7 Burst results for "Department Of Biology"

"department biology" Discussed on 10 Bestest

10 Bestest

04:12 min | Last week

"department biology" Discussed on 10 Bestest

"Check out the show link. Saw us all right okay. Our next one mine michael. She is going to be so. I'm calling this a biology department. I don't know exactly. No but mit department of biology for the second consecutive year is releasing their classes about covered. Nineteen four free on streaming on their website or they have a youtube channel and a playlist all about their lectures for free. All of it starts actually at the time of recording started last week so it started september. Eight two thousand twenty one. They have all their twenty twenty classes available. So you can go back and listen watch those which is super fascinating because it's kind of it started also in september of twenty twenty so when covered was known but still relatively new which was super interesting. And now it's talking about it in real time how it's changed in the last year so it's hosted by richard young and facundo but teesta i believe and they have notable guests and experts talking about the science of cove nineteen pandemic so lecture one. They talk this is last year's lecture one cove in nineteen in the pandemic to ask corona virus. Biology lecture three was vira and lessons from aids pen pandemic and how that relates Four was insights from the coveted nineteen and it was featuring. Actually dr anthony ouchi so again. Big names big experts. Five was viral immunology while these words. I can't even say. Six was target cells innate response. Seven was the patient was epidemic epidemics and epidemiology. I should watch more of these. Nine was emulate g and t cells. Tim vaccines immunology. Antibodies twelve as small molecule therapeutics. Thirteen is therapeutic discovery. Fourteen was rapper. Research response in the pandemic so next one next week that will air couple of days after this premiered on youtube again. Dr fao will be on there again highly. Recommend if you wanna hear experts. And i did listen to some of these. It's not super over to the top. You can glean some information and certainly pretty academic but definitely check out the cova courses. Mit department biology took. I'm watching these big obviously being in science. And you've been talking a lot about this but these are like really the experts in that particular usually and i do. I want so much to understand. Better viruses like a vita water. What is the natural life span. And when they mutate because i've heard that they mutate a lot and then it sort of slows down after some time in that just any virus does that and i would just like to know more about all those kind of details can understand this pandemic better and any future pandemics and i view drivers's how that works too. I mean i know for some reason. This is a political issue should not be viruses and biology are scientific and i think you need to really check where this information is coming from and this is one of the biggest you know most accredited schools with some of the best speakers scientists. Like if you even if you doubt anything check out what these people are talking about. This is a source more. No or at least word that's coming from. I don't know if we know where everything else is coming from right. So i feel really good about checking this out in the past and now the process. Yes under so all that stuff. Thank you very i'm on. I'm so on. And.

mit department of biology facundo teesta dr anthony ouchi richard young youtube Dr fao Mit department michael aids Tim
"department biology" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

