35 Burst results for "Denison"

The Deaths of Dennis and Norma Woodruff

Sword and Scale

01:37 min | Last week

The Deaths of Dennis and Norma Woodruff

"On october. Eighteenth two thousand five in royse city. Texas todd williams had been called to the home of empty nesters. Dennis normal woodruff to perform a welfare check. No one including the couple's college age children had heard from the woodruff's in two days. This was very unusual and the family was concerned when tot arrived everything on the property looked normal. He tried the doors but they were locked from the inside. Todd was told to check on. Dennis enormou- by any means necessary. So he broke into a window and forced his way into the house. What he saw shook him to the core. There were dennis. And norma sitting on the sofa with a soupy black blood pooling between their bodies. They had been shot and stabbed multiple times. The couple was propped up like to slaughtered rag dolls. There was no sign of a struggle. No signs of a break-in norma's hand was dangling over her head like a broken branch while dennis still had his tobacco spit. Cup clutched in the palm of his lap. The tv was on flashing light onto the cardboard box. That denison norma were using as a makeshift coffee table. The small town of royse city and never seen a homicide this brutal and senseless before

Todd Williams Woodruff Royse City Dennis Enormou Norma Dennis Texas Todd Denison Norma
"denison" Discussed on Reverie True Crime

Reverie True Crime

04:42 min | Last month

"denison" Discussed on Reverie True Crime

"You can find out more at katie palmer. Project dot com in january of twenty twenty one reported by k. Ex i dot com and texas state representative filed a bill. That would require law enforcement to test a driver's blood for drugs or alcohol if they hit a pedestrian and cause serious injury or death. The house bill. One two eight seven is named colton law after colton carney. An autistic roy city man who was hit and killed by a driver while walking to work back in january of twenty seventeen colton body was tested for the presence of drugs but the driver involved in the accident was not tested. Undercurrent texas law officers can use their own judgement on whether to test you driver's blood alcohol content when they hit a pedestrian for john palmer he said had colton law ben law at the time that there would be accountability for the death of his wife. The author of the bill said that members of the justice for katie palmer group have voiced their support for the bill which accounts not only for fatal accidents but accidents that call serious bodily injury terry mesa the state representative and author of the bill said quote. Her death will not be for not that it will come to be part of a bill. That's important in the future for the state of texas. What a beautiful person she was and not just talking about beauty externally but a beautiful person inside. What a good person she was that it makes you want all the more to get justice for her. John palmer has filed a civil case against corey foster. John said that he hopes that this will bring to light more information about katie's death which he hopes will convince the district attorney's office to bring the case to a grand jury. I talked to john and as of march seventh. Twenty twenty one. He is still going forward with the civil suit. And as soon as i have an update on how that goes. I will let you all know. There is so much evidence that needs to be put in front of an unbiased jury. So keep john palmer and all of katie's family in your thoughts during this time as they have been fighting an uphill battle since the very beginning i will have all the links in the show notes for the katie palmer project the justice for katie palmer facebook group the justice for katie palmer facebook page and the justice for katie palmer twitter. Please follow join to get the latest and fastest updates in this case. When i talked to john over the phone one of the sweetest things john said was that he loved coming home to his wife. He said it wasn't like oh man i have to go home. He said that he would come home early from work just to be there with katie and the kids merely hanging out with katie and the kids was his favorite thing to do. He said they would always pull out chairs in the driveway. Lay back and just hang out. She said that it was perfect. Every little moments spent together. You could tell he really cherished it. He said if someone would have told him that he would not be able to go back to work and things will have to stay like it is right now forever that it would have been perfect and that he would not be able to ask for more than that john and their children love katie so much and miss her more than anything in the world. No apologies will ever be enough. They won't settle for money. They want to see this. Go to court and for all the evidence to be seen and heard they want and need justice for katie. Thank you for listening to today's episode. I really hope that katie's family gets justice for her way. Sooner than later nobody should get killed and their killer pays no consequences considering all the evidence in this case i find it really sad. That corey foster was found not guilty. I hope the next time that i have an update it will be that there was justice for katie's death and johns injuries my thoughts love and hugs go.

John palmer march seventh John john palmer john katie twitter katie palmer facebook today johns k. Ex i dot com january of twenty twenty one colton carney january of twenty seventeen one colton law colton Project dot com twenty one
"denison" Discussed on Reverie True Crime

Reverie True Crime

04:12 min | Last month

"denison" Discussed on Reverie True Crime

"Severely. John survived with injuries to his arms and back he was taken to texoma medical center in denison by the denison. Ems here's john in the back of the ambulance trying to explain what happened right after the crash. What where we all kind of that on. The north south out of the road. Okay where do you on the router. Traffic ponza thirty four. He did he did. He could see off decided why out a few days later john was discharged from the hospital. Katie was taken by helicopter to a different hospital in plano texas. She was taken to the medical center of plano that tuesday morning after they were hit. Katie didn't make it. She suffered from kercheval head injury and passed away at one. Am wednesday morning. John said quote. She was compassionate so smart and such a strong woman. She was a mother and a loving wife. John talked about one of the things he would miss most saying that it was her laugh. He said that she had this very loud laugh. It was very unique. If you could not find her in a crowd you could hear her before. You could even see her. He said that's one thing that he's going to miss the most a family who had their lives ripped apart and the matter of seconds from corey foster who even told a police officer he should not have been driving corey's excuse was because of the condensation on his windshield in an interview. John said quote. There's not a reason why thirty nine year old woman should be run over seven forty five in the morning you feel like half of you is gone or more than half the better half when corrie took his field sobriety test. The officer concluded that he was not under the influence. However in the footage you can see him stumble and shake corey. Blamed it on his work boots being unlevel. His breathalyzer test was rising and stopped at a point zero six. This just was given at eight fifty that morning almost after the crash. Would it have been higher if the test was given earlier. Corey was not even asked to get his blood tested for alcohol or any other substances. Not only was.

Katie John tuesday morning wednesday morning john denison plano texas Corey thirty nine year old one thing more than half one over seven forty five point zero six texoma medical center thirty four a few days later half of corey eight
"denison" Discussed on Reverie True Crime

Reverie True Crime

03:32 min | Last month

"denison" Discussed on Reverie True Crime

"His wife katie palmer.

Framework's Nirav Patel on Reinventing the Laptop

Techschanges: Insights on Innovation

09:16 min | 2 months ago

Framework's Nirav Patel on Reinventing the Laptop

"My guest today is europe patel. He is the ceo and founder of framework a startup that is looking to reinvent the laptop by allowing consumers to choose different components an upgrade them instead of having to throw the whole device as it gets a bit older. Thank you so much for being my guest today to chat with you so Tell me tell me what inspired you to start framework. Sure yes so you know after a decade and consumer electronics at your apple for a few years a man oculus for the last seven years i got to see. Basically the consumer electronics industry from end to add and just saw an enormous amount of waste and inefficiency just felt like an industry that was kind of broken from end to add except for the big platform owners. Like the you know the facebook. Some bugles naples of the world. It's a sort of like constant race to the bottom for companies that are in the space just out product for ultra low margins trying to make up in volume and there's for consumers is that we've got these products that are just not designed to last their affectively designed to work for some period of time and that we're out of breakdown or of date and then you cycle back through by another one and the process repeats over and over again and of course the end result of all that is just electric waste piling up everywhere and so just like for years of in thinking. That can't possibly be that industry. This important has to operate in such a broken model or must be a better way and so you came upon this erm concept of allowing purchasers to upgrade different components to offer different components really going far beyond the customized to order process that we have today from some of the leading vendors. Could you tell me a bit about the first product that your looking to bring to market and what some of the design goals were and what some of the module options are going to look like. Sure definitely so. I actually got one here. That says after reproductions is not data final version. Bits effectively act completing certainly complete enough to show off the features and functionality. Arrogancy core part of the framework laptop. Is that from five feet away. It looks and feels and behaves like a normal notebook. We sort of took that as like the core sort of table. Stakes of the product is of one half a thin light performance Half inch notebook that within those constraints is as repairable. Upgradable has cut in customizable as as can be and the idea there. It was really that we don't want it to be the slight challenging trade off or you have this great long-lasting product but it looks crazy in bulky at her stuff you know hanging off the bed we wanted. The you know the ninety nine percent of the time but using the product as a normal notebook to be that familiar. Great experience in that one percent of the time where you need to replace your battery or at an upgrade or formats for that to the not. Just possible that easy to do so you can see. Some of the differentiated functionality built in is from customization perspective. You can see that the ports instead of being sort of locked into places you typically find in a notebook. Fine but any factor. We've built our expansion card system. Where on both sides. The notebook there are few expansion court bay's at order time consumer gets to choose exactly what they want and it seemed like till the obvious thing to us that every person has a different set of needs when it comes to what devices they wanna plug into their he see. So why is that. We all have to have all donald adapters. Why not just make the no but flexible to accommodate what people actually want and so building the system. We've got usb a usb c display hdmi. Mike risky we have high speed expansion as for expansion. And we're just gonna continue to add new cards and also opened up the bring in third parties to make the wrong carts. It's funny as you talk about. Some of these options reminds me of some of the days of the pcm. Cia or and there were so many options for adding adding capabilities to pc's. That's where we saw some of the first wi fi cards and there were Ethernet storage There were there. Were all of these These options and we gave away a little bit of that. I think when that That slot a disappeared so any thoughts on the kind of a third party modules that you are expecting to see come to the platform. You've gotten a since announcing product publicly. last week we've got a ton of inbound interest from folks with You know their own applications that near the nice thing about this is that developing a card is relatively straightforward for you know a company making consumer electronics products or even a hobbyist individuals. Be able to do and so you know we. We want to see cards where someone has. Some specific need builds. You know hundreds of something in fines. The hundred people out there in the world who get super excited about that one. Have that built into their laptop. We really expect to seal a pretty massive proliferation of not. Just you know these really high running parts like that. You know like video output like an age. Gm i also really each things like microcontrollers data acquisition cards. Or you know high end audio output. That really enabled things that just haven't been available inside of a note. We're actually offering this. Not just as a pre-built system which you unbox are buying up. You get your pc like you would any other one but also has a kit. Modules you can customize switch deeper level and then actually assembly yourself and lo whatever. Osu like onto it just stop. You mentioned the diy option. Of course. it's still possible today to go out and build your own. Pc and pick your own video card and processor case and and all that but it can be a bit daunting for people who aren't comfortable getting inside of a box and hooking up all of these wires so it's cool to see that the framework computer can rekindle some of that excitement even though as you say to reach a broader audience. It's really going to have to support a lot of these more mainstream options as well definitely. So we've designed this thing to really be as easy as possible service like shut us down and actually opened enough in chase on the inside. But there's just exposed fasteners on on ship with a screwdriver. Inbox the does everything that you need to be able to place an audit of small tool and then it's a rather simple effort up know popping. Open the cover and getting inci and keyboard replacement super easy offering a range of languages. And then as you get inside actually every model miss thing is clearly labeled with what it is and that takes you into repair guide for it as well as a place. You can order a replacement part upgrade art so battery ran storage. Even the entire main board can be taken out or place and we've got a simple easy to follow guides for all these and that's fantastic so it's it's almost kind of an educational tool as well for people to learn more about what's going on inside their their laptop clearly. Sustainability is one of the goals of of the product if you do have any estimates or say if framework is able to affect this kind of change in the marketplace what the impact might be in terms of eliminating or reducing waste in the pc laptop business. Yeah definitely so in general. Our goal is to enable people to use the product for as twice twice as long as they would normally use a notebook ammon and actually that is that we want those be happy ears when someone buys note but they might get like a couple of years battery lights grade and their keyboards working perfectly Function and denison the thing and then you know after that. Battery's wearing out you. Maybe you've got like you know your w he is kind of key in your unit you gotta crack in screen or something like that and you know you suffer through it for a while. But with the framework laptop. We really want people to have happy productive years with the product in a meeting new battery or need more storage space or they want more performance that they're able to just get the piece of the product that what some get back to that good work state and keep going on that alone that extension of the longevity. You know is a substantial reduction. Environmental impact is by meeting to create less new full

Patel Europe Apple Facebook Donald Trump CIA Mike OSU GM
Dennis Muilenburgs Bet on the Future

