17 Burst results for "Deneen Brown"

"deneen brown" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

03:57 min | 10 months ago

"deneen brown" Discussed on Post Reports

"Uh <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> And now one <Speech_Female> more thing <Speech_Male> from reporter <Speech_Male> Deneen Brown <Speech_Male> about how <Speech_Male> Martin Luther King Junior <Speech_Male> got his name. <Speech_Male> The man <Speech_Female> we know as Dr <Speech_Female> Martin Luther King Junior <Speech_Female> was born Karen <Speech_Female> on January <Speech_Female> Fifteenth Nineteen. <Speech_Female> Twenty nine <Speech_Female> is named that <Speech_Female> was listed on his birth <Speech_Female> certificate. <Speech_Music_Male> Then was Michael <Music> King. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> What happened <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> was nine thousand? Nine hundred <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> thirty four <Speech_Music_Female> his father <Speech_Music_Female> whom <Speech_Music_Female> we refer to <Speech_Female> as Daddy King <Speech_Music_Female> Martin Luther King <Speech_Music_Male> senior took took <Speech_Male> a trip around the <Speech_Female> world so <Speech_Female> in Germany <Speech_Female> he was planning <Speech_Female> to attend the Baptist <Speech_Female> World <Speech_Female> Alliance meeting <Speech_Male> which was <Speech_Female> the big convention <Speech_Female> of <Speech_Female> Baptist ministers <Speech_Female> from all over <Speech_Female> the world. Researchers <Speech_Female> say <Speech_Female> that daddy <Speech_Female> king his <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> visit to Germany <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> had a <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> real impact <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> on him there. <Speech_Female> He <Speech_Female> studied Martin <Speech_Female> Luther <Speech_Male> the theologian <Speech_Music_Female> who <Speech_Female> created <Speech_Female> the Split <Speech_Music_Female> and Western <Speech_Female> Christianity. <Speech_Male> Right so <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> daddy. King has <Speech_Female> really impacted <Speech_Female> by the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> story of Martin Luther <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> so in <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> August of Nineteen thirty eighty <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> four daddy <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> king returns home <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to Atlanta <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that year <Speech_Music_Female> he changed <Speech_Music_Female> assists mean <Speech_Music_Female> from Michael <Speech_Music_Female> King <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to Martin <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Luther he he <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> also changes <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> his son's name <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to Martin Luther <Speech_Music_Male> Junior <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> but it wasn't <Speech_Male> until much later <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that the former Michael Michael <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> King junior <Speech_Male> leaned into his <Speech_Female> new name. The <Speech_Female> transformation from <Speech_Female> Michael to Martin <Speech_Music_Female> take several years <Music> <Music> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> and a letter in nineteen <Speech_Female> forty eight that <Speech_Female> he writes to US mother. <Speech_Female> He signs <Speech_Female> it your son <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> L. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and then two <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> years later there's <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> a letter that he's <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> sending to <Speech_Female> Kereta. They're still old <Speech_Music_Female> dating at <Speech_Female> this point. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> It's a really beautiful <Speech_Female> poetic <Speech_Female> love letter. <Speech_Female> And he signs <Speech_Female> it eternally <Speech_Female> yours Martin <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> so he he <Speech_Female> called himself. <Speech_Female> Martin Luther over <Speech_Female> time in the fifties <Speech_Female> and sixties <Speech_Female> as he's becoming <Speech_Female> this <Speech_Female> famous civil rights <Speech_Female> leader. <Speech_Female> But in <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> my research and my my <Speech_Female> reporting I thought <Speech_Female> that final night <Speech_Music_Female> that mountaintop <Speech_Female> speech <Speech_Female> in this really <Speech_Female> really beautiful <Speech_Female> speech that he had <Speech_Female> not written <SpeakerChange> out <Speech_Male> he says. <Speech_Male> I'm you know if I <Speech_Male> was standing <Speech_Male> <Music>

"deneen brown" Discussed on What A Day

What A Day

02:20 min | 11 months ago

"deneen brown" Discussed on What A Day

"This pretty extensive collection on the Tulsa race massacre and the Curators there said when he came to the library in nineteen eighty. He found that someone had gone through all the magazines and used to raise her to cut out. All the stories on the Tulsa race at the time is called the Tesla race fry it. Yeah so people were going to great it links to cover this APP which I think is just proof that they know it's a shameful event. Yeah maybe they're trying to hide it but come on. Yeah I mean absolutely and now the the truth is being brought to light on all of this. Where do we think that the story goes next? Yeah well the next logical question is. Will there be reparations for descendants and a community that might be more affluent or more power had those murders not occurred I also talked to Deneen Brown about this. She's been talking to activists in the community and they believe reparations. It can take a lot of different forms. They say reparations means atonement it means Justice it means paying back the wealth of lost. I it means also even though the perpetrators back in nineteen twenty one most of them are likely dead. It means maybe filing charges charges against them because no one was ever arrested for the killings excuse yeah and acknowledgement on its own is a big deal And I think think that would mean a lot even as gesture to say you know this happened and we recognize that. It happened Well until now the Tulsa Race Riot Commission which is comprised of descendants descendants and historians has only identified thirty five African American bodies with the revelation of these mass graves and the commitment to transparently investigate. There's finally really a real chance for justice and family. Burials and what happens in Tulsa might end up being a blueprint for other cities across America to address in atone for past just racist violence in in those places three and more about this checkout. Deneen Brown's writing at the Washington Post. She's been on this beat for a minute. And I would encourage you to watch watchmen. It does a very beautiful job of you. Know sort of exploring generational trauma associated with specifically the massacre in Tulsa.

Tulsa Tulsa Race Riot Commission Deneen Brown Washington Post America
"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

"Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod a show about the past rediscovered Emmett till his tragic murder in one thousand nine hundred fifty five is a monumental moment in civil rights history. The African American teenager was tortured tortured shot wrapped in barbed wire and tossed in a river by white men seeking revenge for what till had allegedly whistled at a white woman in a grocery store when till's mother Mamie Elizabeth till mobely viewed his lifeless body swollen beyond recognition his teeth missing and I hanging out the only thing she could use to positively identify him was a the ring he was wearing Lord. Take my soul she cried according to a two thousand three interview with The Washington Post in her grief and outrage. Till's mother wanted the world to see the barbaric act committed against her son. She called the Chicago defender under one of the country's leading black newspapers she called Ebony and jet magazines too and she invited them to his funeral on the south outside of Chicago then. Maybe did something that would change history. She asked for an open casket skit at his funeral. I think everybody needed to know what happened to Emmett till his mother said according to PBS fifty thousand people attended the funeral in saw till's body the evidence of a vicious and hateful attack though open open caskets were an African American tradition. Till's body presented challenges not just in how he appeared but also and this is hard to say how badly it smelled. Simeon Wright till's cousin told Smithsonian magazine that the funeral home scrambled for a solution finally settling on the extraordinary step of putting glass over the casket to contain the odor otherwise right said no no one would have believed what till endured the result was profound the emotional photos from the funeral showed Mamie as she approached her son's casket. Her body seemed to buckle. Photographers captured her leaning over the casket to which photos of the smiling boy had been taped inside inside the litter. The funeral gave the nation in image. It hadn't yet seen what a lynching really looked like the brutality the anguish the sheer sense of wrong in this Massoni interview right said the photos led to renewed vigor in the fight against racist and a few months later a woman named Rosa Parks refused to give her seat on the white section of a bus prompting a year long bus boycott in Alabama led by an up and coming leader in the civil rights movement and the Reverend Martin Luther King Junior King may till's murder a centerpiece of his sermons and speeches the crying voice of Little Emmett till he'd say screaming from the rushing waters the evil of racial injustice the justice. I'm Mike Rosen walled. Thanks for listening special thanks to Deneen Brown who reported the story for The Washington Post and for more forgotten stories from history visit Washington Post. Dot Com slash retro pod.

Little Emmett Mike Rosen Mamie Elizabeth The Washington Post murder Chicago Deneen Brown PBS Simeon Wright Smithsonian magazine mobely Rosa Parks Alabama Massoni Martin Luther
"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

"Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod a show about the past rediscovered Emmett till his tragic murder in one thousand nine hundred fifty five is a monumental moment in civil rights history. The African American teenager was tortured tortured shot wrapped in barbed wire and tossed in a river by white men revenge for what till had allegedly whistled at a white woman in a grocery store when till's mother Mamie Elizabeth till mobely viewed his lifeless body swollen beyond recognition his teeth missing and I hanging out the only thing she could use to positively identify him was a ring he was wearing Lord. Take my soul. She cried according to a two thousand three interview with The Washington Post in her grief and outrage. Till's mother wanted the world to see the barbaric act committed against her son. She called the Chicago defender under one of the country's leading black newspapers she called Ebony and jet magazines too and she invited them to his funeral on the south outside of Chicago then. Maybe did something that would change history. She asked for an open casket skit at his funeral. I think everybody needed to know what happened to Emmett till his mother said according to PBS fifty thousand people attended the funeral in saw till's body the evidence of a vicious and hateful attack though open open caskets were an African American tradition. Till's body presented challenges not just in how he appeared but also and this is hard to say how badly it smelled. Simeon Wright till's cousin told Smithsonian magazine that the funeral home scrambled for a solution finally settling on the extraordinary step of putting glass over the casket to contain the odor otherwise right said no no one would have believed what till endured the result was profound the emotional photos from the funeral showed Mamie as she approached her son's casket. Her body seemed to buckle. Photographers captured her leaning over the casket to which photos of the smiling boy had been taped inside inside the litter. The funeral gave the nation in image. It hadn't yet seen what a lynching really looked like the brutality the anguish the sheer sense of wrong in this Massoni interview right said the photos led to renewed vigor in the fight against racist and a few months later a woman named Rosa Parks refused to give her seat on the white section of a bus prompting a year long bus boycott in Alabama led by an up and coming leader in the civil rights movement and the Reverend Martin Luther King Junior King may till's murder a centerpiece of his sermons and speeches the crying voice of Little Emmett till he'd say screaming from the rushing waters the evil of racial injustice the justice. I'm Mike Rosen walled. Thanks for listening special thanks to Deneen Brown who reported the story for The Washington Post and for more forgotten stories from history visit Washington Post. Dot Com slash retro pod.

Little Emmett Mike Rosen Mamie Elizabeth The Washington Post murder Chicago Deneen Brown PBS Simeon Wright Smithsonian magazine mobely Rosa Parks Alabama Massoni Martin Luther
"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

"Pay history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen with retro pod a show about the past rediscovered. This is the story of a pretty shameful piece of our country's passed in one thousand nine hundred thousand six Oregon amended state, constitution to remove a law from its Bill of rights. It was a law that had been part of the constitution since Oregon became a state in eighteen fifty nine and it had its roots in policies that were dated back to eighteen forty three when Oregon was just a territory. It was an exclusion law, and it made it illegal for black people to live in the state of Oregon. That's right. Oregon was admitted to the United States of America as a whites only state. In eighteen forty four Oregon was a huge territory under American rule that stretched from the Pacific coast to the rocky nuts. In the former slave holder at the head of Oregon counties. Provisional government. Peter Burnett passed a law. The law allowed slaveholders to keep their slave for three year. Grace period after that, all black people were required to leave, Oregon county. Black women were given three years to get out. Black men were required to leave into those who refuse were to be severely whipped by law. They would be whipped every six months until they left. It was called the Peter. Burnett lash. The last law was quickly amended in then repealed. No black people were actually lashed as a result of it. But it was the first of three exclusion laws that shaped the history of the Pacific northwest. In eighteen forty eight the territorial government passed a new law making it illegal for any quote, negro or mulatto to live in Oregon county. This time the law was enforced. Jacob Vander pool was a black man who owned a saloon restaurant and boarding home in Oregon vendor pools neighbor reported him to the police, and a judge gave him thirty days to leave the territory, his crime black in Oregon, that lock to was eventually repealed, but as Oregon sought to become a state another. Exclusion policy was included in its first state constitution. The constitution stated that no free black person could reside in Oregon. It also prevented black people from holding real estate or making contracts, and stipulated that law should be created to remove blacks from the state, and punish anyone who brought a black person to Oregon. Or harbored them in the state in exclusion law was added by popular vote to the Oregon constitution's Bill of rights. And so, when Oregon entered the union in eighteen fifty nine it did. So as a whites only state, it is the only state admitted to the union with an exclusion law, written into the state's constitution that legacy of racism, followed Oregon through history, the state rescinded its ratification of the fourteenth amendment, which gave citizenship to all people born in the US including sleighs did not re-ratify that amendment until nineteen. Seventy three. Oregon was also one of just six states that refuse to ratify the fifteenth amendment, which gave black men, the right to vote. Even today. Portland remains the whitest large city in the United States. A legacy of Oregon's policies of exclusion. Although later legislation challenge, Oregon's exclusion law, and amendments to the US constitution. Eventually rendered it moot. The exclusion lost date on the books, all the way until nineteen twenty six. But a lot of other racist language stayed in Oregon's constitution much longer. In fact, in two thousand Oregon finally voted to remove all racist, language from its constitution up until the year two thousand Oregon constitution said, quote, no three negro or mulatto, not residing in this state at the time of the adoption of this constitution shall come reside or be within this state. I'm Mike Rosen wall. Thanks for listening special. Thanks to deneen Brown, who reported the story for the Washington Post and for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com. Slash retro farming.