09:04 min | 7 months ago

"department biology" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"All of universities and their science departments. Biology department might be able to get involved and gather. Try together some evidence, especially he'd known aware they're sampling the waters in the streams and the lakes and ponds and they can tell Everything that's in that environment and if they get a hit on a Unknown primate. Then there you go. That would be I opening, and that'd be awesome. In a documentary. Um You know, they gathered evidence all the time and they get DNA's samples. And every time the temple comes back as human, they assume it's been contaminated or how many times do you have to run a sample or get different samples and before you realize it is human? And I know this challenge is a lot of people's paradigms. But Do they even have all the information that they need? They have the paradigm They have, because it amazes me. How many folks don't even realize every living non African human on the planet. Has up to 2% Neanderthal. Edna is part of their own Edna, and that's a scientific fact. And it's because Neanderthals are our cousins. They were never our ancestors. We bred with them to the point that we still trade there'd now with us. And the reason that it's non African people whose because That people in Africa didn't encounter the Neanderthals. They stayed in Africa, the people that left Africa encountered Neanderthals. And I think that the Bigfoot will be proven with Deanna did. They are also our cousins. And, uh, I just feel like there's there's just so much to consider their and heaven a year round hunting season or a big footing season. And there's just some things to get better like In the wintertime food might be scarce for them. And there's just things to consider on how much you're going to disrupt them. And it's just something to think about. And you know, the skeptics are all I'm gonna say one outfit with human Then they need vitamin C, but the answers were therapy. Research him. So how did they get vitamin C in the wintertime? Well, guess what? Dear liver. Chock full of vitamin C and There's just a scientific way to address all of the questions and I'm excited about your bill. Or however you go about it, and I've been looking forward to seeing how this all ends up. You know what I really like Far Lynette. You did mention that, you know, give this year round thing If that's what's going to happen, you know? Year round thing. Hey, give him a break. Even the deer in the L get a break, Right? Even the other, uh, the other seasons are like they're certain seasons, right? It's not your around. I'm not. I don't know. I'm not a hunter. But Uh, yeah. Give somebody break though, you know. Hey, I don't wanna look over my shoulder all the time. I'm opposed to that. Totally, but if you know, but that is something to bring up. Yes, a bit considering. Absolutely I mean, so I think that Mr Humphrey will get this all iron down. I think everyone will calm down. Once they see the finished product. I think it's a great way. To educate the public and to protect the Bigfoot and I'm looking forward to how this all shakes out. And here's the deal. Legislation never stopped. So you know what I'm saying? If we get into this thing, and we need to pass a bill that says you can't kill Bigfoot, if we need to get in there and say, Hey, they're not getting a break. You know, we're gonna have to limit this. You know, do this. We can always go back and we can run legislation to say, you know, so I do want the listeners to understand there's you know what I'm saying? You can always go back. And whatever the problem is try toe, rectify our Are do something that you see need speaks well, that's right, because let's say that you did somehow get it get the university's involved, and then they had a little expedition in archaeology Department's gonna dig all summer long. You might have some biology department from a certain university stay out in the field for a couple of months. Let's say they gathered from DKNY a evidence and they got tested and it come back is unknown Primate and it contains the Fox pee to Jean. Well, that would indicate that there might be a spoken language that would