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

05:40 min | 2 months ago

Dennis Muilenburgs Bet on the Future

"Denis muhlenberg has kept a low public profile since he left his job. Ceo of boeing at the end of twenty nineteen. But that's about to change me. Lemberg has teamed up with air finance founder. kirsten bartok tau and other aviation luminaries to fund a special purpose. Acquisition company called new vista acquisition corp. They're aiming to raise two hundred and forty million dollars through public offerings to acquire businesses focused on transformational technologies in areas. Such a space defense and communications advanced their mobility and logistics. What does that mean well. We'll let you hear directly from denison. Kirsten who have joined today also with us on my side of the table so to speak is aviation weeks. Technology specialists and urban air mobility guru executive editor graham warwick. Just one no we will. Not be talking about boeing past or future. If you're interested in that i'd like to refer you back to our january twenty nine podcast so let's get started a dentist. Tell us what you're up to. And why joe the good morning and thanks for the chance to talk about new vista. We're very excited about this. New endeavor and that excitement starts with a tremendous opportunity that we see right now as you know i had the privilege of being the ceo of boeing back in. We celebrated our centennial in two thousand sixteen and we. We did some work together on the age of aerospace and when we look back on the history of aerospace the opportunity in front of his right. Now i think it's the greatest one in that one hundred plus year history harris face. We're seeing this convergence of technologies in a way that we've never seen before technologies that span artificial intelligence autonomy new manufacturing techniques satellite technologies new types of vehicles and propulsion systems that set of emerging technologies. All at once has never happened before. Combine that with mega-scale changes in the market. You mentioned air mobility new waste. People are moving Logistics e commerce capabilities the revolution in space in the build out of the lower orbit ecosystem and next generation defense systems that combination of technologies and mega skill. Market ships creates an unprecedented opportunity. And that's what we're focused on at new vista kirsten. Let's hear from you. What brought you into team. Up with dennis and How are you approaching this. Thanks joe and as you know. I've been pretty focused on advanced ever ability for the last four or five years Having been based in silicon valley and kind of live through the internet growth and doing venture capital back then realized early that this transition was going to happen and just from the basic technologies with your talk about them. Electrification greeted propulsion which then goes to autonomy and an ad in hydrogen which has come on the radar lately These technologies are going to completely change Aerospace so that the next twenty years is going to look completely different in the last twenty years and even the is you know. The aircraft designs will look entirely different. Lucky enough i been working on this trying to figure out the right vehicle to investment doing a lot of my own personal investing some through our finance and then was Got on the idea of a spec realized that could be the optimal solution to help. These emerging companies crossed the chasm of death valley of death that we call where you got early stage venture capital money but they needed at large amount of growth capital. These are deep company's hardware and software at their capital intensive and then added that they've got the regulatory component of the faa and. they needed some good opportunities. For large amounts of crossover capital groups. Like softbank could have been that or sovereigns but the spac product has really come in to help. These company cost the valley of death and make it to the next level where they're commercialization occurs and their operational so i couldn't be more lucky to partner with such an incredible operators dennis someone who really pushed billing to be more. Entrepreneurial created horizon ex and necks and We put together a great team here. And we're excited to make a positive difference in the landscape. So so what are you thinking. I mean how do you take these technologies that we write about all time. I guess our listeners want to know and apply them to be like a real product. What what is really exciting. Talk about this this change in the next twenty years. What can we see in practical terms. What are we going to see. joe. I think you're gonna see transformation in these four market segments that we're talking about that's way beyond what we've ever seen before i take what's happening in the in. The lower orbits space ecosystem and extraordinary the number of technologies. That we're seeing that are coming into places real applications now. The build out a satellite infrastructure nanno sats micro sats we see a market for fifty thousand plus additional small sets on orbit or the next decade. We see a number of companies who are working on breaking the cost curve for access to space new launch capabilities that are coming to bear and then new applications in terms of how to use those satellite networks to create information at useful data earth observation New kinds of reconnaissance and surveillance capabilities connectivity. In communications i think the low earth orbit ecosystem. Build out that we're seeing now is just one example of the kind of massive transfer transformation that we're gonna see that's going to create economic value. It's gonna create new companies new jobs. it's going to create a new technologies that are on the innovation edge that are now ripple out into other business sectors. So it's an exciting time to be working on this leading edge

Boeing Denis Muhlenberg Lemberg Kirsten Bartok Tau New Vista Acquisition Corp Graham Warwick JOE Denison Kirsten Dennis Harris Silicon Valley Softbank FAA
LG Announces New OLED TV Lineup, Launches New 4K Monitor at CES 2021

Howie Carr

00:56 sec | 4 months ago

LG Announces New OLED TV Lineup, Launches New 4K Monitor at CES 2021

"Are getting a little less flat. LG is showing off some new TV concepts that this year's consumer electronic show, including one that can bend at the touch of a button. Neither be flat or can be curved, which is really immersive for gaming. If you're sitting up close to it. Have that curved display digital trends Caleb Denison says Curve TV's didn't catch on when they first hit the market a few years ago. But with more people getting into gaming, LG decided to test the waters again. They're kind of coming back around to some of the stuff that they've tried in the past. Now that there's a really reasonable application for it. LG Answer demo Too transparent, old led TV, which Denison says is aimed at restaurants. You can actually use that transparent old. It is a shield between the two of you. While also looking at the menu on this display, picking out what you want to order. It'll let you watch TV while you wait for your food and even display the bill at the end of the session with Tech friends about like stone, ABC News

LG Caleb Denison Curve Tv Denison Abc News
CDC Requires COVID-19 Test From Air Passengers Entering The U.S.

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:21 sec | 4 months ago

CDC Requires COVID-19 Test From Air Passengers Entering The U.S.

"The centers for disease control and prevention announcing that beginning on the twenty sixth of this month. Anyone flying into the us will need to be tested before departure. In addition the cdc urges those passengers to get tested three to five days after arrival and stay home for the first seven days after their trip which denison the order comes as the virus surges and new variants are detected