Oregon Oregon county Mike Rosen United States Peter Burnett Burnett lash Pacific northwest Washington Post Washington deneen Brown Jacob Vander America Pacific Portland thirty days three years six months three year
"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

"History lovers. I'm Mike Rosen with retro pod a show about the past rediscovered. It was thirty minutes past midnight on June seventeenth nineteen seventy two Frank, wills twenty four year old security guard was patrolling the parking garage at the Watergate office complex in Washington. It was a night, just like any other except for one tiny very important detail, there was masking tape covering the locks on a stairwell door. Maybe the maintenance crew had taped the doors to keep them from locking. We'll thought he ripped off the tape then took his shift when he came back about an hour later. He noticed the tape had reappeared. Then we'll made a decision that would change the course of history in American politics. He called the police and reported a burglary in progress. That little piece of tape. We'll spotted was the beginning of the biggest corruption scandal in US history in led to the resignation of president, Richard Nixon, but despite his crucial role in the incident wills rarely gets any credit. Take the best selling book all the president's men, wills wasn't even mentioned by name. He was cast to play himself in the nineteen seventy six film version, but you could barely even call it a cameo appearance. The movie opens with an eleven second scene of wills turning a doorknob the shadowy shot. Captures him inspecting the tape on the door before ripping it off the camera cuts. That's in. Will's named faded from headlines quickly after Watergate post reporter, Carlin Barker remembers him as a nice guy when she met him at his house. He opened the door carrying a kit. The security guard would give speeches or interviews when ever the anniversary of Watergate rolled around, but he would never profit the way other players did during Watergate, even those who were convicted. He quit his job with a security company in nineteen Seventy-three after he wasn't given a raise. He couldn't find work in Washington and wondered if he was being blackballed later on he returned home to care for his ailing mother. He was arrested for shoplifting. A twelve dollar pair of sneakers a charge. He denied and was sentenced to one year in jail. Even their Nixon had been pardoned for his crimes. We'll spend the rest of his life in poverty, not even being able to afford hot water and electricity. He passed away in two thousand. His forgotten role in the Watergate scandal. Got a new burst of attention recently when the movie the post it fears the final scene in the movie depicts, wills wielding, a flashlight in the Watergate, but the moment is brief and once again his name doesn't show up in the credits. I'm Mike Rosen walled. Thanks for listening special. Thanks to deneen Brown who reported this story for the Washington French, and for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pod.

wills Washington Mike Rosen Watergate Richard Nixon president Frank deneen Brown US Carlin Barker burglary shoplifting reporter twenty four year thirty minutes eleven second twelve dollar one year
"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

"Hey history lovers. Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered. Today. I want to tell you about one of the most famous executions in history. December second eighteen fifty nine in. What is now Charlestown West Virginia John Brown road from his jail cell to the gallows on top of his own call. It was hauled in criminals flagging drawn by two white horses round the fierce abolitionist who had led an insurrection against slavery was ready to die. In one thousand troops line the field to protect a gallon. The governor was worried that rebels might rush in and try to rescue Brown. The whole spectacle was close to the public and to journalists and Brown was defiant. Before he left that day for the gallows. He had written a note in his cell. I John Brown. Am now quite certain that the crimes of this guilty land will never be purged away. But with blood. Brown was a fervently religious man from Connecticut, and he believed that slavery was the country's greatest sin. He dedicated his life to a Radicati it by any means necessary. He and his sons fought pro slavery fighters and Kansas were violent surrounding the issue was common. But he is most famous for leading at least eighteen men in a raid of an armory at harpers ferry West Virginia his plan was to seize the weapons and give them to enslave black men. So they could rebel he hoped to set off a rebellion and create a new Free State. But after a thirty six hour standoff most of his men had been either killed or captured by militia members in the US marines Brown himself was wounded. He was convicted of conspiracy, inciting insurrection and treason. On the day of the hanging Brown dressed in all black except for his red slippers. And White Sox was not allowed to make the final statement people who attended the execution including the man who would become the famous confederate General Thomas. Stonewall Jackson wrote that Brown was calm and unflinching. Jackson sat so close to the gals that he can hear everything Brown said he wrote in a letter to his wife that quote Brown had his arms tied behind him in ascended the scaffold with apparent cheerfulness. After reaching the top of the platform. He shook hands with several were standing around him the sheriff place the rope around his neck, then through a white cap over his head and asked him if he wished to signal when all should be ready to which he replied that. It made no difference provided. He was not kept waiting. Brown. Ended up waiting ten minutes before the end came. His body was placed the coffin made of black walnut. And he was buried in front of his New York farmhouse less than two years later. The civil war began Brown's final prophecy that bloodshed would be required to settle the sin of slavery was filled. I'm Mike Rosen walled. Thanks for listening. Especial? Thanks to deneen Brown reporting. The story for the Washington Post and for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pod.

Brown John Brown deneen Brown Mike Rosen harpers ferry West Virginia Washington Post Charlestown West Virginia Stonewall Jackson Washington Kansas US New York Connecticut General Thomas thirty six hour ten minutes two years
"deneen brown" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