indicate there with the human. And so once that came out as evidence, and some legislation might definitely get passed to protect the Bigfoot. Listed all lead to some good things. You may not start out exactly perfect, but it could end up perfect. Lives. And I think this puts attention on. I think it girls money, too. And I think you know if if one of the larger universities wanted to put something in this area Do a study to do the water samples to do you know, I think that would just be me and another draws for, you know, would be something and if they wanted to educate Have people go down there with them. Watch him, girl. This is how we do it or or what people through. This is what we're doing. This is what we're doing. Just be another thing for people to come and do in our area. So those who can't think that I'm hoping we draw people because otherwise, if you show up just in the middle of the woods with nothing to do. You're not gonna have people coming back. You know what? Maybe that's right. Yeah, and the big success. Whether it's gonna be is all about providing some funding for the educational Cleary's So It's all the win win, and I love the idea of having a Bigfoot museum in the area. I've been thinking about that, too. That's great. Oh, Farley, Thanks so much for calling in and given your information And absolutely, I mean, that's what you know, like, like Jason, But together one of those when we were at our last hot spot together, and he was pulling all the stuff together, he's gonna be putting it on the walls and s so so you're gonna have access to every bit of that. Justin with the people that are coming to you now, and that's where I was talking about, you know? Hey, after the show, let's definitely talk s so that I can help you pull some of those people together to that I know. And Pharrell and of course, being right there in Oklahoma. Like I said, Hey, I'm from Kentucky. You Oklahoma Folk are just like us. I don't I don't. I never would have thought you guys think like us. You eat like us, and you talk like us, And when you eat like that, us, that's pretty good, just saying Especially when you got wild boar running around. I still love that idea. I love it. A Bigfoot barbecue is in line for the future. And that and that barbecue is four. I'm with you on that. We got a lot of people on the phone. I'm just seeing how, um I can fit them all in here. Let's see if we can do it kind of quickly. Here. Um, I don't know that we can. Everybody wants to have a full conversation with you. And I get it totally 100%. I You know I had had. I know A lot of people were thinking It's gonna be a scream match. It's not that it's not over yet. But I knew that you are. Listen, you know, being a listener, so that makes all the difference in the world. So when you had the when you shot the last documentary, and you've got a new one coming are these documentaries. Are they the one? How are there they put together of? Hey, we're looking for the truth. We or Are they searching deeper? They just taken story's kind of documentary. And this is the same documentary. What the first one is They set me down 2.5 hours interviewed me. They clipped that down to 30 Minutes Senate too. I think somewhere California Then they called me back and said, Hey, we want to build on this. We want to talk to people who have really Had an encounter with Bigfoot. Satch Squatch. Um, we want to talk to business. People say, Do you think this is really going to affect you? We want to talk. Tomo gave him another legislator to get another perspective. On, you know, I He's crazy or not crazy, Or has this affected him? And you know what's he think so? I gave him the whole gamut way kind of kicked in round of who? And I was like what? You ought to talk to this person, because I mean, I've talked to so many people like you and meeting people and your two guests here are awesome. You know, with ideals and friendly and you know again. I know that we may have a little disagreement. But, man, we can work that out and I greatly this turns out to be a good deal. And so anyways, throughout this I've Bigfoot community 3300 people. I got to know these two guys that put that, uh you know, they do one of them What he call it, Uh, Not.