CDC United States
Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

Goodbye to Alcohol

27:17 min | 4 months ago

Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

"It was his guys talking roland hydra one year and end the sky was the and he came up to me after he said like. I'm here to help me recover from alcoholism. I don't want to rehab. I've just come to detox. My buddy what. Can i do to stop caving. Alcohol acid right. This is what you gotta do. Every morning you get up and you have as much fruit and a nice handful of narrow nuts or seeds with just eat as much food as you can stuff. Your face doesn't have to be early in the morning but it must be a first meal of the day and eat as much as it. If it's a box of mangoes and eat the box of mangoes op done that. Eaten a box magazine taya watermelon. And you might do that for three months and eventually what happens. Is you end up eating one mango in. It's really sweet sausage. I into stuff your face. Full of lucas. In every natural glucose fresh fruits nuts every time. You crave alcohol. Just reach out for some dates or some raisins or even like a hundred percent pure grape juice or you know have sparkling grape juice. It satisfies your cells needs for glucose that craving will stop welcome to goodbye to alcohol about calls from wealth without wine with you. Want to say goodbye to alcohol. Revie said goodbye. Twelve called over the on just so this is the podcast few. We've got recovery stories to in spy experts to inform you plenty of advice on how to drink and change your life. Hello hello and welcome to the good. By twelve coal podcast. My name is john goran. I'm the founder of wealth without wine. And i'm your host for this podcast. My hero wealth without wine we help people to change their relationship with alcohol over the past five years. We've helped hundreds of people to do just that and we created world without wind because we believe it's really really halt to change your drinking alone so wealthed without wine wit all about community each week we're going to feature a community voice just to give you a flavor of the also. Try his somebody from one of Subgroups hello everyone. So i have a little friday when which happened last night Myself my family celebrated thanksgiving with our american bamiyan states Remotely and it was the first time in twenty-six days at i would becoming face to face with an actual bottle of wine so i was a bit concerned and i knew that i had to have some safety precautions. Set in place for myself. So i had my phone Close by me. So i could contact group if i needed to My also got some alcohol free wine that was recommended by this group and And the support of my family so my mom and i enjoyed some lovely alcohol free wine. Which actually wasn't as bad as i thought it would be. We served at super chilled and it was actually super delicious and refreshing. We skype with a family overseas headed delicious meal and i didn't have a drop of alcohol And then at the end of the evening we weren't bid. I finished off my class of savvy. Rich in the candlelight listening to some chile music Went to bid and the biggest one of all was waking up this remembering exactly what happened last night and without a headache I'm super proud of myself. Never ever in a million years thought that this was possible. But it did it and today is day. Twenty-seven machine all a fabulous wonderful weekend wherever you are in the world if huge cut to join our woman welcoming community and get a bit of support. Just go to weld without wind dot com and click on the membership top. So let's get my guest today into being a lady who's pretty well known here in south africa. Her name is maryanne sheera now. Maryanne is a woman before had time. She wrote a book called the natural way more than twenty years ago. An only now is the way of life. She advocates going mainstream on apart from being an author. Marianne is a motivational speaker. And she runs a very successful pekan restaurant as well as running natural health programs. I'll begin by asking maryanne satele to bit about herself. I had serious health problems which included being bipolar had kids at had ear infections tonsillitis runny noses that was high blood pressure so we had these kind of. I call him normal health problems because it wasn't like the big three cancer heart disease diabetes. It was just all like niggly stuff that was affecting our relationships and was affecting the way we functioned from day to day. And i have always been interested in the human body i prob- i might have become a doctor. But i'm i'm glad i didn't because it made me look for answers and other places so i was fascinated with the human body studied physiology anatomy and chemistry in the sciences and i was fascinated with the how the human body worked. So we're not. We started having these problems and we were being treated traditional medical way with anti anti-inflammatories and antihistamines for a head allergic dermatitis. On my hands and the kids with antibiotics just didn't make any sense because nobody actually got well. all it doesn't seem to do is suppress symptoms. And then they'd come back two weeks later. I saw the athol up. Gotta find answers. This was long. Before the era of google that really dates meet And just go and do a search on google. And the closest i've got to google was on several occasions sneaking into the fits medical library in johannesburg and he are trying to find says there and looking at books in the archives and just like nobody really had answers to my questions had to find the myself now. I really believed because i could see the. You'll buddy actually repays itself if you cut your finger to paint it stop. You don't need to go and you know cost a spillover it or go to the doctor. My fingers cut itself. Please can drug. I mean unless you chopped to finger off you'd want to beg on but just a cut finger. Paper cut irritate you. It hurts but you it just eventually repays itself and and if you study the human body like a did you find out that the liver you can actually cut off your liver out. Remove it entirely donated to somebody else. Give the small lobe to somebody else in the big global grow and then you've donated your smaller that logo groesbeck like this is the most amazing thing and yet when it comes to lever cancer you told is no cure for it. You're going to die while you would because you're going to be given all these drugs and you live a second will just get sick and pick up than you will die so i was looking for ways to correct the looking for the causes and then ask trying to fix the causes. I did find that. Nutrition made a huge difference. When i changed my diet. Took after find sugar and my by pella symptoms when my crazy periods of manic unbelievable highs. We are could take on the world. And i was going to change the world and i'm actually by nature very idealistic person and my mission in life is i want to change the world. One person at a time. I want to get them healthy enough. Got the goal to reach. A million people wrote a book called the natural way it came out in nineteen. Ninety-one was a runaway bestseller according to the publishers and it sold as i say of three hundred thousand copies it's been published in the united states. The funny thing is it seems to be taking of now first published in the states in two thousand five fifteen years not getting traction. So it's like if it does take off and i happened to reach the new york times. Basically nobody can ever say was an overnight success at this pathetic years. So you're a woman before your time. Someone emission to really help people if i can get rid of my bipolar symptoms and be completely sane And and thinks straight and have a brain in and and bow bowels and bladder that works properly all the time and be living in that sweet spot of health than anybody can do it. Because i had terrible problems. Janet listening to all calls from weld without wine. Marianne take me about you just mentioned alcoholic parents. It that intrigued me wondering if that was one of the reasons why you want it to research to health unle- to healthier lifestyle was that of a trigger. I think it. I think it was. I think you know even mentioned to some one time that i want to try to get drunk when us fourteen and jank moms cara pheno one and didn't like the way i felt i felt out of control and i think that sense of not being in control of my immediate environment and i wouldn't say i'm a control freak but i needed to be common working properly and audley at the sense of order i think that comes from growing up in the chaos of alcoholic appearance at home and my mom was a party animal. She was functional alcoholics. She could party all night and go to work the next day in absolutely fine my father however party will not and he wouldn't work for six months and that was you know he'd worked for six months and then not work for six months to a year or two years so we grew up with that sort of chaotic and then my parents got divorced because my mother said she had four kids anita fifth one. My father married. Somebody was crazy as he was. You know do things like pour petrol over my stepmother and threatened sitter a lot this crazy stuff that chaos does makes you want to live an ordinary that the thing. That really got to me when i was a kid. My mom had this medical encyclopedia. And i would pour over at the age of four hundred. All these gory. Pictures of people as innocent large thyroid landed was like the size of pumpkin and the knicks and these open ruins and at sit there and cringes kind of not. Wanna look at them. But it's fasten. The human body fascinated me from a very early age. My mom was kind of forward thinking as much as she was a party animal. She told us we couldn't chew gum or drink. Physical because our brains would fry and and we went lottery comic books either. So i had the sense of trying to do the right thing I think it also grows up with you know you grow up with a parent. That's a bit narcissistic. i think. Alcoholism in a sense is a narcissistic habit. Because you just carrying about a million myself. And i'm trying to numb my pain. You know not thinking about the responsibilities of life you know growing up with it. I had the saints. That i wanted to please my mom and do the right thing so i was considered the goody. Two shoes in the family just always trying to do the right thing in an nfl had to take it back to pregnancy was a need to just have off in my life Feel like yeah. Things went as chaotic. As they've seen. We moved a lot as kids. You know doing a geographic alcoholic. Parents do that things. Don't work you just move somewhere else. Yeah i've i've come across two different reactions when people have Parents they are do what she did. And react against the kale. Some won't control an order in their life all they they tend to say well. You know sin family. I'm bound to be that as well and then kinda give up unsolved drinking as well so Is that been your experience as well. Do you think people tend to go. A different one of two was party. Animal ended in two brothers. That partied hard. I mean they crashed a few calls when they were aided. And that god they've grown up and grown out of it and They've so but very working my two brothers especially very sober and very hard working And and i just think. I think what you you learn the learned behavior sydney. I look at myself is it. I may not have been addicted to alcohol. But as very addicted to sugar so ahead addictive side to me that anita to the sugar made me feel good in that space. So i suppose in a sense. I was doing much what people do with alcohol when us feeling unhappy or was feeling sad or on feeling like a done something. Well i would reward myself or console myself with suga whether it was fragile candy or cake. So is scream. It didn't really matter how much as i said. Even propane sugar staying out of the sugar bowl. As i got older. I became health conscious. South for made fudgy using brown sugar. That was really good. But you're that that that needs that sense of of you don't you you know parents at properly as if you growing up in an alcoholic home so you learn. The navy is that that it's a k. To satisfy yourself for full let need with a something in a with some people it could be gambling. All pornography will with made was shook end and food as a compulsive overeater. And the only reason we're glad clinically obese of always been physically active and and if i was not eating properly and exercising. I wouldn't ever sleep. I would. And i think that looking at having dealt with so many people in our family and with people have met of the years that alcohol sometimes puts people to sleep just eventually knocks you out so eventually do sleep when you're very active brain not taught how to look off draw brain. How what does alcohol do to bring. What is caffeine due to the brain so one minute drinking coffee over here and then that's like over stimulating central noticing. Make all your nerve cells five. Ab rapidly and then you'd having alcohol too. Because that's a natural depressant than you take the to calm you down and put you to sleep and then you wake up the next morning and you hung oversee start with the coffee again in the brain goes into overdrive. Then you would lots of sugar into the coffee. So you just getting on this treadmill and i think i think if we were taught the staff about how everybody body reacted to sit and things from when we were kids. Part of the reason assorted school is that we would understand how our body worked and figure stuff out pretty soon and make good choices. But that's me probably being idealistic as well if you were talking to someone. That was drinking super too much. They weren't really aware of what it was doing to that office. That brains. what what would you tell them. How would you summarize the home that it does to us. Gee i'm the first thing we know. Is it really damages the central nervous system in the brain. And we've now these quite a lot of research showing that parkinson's disease which michael j. fox got a really young age and he has a. He was a big drinker. Huge drinker everything. I've read on him. The alcohol played a big role in. He's laughing was younger. That can damage your central nervous system. and it doesn't do it alone. Units alcohol and sugar and bed diets and bed living but alcohol plays a huge role in that. It really affects a whole lot of things affect your central nervous system in your brain so you don't handle stress well and lacewell you handle stress. The more you're going to drink because it numbs you. Eugenic feel you can just numb yourself. you stop feeling in dozen courage assistant behavior because it becomes all about my feelings and my stress and my money to numb in. I mean we all know this. We would go without food in a hassle appearance drink and i've seen it in other families. The mother a single mumble drink because she's lonely or because she feels a failure whatever. Her reasons are and there'll be no food in the fridge. Another normal alcoholic friggin. Look on his nets moke in there in a piece of cheese. And that's about it if you lackey Most just don't have food in them. And i know as kids if they was cheese enough ridge. We would flatness in like half an hour because he's a no win. The food was going come which didn't help but encourage things like a compulsive over eating so a central nervous system and that's the one side the other side that in a fix and impacts really badly as the indicating system and that's a system that controls every single part of the buddy janice it controls your liver your lungs your kidneys digestive tract your muscle tone. You sleep your menstrual cycles. Your facility these nothing. It's not in your breathing. Your lung function your hair. Growth your nails. You'll skin it it. It affects every single part. The endocrine system produces hormones in different parts of the body in those hormones may chemical reactions take place which makes the body function properly. Have alcohol's interfering with it function because what it does is it actually pushes your blood sugar up really really high so you feel like good on alcohol woo and then your blood sugar over produces your body produces over produces insulin. 'cause you're about to go into a diabetic coma and in your body's designed to repeat itself over produces the insulin brings it all the way back down and as it starts to slide mcdonagh feeling really tired immaculate and sleep and pass out if it gets really bad And then you you. You might have something like coffee or tea or another drink to try and raise your blood sugar again so when you blood. Sugar fluctuates fitting brain and central nervous. System your endocrine system and your immune system and you can understand the not explaining this very well with the whole covid. Nineteen they send. People are drinking and having caught accidents but alcohol suppresses immune function. That's what it does. So the government instead of educating everybody in showing us adverts over and over which i think would help better than just locking everybody down and telling you you know these content touch alcohol reagan so ridiculous. You can't buy alcohol during the on the weekend so everybody's just by way more so every restaurant selling wine under the counter to the clients you know because they can't make money selling food during lockdown. It was bizarre to see the activities that going on at the end of the day understood. Exactly what it does. And how it suppresses immune function we must take these things a little bit more seriously than being wrecked on the knuckles suck educate people that teach them the stuff so i think other thing that it does and this is fascinating. Refined sugar does exactly the same thing is alcohol does just desert loose something called reactive hopper blah seamier. Which when the blood sugar shoots up to high we over produce insulin and brings it right down so down so far down your blood sugar that the part of the brain your frontal lobe that controls moral behavior planning and forethought will just shuts down completely. Okay and the part of the brain that takes over as part of the brain that controls aggression appetite and sexual function. And i think this is probably really important to help people understand these blackouts that they have so you can have a blackout but you not passed out you just living life. I mean. I know a girl that poured wax all over yourself. Hot wax in that state couldn't remember how she got burned from this x. She took all our clothes often. Did this is absurdity. Because the people that were they told her what she does. She could not believe she did something like that. I had a woman that came and spoke to me. Because i was when i speak often speak about the stuff because it played such a role in my life and how important it is to make. Sure you're getting the right kind of glucose about in a while. And she came up to me after she said. I'm embarrassed to raise my hand and tell you what i do but cannot speak to you privately. Acid short can understand when she told me the story. She said i'm going to tell you. I'm very very committed. Christian person go to church regularly. my husband's actually involved in the leadership of the church. We go to bible study on wednesday nights. We go to between one and three services and the sunday we we're involved in the charitable work and stuff but she says periodically. I wake up in another town or another suburb in strange man's bid. And i have no recollection of how i got the and i say to you consume and she said. Nah don't i said are you a sugar addict. And she said yes osama title sugar addict and it does the brain. What alcohol does we. You just black out completely. Obviously you've got to be extreme amounts of sugar to do this but alcohol does the same thing you drink. Extreme amounts you'd binge drink and the knicks thing you wake up and you in somebody else's bid and like how the hell did you get in the shame of all of this is worse than you start drinking again and this whole thing goes on so what happens is when the primitive brain takes over. You either going to get aggressive. You're going to just eat and eat and eat canoe appetites. Just nothing's gonna be enough or you. Could your sexual function could take over. And you become extremely promiscuous and that's clearly very dangerous because besides possibility of fathering all mothering a child you could end up with terrible sexual diseases. So it's it's a huge problem and people don't know this until somebody like me comes and tells him and nobody studies this. Because you take the average psychologist or psychiatrist. Dr they studying medicine and how to cheat you when you sick with medicine and surgery than looking. And what is the cause of all these problems and vivian often. It's a physiological or physical course an and utrition is something that's kind of just ignored and net. That study was done with reactive. Hoppy glycemic was done by women. Called baba read stood. She lived in the united states and operated in stable municipal area and she was in charge of the juvenile delinquent and criminal juvenile delinquent and the prisoners. The adult prisoners in the end the juvenile delinquents and she found that of them something like ninety three percent of the people that she'd work with suffered from this reactive hypoglycemia and in that state of blacked out. Where you can't remember what went on people will kill the family. They'll the children we ask you. Yeah then they will beat somebody into coma they'll be do the most. They'll they'll commit a crime. And they have no recollection of course when you committing crimes being something people like as easy to say you lost your mind and you can't remember but it's an actual condition where you had no recollection of went on. It's completely blacked out. You listening to reply to alcohol. The podcast from world without one if eat lights join our tribe. Please check out website. That wine don't cold so yeah. Apparently those many people in child but have done that have a blackout killed somebody. You cannot in jail recollection too. Many people in jail i mean. Can you imagine Horrendous but blackouts very common in all community. We talk about the loss of people have blackouts. I used to have the have them as well Boston is like all it was a walking talking blackout because I was with some friends for afternoon. And apparently i seem quite normal. You know i was walking around talking. We'd walk quite a long way together. I have no recollection. I mean we'd been drinking since frightful Drink but i. It just hit me over the edge. I lost an entire. And you know i used to have blackouts where the end of the evening was a bit fuzzy Quite remember how it may be. But this one was really serious Hated the idea thought woking talking blackout the fat my brain was so alcoholic couldn't even make memories nazi Absolutely terrifying and here's the thing that people don't understand is that you'll cells and your buddy a designed to consume glucose. Nothing works in your in your at salable. You got thirty seven trillion cells in your body. They desperately need glucose they needed to make. Atp a denison triphosphate which is what creates energy your monaco andrea desperately. Need that your every little organ nelio in the plasma critical in these tiny little things inside the cell that you can't even see with your naked eye it needs glucose your brain and central system can't work without glucose and if you're not getting enough you going to crave alcohol or sugar and barbara read stood say we knew feed children refined sugar growing up on any level. She said you're actually preparing them for alcoholism because they get into the cycle. The blood sugar going up and it's coming down and they feel that the sugar satisfies and then you you graduate from a kid to adolescence or young young person in your twenties wait sitting stuffing faced with ice cream and chocolate says locked kind of interdict so will have a drink and it does. What sugar to to you. And now you recognize that. Except that the alcohol gives you even a bit of feeling takes you higher disrupts you lower so if we understood that we need need proper glucose for body's natural glucose and and so often when i've done a talk i actually say to the audience and i remember reading this one year at a secrets convention at sun city outside johannesburg. The were probably five hundred people Woman and i said to them. Okay if you do any of you crave sugar and they've just everybody put the hand and i said when you craving sugar. What is it that you put into your mouth. What is it you put. And what is it that you actually craving an attempt to get the point across. Imagine yourself in the garden of eden and you craving something sweet. What would you eat. And there was a stately silence and this woman blonde voluptuous woman sitting in the front rows in this deep voice. Adam evan rumor osc that christian. I'm thinking this woman. It was really funny at the time. But it's just interesting because i've often christian in los angeles of austin in the republic of hot bay of austin zimbabwe of austin the uk. Austin all over the

Roland Hydra Revie John Goran Maryanne Sheera Maryanne Satele Cancer Heart Disease Diabetes Allergic Dermatitis Marianne Cara Pheno Google Anita Maryanne Tonsillitis Parkinson's Disease Knicks Lucas Johannesburg Skype Headache
Core Scientific-Ian Ferreira