07:23 min | 1 year ago

"deneen brown" Discussed on Post Reports

"First. This year is the four hundred anniversary of when the first enslaved Africans were brought to colonial America, the first specific person that we know of lived in the Jamestown colony and what's now known as for Jinya. Her name was Angela. She arrived in sixteen nineteen on a pirate ship called the treasure. That's deneen Brown. I'm a reporter at the Washington Post, and I cover many black history stories for the blog called metropolis two years ago. Archaeologist launched a archaeological dig at the Jamestown site, and they're searching for any clues of Angela. They're hoping to provide some kind of dignity to her story. Deneen went to Jamestown to see the archaeological site for herself. I jumped in my car and drove to Jamestown because I had heard about this. I just wanted to see the site. And I got there just in time for this tour that this curator was doing specifically about Angela. His name. We know. Angela. We know one of the first thirty two Africans are so would have been a part of the sixteen sixteen or it's very when I walk from the visitor center to the banks of the chains town river, I felt the heaviness the sadness. It's almost like the place is haunted by this really sad history. But very important history because we wanna know so much more about the first African woman to be documented to rive, Mus colony. What little we do know comes from historical records and the ongoing dick we know when she arrived in colonial America, what her captors named her. And we're she lift, but the trail of evidence about her story stops few years after her arrival in Jamestown for deneen, though, all of the things that happen to Angela before she came to the colony are what really standout she was forced to March more. Than one hundred miles from her village to slave ship which was run by the Portuguese. She was packed on the slave ship which was headed for Veracruz was on the coast of Mexico. The slave. Ship was intercepted by pirate ships one was called the treasurer. The other was called the white lion. There about three hundred fifty Arbor board who were chained and the pirates took off about sixty. We don't know what happened to the rest of the Africans aboard the ship. But Angela was among the sixty that the pirates took off. So historian say she's the first documented African to arrive on the colony of what is Virginia. She was listed in the sixteen twenty four senses by name as Angela and she's also listed in the sixteen twenty five senses by the name Angola of the treasurer. And what do we know about what her life was like after she arrived in? Julia. They don't know much about her life. They know that she lived in the household of William Pierce who was a captain. He was a wealthy merchant. They're not quite sure what kind of work. She did. Whether she was a servant or they're speculating that she was servant. This was before there were slave codes and Virginia. So some historians. Call her denture, but many argue that you know, she was an enslaved person. And Angela head arrived in Virginia in this critical moment in the development of America, right? The historian. I talked to Jim horn said she arrived in this kind of great paradoxical moment at the creation of democracy. But also at the time that slavery began, and what's now, the United States Jamestown was a colony. It was sixteen nineteen at the time of her arrival was this muddy place that was really dangerous that had. Really bad characters. It had pirates. It had colonised who had survived the starving time where there was cannibalism and people age other there were Indian wars that had wiped out many of the colonists before Angela had arrived, but Angeles arrival coincided with the meeting the first general assembly and Jamestown. It's the legislative body that's created in Jamestown, the longest continuous legislative body in America. So it's the beginning of government. So for a long time, we didn't really hear much about Angela as this first African person to come to the US and was there in Jamestown at this critical period. But recently, researchers started taking more interest. Why did that happen from my reporting? What I hear is the researchers in Virginia want to expand the. Of of the history of the country, and particularly to include the Africans who arrived, they call them. The first Africans who are in sixteen nineteen so throughout history. Their stories were often excluded from tuck spokes, many of us don't know much about the history of African people in this country. So there's this push to tell a broader story that's more inclusive. You know when you're coming up in class and school. You learn about the founding fathers. You learn about like we knew the name of John Ralph we knew the name of polka hana's. But until now many people didn't know the name of Angela. So that brings a whole group of people into our country's history. And they now have this person that they can relate to and some way and it helps to fill in the pieces. The missing pieces of the puzzle of what is our missing culture missing. Because of the the whole horrible slave trade. Where people or ripped from their countries. And whipped if they spoke their language and many black American Snell. They don't have that identity that information. So I think people are happy to know as much as they can about her even though we don't know her real name. We don't know her age. We don't know that she had children. We don't know whether she married we don't know what happened to her out of the sixteen twenty five sixes. She disappears from records. Did she live longer? We don't know. Kenin L Brown as an enterprise reporter for the post.

Angela head Jamestown America Virginia Africans United States Jamestown deneen Brown Deneen reporter treasurer Washington Post Jinya Jim horn deneen Veracruz William Pierce Julia US Mexico John Ralph
"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

"Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosenfeld with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered. Nineteen sixty eight was a year of protests on the streets on college campuses. And on the fields of battle battles. This is the beautiful capital of Mexico. Mexico very old and today, especially very young as host to the cream of the world's athletes and the greatest of it's cultural leaders here to take part in the nineteenth Olympia. It was their next eco city with the world watching that one of the most iconic moments of that chaotic year unfolded on television screens around the world. U S Olympia ins Tommie Smith and John Carlos had just competed in the two hundred meter sprint. Smith won the gold. Carlos the Bronx, and when they strode to the podium to accept their medals. They went with a plan a plan to peacefully quietly, but forcefully protest the injustice in racial cruelty. Taking place back home stepping up to the podium. They took off their shoes that was to protest poverty. They wore beads in a scarf that was to protest lynchings. They had one pair of black gloves between them Smith. Put one on his right fist Carlos covered his leftist. When the national anthem was played. They lowered their heads in defiance and raise those fists the black skin covered with black loves in a black power salute. And they prayed. Decades later their protests would be remembered as an act of patriotism in two thousand eight the two were honored with ESPN's Arthur Ashe courage award, but in nineteen sixty eight Smith and Carlos received no such praise. They were kicked out of Olympic stadium. And there were no awards waiting for them when they got home. They were suspended from the US -tracting they received death threats. After their track careers, Both Smith and Carlos played in the NFL. But their time on the field was short-lived Smith became a sociology professor and track and field. Coach Carlos became a guidance counselor in two thousand twelve in an interview with the guardian newspaper Carlos recounted their simple mission that day he said, quote, I had a moral obligation to step up morality was a far greater force than the rules and regulations they had. I'm Mike Rosenwasser. Thanks for listening to read and hear more about the extrordinary vents of nineteen sixty eight go to Washington Post dot com slash nineteen sixty eight special thanks to deneen Brown who reported this story for the Washington Post and for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pot.

John Carlos Tommie Smith Coach Carlos Carlos Mike Rosenfeld Mexico Washington Post Washington Mike Rosenwasser Olympia Bronx Olympic stadium Arthur Ashe deneen Brown US NFL ESPN professor two hundred meter
"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