Oklahoma Africa Kentucky Tomo Justin Jean 100% Farley 2.5 hours Jason Pharrell two guys 3300 people Deanna two guests Far Lynette first one African Humphrey Edna
"department biology" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

08:10 min | 7 months ago

"department biology" Discussed on KTOK

"Enjoying great conversation. With the hated man in the SAS Squatch World. Oklahoma State. Rep. Justin Humphrey and people are starting to see that, Hey, they can actually talk to him and he's gonna listen. And that's what I had discovered when I got on the phone with him, and I was like, you know what? Hey, this man can get some money. That's pretty cool. Let's see what we can do. Let's all get together on this because You know Justin's open to that, and we love that. And, you know That's a good thing. You know, That's a good thing. We all got a lot in common. And and Justin. You know, it's gonna be one of our goals and I'm gonna tell you it's not gonna take long. But we're going to show you What? What? What? What? The discussions all about how you feel about that. I'm very open. Here's the deal. You know, one of the things that when I was a law enforcement officer, when I was young, I went in to prove the person guilty if you were in the criminal justice system. Went into previous guilty. I had some things happen to me, and it taught me that tape. My job's not find somebody guilty. My job is to look and let the evidence lead me and to get me to the truth. And so here's where I'm at with this. I'm just gone. You know, open as I go through lives to say, Hey, I'm open to the truth. And so you know if we get evidence if we get More proof, you know, that's just part of the journey and that's part of life. And you better be open to all things and ready to review. You know what's out there, So I bring it on. In fact, like I say, y'all, you've already Give me a lot ideals Just being on here talking. Hey, I love the hard thing. I love that. I didn't do it. I love it and Well, I'm crazy. I'm taking notes. Johnny. I'm taking notes and I'm already going to talk, Tomo. We have the child Tell tribe here and I'm gonna talk to me about, you know, with job. I'm working on another deal with tourism to open up money and again that we might get money for the museum we're talking about. Already talking. It's hard walking through my mind about creating trails that you would just you know, you could have a big put up and you would come and read. You know information on Bigfoot, So you'd have a better lookout station, but there'd be this Where you get educated to Bigfoot walk down to the next spot. Here's more information about Bigfoot. So you know those are the kind of things that I'm looking for. Bring people in because most of the people are not gonna want to go camp out. Hard core, you know, get into this thing that some may and I'm sure there will be those and I will agree with your way have toe Look at that. But the majority of the people that I think will come from New York are going to want to eat in the restaurant, Go walk down a cool trail. Have a license and maybe go hang glide and go write a four wheeler and then go back and go, Man. There's all kinds of stuff. It's inexpensive with Tobin. It's out in the Open. You know, All of those kind of things is what I am looking for that people go to a beautiful, beautiful part of our country and that they have an adventure. They meet great people, new friends, relationships. Learned a whole lot about the area and take away an adventure and a good time. Tell their friends and come back now. That's what I'm hoping. That's what I'm trying to sell. Well, there's a guy that is in your state, and he told me about you. He may have been the first for I don't know when I first saw the store if I saw it myself or If he told me about it, But he's one of our big coast listeners, and he calls in from time to time. He's also a blue rocker on my show, and I have been to his place with the creepy hot spot. He's amazing guy really nice really into, really knows his stuff. But he's right there in Oklahoma. And his name is far one, huh? Farley, Welcome again here to coast to coast. How are you? Oh, hi. I'm great. And thanks for having me really appreciate getting a chance to share some thoughts. Absolutely. Take it away. It's all yours meets Justin Justin Far. Lynch Far Lynch, Justin. Hello, Mr Humphries. Pleasure to talk with you. Yes, sir. I had a little checklist of things here is going to mention to you and you, You're eventually. I mean, you're gradually covering them all I was gonna suggest you talk to the Choctaw Nation. I think it's a great idea, and, uh Talking to all of the tribes in Oklahoma, I think would be a very neat way of putting a brochure together for what you're doing. And I was going to say once the tiger Always a tiger. I thought you were gonna help me out on that was trying to be cool about Yuri. See you. Yeah, Yeah. Yeah, I forgot. Yeah, I My God, It's been so long ago, brother. I'm I'm old. Well, I used to organize the Bigfoot conference. They're having that before the federal And, uh, I really liked the area, too. I just think it's beautiful, and I think it's a great idea, and I know that everyone's having a knee jerk reaction on this, but you'll get the language right. I think part of the language your changes. Going from making sure that Bigfoot is alive to make sure that he's not harmed at all. And that's got to be in there that will be in there. I promise you, Yeah, and The only thing I worry about is maybe some juvenile Bigfoot's getting in a situation. But there's groups out there that are already trying to shoot a Bigfoot. I mean, they go to the home of the area all the time. And that is their objective, and they are serious about it. So That's one thing that keep in mind is that those groups are out there already. And you don't wanna let do you know, I hope I hope by doing this and if we get everything right in this Hope it will actually stop that, because there's nothing that would prevent that right now. And I'm hoping maybe we can do something in the May not get it in the first deal, but if we continue with this that we get that kind of, you know, we'd come back and introduce the bill if it gets big enough. Say how you can't do this. You can't So I think we can address that right, Justin, they're saying far Linda. You know the state. What's the state that it's against the law to kill? SAS quote Lot Washington over Oregon, one of the other, I think, Okay, There's actually a law and one of these states, and it may just be a county that's in the state. No summer. Okay for farming. What part of the state you live in? I'm in a to eliminate it. You're right. Okay, Well, cool. Yeah. In fact, I do a lot of stuff tonight. I'm in fact, I was up there with Lieutenant governor the other night, So Yeah, well, I would love to get with you and let you pick my brain if he wanted to, Uh, I would absolutely love that. I'll go through 80 just all the time. I've got one of my best friends like a sister to me. It's awfully well, what's in this? E? I just want to get the message out that that what I think Bigfoot are. I think they are people and And, uh, that's what I was going to suggest to you is that you mentioned maybe changing it from hunting to just gathering evidence, and you might be able to get the Oklahoma universities all of the universities and their science departments, Biology department's might be able to get involved and gather. Try together some evidence, especially he'd known a where they're sampling the waters in the streams and the lakes and ponds and they can tell Everything that's in that environment and if they get a hit on a Unknown primate..