The Bitcoin Podcast

04:38 min | 9 months ago

Core Scientific-Ian Ferreira

"I'm an from Iran on chief product officer at core scientific. standards with scientific. Approaching two years now before that. I. Danced around a couple of other machine learning startups and spent a decade at Microsoft working in the search team. So have been around the algorithms and big data distributed system space, my entire career mostly. But do now like what kind of brought the core scientific do there? So core scientific was interesting for a couple of reasons. One is. I definitely wanted to focus on a I said, that was one of my criterion. The second was it's a very different crowd. So lot of companies. If you go and work in a role, YOU'RE GONNA start from business problems, downwards, and kind of make your way to, let's say, ten flow kind of that. You know to flow by dortch layer up the stack. In what was unique about? Of course, scientific starting from the bottom bottom. So we were studying from concrete. Our Katie P chipsets in understanding into connect said really an opportunity to get the under the hood experience. If you will the hardware experience if you will of Ai and then work your way up at once you've done that you have a full picture of everything from. Okay. This is GonNa, use this library that's going to take advantage of this silicon feature. That's GonNa be accelerated by this hardware infrastructure and Blah Blah Blah, it just gave me a really. Unique opportunity to work from the bottom up. That's really interesting. So you're like because I, of course, scientific is I, guess you boast yourselves as a structure company. Providing, a lot of resources for people to do a myriad of things that I need compute power part of that being mining, various cryptocurrencies, as well as like machine learning and so on and so forth. Today. I. It's interesting that you you take it from. These are the resources that we have. These are the architectures that may be fit to these different types of. Algorithms that are applied across the board Does that. Even that perspective like how do you approach a problem, but what does that? Learned from that. So as you mentioned, core scientific provides a hosting infrastructure is gonNA suffer services for the two primary categories. One is blockchain in the other day I. In the blockchain side were lowered down the stacks in a somewhere between Denison as service and infrastructure is a service where we host. Mining gear for customers in aside, we've much higher up the stack. So where pretty much a a past bathroom as a service. In we'll talk about that some more later, but does it kind of the two differences in we have a, you know some synergies between the two. If you start at the facilities level, not commenting with crypto and an ai gear is high, he taipower Sarah facilities are typically much higher rated than you would find a traditional data center. And the other aspects is. Around controlling heat. In making sure you can deal with these machines at in normal standard racks that you might be used to So that's the infrastructure here and then we did a couple of things around. Using Algorithms around a workload placement, we do that both in ai on blockchain. to, as you can imagine, if you look at on the blockchain side are very common workload that you might want to figure out what's the optimal coin to mind? Right. So how do you do that? You have to figure out a bunch of algorithms, ingredients? To make a decision what to mind, and we can, we can talk a little bit more about how that works in the same thing. On the AI side, you might want to run a large training job. and you might WanNa, know is this better to run on. Azure visit bidders run on our infrastructure core aws because again you have the same equations, there's a cost in the compute. Capability in, you have to figure out what's the optimal for the customers need. So that's kind of the suffer overlap we have between the two verticals.

AI Chief Product Officer Microsoft Iran AWS Denison Sarah
"denison" Discussed on The Daily Article

The Daily Article

05:02 min | 11 months ago

"denison" Discussed on The Daily Article

"His heart is fascinating, so that before if I don't do that before long I'm defending my beliefs. I'm defending my positions. I'm defending my doctor even more than I might. Even though I think I'm defending. God's Word I'm not always doing that and before long. I'm in this defensive kind of aggressive position, rather than speaking the truth I need the holy. Spirit to help me do that to lead me to empower me, and that to me is a continual request and submission that we have to decide everyday. I, do think there is. This clarity in that that you just said where we we begin to espouse and become passionate about a position that. Might or might not actually be what God's word says. We've become very. Closely tied to our political affiliations and so. We can be in the place where our information. Is Not coming ultimately through the grid of God's Word that more through the grid of the. Affiliations that we have in the world whatever our political party is whatever our denomination is whatever our ethnicity is I mean that grid can be anything, but we can. I let me just say I have found myself in that position of convincing myself that thing to which I feel fiercely defensive of. Turns out. Isn't really a biblical principle. Now mini the ones we're GONNA. Talk about have some, but don't you think Dr Denison that there is that element where sometimes we don't. We haven't really researched it and run it through the Grit of God's word. No question I used to sell my seminary students taught at four different seminaries over the years and one of the things. I've often said to them. As you've got a choice to make, you can interpret the Bible through through current events, or you can interpret current events to the Bible. It depends on what you put in front of the other. Obviously, the right answer is to interpret the news through scripture to interpret current events or scripture to let that be the prison through. At the world and everything that's out there, but the real challenge and you've already spoken to is as we get into partisan positions or denominational positions donald positions. We can very easily with today's technology. Only listen to the voices we want to hear raising strongly reinforce our. It becomes an echo chamber as they say, and before you know it I don't want even to listen to a different position than pints and conflict with they think with what I think with what God thinks. It's a dangerous place to be. We have to always be measuring. Our beliefs are ideas by the word of God and asking the Holy Spirit to teach us how to do that. Such an example of that inscription in the Pharisees would go to other Pharisees to talk about. This idea that they have about evaluating Jesus claims. And that. Exactly echoed their own thoughts to the point that they become convinced so not much has changed in human nature. We're convinced of what's right, and then we look for the sources develop eight. What we already think, but even if it's even if it's not that cynical, even not that premeditated There is this there can also be the sense I. I think this is what God thinks. That sounds right, you may..

Dr Denison
Man sentenced to death in Singapore via Zoom

Rush Limbaugh

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Man sentenced to death in Singapore via Zoom

"Singapore for the first time in history a man has been sentenced to death by a zoom this is Paul Cooney time Dennis on the thirty seven year old mother lay whom the judge in Singapore has sentenced to death for a his role in a twenty eleven heroin transaction **** because of all the corona virus than not having court house hearings as such so that now doing it by zoom and this man Mr Denison has become the first person to be sentenced to death by

Singapore Dennis Mr Denison Paul Cooney Heroin
"denison" Discussed on The Daily Article

The Daily Article

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"denison" Discussed on The Daily Article

"Parenting dot. Org is a fourth brand that we have right now and then in January we started a fifth ran for pastors. We call a pastor's view. Mark termine who pastors Cross Pointe Church. In mckinney is is doing this with me. We do a blog every week. We do a teleconference once a month or write a white paper once a month helping. Astra's think about cultural issues as well swallowed. That's under what we think of as Denison ministries now Denison form being only. When brand within the larger kind of umbrella that we think of innocent ministries so the total reach. Now's about three point. Two million I think we have thirty five staff members It's about four and a half million dollar organization and that's how it's grown from seven thousand readers in the Baptist building eleven years ago so God has been very good to us. God has been very gracious jeopardy and I often see how funny it is that we started donor base ministry and the head of the Great Recession Martin but God knew a lot more than we did and he's been incredibly gracious. That's an important point that That you just made that you started this at the height of the great recession at a time when the world tells us you don't start something like this and here we are again in a pretty dicey time. certainly financially economically and. I wonder if there are those out there that God is calling to start something new and incredible and the world is saying. No no no. This isn't the time I I just wonder about that. But the numbers that you were citing about The reach of Denison ministries. It's striking to me and I'm going to go back to the beginning of our conversation as we wrap up that Sort of tucked in to this ministry. He is well those guiding questions. Your Dad's questions and from seventeen men emerged this set of questions that now is informing you and your wife and your son as you reach millions of people That is you were talking. That really struck me. Well thank you eric. I hadn't thought of it quite that way. It's just the providence of God Alfred. North Whitehead said great people plant trees on Everson under has really do believe. That's part of the story of God's Providence. You know we just don't know none of us can no. I wrote a blog. Post for our facebook and website applications. Today I happen to be reading an ex chapter nine. And the conversion of Solid Tarsus and trucked by all of the unnamed heroes in that story at the end of that of that plot against him in Damascus. And these disciples unnamed disciples who let him down the in the basket down the wall and then another group of unnamed believers brothers as they're called who caught wind of plots against him in Jerusalem number able to save his life. How many people that back and then had no idea that they were contributing and writing half the New Testament they were flying. Romans going to reach the entire Roman Empire in some ways. What the Bible will you and I have no idea what seats. We're getting a plant today. What lives were going to be able to touch? We can't know that I've often said you can't measure the terminal significance of present faithfulness. And so the key is to be faithful where you are. God Measure Success by faithfulness and wherever we are wherever we get to be faithful in that context. God uses. Uh he multiplies us in a way we could never imagine at the time. We have no idea who's going to hear this podcast someday. No idea what was going to do through this conversation and all the others that you're doing one of the reasons. I don't mean this to sound patronizing and you certainly didn't espen to say this but one of the reasons I believe in the mission of Apple Standard is because I believe you're ran has to be trustworthy. Your brand is too objective. Your your brand is is to explain the world in this Lens. In in this ultra and away. They can encourage people to about their faith about their church life about their engagement in the culture in these days and you just have no hidden. Who's going to read some of what you rights and some of what you produce and make a difference you don't know who the neck Saul of. Tarsus who the next Paul. The Apostle. That's why you just have to be faithful and Truscott. That's right that's right. Well Jim Thank you very much for spending time with us today and I am certainly glad that you are on the way. Christ thank you. What an honor to do this with you to bless God bless you to subscribe to Jim. Dennison's free daily Article Visit Denison Forum Dot Org. That's Denison D. E. N. I S. O. N. Forum.

Mark termine Denison Jim Denison D. E. N. Cross Pointe Church mckinney Tarsus facebook Astra Jerusalem Truscott Dennison Saul North Whitehead Damascus Everson espen Bible O. N. Forum
"denison" Discussed on The Daily Article

The Daily Article

11:42 min | 1 year ago

"denison" Discussed on The Daily Article

"To my father's questions the bad to standards executive director. Eric Black Interviews Dr. Jim Denison about his coming to faith his work as a pastor and his writing and leadership of Dennis inform. Welcome to on the way a podcast about life but not just any life. It's about life with Jesus. Why do people follow? Jesus and how do they get started? And what difference does following Jesus make in their lives before Christians had a name. They were known as people of the way people who follow Jesus teachings people have been on the way for nearly two thousand years now during the podcast. We explore the ways that people become followers of Jesus and why and what difference following Jesus makes in their lives on the way is produced by the Baptist Standard. The donor supported provider of news opinion and resources for living. Like Jesus. I'm Eric. Black editor of the Baptist. Standard I'm glad you're with us today. We're glad.

Eric Black Dr. Jim Denison Baptist Standard executive director Dennis editor
Inside Dennis Rodman's Wild 90s

