can we be sure it won't happen again end of quote? Calling this the green new deal shows profound historical ignorance. I mean, my goodness now gentlemen, we have tried spending money. We're spending more than we ever spent before. And it does not work. I say after eight years of this administration. We have just as much unemployment is when we started and an enormous debt to boot end of quote may nineteen thirty nine Treasury Secretary, Henry Morgenthau.

FDR depression Treasury Secretary Henry Morge UCLA New York Twenty twenty Fox News Leo Haney Astra President Obama Marc Davis FOX Hillary Clinton John Anthony CNN
"department economics" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:15 min | 4 years ago

"department economics" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"The on jaronnie rumble with sam c it is wednesday december twenty seven two thousand seventeen my name is sam cedar this is the fivetime award winning majority report we are broadcasting live steps well actually not alive no sorry allied lives to tape steps from the industrial ravaged go on its canal in the heartland of america downtown brooklyn usa hits vacation time perks it's vacation time in it's the last week of twenty seven teen you know what that means the best does all this week on the majority report now we're going to throw you a curveball you're thinking like oh okay i get it best of 2017 that means the best up shows of 2017 right so today is the show going to be one of the best from 2017 pride wrong trick to you we had a lot of people who said we want to hear stephanie kelton she is now a professor i'll be economics and public policy it stony brook university but we had her on in september oh a lot of people listen to her then maybe what we should do is have iran from the first time i think she was a i think is the first time and it was may twenty second of 2014 i believe of i'm not mistaken and at that time she was the chair department economics at the university of missouri kansas city and it was a similar interview but urged dan at that time people worried about hyperinflation that was the big thing we are here again all we're gonna have hyperinflation berry better get your gold.

iran chair department economics dan america brooklyn stony brook university university of missouri kansas twenty second