Oklahoma New York Justin Justin Humphrey Johnny Tomo Farley Humphries tonight Choctaw Nation Yuri first SAS Linda Oklahoma State Oregon Bigfoot conference Lynch Far Lynch one thing Justin Far
"department biology" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"department biology" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We find scientifically interesting and we get ready and round up the students. I sounded, you know, go. Here's an incident. Let's think about going to this either today or tomorrow. And so we have all our equipment, all our fire pp ear, personal protection equipment ready to go into go bags. And we make decision where we could be safe and where we can deploy without being in the way of fire suppression operations is the last thing we want to do is be a hindrance to those operations. When you get this data, what is the final product? What are you trying to measure and produce? Generally, if we think about atmospheric phenomena, fires are just not sample at the same intensity as other phenomenon. And so what we're trying to do is understand the fire environment and particularly fire induced wind. So how they surge into the fire front, So we're trying to measure those with the Doppler radar in the Doppler light are And so these things allow us to better understand the physics of fire spread and also provide a data set. That allows us to model the fire behavior. So with this new research center, why does the study of wildfire need to be so interdisciplinary? Well, while fire is by nature, interdisciplinary science, we need to understand fire Ecology. How do plants burn? What plants are burning, where the plants growing. What's the evolutionist plants? Different ecosystems. We have to understand the technologies to sense the weather to measure the fire that's remote sensing. We need to understand the policy afterwards how our communities impacted. So it is a blend of scientists here at San Jose State that we've hired From multiple disciplines, social sciences and welfare management, fire ecology in the department, biology, mechanical engineering and looking at fire dynamics and then in meteorology Department. We have two positions remote sensing of wildfire and wildfire modeling. And so all that together allows us to basically better understand the whole system. Professor Craig Clements of San Jose States Brand New Wildfire Interdisciplinary Research Center. Thank you so much. Thanks for having me. I'm Rachael Maria Della NKVD News. Support comes from fieldwork. Brewing Craft beer delivered at home within three hours. Seven Bay Area locations more at fieldwork brewing dot com. A new study shows that the number of Americans experiencing symptoms of depression has nearly tripled during the pandemic in people who have lost a loved one are especially vulnerable. That story is just ahead on all things considered. Support comes from the Bernard Osher Foundation supporting higher education in the arts. And from Redwood Credit Union. Proud Sponsor Check, please. They area. Proud sponsor of Check, please. Bay Area taste and sit at home on September 3rd celebrate and watch Les Lisa Brocco share favorite moments on the show, with special guests visit dot org's last events. Areas of smoke and haze will continue tonight in Northern California. This Farrell air smear, the air alert will remain in effect through tomorrow. The National Weather Service says. We'll have a heat wave for the.

Bay Area Professor Craig Clements San Jose State Rachael Maria Della NKVD Interdisciplinary Research Cen Bernard Osher Foundation Les Lisa Brocco National Weather Service Redwood Credit Union meteorology Department Northern California
"department biology" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