ESPN Daily

08:51 min | 1 year ago

Inside Dennis Rodman's Wild 90s

"So Tim. Did you watch last night. Thank you for doing your duty as an Eastman Employees Tim. Cuban is a senior writer for. Espn Tim I am looking cover of the book. Bad as I WANNA be and it has a picture of Dennis Rodman. He is naked sitting backwards on a motorcycle. A there is a strategically placed basketball. His air is too Tan Blonde. And on the bottom of the cover it lists Dennis Rodman as the author in very big letters and then right below that in much smart letters it says with Tim. Cute which question. How did YOU COME TO BE WITH TIM? Koon and goes right. Dennis Rodman's autobiography my epitaph with Tim. It started with a friend of mine. Mike Silver who at the time was working at sports illustrated and had written the provocative cover story about Dennis where he was on the cover wearing the feather boa with a parrot on his shoulder. Mike was supposed to write. This book and sports illustrated would not let him because he was an NFL writer at the time and it would have taken up too much time of the season so they put out a casting call of writers. And Mike recommended that I put my my name in the hat. Several of US interviewed with Dennis to see who might mesh best with him. Who also might be able to finish a book in a shade? Under three months I interviewed with the Denison. A diner for breakfast in Anaheim with his agent at the time. Who's a coin collector named Dwight Manley who had just dipped his toe into sports agent? Tting after he became friends with Dennis. What into this diner set down with the two of them. Dennis Kata said Hi Kinda grunt high kind of thing I can remember the waitress coming over and Dwight ordering for both himself and Dennis and Dennis just not ever even looking at the menu and thinking. This is going to be a tough book you know. Get a hundred thousand words out of a guy who doesn't even order his own breakfast. I kind of looked at it. As as a Lark at the time Lo and behold a few days later I got a call that that I was chosen. Why do you think he got the job funny? I've I've run that through my head so many different times and I honestly think that I got the job because I I was just desperate for the job. I think that I just kind of sat back and maybe give off that impression that I was not going to be demanding to be his lifelong friend. You know I I wanted to hang out. I wanted to get the work done. I thought I could do the job. Well and something in the way that I carried myself. I guess hit a chord with Denison in made it work so this was nine hundred five. Dennis Rodman is already a known quantity and as you mentioned. He had been on the cover of sports illustrated. He was fairly far along in his career. What was your perception of him. Going into this. You know at first I was a little bit leery of the whole thing. At that time there wasn't a whole lot positive coming out about Dennis. He did have this high profile and his Rodman with that wild hairdo of his a lot of it was because he was disrespectful to referees. He didn't get along with coaches now. He's fighting one of his assistant coach. I was very curious as to who was the guy behind. All that is getting really annoying when you too. You've got to go out there and kick somebody's ass basketball is nice. What about as a basketball player? I mean before you spent time with him. I imagine you spend a lot of time thinking about his play on the court and what he had achieved so far with his career. Where was he at that point but that point he had been established as probably the best rebounder in NBA history especially for someone his size debt is just got the word doing his usual established early on that the way he was going to make his mark was by doing things that nobody else wanted to do doing the menial tasks of basketball and almost refusing to shoot which made notes to almost anyone his determination and the way that he played every possession like it was just a referendum on his self worth. I think was fascinating to me. I think it was so different from anybody else that we'd seen to this point now work very hard work. At the moment he was still on the spurs he was yes. He was rapidly playing himself off the spirits to San Antonio Thirteen months ago. Dennis Rodman has had three suspensions eight injections forty technical fouls and paid fifty four thousand two hundred fifty dollars in fines. They were desperately trying to rid themselves of him and it was actually with him when he got the call that they were trading him to the Bulls which just spun everything in such a different direction. I mean this book and Dennis's career and the world of basketball everything. Everything changed when with that phone. Call before we get to that call and how it led to everything we saw that transpired last night in blast aunts once. Dennis had chosen you. What was your next move? What are the parameters you had for working with him well it? It became clear probably at that breakfast meeting that Dennis was not going to be someone who is going to be able to schedule meetings. That just wasn't the way his world worked and so his his agents said okay to do this. You're basically going to have to move in because he's not going to be on any kind of schedule so I did two stints of living with Dennis. Rodman that we're about a week each the parameters were that you pretty much just had to absorb yourself into his life because that was the only way to get the information that was going to be needed to write a book. You get a sense from Dennis. Why he was doing a book and what he wanted to be in it. He wanted to do a book in part because I think he felt like. He had something to say to people that were like him. You know people who had been marginalized and and sort of shoved over societies edge. And I think that he knew it was an incredible marketing opportunity for himself. At that point he had established himself as this flamboyant character in basketball and he had gotten a lot of attention outside of basketball with his relationship with Madonna and. I think that this was something he saw as a a way to sort of spread his name even outside of any kind of sport parameter. So you're told you got to move in with him. At what point. Do you become a roommate of Dennis. Rodman's it was late. September of Nineteen Ninety five if I remember correctly and it was at Dwight Manley House in Orange California. I slept on the couch and I can remember at many points wondering if this book was ever going to be done because Dennis for all his flamboyance in the public eye is a very shy at times non communicative person. There were a lot of really really black spaces on my audiotapes from that time. Dwight his agent at one point said you know the best way to deal with Dennis. Get Him in the car to get him in the car he's captive. He will talk and so you know we started going out driving to Los Angeles going different places. Dennis would be driving and talking and would tell me stories about his childhood about how he fell into a basketball career so randomly even over the roar of the Ferrari. Engine I could make out with. Dennis was saying in the car and you know it made a book thankfully.

Dennis Rodman Dennis Basketball Dennis Kata Tim I Mike Silver Dwight Writer Dwight Manley House Dwight Manley Tan Blonde Espn Eastman Cuban United States Anaheim LO Denison Koon
Oprah and Alicia Keys: The Interview

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

09:31 min | 1 year ago

Oprah and Alicia Keys: The Interview

"Hey Alicia keys. My sister my sister sister. I am like your sister but also old enough to be your mother so sister I was talking to a reporter yesterday and I was. I was talking about you and I said I feel like Maya. I feel that I am in many ways like you as Maya was to me because I have such admiration and respect for you and Just deep love for you and feeling that allows me to know how am I actually felt about me so I feel that way about U. S? How Start Right there? The healthy start but also said I am your mother sister friend. I feel like your mother sister friend. Yeah me too. That thing it's there's a beautiful embodiment of so many type of relationships that I think that we have and it's fair. You normally have those type of relationships with many people I find I don't so I really appreciate those different levels. Yeah yeah connection. Yea I've only felt that with one another with you able do rene who I feel like. Wow this mother's sister connection and it's so interesting because all the years that I had Maya as a mentor. Friend MOTHER SISTER FRIEND I. I couldn't really grasp it. You know I couldn't really grasp it so I get to grasp it through people like yourself and people like Abe so as an aching good to see you good to see good either that there'd be singing. I'm glad to be together with you. And in this moment I think have happy Sunday. Happy Sunday. Happy Super Soul Sunday at so. So how's your family doing? How are you all doing all clustered family as did you know? We're we're good. We're healthy and and we're feeling well. My youngest genesis is a homebody anyway. So it's only so much to get him out the house anyways he couldn't be happier and the older the older ones are definitely you know missing their friends and and asking what's coming on. How are they going to be going on? But I think that we're doing some good things that I like to try to have. Some type of routine has happened after them to look forward to it. But we're doing well and we are. We're keeping spirits high. What are you all doing? Are you playing games? And how many kids are in the house? I know Genesis and and and and Dr there but are the other big kids there to Denison Egypt Genesis Egypt Air in the house. So that's thirteen nine and I'm five. Wow Are you playing games? Are you getting out for little walks? What are you doing? I'm doing good walks and bike rides and come scooter. Rides and stuff like that in our in behind them and and we're doing monopoly omens the endless games of endless nights with monopoly. I'm getting beat real bad. I don't know why I can't seem to win. Monopoly is making me a little frustrated. But we're getting there. We're doing books reading every day. You know that for a certain amount of time working out doing sit ups. Even Genesis is trying to get a six pack pop in. Do you feel more connected or getting a little. Stir crazy me what. I'm what I'm finding that I don't feel like I have any time personally. I know that sounds so weird because we're all talking about how not doing as much as how we normally do in that kind of thing but I'm finding that obviously with the kids home and then with us all together. I don't have the space that maybe I was able to carve out of the space. That's a little bit. You know what of nowhere to show? I think this is especially hard on mothers. Moms shoutout to all the MOMS out there. Because I've said my whole career that it's the toughest and most important of all the jobs on the planet and now MOMS have to be. The teacher had to be the principal. The Cafeteria Lady there the gym teacher and school nurse all at the same time. I heard that Egypt said you were mean teachers at your box. You being mean to being means you. You have to do this particular thing you gotta do eat. So let's do it but you know that that balance between being strong enough to make sure that this thing on track and staying connected to what they needed to do. Because it's hard to self start to actually have to sell start yourself a complete a project without social element. It's really really hard so he did. I think he was just a little frustrated. I'm how but I mean yeah and you know so so well I believe a crisis comes to teach us something and this is a crisis for sure on every level your husband posted on instagram. That this is the best time to get your mind your body and your soul strong tune into to yourself and pull out the best ever. That's what I think Swiss posted. What is what. What have you learned about yourselves and each other during this time? I think we are seeing that. Were very good together. We do have a good flow together which I think could become quite difficult neck. You and you're kind of always together always in close quarters. Sometimes you can maybe all the things that you haven't quite worked through amount. I find that we're we're actually quite good together. We have a balance. There's something about the age of the kids that's added simply because at a certain time that was tricky to you. Know with an age difference sometimes is creates just right on so that's one thing. I'm happy for that. We have a good connection there I think that we're definitely feeling a lot. I think the gratitude for the little things from you and I was just saying you know. The planet needs a little break too and needs to regenerate and rejuvenate needs us. All the kind of you know do that as well. So we've been saying and I love this but that you you been saying this that encouraging people to keep their frequency high us. Yes he say hi. Yes because I think it's it's very disconcerting. Obviously it's it's troubling. It's scary. I'm sure about of US. Know people who are sick or ill or or having difficulties and you know you want your family to be safe and many of us are not with our families because we're in different locations and so you just feel very uncomfortable and you feel out of control and a lot of ways and I think the normality of our everyday life really helps with the schedules and things. It really actually helps keeps pounding. So you don't have that. I was even thinking how many people united sometimes you're not even getting dressed because you're like well I'll have to get dressed so I'm just gonNA show which feels good but then after a while you messes with your head. You know what is interesting? I was just thinking about this morning. Is that all the things that we use to show our status and create our value in the world. You know all the material things. All of that level don't mean nothing right now. Meaningless slippers slip. I'm doing to change pajamas honey. I'm doing good just a okay. I want to talk about the grammys. This year's grammys in particular. I was I I remember watching and literally. I promise you my mouth was open. I had to say. Close Your Mouth Oprah wow you I mean it makes my eyes water a little bit now just thinking about how beautifully you stepped into one of the hardest moments of our time and you took control and you mastered it and there was such strength and love and control coming from you on a stage in front of millions of people. I remember Texan you afterwards and I thought well nothing I can say to express what I know that took to do that and I was thinking as a person who's been a communicator. My entire life what would I have done would have been able to handle it as well as you. I don't think anybody anybody could have done a better job than you did with that. Grammy's thank you. Thank you so much it was. Did you do that? You will trade up you must apprai- just of Oh yes. A lot of a lot of meditation. I read hard and I wanted to make sure he honored it properly also acknowledged properly because it was out with ours ours it is warning it was that morning. People were still in shock. We were all still in shock. People were outside the staple center. Like I don't care about the grammys what I just lost my hero. Yeah in that building that he played in. I mean it was. Wow

Denison Egypt Genesis Egypt Ai Alicia Keys Reporter United States ABE Egypt Grammy Principal
"denison" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"denison" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"Sixty our one oh six get some writing done days some second choice and giving them the room wasn't done the game is up that was a victim of the deadly is done he must sound like it's you among them up the I think it's what you do is you know with something yes my next we okay which is the it will be put to because not they said in a statement so you might as well because some of my age everything I'm glad you came out of the state the pay to the old great some not great is right now no problem this is a promise to we have some right no names second prize and I'm giving them the real was been done Denison that's almost daily is dirty must I would like you to one of my I just given thank you what is generations just that was about to go on the the young young straight outta project will think it's just almost a year coming from a this is the best number yeah I'm a student I just I do given give me some naked I.

Denison
California monitoring 8,400 people for coronavirus

On The Edge With Thayrone

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

California monitoring 8,400 people for coronavirus

"Denison California governor Gavin Newsom today saying his status monitoring eight thousand four hundred people for potential signs of coronavirus as the CDC confirms a case of the illness in California with a person with no travel history or contact with other patients we knew this was inevitable as it relates to the nature the epidemiology the nature of these viruses that that incident would occur the virus has killed more than twenty eight hundred people mostly in

Gavin Newsom CDC California Denison
Hair Club for Men founder -- and client - Sy Sperling dies

Todd and Don

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Hair Club for Men founder -- and client - Sy Sperling dies

"One in the world of business the man behind the iconic hair replacement system yes he's dyed hair club for men founder sy Sperling has died you might not remember his name but he was a prominent fixture on commercials for his business in the eighties remember I'm not only they have for president but I'm also clients ruling founded the company in the late sixties after tiring of two pages he discovered a technique that utilize the system of weaving purchase tear into a nylon mesh cap glued to the scalp replacing removable hairpieces strikes whirling died at his Florida home after a lengthy illness he was seventy eight rich Denison fox news the guy has done a lot for men in America and some women he changed lives he really did it it's not a road that arch I could have gone down that road I could have I could help the following message but I did not what I did not realize until just now is it that here was literally glued to his cap I didn't know that what I was nearly technology that was the early days that was the early just use a hot

President Trump America Founder Sy Sperling Florida Denison
Does Chocolate Give You a Happy High?

BrainStuff

05:34 min | 1 year ago

Does Chocolate Give You a Happy High?