06:21 min | 1 year ago

"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

"Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered ten months after the civil war ended a woman named Elizabeth Williams was trying to piece her life back together. Now living in California. Elizabeth was looking for answers from her past before the war. She was in slaved. She had four children, but she was separated from them decades earlier after she was sold the last time, she saw them was twenty five years earlier in Woodbury, Tennessee. Now, a free woman. Elizabeth was determined to find them information wanted by mother concerning her children, she placed an ad in the Christian recorder, a Philadelphia paper with a large black readership letty a-, William Allen and Parker who lived about six miles. The recorder was the official newspaper of the African Methodist episcopal church, which according to the church's history significantly expanded its membership across the south during reconstruction. Elizabeth wasn't alone in her quest. Were it turns out how she searched? She's never seen the above named children's sense. Any? Information given concerning them, however will be very grateful received by one whose love for her children survives, the bitterness and hardships of many long years spent and slavery. Torn apart and seeking help to reunite with their loved ones. Former slaves placed notices and black owned newspapers across the country. These notices were known as last seen ads. These ads for cell heartbreaking. Like, I went through dozens of. And. And many cases it provides this detail of the desperation of family, so return apart by slavery. That was deneen Brown who I reported on the last seen ads for the Washington Post the process of separating children from their parents was cruel and heartbreaking in his autobiography abolitionist and former slave Henry Bibb described an emotional scene at a slave auction. A mother clean to her baby while being whipped with the lash why because she refused to put her baby down in climb an auction. Block finally bid wrote the poor child was torn from the mother while she was sacrificed to the highest bidder. In their ads, formerly enslaved black people listed any clues that might help. Connect them to a strange family. Members physical descriptions names of former slave owners locations where family members were last seen dating from eighteen sixty three to nineteen o two sometimes they took up whole columns and even entire pages of a newspaper. Most of the ads were placed in the Christian recorder but black run newspapers in New Orleans Charleston. Cincinnati Nashville ran them as well. Some of the ads were left intentionally vague people signed their ads as a non ass- or provided sparse contact information. That's because even after president ABRAHAM LINCOLN declared enslaved people in confederate states to be freed were suspicious about the terms of the emancipation fearing that releasing any personal information could get them. Returned to slavery. But other ads contain specific telling details of life after slavery in the neural in south western Christian advocate newspaper. A woman named Betty Davis wrote of being separated from her mother when she was three. I am now fifty five years of age. I learned how to re when I was fifty. I take him read the newspaper. It is food for my soul. I am anxious and will be glad to hear something of my mother or my brother someone helped me. Historian say it's unclear how many matches were made from the newspaper notices, but Genealogists and researchers say the last seen ads helped break down the so-called eighteen seventy census wall before that year census there were very few official records of black people in the United States. They were often listed as property with check checkmark or a number by those who own them the ads, however place black people together in family units before eighteen seventy they tell real stories of real people with real names. Those searchers lucky enough to find family members with last seen ads sometimes submitted their good news to the very same newspaper. Like Elsie Boone in August of eighteen eighty six. She wrote a letter to the editor of the southwestern Christian advocate. I have found my mother through the deer south western God bless you. And your paper it resurrects the forgotten. The lost can be found. I'm Mike Rosen walled. Thanks for listening. This episode was adapted from a story written by deneen Brown for the Washington Post special. Thanks to deneen Brown charity Brown and Jillian Jarrett for reading the last seen ads in today's episode for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pod.

Elizabeth Williams deneen Brown Mike Rosen Washington Post African Methodist episcopal ch official California Washington Betty Davis Henry Bibb Woodbury Elsie Boone ABRAHAM LINCOLN Tennessee Philadelphia New Orleans Charleston United States Cincinnati president
"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

"Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered. On June twelfth nineteen sixty seven the United States Supreme court ruled unanimously that Virginia's laws against interracial. Marriages violated the constitution. The case was loving v Virginia and the ruling overturn laws against interracial marriages in sixteen states. It was a landmark moment for the country and for Mildred and Richard loving. Their love story has been told for decades. But history, even when it reveals old truths can also sometimes conceal like in the case of the loving 's they weren't the first interracial couple to fight Virginia's laws against mixed. Marriages. According to the library of congress, Regina approved its first law banning marriages between people of different races on April third sixteen ninety one the act aimed to prevent what it called abominable mixture in eighteen forty nine someone hundred and fifty years later Virginia declared all marriages between black people and white people quote. Absolutely void and the punishments for trying kept getting more harsh sentences increased from six months to two years to five years in prison. There were steep fines, including for anyone who even officiated in interational wedding. It was against this backdrop that Andrew Kinney a black man and Mahala Miller a white woman decided to get married. It was November fourth eighteen seventy four interracial marriages had just become legal in Washington DC. So the Kinney's left their home in Virginia traveled to Washington and married there. They spent ten days on their honeymoon. And then return home as husband and wife, but it didn't last they had been married for just three years when they were arrested and charged with lewd and lascivious cohabitation. A judge ruled him guilty of miscegenation that's the marriage of people of different races. They were fined five hundred dollars each the case was appealed to higher and higher courts. Each one upheld the ruling. In Virginia's highest court. The judge ordered that if the Kinney's wanted to stay married they had to move to a state or country that recognized it could be married in Virginia and of story. Decades later, Richard and Mildred loving made the same journey from Virginia to Washington DC, and they were arrested charged with miscegenation sentence and told to leave Virginia. But that time the story had a different ending. I'm Mike Rosen walled. Thanks for listening special. Thanks to deneen Brown for reporting the story for the Washington Post and for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pod. Hey history lovers. I'm Lillian Cunningham. The host of constitutional a Washington Post podcast about the people who framed and reframed America's constitution over time. If you wanna learn more about the evolution of the right to marry in the United States. Take a listen to constitutional episode called love you can subscribe to constitutional on your favorite podcast app. Or just ask your smart speaker to play the podcast constitutional.

Virginia Washington DC Andrew Kinney Mike Rosen Richard loving United States Washington Post Mildred Supreme court Lillian Cunningham Mahala Miller congress deneen Brown interational America Regina five hundred dollars fifty years three years five years
"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

"History lovers. I'm Mike Rosen wall with retro pot a show about the past rediscovered. So here's the thing about printing books with thousands and thousands of words in each one. There's bound to be a mistake somewhere. A word missing or misspelt often. It's no big deal. Sometimes it changes the meaning of a sentence or causes a little confusion. But other times the result is way less desirable and changes the book entirely like in the case of the wicked bible. A full year after the King James bible was printed. In London sixteen thirty one people discovered in air in the book of exodus, Moses brings the stone tablets containing the ten commandments down from Mount Sinai that part of the story is familiar. And then in this particular version of the bible printed between the lines thou shall not kill. And now shall not steal is a somewhat different commandment, thou shall commit adultery. Pretty important word missing. There. The confused commandment is not the only major air in that printing. Either in a passage meant to say that God showed his glory and greatness, this particular bible says God showed us his glory and great dairy air. When the air was discovered. King Charles the I was justifiably furious. He ordered every copy of that printing to be gathered up and destroyed the Royal printer who oversaw the work was punished severely. His printing license was revoked and he eventually died in debtor's prison. Some scholars believe it couldn't be an accident to have to such blasphemous mistakes in the same bible suggesting there was sabotage maybe by a rival printer who wanted one of the few coveted Royal licenses to print bibles. Despite king. Charles orders to have them burned. Eleven copies of what's now known as the wicked bible survived and one is on display at the museum of the bible in Washington. Diana, severance of the Dunham bible museum has even more examples of blasphemous bibles, one sixteen fifty three printing has a similar error beating out the word not in this passage from I Corinthians know Ye not that the unrighteous shall inherit the kingdom of God. In her museum's collection. You can also find what's called the vinegar bible in the heading instead of the parable of the vineyard. It says the parable of the vinegar. There's a book titled let it go among our people and it list other incredible bible printing errors as well. In the so-called. Murderers bible, a King James version from seventeen ninety five. It says let the children be killed instead of build in the printers bible, a seventeen to King James instead of saying princes have persecuted me without a cause one psalm complaints printers have persecuted me without a cause. That's right printers. All these really old and really permanent mistakes makes one long for something that can be easily updated something like I dunno the internet. I'm Mike Rosenfeld. Thanks for listening. This episode was adapted from a story written by deneen Brown for the Washington Post for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pod.