08:10 min | 3 years ago

"department biology" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Little bit, you know, always think corporations, the ones taking advantage. But if you work for IBM and you have they have given you the resources and paid you money to do this, then that's, you know, quit your job and go invent something on your own, then you know? Yeah. So I kind of see both sides. Yeah, but generally corporations probably sticking to the man. So speaking of corporation sticking to the man or humanity in general, is. The pharmaceutical industry again. So I said that they're, they're very happy with the status quo and one of the great criticisms of the patent system. Now, as it is is you can get a patent, you can buy a patent and just sit on it. You can buy a patent safe from a competitor or from somebody who may be a competitor down the road, right, and prevent them from making even if the thing benefits humanity, even if it literally saves people's lives, you can. You can sit on a pen and apparently drug companies have been known to do that. There's one famous. Case with a company called Amgen, and they developed a Nimia drug that treated anemia and Irene deficiency. Yeah, and it worked really well. The problem is like the body absorb it really quick. So you had to take large doses for your whole life, right? Apparently, this researchers chemist found a way to make the drug longer-lasting, which in Amgen's mine meant well, we can't make as much money off of selling fewer drugs. So this lady was like, can I see your patents? And I can figure out a way to to latch this onto your drug? Yeah, and save lives. Ams like we're not gonna let you see our our materials are researched. You don't want to make that better man, but so and that's, that's not as overt as buying a patent sitting on it to keep people from doing it. Yeah, but that does happen like it's a, it's a, it's a, it's a competitive way to navigate the business climate. Well, puts Josh. You worked your way around that one very nicely. I got something here. If you might take like a year to five years to get this patent from pending to approved, and let's say you put in an idea very similar to someone else around the same time that happens all the time that happens declare in what they call an interference, a dance off dance off. Exactly. And they have to actually have a little trial a little trial. They serve tea and everything's a minute. Everything small may have a trial where they basically figure out who got their first. Yeah, there's a very famous case of Alexander Graham Bell and Elisa gray basically putting in a patent for the telephone at the same time. Yeah. And I guess for a long time, it was whoever could prove they invented it. First in the United States was the one who got the patent. Right? And then I just to simplify things in March of two thousand thirteen. The US changed its patent law. So now the first inventor defile is the one who receives the patent, right? So even if it's a minute, yeah, whoever got it there I as the one who gets the patent. That's why filing that patent right away is is your best defense go now, stop, press, pause, do it right now? Seriously. If you have an invention, just got one more thing. I'm the the, the infamous poor man's patent means copyright sure. Everyone's heard like I gotta do is write it out and mail it to yourself. I think I suggested that on this this show before it, you remember I don't remember that, but that is just old wives stale. That's not going to hold up in court. It's basically worthless, but I don't understand why if like, right, when you create the work, it automatically is copyrighted. Why would that like dating it not make. It not just substantiated even more well, not that I'm not talking about writing a book I'm talking about, hey, I'm a did this invention, and here's a schematic and I'm gonna mail. Okay. Okay. Yeah. So it could work for something copyrighted but not a patent will. No. I mean, if it's if it's just a original work of art, you've created like a book. Like I said, it's already copyrighted. Okay. So that doesn't even apply. Okay. But if you invented something in designed it and just mail this yourself, it's worthless against you. Basically, you can't prove like envelopes can be steamed open a manipulated like hold up in court. You can do it if you want. Take it to court. I have an extra stand that I don't know what to do with. That's right. Let's see. You got anything else. I got nothing. If you wanna learn more about patents, it takes surprisingly interesting stuff agreed. You can type that word in the search bar. How stuff works dot com. And since I said that it's time for listener mail. I'm gonna call this. Thanks for the panic attack episode. I'm glad they said we got a lot of great feedback. I think this touched a lot of people because they're way more common than you think, hey, guys loved the episode on panic attacks, had them in college brought on by normal college dress plus the loss of blood uncool would often wake up in the night standing in the hall of my dorm feeling like I could not breathe. Sometimes I would be awake enough to think I'm dying. This need to get the hallway. Someone will find me or my body. Sometimes I would just wake up screaming what helped. And the reason I'm writing was some wonderful therapy offered through my university's health services along with some antidepressants in the support of my family and friends. I learned coping mechanisms to get me through my anxiety, how to express my stress. So I wasn't bottling it all up inside and the importance of taking time to rest my mind and body all the help. I was able to leave therapy after a few semesters was able to recognize that needed it again later in graduate school after the birth and. My second year that my much love, but very implant child all college students, graduate and undergrad to really take advantage of their mental health services that are offered to them. For me, it's a student might university. Each session was only ten bucks, man, remember that college. All that stuff was so cheap. Like the doctor, you go see a shrink for like five dollars. I remember I got acupuncture, like three bucks a section. Really. They have that UTA. Now I did that in LA through though my roommate. Is this some dude? Exactly. He was good with a needle. And it could also be charged to my bursar account with even know what that is bursar. Yeah, I didn't have on. Yeah, I remember that from college, but I don't remember what it was. I think the word looks familiar. The health building was on campus of sessions fit right into my schedule, and I can't stress enough how beneficial it was for me without their be. I would no doubt have not made it through college in graduate school. There's no shame therapy or medication to help you through tough times. Turns out pretty much everyone goes through it to some extent, and no one is weak forgetting help, admitting you need help us what makes you a stronger person in my opinion and Rosalie Maltby researcher at university of Oklahoma department. Biology, I couldn't agree more. Well, thanks. Is it Rosa Lee, Rosalie, Rosalie, thanks a lot. Rosalie. Repr- you writing in spreading that message because it's a good one. Very, pretty name as well. If you have a patent we want to hear from you tell us what your patent is, so we'll steal it or not. It's padded. If you've got a great idea that you haven't yet patented in that too. Whatever you wanna do. You can tweet to as podcast you can join us on Facebook dot com, slash stuff. You should know. You can send us an Email to stuff podcast that house of works out calm. And as always to answer on the web stuff, you should know dot com.