"We humans tend to like chocolate as of two thousand seventeen. The global chocolate market was valued at one hundred three billion dollars a year and growing but why eating chocolate makes us feel good but how chocolate contains several compounds that have been shown to add on the brain in myriad ways and most of them induce pleasure. It's also long been believed that Chocolate bestows heightened feelings of sexuality upon the eater apparently as tech ruler. Montezuma bought into this. He said to of drunk goblets full of chuckle auto unsweetened chocolate drink to boost his stamina and Libido there's also a widely held belief that chocolate can produce a euphoric feeling akin to a runner's high are understanding of euphoria producing compounds. Put together with the modern concept of addiction has even led some to believe that one can be a chocolate addict. Is that even possible? Can a person become addicted to chocolate? There's more than one compound found in chocolate. That could potentially make a person high for starters. The most widely used psychoactive drug in the world is found in chocolate caffeine. It produces a stimulating video logical effect by exciting the central nervous system which in turn increases heart rate and contracts muscles. It's a lot like the fight or flight. Response Caffeine acts on dopamine and a Denison receptors in the brain which then release respective pleasure producing chemicals. Chocolate also contains a compound. That's closely related to the active ingredient in cannabis. A cannabinoid called TETRAHYDROCANNABINOL. Nine fatty acids called cannabinoid hit the C. B. One and C two receptors found most predominantly in the frontal cortex and the parts of the brain responsible for motor function and memory when cannabinoid hit these receptors. A person starts to feel intoxicated and relaxed as a result. And as if that one two punch of psychoactive stimulant and depressant wasn't enough chocolate also packs another surprise fennel ethyl amine is often called the love drug since it releases same chemicals that are introduced into the human body. When love comes to call the compound produces a similar effect to the one produced by amphetamines and is classified as a hallucinogen. It's also aces. Releasing the pleasure producing chemicals dopamine and Serotonin a combination produces an exciting high much like the one generated by the designer drug. Ecstasy chocolate has all of the ingredients needed to make it a wonder drug by all rights. Eating a bar of chocolate should send you into orbit. So why isn't the stuff regulated by the FDA? Why aren't chocolate bars? Sold from locked cabinets behind the pharmacy counter. The truth is while there are indeed pleasure inducing and stimulating chemical compounds found in chocolate. The amount of most of these compounds are relatively small as a result of the energy drinks coffee cigarettes and yes chocolate that humans consume these days. Our brains become quite accustomed to the effects of drugs that release pleasure inducing chemicals compounds that act on receptors in the brain that released pleasure generating neurotransmitters like dopamine work. In two ways they either bind to the receptor causing it to release neurotransmitters or they bind to the site to prevent the reabsorption of those neurotransmitters. Either way there's a lot more of the chemical floating around in your bloodstream. This process is how chocolate or any other substance for that matter gets eater hi. It's also why chocolate doesn't have much of an effect on us. As the brain is exposed over and over to a barrage of compounds the number of receptors available for the compounds to bind to actually decreases and the ones that remain are less easily triggered. The reason for this reaction to drugs is the body's natural state of seeking equilibrium in other words. There's only supposed to be so much dopamine or other pleasure producing chemicals in the body. When hormones are released artificially by the compound in chocolate or any other drug. The bodies seeks balanced by shutting down the receptors released the hormones as a result we become desensitized to the effects of these compounds over time even if the compounds found in chocolate maybe two minute for some of us to get a chocolate happy high. The beloved food can still affect our happiness. The category of self interest that encompasses our pursuit of happiness. Hedonism definitely includes eating chocolate. We gain feelings of pleasure comfort and gratification from it the act of eating chocolate is hedonistic when we eat it. We're seeking pleasure in alleviating pain. Which are the hallmarks of hedonism as we've seen measuring the exact effect of chocolate on her happiness can be difficult most people however believed that such an effect exists in fact one. Canadian study examining the link between chocolate and happiness ended with no conclusive results because the control group that received no chocolate ended up raiding the refrigerator where the chocolate used the study was stored this bombing the experiment while scientists have yet to discover what causes the relationship between chocolate and happiness studies have managed to turn up correlations one two thousand seven study surveyed one thousand three hundred sixty seven respondents all men in their seventies with similar socioeconomic backgrounds and ask questions about their health that his faction in life and emotions like happiness and loneliness. They also snuck in a question that asked what kind of candy they preferred. Those who preferred chocolate showed lower frequencies of depression and loneliness and had a more optimistic outlook on life. Even science never quite figures out. What chocolate does to our moods? Does it really matter if eating chocolate makes you happy go for it?

Dopamine Montezuma Caffeine Cannabis Stimulant FDA
"denison" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"denison" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Denison fox news growing worries about the corona virus sent stocks lower Friday the Dow dropped two hundred twenty seven points the nasdaq down fifty one on Thursday started posted record highs and the worries about the coronavirus over powering the strong jobs report for January employers added two hundred and twenty five thousand jobs as more people were encouraged to look for work I'm Carmen Robert's son this fox news pleasant hand warmer today with plenty of sunshine high seventy two tonight a moonlit sky high low thirty eight from the weather center I'm Brian may when you turn on your radio will always be there with news every half hour and the smart talking between Austin's only news radio K. LBJ five ninety eight AM and ninety nine point seven FM this is Jay Farner CEO of quicken loans and we want to help your house feel more like a home with some of the lowest re financing rates ever rates have dropped so much that many Americans can reduce their rate you may be able to save money on your monthly mortgage payment right now the rate today in our thirty year fixed rate mortgage is three point nine nine percent APR four point two three percent call us at eight hundred quicken or go to rocket mortgage dot com rates of change a two percent is he the subscriber ID call for confirmation commissions equal housing lender lessons of it is it's an analyst over thirty thirty let me grab a quick smoke you can't keep up now and then by that stuff you're not twenty one I I bought this before the light changed and of the matter is the legal to possess any tobacco products including electronic vaping products that contain nicotine if you're under twenty one you can still buy FDA approved thank you Dave like nicotine patches and gum though why don't you get some in quit quitting is hard but now is the time quit now Virginia is there to help go to quit now dot net slash Virginia or call one eight hundred quid now for free help today ABC Oscar Sunday the star Leonardo Scarlett Johannson movies Margot Robbie who will win coal and gas to Sunday eighty five see remember the feeling waking up to find snow on the ground and school cancel this is a place for that feeling happens every day with the snow is abundant the winter playground with skiing snowboarding and snow tubing but what you will remember most smiles the laughter and the memories that will last a lifetime welcome to seven springs mountain resort every day is a snow day millennials entitled dreamy technology reliant eighteen to thirty four year olds are about to move into their peace purchasing power are you ready contrary to what you may think millennials are very observant and have introduced new corporate expectations into the market ninety percent of consumers will switch brands to one associated with a good cause given similar comparison how do we know in St is a group of people that uses advertising for good how can we improve your community visit I. N. C. I. T. impact.

Denison fox
How Mason Buffalo Combats Suicide in His Community

Unreserved

06:13 min | 1 year ago

How Mason Buffalo Combats Suicide in His Community

"Four of Mason Buffalo's cousins died by suicide. He dedicated his life to helping others the man for musk. CHIESA BERTA says while everybody's been hurt in his community. He wants to give them hope again this. ABC's Roberta Bell has that. That story Mason Buffalo puts the headstone at the base of the white cross that marks cousins grave. Holy I'm just GONNA emotional denison Thomas not birthday other. He maintains the Samson cemetery in Moscow. Chief for she's buried alongside three of their other cousins who all committed suicide before they turn thirty. Look all my family here. It's easy for me to disclose known assume but it's easy for me to disco. String up give up on everything but I don't Wanna be either guy. I want to show people hoping community. He says his life is like many peoples in his community. He's struggled as a teen parent on the front line. China's young firefighter with alcohol with mental health and with loss in a community of sixteen thousand people. He says it surprisingly easy you to feel alone. That's why he's dedicated himself to being there for other in person and in spirit. If I wasn't doing what I'm doing right now then I wouldn't be here. I'll probably be buried in Vevey to guaranteed I would have been here in our fight instead helping other people off breath this is his story. Mason walks through the field behind his dad's two story farmhouse. where he grew? Up on the Samson Hamson cremation in Moscow chiefs all get behind his dad. Patrick Buffalo is a rancher and a hypnotherapist and Reiki master astor the reference point for most people is the past and their experiences. That's where they're stuck is in their memories. After Mason became a dad himself at fifteen he took a job with the fire. Department is a fire department. You don't know what call your on on his first day. The very first call it came in was about his cousin ferron three years later it was his cousin. Tyrel seem more. I looked lifeless. Die Total soda from their guts on my life went downhill fast for one full year. Not Something I didn't WanNa live. Noma Mason left my asquith cheese for Toronto. That's where he was when his dad called him and told him his cousin cody had died by suicide. I didn't even have time to come back and pay my last respects for cody. And it's tough especially for if people would what we're GONNA do some analysis step up and take the lead so he came home if you ask them to describe himself now. He says. Suicide side awareness advocate if our thought all my life and what. My plans are in everything that I didn't think I'd be what I'm doing. When he got back he started his first of many community initiatives walking and spirit so with all this as like when you commit suicide is there? You'RE GONNA be lingering around this area time too so it's like You lost your spirits. Lost people people from all four of the nations that make up mask. WHOA cheese now set? Aside a day every year to walk the reserves royal roads carrying handmade signs mementos wearing shirts shirts with the names of their loved ones written across their chests. My heart breaks into a million pieces each day on picking up these pieces and getting my hard-backed together and health and people helps me. Mason says the number of suicides look like they've gone down at least in Samson for him. The work is year are long and a part of everything he does. This team of horses at his father's ranch makes frequent trips to to the cemetery. Three funerals doing within the leaf they pull rehearse with big spoked wheels and light pink curtain toppers with tassels hanging from the top of the glass window on every side. It was an idea that Mason and his dad had to give community members that last ride. That's not all the horses to though. They're also helping people to heal nestled in the snow. Coated trees to the east of Patrick's barn is another project with his son. Mason came back and then he started making pass and clearing the bush and we bought a cabin set up a TV. They call it was dossier village. It's a place ace where people visit to confront their trauma. Going for a ride in a wagon with a team of horses is a very therapeutic. It's very healing going for a horseback ride. It's very therapeutic therapeutic. So that's what we offer here is Is that I am experience. It's so peaceful there it's like Like being somewhere else. Oh Patrick says his son needs to be doing this work for his own wellbeing and others so mason does have a strong villa vision for healing although he struggled in his own ways continuously. You know because he's had his own experiences ever since he was a child that he has to continue. Continue to deal with And it's no different and all with the the sixteen thousand people that live in this community and everybody's been hurt everybody's been everybody's stuck in a Rut. Not Knowing how to get unstuck. He knows what he needs to do and when he's doing it yes I feel good care when we can work as a team. I feel good

Noma Mason Mason Buffalo Patrick Buffalo Cody Samson Hamson Moscow Chiesa Berta Samson Cemetery Denison Thomas ABC Vevey China Roberta Bell Samson Tyrel Toronto Bush Patrick
A record-breaking year for ocean temperatures