King Charles King James bible Dunham bible museum Moses Washington Mike Rosen King James Mike Rosenfeld Washington Post Mount Sinai deneen Brown London Diana
"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

"History lovers. I'm Mike Rosen with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered. She walked with a limp. She had a blood clot behind her eye from being severely beaten in a Mississippi jail for name was Fannie, Lou Hamer. She was the youngest of twenty children born to black sharecroppers in Mississippi and in late nineteen sixty four president Lyndon B Johnson was absolutely terrified of her. Why she was about to make an appeal before the credentials panel at the democratic national convention, the potential implications were profound Hamer represented the Mississippi freedom Democratic Party a racially integrated coalition of delegates Hamer wanted to challenge. The seats of the current all white democratic delegation from their state saying that they were in violation of. The party's rules because they had systematically excluded black citizens. According to time magazine Johnson was worried that Hamer speech could offend the southern Democrats whose votes he needed for re election. He wanted her silenced. But Hamer had a following that rivaled that of Dr Martin Luther King junior, and she would not go unheard. Henry was born in one thousand nine seventeen in the Mississippi. Delta the share cropping system kept her parents in debt and without enough food to feed their twenty children in the winter Hamer tied rags on her feet because she often didn't have shoes. She started picking cotton. When she was six years old. Hamer started her civil rights work in one thousand nine sixty one after she was sterilized without consent during what should have been a minor surgery. She tried to register to vote in one thousand nine hundred sixty two but was turned away after she failed a literacy test which were used in the south to discourage black people from voting the clerk asked Hamer complicated. Questions like interpreting the state constitution after she failed the test. She told the clerk she'd be back when Hamer returned to the plantation that day, she was fired from her job, but she wasn't defeated Hamer became a student nonviolent coordinating committee community organizer and helped found the Mississippi freedom Democratic Party in reaction to the lack of integration in the state's Democratic Party as a candidate from the party. She ran for congress in nineteen sixty four against democratic incumbent, Jamie l Whitten at that year's democratic national convention Hamer made her. Way to the stage through a crowd of men who refused to make space for her other members of the civil rights movement, including Martin Luther King junior spoke. But all eyes were on her. She then talked for thirteen minutes. Mr chairman. And two they could dentist committee. My name is MRs Fannie, Lou Hamer, she called for mandatory delegation, integration and recounted her experience trying to register to vote. The thirty first of all the the night food. That eighteen of all travel put the six miles who the county courthouse in in the null to register to become first class Hamer described being arrested in beaten in a Mississippi jail after a white waitress at a rest, stop refused. Her service. That's how she got the blood clot. This is the own account of we will to register the become first class. If the freedom democratic fun if not feed enough. Question amount. After her testimony Hamer and other Freedom Party members discovered that Johnson, a wildly tough politician had held a news conference. So that national television networks could he cover her testimony live? She was livid, but Johnson's efforts to silence her didn't work that night in a hot Atlantic City hotel room Hamer in the rest of the country watched her testimony broadcast in prime time on the evening news less than a year later, congress passed the Voting Rights Act, and at the nineteen sixty eight convention in Chicago Hamer became the first African American to be seated as a delegate she received a standing ovation. I'm Mike Rosen walled. Thanks for listening special. Thanks to deneen Brown who reported the story for the Washington Post and for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pod.

Lou Hamer Democratic Party Mississippi Lyndon B Johnson Mike Rosen Martin Luther King congress Freedom Party Washington Post Washington deneen Brown Delta Henry Atlantic City chairman president
"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"deneen brown" Discussed on Retropod

"Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered. Emmett till his tragic murder in one thousand nine hundred fifty five is a monumental moment in civil rights history. The African American teenager was tortured shot wrapped in barbed wire and tossed in a river by white men seeking revenge for what till had allegedly whistled at a white woman in a grocery store. When Till's mother Mamie, Elizabeth till Moberly viewed his lifeless body, swollen beyond recognition his teeth missing. And I hanging out the only thing she could use to positively identify him was a ring he was wearing Lord, take my soul. She cried. According to a two thousand three interview with the Washington Post in her grief and outrage Till's mother wanted the world to see the bar Barrick act committed against her son. She called the Chicago defender one of the country's leading black newspapers, she called ebony and jet magazines too. And she invited them to his funeral on the south side of Chicago. Then Mamie did something that would change history. She asked for an open casket at his funeral. I think everybody needed to know what happened to Emmett till his mother said, according to PBS. Fifty thousand people attended the funeral and saw Till's body the evidence of a vicious and hateful attack, though. Open caskets were an African American tradition. Till's body presented challenges not just in how he appeared. But also, and this is hard to say how badly it smelt Simeon Wright Till's cousin told Smithsonian magazine that the funeral home. Scrambled for a solution finally settling on the extrordinary step of putting glass over the casket to contain the odor. Otherwise, right said, no one would have believed what till endured the result was profound the emotional photos from the funeral showed Mamie as she approached her son's casket. Her body seemed to buckle for Taga captured her leaning over the casket to which photos of the smiling. Boy had been taped inside the lit. The funeral gave the nation in image. It hadn't yet seen what a lynching really look like the brutality. The anguish the sheer sense of wrong. In this Massoni interview right said the photos led to renewed vigor in the fight against racist. And a few months later. A woman named Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on the white section of a bus prompting a year. Long bus boycott in Alabama led by up and coming leader in the civil rights movement. The Reverend Martin Luther King junior king may Till's murder, a centerpiece of his sermons and speeches the crying voice of little Emmett till he'd say screaming from the rushing waters, the evil of racial injustice. I'm Mike Rosen walled. Thanks for listening. Especial? Thanks to deneen Brown who reported the story for the Washington Post and for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pod.