Rosalie Maltby Amgen United States IBM Facebook Alexander Graham Bell LA Josh anemia Irene Rosa Lee Elisa gray university of Oklahoma departm researcher five dollars five years
"department biology" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

02:19 min | 4 years ago

"department biology" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"Here's the buzz hata's someone decide you know this is back in the nineties where neuroscience was really kind of in my mind at least the unknown scientific it's no but it's not the popular place to go right now so how do you decide to go down the neuroscientist you know line like what was that decision like for of good med school well it's funny because i decided neuroscience arm in undergrads so i went to trinity college in hartford connecticut and um in the 80s um and besides you know playing uh base in a crazy punk band and making at art projects and i was also a you know a psychology major but i uh built male major eternity which is unique school because you could do those things that um i built a major that combined biology in psychology which is now basically neuroscience uh ed uh had props in the psychology department biology and um even computer science bourbon that work together uh so that i can have a degree that was very very specific untailored tailored to my interest which i was really interested in the mind brain paradigm i mean understanding that you have this what people like to call an oregon which i don't believe is necessarily an oregon if you look at a qualification weis it runs everything it's your brain um it's you it's it's what you you the spirit of the it's what you're you express that that is a both a tissue and it's also um uh something that some ethereal and outside of a tissue that's what do with it in it's what creates creativity in all these other components that makes you you um dan is always been interesting to me like i the idea of consciousness as always been interesting um i learned about buddhists thought in uh in under grad as a like a sophomore think at trinity and i was overwhelmed by how interesting um the buddhist thought process was and what are you apply that to uh mindfulness in the concept of being mindful in the moment and how it makes you freeze up because you cannot interpret all of the signal at one time your mind is constantly gaining things from experience that led me to really kind of want to investigate that further skills.

connecticut oregon computer science
"department biology" Discussed on Science... sort of

Science... sort of

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"department biology" Discussed on Science... sort of

"Okay hi ryan patrick adapt in losing the episode to forty seven i wonder how dabney's molecular biology class would be better now i totally i totally shed on west virginia's biology class as an aside but we'll let him i am an assistant professor at her alma mater west virginia university department biology m it was funny to listen to the podcast has struggled molecular biology and how daphne would blow past y'all have ryan put on the brakes for definition then i read her paper and there was a lot of oh i know what this is any hugh we have been working to improve the molecular biology course which i will he would be to living cell to ninety correct as you say cracked not yes me saying correct i was the class and i was referencing she didn't also talks about he's very happy that you taught her about for beers and she studies i wanna say what she says is as though he schools she says you're nightmare asian in how within split have we said her name no jin jinjie loop jinjie said he's how genetic mary asian within species contributes to differences in response to environmental stresses she works on buddy niece engage in ge but i will say i also hope that molecular biology at west virginia has improved i guess i haven't talk to anyone in the program as of late but i would i would like to talk to someone programming hennessy where it that right now because i think that they definitely had an opportunity to make sense stuff better anna giving grants i really yeah jinjie when we know how is it what he do there now what's what's in about towards also gets cooler nova the people at the university's that we've all been to are carrying about things yes and and one i want to talk to us about it like that's great would we love no i was very excited i was super excited to have somebody from w's cynically be like i hope it's better and i was like that's awesome means you like.

dabney west virginia assistant professor molecular biology jinjie ryan patrick west virginia university hugh hennessy w