Climate Cast

11:35 min | 1 year ago

A record-breaking year for ocean temperatures

"So this happened last week. We learned Earth's oceans. Were the warmest ever recorded in two thousand nineteen and the scientists found. The past. Ten years are are also the warmest on record that paper in the Journal Advances in atmospheric sciences included a Minnesota scientists. It's University of Saint Thomas Scientists. John John Abraham is part of the team that includes some names. Climate watchers will know Michael Man from Penn State Kevin Trenberth from the National Center for Atmospheric Research. So what does this mean for earth's atmosphere and for us here in landlocked Minnesota. We're fortunate to have study co-authored jumped Abraham here this morning to talk about that. Hi John Hey pleasure to be here Paul. And we're also thrilled to have Georgia tech climate scientists. Dr Kim Cobb here this morning. Her work includes going deep into our Russians analyzing corals deep sea sediments and cave stalagmites. Sounds Fun while come back. Kim thanks for having me and we want to hear from you This morning do you have questions about our oceans record-breaking warmth or maybe you're a Minnesotan who plans to travel back to a favourite seaside escaped this winter. What have you seen in the Russian where you visit? Give us a call and talk to these two great climate scientists six five one two two seven six thousand or toll free at eight hundred two four two two eight two eight John. Let's start with your recent study. What did you find out about earth? Oceans Will Paul in a nutshell. We found that the earth is warming alarming and it really matters So when we want to know how fast the climate's warming what we need to do is measure the amount of heat in in the Earth's climate now fortunately As the earth warms because of human heat trapping gases most of that heat ends up in the oceans in fact over ninety percent of it. So if you want to know how fast the earth is warming you've gotta measure the oceans what I like to say is global warming is ocean warming and my research team keeps track of ocean temperatures and ocean heat and we report those results each year and we found that the year two thousand nineteen set a record that record had previously been set in two thousand eighteen which by the way broke the record from two thousand seventeen so I'm sounding like a broken record but the oceans are warming their warming extremely rapidly. And what we need to know here in Minnesota as it has consequences even here though we're far away from the ocean and you had an interesting sort of nuclear clear comparison of just how much heat energy is going into the oceans. Tell us about that. Yeah that's right so the fancy term that we use to to tell people how fast the oceans oceans warming is a Zeta jewel. Now you haven't heard that in a long time if you can pull that out of a cocktail party tonight you extra bonus points but a jewel is a unit of energy. I'm not talking about a jewel on a you know jewelry or a ring or hearings but a jewel is a unit of Energy Zeta. Jewel is a one with twenty one zeros. After it I mean these are huge huge numbers so the earth warmed. Twenty eight Zeta Zeta jewels or about twenty-five Zeta Jill's last year. And I. How do you wrap your head around that? And it's crazy crazy number so I related it to the the energy released by hero Shema atomic bombs and it turns out we are heating the ocean at the rate of five Herro Shema bombs uh-huh per second per second day and night three hundred sixty five days a year so I just helps put into context the scale L.. What's happening to our Oceans Kim? As John mentioned we know that more than ninety percent of earth warming is being absorbed by the oceans. How does that extra heat impact the atmosphere and weather systems? Well it's definitely going to be the dog that wagging tail there so obviously the there's temperature globally as John said is really set by the oceans and that goes to the atmosphere as well and so we're the ocean goes the atmosphere it goes and so that is warming up the atmosphere and that causes the atmosphere to hold more water vapor which leads to one of the impacts that that we know is being caused by rising greenhouse gases which is more extreme episodes precipitation as one example of how how disconnection between the ocean and the atmosphere? And where we live is tightly linked and Kim looking at Johns recent paper here in this work. How does that dovetail with the work? You've been undoing for so many years on oceans and climate. Well definitely very closely related. So what I do is recover Corals that are growing growing in the surface ocean from data poor regions and so they make those estimates of ocean heat content from instruments like thermometers and put their monitors through the surface ocean to determine that heat content but actually if he wanted to play the current Global warming in the context text the last centuries you have to go to our guys that can push those estimates back with geological records like corals and so looking at the call records Over the last millennium which is one of my specialties from regions where we have very few instrumental records. You can clearly see that these last several centuries ah of warming this last several decades of warming. stand out like a sore thumb against the background of natural variability at these sites over the last several centuries and so that's again that kind of information that we used understand just how unusual and rapid these recent changes. It has been. Yeah so both of you. I'm hearing it's all tied together. The oceans the atmosphere. We know that. And we're still learning a lot about precisely how that works John. Is it fair to say because I'm curious about this that our ocean's ability to absorb heat may be one reason that our atmospheric warming so far has been limited to ron one degree Celsius globally. Yeah that's exactly right Paul. The Oceans Denison incredible favor by gathering this heat. And it's time now. The oceans haven't solved the problem with climate change. The only thing that's going to solve that problem is if we very quickly Reduce our missions to near zero But nevertheless the the oceans have bought US time you know. Climate scientists have been talking about climate change for a long time in fact if I were to ask people win win. The concepts concepts of global warming and understanding was set. They would be surprised that was actually in the eighteen hundreds. I mean this isn't rocket science. This is an Internet age. This is stuff that we've known for a long long long time and unfortunately we've done very little about it in the longer we delay the the harder it's going to be to take action so the oceans have done us an incredible edible favor but let's not Rely on them forever. Because as Kim mentioned that he comes out of the ocean and it drives weather the atmosphere. There is more humid now than it was before. And that is the juice that power see storms and it makes our weather more extreme. It makes things it makes weather either. Go from one extreme to the other more rapidly in Minnesota. What what are we experiencing what we know we because we can see it as we look out the window? But we're experiencing more dramatic swings in temperature more dramatic swings in precipitation. So you might get really heavy down bursts of rain with flooding. But then you might go to a hot dry period. Did and go to droughts here going from one extreme to the other and that has incredible implications for society and you know as these oceans warm. Can it reach a limit on being a heat sink. I'm curious then. What happens to the atmosphere? Could we see a more rapid atmospheric warming when the ocean sort of hit their limit. John can you jump in on that real quick. I can't and it's almost like you are a member of my research team and I have you been spying on me. I should be so fortunate. So wh WHOA. The one of the important things at the ocean is able to bring heat from the surface water down to the deeper depths and we liked that because it it pulls heat away from the atmosphere and there are parts of the globe where ocean waters will fall from the surface down to the bottom of their other parts of the globe or a waters waters will rise. What we want to know is will that process continue And will we get to a situation where there's a stratification nation that means the layers are more or less constant we experiences in Minnesota. We have Kim. You may not know this. We're called the land of ten thousand lakes but I've heard we have something like seventeen. Thousands of MINNESOTANS really understand water inversions in water temperatures in lakes and that happens in the ocean and if that stratification Asian changes if the ability of the ocean to bring heat down changes then we could be inferred even wilder ride and the reason why I mentioned our research. Is We actually have a paper submitted on that topic Kim you mentioned corals you study those where are we at with coral bleaching and death in Earth's oceans today and where are we headed current trends. Continue well certainly. We've seen a really sobering last several years with year on year bleaching across the great eight bear reef But the record for the extent of Global Bleaching and mortality in the corals is really remains twenty sixteen which which is currently by the way still holds the number one place for global temperatures on record Only second only well of course. Twenty nineteen is second only to twenty sixteen in that in that statistic so for corals we've seen real decimation of some sites that may never be the same Besides like my research site in the middle of the Pacific Ocean which was devastated by that? Twenty Sixteen El Nino event compounded by The the ocean warming that we've been talking about and of course going forward Projections show that we're going to lose. Maybe the vast majority of current Ryan Tropical Reef perhaps as early as twenty fifty if we do not take aggressive action to curb emissions immediately. And so you hear a a lot of News coming out every year in the Great Barrier Reef researchers studying the follow on impacts of these massive coral bleaching and mortality than. I'm hitting things like the ability of coral larvae to settle and be successful after these successive events Really understanding that. It's not just the one hit that they take it's really The beginning of the ecosystem collapsing on itself and a number of horrible feedbacks taking place and and so That's something that I think. People don't understand is as well as they need to in the sense that corals are not just Pretty place to die which is where most of us fell in love with these things but they really provide a huge range of ecosystem services that are incredibly valuable to us as a planet including supporting Global fisheries providing protein for a billion people Even in so far as drug discovery for some of our most advanced drugs today so again Really horrifying news from the frontlines of ocean warming with very vulnerable ecosystems. Nicole's

John John Abraham Dr Kim Cobb Minnesota Paul Pacific Ocean University Of Saint Thomas Sci Atmospheric Research Great Barrier Reef Zeta Zeta Zeta Energy Zeta Global Bleaching Jewel United States Kevin Trenberth
Joel Smith Q&A on Sprint Training Methods and Running Biomechanics, Physical Preparation and Motor Learning Topics | Sponsored by SimpliFaster

Just Fly Performance Podcast

08:30 min | 1 year ago

Joel Smith Q&A on Sprint Training Methods and Running Biomechanics, Physical Preparation and Motor Learning Topics | Sponsored by SimpliFaster

"So the first question comes from Chris. McCormack Chris says says How have your thoughts changed on training team sports over the past one to two years? And what things you may have added to your teams. So I'll answer this from from what I've done from. Just a general perspective and really that is making a higher percentage of the total work bodyweight and making king a higher percentage of the training a little more intuition based Or unscripted at least the early part like the warm up more unscripted versus the latter portion of the workload so The My my buddy Paul cater from Selene owns the Alpha project. And Salinas. I talked with him frequently about the idea of really just a really straightforward just trying to not make athletes robots trying to give them freedom and creativity and problems to solve and being in flow in a session question. Now I think an unscripted portion of the work can definitely do that on for me. A lot of that unscripted work is in the body weight medium so crawls and and monkey bars ars and Things like you even A lot of a lot of things as well that I've learned from Dr Tommy. John Likes like various hip circles than single guard. Yells and things on one leg and lightweight body weight options done for high repetitions to really cover a basic human movement and motor patterns. Now I like to get into a lot of medicine ball work. I like to integrate a lot of games and things That I've learned for like Raith Kelly and ways to basically make sure an athlete is emotionally ready once we get to harder pro- portions of the work or not even harder but I guess more scripted more traditional more block esque versions of things One one thing I've done as well as that I've increased the relative proportion of body weight but also extreme isometric work done at the tail end of the workout. I would say. I've traded a decent chunk of traditional barbell lifting for extreme isometric work and I've seen a great pay off in terms of injury rates and decrease decrease Decreases there. I also feel like it's just. It's a good thing to to do that type of thing as well. Because I think it's good to hone your eye for movement in the body weight medium because that's what athletes compete in. So I'm always trying to do just a little bit more work there and just because it's body weight Doesn't mean that it's easy. It doesn't mean that there's not in intensity to it. That's not the case at all. If anything a lot of the body weight work should be done with the same equal intensity to I N. It's different typewriter high-priced tunneling as much but to a heavy set of lifting like bench. Press or squat. There should be everything you're doing is important in so cultivating flow through the whole workout. Whether it's whether it's a crawl whether it's a lunch whether it's a monkey bar extreme isometric or remain set of work it's all it all matters. It's all the same and it all should be done with a high expectation of movement quality and so at for me personally. Actually I I get a lot of enjoyment out of creating unscripted body. Wait based work and I often also and this is something. I'm doing more recently as I really look at how. The music cultivates that and caters to that so using using stuff that's a little bit more in the Edm or deep house. Even genres can keep that rate of work and put athletes flow better for that type of stuff and I think it's all really important especially especially to on the last thing I'll say is I definitely done more unilateral work than bilateral work. Just because it's and along on the coattails of that Cam Joss Chad Denison Denison episode. I just think that there's so much gold in just the functionality. How do we move? And when Your Trade Team Sports I we definitely have to ask ourselves. Would we rather have an extra inch. Vertical job maybe an extra cutting extra three or four hundred forty dash or would we rather have an athlete. WHO's a a little more robust and resilient I mean it's an argument that with the single versus double-leg we can also make the argument that it doesn't even matter But that's not really the point of this. I'll just say that I've Added in a little bit more single leg work throughout the year that also makes it. A higher percentage so moral of the story is bilateral. Sadula plan exercises. I still have them in there but they play a little bit less than they used to. Okay second question is from Brandon Green. He says what is your opinion or viewpoint on information that we have acquired from the Soviets or any of the former eastern bloc nations. So I think this is a good question. Just in the sense of a lot of people will say well the Soviets were using using steroids in the eastern bloc. Were it was just steroids. That was there do are creating their success so we didn't really hold their training to a higher guard. And yes obviously. These athletes were definitely masterful users of steroids. But I do think I'll just say this is I. I have like a lot of the texts. And your Dr Gorka Shanansky huge influence on me book like books like Super Training and things like that. I just have a couple things to say in one is if you look at the quality of the research that was coming out back then then in the seventies from Russia like the studies in Super Training are just awesome studies. They're they're they're very applied studies. That I don't. I think that we really do as much today because I made like the funding isn't there. We have untrained recreationally train college students not high performance athletes. Fleets doing this. And it's not it was more of a government thing back then it was a whole nation. Really trying to spearhead these efforts and so the quality of the work done it was just fantastic and then also say to to you if you look at like the technical models if you go to track and field and you look at the technical models and triple jump is one. I like in particular you look at these. I think is a Ukrainian female who has the world record but if you look at like her style it was a dairy bar has shown to me. It's a high flat high wave form. It's not the flat flat flat. And these these athletes. They're in my opinion a lot of their technical models even were superior or to what we have now or what. We think is optimal technique now and if you watch those athletes it's not just they're not just more powerful because of the steroids royds. They also had a superior technique in a system. That was behind them. So I think there's a lot more than just that so I am definitely a huge I I the Russian and Soviet stuff means a lot to me. I don't bypass it. Because of the whole steroid thing. And I know that I think we'd be naive to say that the Russians and the eastern bloc the only people using steroids in that era. So yeah I think it's certainly valuable information and I think it's good things to look at okay next one This is Citric doc over and he says what are your thoughts on the role of ankle strengthened maximizing the single leg vertical job so this is a great question Ankle Strength Frank Foot strength very important and so the man I want to say I think this goes back to angus young. Quite a few podcasts ago where he was talking about Athlete that was like blowing everybody out of the water in acceleration and counter movement jump and we came to top end speed. I think they they weren't quite as good. And one of the things that was a factor was their foot or ankle. Strength was not that great and so I do think that the foot and ankle and you could call it like a fashion. The fashion line the system it becomes more important. The faster contact times get So generally speaking it is really important. It's definitely not everything I think. A lot of times. It comes with the territory. If your feet are sensing in working properly so if my feet can sense the ground well I have good bio mechanics a lot of times. That's just gonNA come along naturally but if not a things there's a lot of things that can help we've had Chongzhou on the show talking about hyper chops even stuff office. Simple as single Eglin hops can be awesome for helping to improve that and things that I like doing. It had been leaning more toward these days in the world of motor learning as combining these things. So if you're doing some single leg vertical jumps doing some single egg line hops and making it a complex or complex thing single egg jump work with sensory work and with high rep elastic working. We're making this a combo to almost like a sandwich to to really give a full. You're feeding sensory work in your feeding activation and and Activation High Rep work him. And you're feeding the actual skill and so we're putting this on one thing. I think the output is is pretty