Mamie Emmett Mike Rosen Washington Post murder Moberly Chicago Washington deneen Brown Martin Luther King Rosa Parks Barrick Simeon Wright Smithsonian magazine Taga Alabama Massoni Boy Elizabeth
"deneen brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:50 min | 2 years ago

"deneen brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"WNYC comes from hospital for special surgery ranked number one in the country for orthopedics for nine straight years. According to the two thousand eighteen two thousand nineteen US news and World Report. Best hospitals ranking HSS how you move is why we're here. WNYC independent journalism in the public interest ninety three point nine FM and AM HD twenty NPR news and the New York conversation. This is the takeaway, I'm Tenzin a Vega, and we go to Haiti now where a five point nine magnitude earthquake hit the Caribbean nation over the weekend. The earthquake struck the coastal city of Puerto pay and sent residents into a panic. It's also raised questions about infrastructure improvements. Made in Haiti since the last earthquake struck in two thousand ten killing hundreds of thousands of Haitians. Joining us now is Jaqueline Charles Caribbean in Haiti correspondent for the Miami Herald Jacqueline, thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me Jacqueline. What kind of damage was done by this latest earthquake? They are still join the damage assessments. But there are reports of a lot of homes private homes and structures that have gone down in one of the town's actually in the next region next apartment next to pay Ramon. There was an auditorium that also collapsed what I have seen from the disaster folks is that it doesn't seem to be any major damages to government. Buildings. There is one police station that did suffer some damages, but in talking to seismic experts. We know what they've said is that damage is really should start at six point. Oh, and the fact that you do have damages at five point nine it really speaks to the fact that these buildings are just not prepared to handle a major earthquake over these the same buildings were these buildings that were still suffering from the twenty ten earthquake had these buildings been fortified, or is this just indicative of Haiti's larger infrastructure issues one it's decorative Haiti's large infrastructure issues. But in twenty ten point detail was spared. The earthquake in twenty ten was essentially Port-au-Prince metropolitan area, and it extended to the south to the city of shock Mel which is another port city, but after twenty seven there were calls by the top expert on earthquakes, and others assists than we've got to fortify these buildings did exist here when you take the city. Of patient, which is Haiti's second largest city in the north. It's next door to put your pet day also suffered some damages, and you have very old infrastructure. That's there. And so this is a huge problem today. In terms of what needs to be done because a major earthquake is coming. They just don't know when they just don't know the magnitude, and of course, here in the United States. The Trump administration has said it wants to end temporary protective status for Haitians and other immigrants that are living in the United States. Despite the fact that a federal judge blocked that decision last week thousands of Haitians could end up facing deportation depending on how this plays out in the courts. What impact could that have given this latest natural disaster? Well, it's going to have a major impact. Because when you think about the port pay region and a north it really is sustained by people who are living outside of Haiti the country already has issues with economy. It really has not recovered since two thousand ten and now on top this you have this earthquake here that it's happened. And so these are going to be difficult for a while. And of course, the Haitian president has also been under political pressure after the controversial increase in fuel prices. Does he and his administration have the support of the Haitian community to work through this? Well, we haven't done to that test yet because they just put in a new prime minister just a few weeks ago. The IMF is supposed to go back. They still want their fuel prices raise today. We're hearing the government saints aid organizations were going to take control of this by the Haitian population is saying are you able to take control of this? You know in doing this, are you going to prevent us from getting any kind of assistance, so they have to tread very lightly here because. What you have is a population. It's desperate. That's fearful that's panicked and things are out of their control. You have communities whether they are Haitian American communities or aid organizations that watch provide assistance that wants to help. So if there's a perception that the government is stopping that aid from arriving, Ben, you know, you're going to add on top of everything else in terms of an economy. That's not working no jobs, pending end of TPS, and a government that really doesn't know what the next move should be Jacqueline. Charles is the Caribbean in Haiti correspondent for the Miami Herald Jacqueline, thanks for being with us. Thanks for having me. In may nineteen twenty one horror struck the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, a white mob massacred more than three hundred black Americans in what had been a thriving black owned business district of Greenwood sometimes called black Wall Street the mob. Also burned down the town leaving more than ten thousand people homeless. It was one of the most horrific episodes of racial violence in US history. And after it was over the mob is said to have dumped the victim's bodies in a mass grave that alleged gravesite has not yet officially been investigated. But that may change soon joining me with that story is deneen Brown in Washington Post reporter deneen, thanks so much for being with the takeaway. Thank you. Why don't we hear more about this story Janine? Well for many years. It was only whispered about from my reporting by people said that they didn't talk about it out of shame of what happened and for many years, the perpetrators for alive and Tulsa lack people didn't talk about it. Or they only whispered about it out of fear that it might happen. Again. The clan was very active until sir during that year. So for many years, they say state city officials just covered it up. It was left out of textbooks. Many people grew up in Tulsa didn't hear about an until they were adults and nineteen Ninety-seven estate commission was organized to start investigating to find out. What exactly happened that was eighty years after it happened? So they interviewed the the remaining survivors many of them were in their nineties somewhere hundred who could recall very specifically what happened. And that was also the year that the state began to investigate these reports of mass graves and Tulsa. They identified three sites. One was a dump had been used as the dump in one thousand nine hundred eighty one two others were cemeteries and nineteen twenty one. And at each site. They found what they called anomalies they used ground penetrating radar defined. What was and they sight. So the reports that that they found anomalies that were consistent with what may be mass graves. They suggested that the city physically examine the smashed gravesite. But at the time the mayor decided against physically examining the site and the investigation was closed. What's the change been because the mayor of Tulsa? Has announced a new investigation into this alleged mass grave. What is the expectation? What are they hoping to find is this meant to close that chapter or maybe even open that chapter in history and reconcile with it? Well, the mayor says that the city hopes to heal from this massacre that happened nearly one hundred years ago, the smear GT bottom. He said when he was city council member and two thousand twelve he told himself that if he were ever mayor than he would investigate like physically investigate these mass grave sites. He was elected mayor. He said that he has the executive authority now to reopen the investigation he told me in an interview, he says, we owe it to the community to know if there are mass graves, and our city will do everything we can to find out what happened in one thousand nine hundred ninety one and until the questions are answered until they investigate every site that the city will continue to be haunted. What's the reaction been from? Black Oklahomans and from the wider community. The activist. I talked to or ecstatic that the mayor had announced that he would reopen the investigation they have been working for so many years to try to get the city to reopen the investigation and to just to to find peace for the peoples whose bodies were never found in nineteen twenty one they believe that Justice was never served and that the people buried deserve proper burials deneen Brown is an enterprise reporter for the Washington Post. Thanks so much for being with the takeaway. Thank you..

Haiti Tulsa United States Caribbean Jacqueline Miami Herald NPR Washington Post Jaqueline Charles Caribbean reporter Tenzin a Vega Puerto deneen Brown New York IMF Ramon Mel Charles prime minister
"deneen brown" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:03 min | 2 years ago

"deneen brown" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Into a panic. It's also raised questions about infrastructure improvements. Made in Haiti since the last earthquake struck in two thousand ten killing hundreds of thousands of Haitians. Joining us now is Jaqueline Charles Caribbean in Haiti correspondent for the Miami Herald Jacqueline, thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me Jacqueline. What kind of damage was done by this latest earthquake? They are still doing the damage assessments. But there are reports of a lot of homes private homes and structures that have gone down in one of the town's actually in the next region next apartment next to repair Ramon. There was an auditorium that also collapsed what I have seen from the disaster folks is that it doesn't seem to be. A major damages to government buildings there. One police station did suffer some damages, but in talking to seismic experts. You know, what they've said is that damage is really should start at six point. Oh, and the fact that you do have damages at five point nine it really speaks to the fact that these buildings are just not prepared to handle a major earthquake where these the same buildings where these buildings that were still suffering from the twenty ten earthquake had these buildings been fortified, or is this just indicative of Haiti's larger infrastructure issues. Well, one decorative Haiti's large infrastructure issues. But in twenty ten point the pair was spared. The earthquake in twenty ten was essentially Puerto prince metropolitan area, and it extended to the south to the city of shock Mel which is another port city, but after twenty ten there were calls by the top expert on earthquakes and others. This is less than we've got to fortify these buildings. Did exists here. When you take the city of Cape patient, which is Haiti's second-largest city. It's in the north. It's next door to put your pet day also suffered some damages, and you have very old infrastructure. That's there. And so this is a huge problem today. In terms of what needs to be done because a major earthquake is coming. They just don't know when they just don't know the magnitude, and of course, in here in the United States. The Trump administration has said it wants to end temporary protective status for Haitians and other immigrants that are living in the United States. Despite the fact that a federal judge blocked that decision last week. Thousands of Haitians could end up facing deportation depending on how this plays out in the courts. What impact could that have given this latest natural disaster? Well, it's going to have a major impact. Because when you think about the port if he region and a north it really is sustained by people who are living outside of Haiti the country already has issues with economy. It really has not recovered since two thousand ten and now on top this you have this earthquake here that has happened. And so these are going to be difficult for a while. And of course, the Haitian president has also been under political pressure after the controversial increase in fuel prices. Does he and his administration have the support of the Haitian community to work through this? Well, we haven't done to that test yet because they just put in a new prime minister just a few weeks ago. The IMF is supposed to go back. They still want their fuel prices raise today. We're hearing the government's saying to eat organizations were going to take control of this by the Haitian population is saying are you able to take control of this? You know in doing this, are you going to prevent us from getting any kind of assistance, so they have to tread very lightly here because. What you have is a population. That's desperate. That's fearful that's panicked and things are out of their control. You have communities whether they are Haitian American communities or eight organizations that watch provide assistance that want to help. So if there's a perception the government is stopping that aid from arriving, Ben, you know, you're going to add on top of everything else. In terms of an economy. That's not working no jobs, pending end of TPS, and a government that really doesn't know what next move should be Jacqueline. Charles is the Caribbean in Haiti correspondent for the Miami Herald Jacqueline, thanks for being with us. Thanks for having. In may nineteen twenty one horror struck the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, a white mob massacred more than three hundred black Americans in what had been a thriving black owned business district of Greenwood sometimes called black Wall Street the mob. Also burned down the town leaving more than ten thousand people homeless. It was one of the most horrific episodes of racial violence in US history. And after it was over the mob is said to have dumped the victim's bodies in a mass grave that alleged gravesite has not yet officially been investigated. But that may change soon joining me with that story is deneen Brown. Washington Post reporter deneen thanks so much for being with the takeaway. Thank you. Why don't we hear more about this story deneen well for many years? It was only whispered about from my reporting by people said that they didn't talk about it out of shame of what happened and for many years the perpetrators for alive. Until sir. Black people didn't talk about it. Or they only whispered about it out of fear that it might happen. Again. The clan was very active in Tulsa during that year. So for many years, they say state city officials just covered it up. It was left out of textbooks. Many people grew up and toss it didn't hear about an until they were adults and nine thousand nine hundred ninety seven a state commission was organized to start investigating to find out. What exactly happened that was eighty years after it happened? So they interviewed the remaining survivors, many of them were in their ninety s somewhere hundred who could recall, very specifically what happened and that was also the year that the state began to investigate these reports of mass graves and Tulsa, they identified three sites. One was a. Dump had been used as a dump in nineteen twenty one to others were cemeteries and nineteen twenty one. And at each site. They found what they called anomalies they used ground penetrating radar defined. What was and they sight. So the reports that that they found anomalies that were consistent with what may be mass graves. They suggested that the city physically examine the smash gravesite. But at the time the mayor decided against physically examining the site and the investigation was closed. What's the change? Because the mayor of Tulsa has announced a new investigation into this alleged mass grave. What is the expectation? What are they hoping to find is this meant to close that chapter or maybe even open that chapter in history and reconcile with it? Well, the mayor says that the city hopes to heal from this massacre that happened nearly one hundred years ago, the smear GT bottom. He said when he was city council member and two thousand twelve he told himself that if he were ever mayor than he would investigate like physically investigate these mass grave sites. He was elected mayor. He said that he has the executive authority now to reopen the investigation he told me in an interview, he says, we owe it to the community to know if there are mass graves, and our city will do everything we can to find out what happened in one thousand nine hundred ninety one and until the questions are answered until they investigate every site that the city will continue to be haunted. What's the reaction been from? Black Oklahomans and from the wider community. The activist. I talked to or ecstatic that the mayor had announced that he would reopen the investigation they had been working for so many years to try to get the city to reopen the investigation and to just to to find peace for people's whose bodies were never found in nineteen twenty one they believe that Justice was never served and that the people buried deserve proper burials deneen Brown is an enterprise reporter for the Washington Post ending. Thanks so much for being with the takeaway. Thank.

Haiti Tulsa Jacqueline United States Miami Herald Washington Post Ramon Jaqueline Charles Caribbean deneen Brown reporter Puerto prince IMF Caribbean Charles prime minister Oklahoma Cape president executive
"deneen brown" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"deneen brown" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Could that would not have been one because the south wasn't while i go there slaves i'm hey it's real simple and and his editors actually want to solve the problem all right well andrew jackson this deneen brown did some great research uh uh or maybe this is easy to find i i was unfamiliar but i'm not an andrew jackson historian baen pretty competent in the area from seventeen sixty two eighteen o a andrew jackson came after that and that's not an era of american history i mean i know the broad brushes but but nato four andrew jackson was there just a tennessee slave owner when he died at one hundred and fifty slaves i'm not sure how many had eighty four and he placed an ad in the tennessee that in october of eighteen o four that well actually this is the this is in the air that i'm really with them and this was last year of the first term of fared thomas jefferson's presidency was also a slave owner and andrew jackson's add his advertisement had a picture of of of a slave and the headline said stop the rot away and then underneath that said a mole lotto man slave about thirty years old six feet of an inch high style made an active talks sensible stoops in his walk and has a remarkably large foot brought across the toes will pass for a.

andrew jackson tennessee thomas jefferson nato thirty years six feet