Chris Activation High Rep Cam Joss Chad Denison Denison Salinas Dr Tommy John Likes Alpha Raith Kelly Russia Dr Gorka Shanansky Brandon Green Paul Chongzhou Selene
Country Star Joe Diffie on Making a No. 1 Record

Bobbycast

02:50 min | 1 year ago

Country Star Joe Diffie on Making a No. 1 Record

"Welcome to episode to seventeen with Ed. A Guy I really like and been a big fan of yours. Jody gooding here. Yeah good to see all thank you you as well you know I was looking. I know most of the stuff about you like I've been a fan before we've been able to be friends. I was just a massive Asif Fan of you growing up and so as I kind of one of the deep dive. 'cause I always like to find out. What do I not know about people coming over to the house? Right listen to this. I don't know if even knew that. Go on this day. December Sixteenth Nineteen Ninety Four. You had the number one song on the Billboard Country Charles Pickup Man. It was your longest lasting number one having spent four weeks at number one from December ninety four to January ninety five. Did you know that was today. No I didn't notice today. I knew the the rest of that. I didn't realize the data. That's pretty cool on this day. Number war yeah so for example Luke. Combs just spent three weeks at number one And that's a long the last three weeks number one especially today really big deal when you have a song this one for four weeks in in Nineteen ninety-four. What's the vibe that well I mean? It was unusual because back then you know they put out a lot more songs that the frequency of you put forth four four or five times a year and now you might have one son stays on the charts. Lingering there at some point For almost a year you know so So that was kind of weird weird part. We had to wait to see what how long it was going to stay number one before we could put another record. So did you feel like that song was going to be a number one song. I knew it from the institute after I heard it really I really do. Yeah I don't know why just something about it just you know. Have you been able to name and nail boasted most of your big songs for the first time you heard them. Yeah pretty much There was a couple that it didn't Like John Deere Green. I hated one. I heard it real. Why why well because the demo now this is a long saga but it but when I first heard it it was done by the rider writer named Dennis Linde and he had a very eclectic sound voice and he did all his own demos at his house so it had a Jew's harp planning ardine are Ernie Ernie and I was like what the heck is that you know in my producer so we'll just ignore the demo part I I'd have to add right now? That is subsequently Loved all Denison. Lindy's demos they were so cool after he got kind of figured out what was what was happening. You know my producer said listen to the words and and and I was like man. I just don't like it at all. He goes. Well I think this hit and I said well we can try you know go in the studio cut it and if it doesn't work out then we scrap grab you know so. Luckily it worked

Dennis Linde Jody Gooding Producer Ernie Ernie ED Charles Pickup John Deere Combs Luke Denison Lindy Writer Three Weeks Four Weeks
Chile: Debris believed from missing plane carrying 38 found

America Tonight with Kate Delaney

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Chile: Debris believed from missing plane carrying 38 found

"News ominous sign him the search for a missing Chilean Air Force plane Chile's airforce says it's found debris believed to be from a missing C. one thirty aircraft that disappeared Monday just over an hour after departing from a southern Chilean bass on a maintenance flight for a facility in Antarctica the materials were found in Drake's passage the notoriously rough waters between south America's Cape Horn and Antarctica's south Shetland islands the plane was carrying twenty one passengers and seventeen crew members it could be several days before authorities can determine if the debris is that of the missing aircraft rich Denison

Chile Antarctica Drake South America Cape Horn Denison
"denison" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"denison" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"Rich Denison. And this is Fox News. It's a very simple procedure. Mr. d as we're just gonna make one small incision here and we're going to go in and remove your sixty seven corvette by bet. It's just a gallbladder. You don't have half black paying Akash. So you might have to sell that sweet little muscle machine just to cover your rent more financial. But my public gave me that what do you wish you had? Love doing that health can change. But the life you love. Doesn't have to keep your lifestyle healthy with. Flack. Branding. I started playing hockey people always told me I was too small, but I never let that stop me. Hasbro children's take like me would on be conditions debt that that's, that's right. This is a place of hope for kids learned that they can achieve their dreams. For children. Today. It is free. Talk live launching into the second hour program. You can bring up what you one here. Our toll free number's eight, fifty.

Rich Denison Fox News Hasbro Flack hockey Mr. d
"denison" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"denison" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"Some things. Good. Broke. Jason. That's my next mission is lacking quick. This. Because my they sell in the same. Because some of my everything grows. Sunglasses came out as the. No money two. I was watching. Star studied the race on the greatest right now. Got a choice. Clip some writing no names are making a list checking it twice in them. Getting them real has been dying. Damon Denison bedroom is the billions dirty dirty. I just bought something. Something. Tommy science. Got it. Okay. We gave you the song of the hour. Host Malone wild.

denison
"denison" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"denison" Discussed on WLAC

"Plays the same disclosure soon for its other medicines. I'm rich Denison. And this is Fox News. Spinning complacently in the darkness, covered and blinded by a blanket of little. Lives false security has lulled the madness of this world into a smooth number wake up and eyes upon you staring straight down and keenly through seeing all that you. And everything that you can never be. Yes, I is a brand new. I ready to blink. So. With arms wide, open and mind. Freezing your future has arrived. You ready to go?.

Denison Fox News
"denison" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"denison" Discussed on 600 WREC

"I'm rich Denison. The president. Trump says US troops will be immediately pulled from Syria, but they will be coming home. His decision last month to withdraw US forces from Syria, drew intense criticism from many in congress, especially Republicans. They claim the administration would leave Syria to the. July on nightmare. Twenty four soccer players. On March twenty nine hundred North Korean soldiers. Six hundred ninety two point one FM. Never forget the day. I'll landlord called and said read your lease. No pets allowed tells them mytalk easterlies, but that didn't work and now I'm stuck in a shelter. But this people is ready for nutrition loving loyal and play well with others. So don't be intimidated, all my muscles. Because the biggest one I have is my heart. That's right. I said. Hi, I'm Dan Patrick watching my nieces grow play. And learn is amazing. But not every child gets to be carefree one in six kids in the US are hungry. This breaks, my heart. And it's something that Feeding America is working to change each year. The feeding American network of food banks rescues billions of pounds of good food that would have gone.

Syria US Denison Trump president soccer congress Dan Patrick America
"denison" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"denison" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Being the prince of the powers the air that sort of thing. So the idea of aliens being demonic? Do we honest has been a recent accusation as some religious groups, the aliens is a threat to the worship of God. And some religious figures have been claimed but aliens demand our worship. Well, I really don't think that aliens are worship but easily see in the bible, how some metaphors descriptions of what would be called UFO's today would be explained away in a lot of biblical jargon. And that's of course, up for determination reputation by those who are in the clergy or even those who even read the bible for that matter. So a lot of things at play here about UFO's the signs and wonders of the sky's the I mean, the the prince of the power of the air all this is part of the investigation UFO's now it's becoming very real to a lot of people, and it's not just for those who fantasize anymore. We'll be back. What's not to love about the fall favorite season? Like, the smell Chris. Changing apples. Yeah. But once you get past the apples, and the pretty colors things are gonna get pretty miserable. Right. So pleasant out there. The rain and the winds known will be falling. This fall. I'd say a wet snowflakes that is snow storm team ten forecast. Twenty four seven on NewsRadio nine twenty four seven FM. This is a Fox News alert time. Rich Denison, the northern.

UFO Rich Denison NewsRadio Fox News Chris
"denison" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"denison" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Denison reporting for america's trucking network if you or a small business trucker you do yourself to call oh the owner operator independent drivers association in oh a membership kim provide you access to information and resources to help your trucking career along with many cost saving benefits like affordable truck insurance medical benefits drug and alcohol testing fuel card and discount programs with over ninety manufacturers and vendors best of all oh has been fighting on behalf of truckers for over forty five years revenues generated from its benefit programs directly support it's ongoing representation in washington by joining oh idea you lend your voice to his efforts to improve the industry for all truckers one joined today call one eight hundred four four four fifty seven ninety one that's one eight hundred four four four fifty seven ninety one or visit oh dot com you can make local lifechanging wishes come true for kids with critical illnesses at the fifteenth annual cincinnati walk for wishes a wish granted gives kids hope and helps bring families closer together join us at sawyer point on thursday july twelfth at five pm registry a team of family friends or coworkers and start making a difference for kids and families in your community today for more information about walk for wishes visit okay i dot wish dot org one in six seniors faces the threat of hunger and millions more live in isolation drop off a hot meal and say a quick hello volunteer for meals on wheels by donating your lunch break at america let's do lunch dot org this message brought to you by meals on wheels america and the ad council.

Denison america washington cincinnati forty five years
"denison" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

KFQD News Talk

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"denison" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

"Things yeah it is funny it makes you realize how much of our interaction happened on facebook this one woman used a fake first name and then she ran into a friend who completely forgot that peo wasn't her actual name and called her that there was a guy who got a wedding invitation his name's mike denison on facebook keys mike dennis soroush the wedding invitation was a was a said mike dinosaurs on it so you know people really interact with those facebook personalities and sometimes forget that they're not completely true on the other side of things facebook is in so much hot water right now i would think that they don't think some of this is funny coming up the case of the missing launch.

facebook mike denison
"denison" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"denison" Discussed on WLAC

"So only people over ninety wear slippers right we're speaking with high devoted the wall street journal heidi what about this misspelling your name or giving the wrong phone number is that the most common things yeah those are very big also just providing either a dummy or fake email address i think lots of people who don't misrepresent themselves other ways do that but yeah i mean i mean this is also stuff that i do i always sort of misspell my name or don't give a phone number unless i really have to there's some sort of extra sensitive security in that you know there are also some funny things though your story points at where people made up crazy stuff on facebook and then someone who thought they knew them a relative or whatever would take that to be real information and it causes some awkward moments yeah it is funny it makes you realize how much of our interaction happened on facebook this one woman used a fake first name and then she ran into a friend who completely forgot that peo wasn't her actual name and called her that there was a guy who got a wedding invitation his name's mike denison on facebook keys mike dennis sorest the wedding invitation was a was fed mike dinosaurs on it so you know people really interact with those facebook personalities and sometimes forget that they're not completely true on the other side of things facebook is in so much hot water right now i would think that they don't think some of this is funny uhhuh yeah well i mean they have in their terms of service that you have to represent yourself accurately online they actually block accounts all the time that they see as not being authentic so it's it's really something they see is an issue and also you know we're we're we all know that one of the reasons facebook one this data is in order to use it for marketing or selling purposes so that messes up their possibility of doing that if everybody's providing information.

wall street journal heidi facebook mike denison
"denison" Discussed on Forbes Under 30

Forbes Under 30

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"denison" Discussed on Forbes Under 30

"Uh but by large it say most most of them are consumerfocused okay ran how final you getting the word out uh people to use wrap up five what you're doing other than by doing this podcast how he could asia where it out we are doing doing things like this podcast definitely help but a lot of what we do is very pr driven i in addition to that we leverage paid social we leverage a lot of things that i i used to do on the demand gene side view different digital channels and it's something that you know i continue to do here but as far as far as what we do on the driver's side most of that is done uh either organically or deng directly through paid is social du wrap your car in any kind of ad yeah i'm almost all or affect the most of our employees vehicles or wrapped in something on avery denison who is a vehicle they make the the are actually the manufacturer the film um they they've did our most recent round thursday backers we actually codeveloped a new wrapped film with them see how we were constantly testing different things uh we all are our vehicles are being wrapped in unwrapped on a regular basis via age i drive a wrapped vehicle grant great well listen um can you tell me if this any obstacles uh the the the you know have there been any struggle for you has there been any struggle for you uh over the course of of setting up this business and if so how did you overcome it.

avery denison asia