39 Burst results for "Democratic"

Fresh update on "democratic" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:55 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "democratic" discussed on Morning Edition

"Ukraine As you can tell by the blue and yellow Ukrainian flag on our House and by her blue shirt with yellow fingernails she came to the United States 9 years ago This is our choice to move We have some concerns about our future for our kids Yeah she first settled in Los Angeles but Los Angeles became so democratic So we wanted something more More conservative Me too Yeah So you feel politically more comfortable here than in Los Angeles Yes What are the issues that bothered you in Los Angeles or that you feel better about I wasn't happy with the freedom sexuality area Gay rights that sort of thing Yeah Those people are fine I don't I don't want to judge them Studies show Americans are geographically segregated by party although it's not clear how many moves specifically for politics People move to this big Republican leading county for many reasons.

Los Angeles Ukraine United States
Biden Uses Buffalo Shooting to Divide and Divert

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:05 min | 19 hrs ago

Biden Uses Buffalo Shooting to Divide and Divert

"I spent a lot of time on the bum who was the president of the United States. He used buffalo to cast hatred upon half this country. He's a hate monger. One of the greatest lies in the history of presidential election campaigns was his statement that he wanted to unify the country. He makes Donald Trump look like a unifier. Yes, however, if you can keep talking about white racism enough, white supremacy, people might forget that they can't get baby formula. Or that gas in California right now is well over $6 a gallon for the first time. Because of the sick fanatics in the environmentalist movement known as the greens. Having dominance in the Democratic Party and

Buffalo Donald Trump United States California Democratic Party
Fresh update on "democratic" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

01:58 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "democratic" discussed on Morning Edition

"Esther Harding moved here to foresight from gwinnett the blue county we heard from yesterday And why did you move here Because for scientists a great county to live in it's not as democratic rule as grenades Why is that important to you That's super important to us because you know we have values in gwinnett you don't get those Which values are we talking about Illegal immigration abortion what the kids being taught in school Harding is an immigrant one of many in this metro area and one of several we met who object to illegal immigration Is the worst thing we pay thousands of dollars for me to become a legal citizen And why do they have the right to come in here and get it all for free Why Where are you from originally Germany She lived in gwinnett county until around the time it flipped to the Democrats and came to this county a year and a half ago How do you feel about the direction of Georgia right now Just praying that Stacey Abrams won't take over She's the democratic candidate for governor Republican governor Brian Kemp is in a primary fight right now What do you think of governor Kemp I mean he might be our only option when it comes down to it right Doesn't sound like you like him very much either Well not nuts since the last election She dislikes governor Kemp's affirmation that Joe Biden won Georgia in 2020 So when Trump says the election is stolen was stolen you believe that It's not Trump's words It was stolen In our interviews some voters from both parties told us they respected Kemp for stating the facts about the election but Esther Harding believes otherwise Thank you Thank you Harding is one of many people moving to these new neighborhoods in northern Forsyth county So many have come that the legislature just added a new state House district here Harding's next door neighbor has also come in the last few years and also moved for political reasons Natalia cosign is originally from Ukraine As you can tell by the blue and yellow Ukrainian flag on our House and by her blue shirt with yellow fingernails she came to the United States 9 years ago.

Esther Harding Blue County Gwinnett Governor Kemp Harding Stacey Abrams Brian Kemp Gwinnett County Georgia Donald Trump Germany Joe Biden Kemp Forsyth County Natalia Cosign Legislature Ukraine United States
Sunny Hostin: Democrats Moved Centered; Republicans Moved to Extremism

The Dan Bongino Show

01:35 min | 21 hrs ago

Sunny Hostin: Democrats Moved Centered; Republicans Moved to Extremism

"So this is what sunny said Again I want to play this again She's an obvious leftist I had some conversations with our back in the day when I was doing some commentary at CNN and she used to portray herself as kind of like a mainstream Democrat She's really now like most of them because Trump broke all of them A radical leftist And he or she makes the ridiculous point that it's Democrats that have moved more towards the center and Republicans should become more radical Now keep in mind she has zero evidence facts or data to back this up unlike us we've got a whole bunch of it She has zero evidence to back that up because conservatives have not moved We believe in economic freedom school choice regulatory reform pro life pro Second Amendment pro Bill of rights pro constitution pro public safety Law & Order and national security None of that has changed None of it So how we've moved is impossible given that we haven't moved It's the same positions we've held for decade But here's sunny hostin say and you're all crazy and the left are now the party of the centered centrists Check this out They are playing to the base I mean if you look at all the studies the Republican Party has moved further to the right than Democrats have to the left There's a Pew Research Center analysis that finds it on average Democrats and Republicans are farther apart ideologically today than at any time in the past 50 years and that ideological divide breaks down to the Republican Party being an extremist party and the Democratic Party actually as you just mentioned Sarah moving more to the center That's a good one there Sonny

Donald Trump CNN Republican Party Pew Research Center Democratic Party Sarah Sonny
Fresh update on "democratic" discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

00:58 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "democratic" discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Hey folks, welcome back. I am still talking to Nick. Giordano, who is a poli sci professor at Suffolk community college. It really is wonderful to know that your politics professor at Suffolk community college and that people can get this in an academic environment what you're talking about, because this is basic American principles, philosophy. It's basic stuff. Some people say, oh, it's conservative. No, not really. It's kind of fundamental. It is. And I think that's probably the biggest problem that we're seeing. So it used to be Republicans Democrats had disagreements on policy issues, but we always agreed on the founding of the country and the founding fathers and we valued the constitution, that's all gone. I mean, now when you look at it, the left just despises the founding of this country. They believe it's an evil country. It's a racist country. I mean, they are treating today's generation as like the most racist and bigoted generation to exist. Meanwhile, they're the most open intolerant generation to exist. And so what they're doing is if you destroy the idea of the United States, then it's easy to change the United States. And that's what they're looking to do. Well, that's exactly right. And it seems, I mean, I say this all the time. But there are a lot of people who still live in this weird world where they think it's the Democratic Party of Paul tsongas or Richard Gephardt or Sam nunn or I don't know what they think, but the Democratic Party has just lurched so dramatically left. It may as well be the party of Stalin and Lenin. It is no longer a genuine.

Suffolk Community College Giordano Nick United States Paul Tsongas Richard Gephardt Democratic Party Sam Nunn Stalin Lenin
Democrats Love Replacement Theory for Electoral Gain

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:58 min | 1 d ago

Democrats Love Replacement Theory for Electoral Gain

"So what do we say about all of these Democrats who for years have done exactly that? It seems harder and harder to ignore that the echoes of replacement theory and other racially motivated views are increasingly coming out into the open. In a few years, we're going to be a majority Brown country. White people will not be the majority in the country anymore. This will be the first generation ever in American history in which whites will be a minority of the generation at some point. As of 2007, every year, babies being born in this country whites now with a minority. In 2044, everyone is going to be a minority. As the demographics change, as white people become the minority in the country, which is coming. Demographics is destiny. Demographics is destiny. Demographics is destiny, right? The country is changing. I've been saying it here. Other people have been saying it here for years now. Even before Donald Trump, the demographics is destiny. The white population is declining for the first time in history in America, while the number of multiracial Americans have more than doubled. So we live in a country where the demographics are changing. It's becoming less white. Correct. Okay. You'll be announcing that we're calling the 38 electoral votes of Texas for the democratic nominee for president. It's changing. It's going to become a purple state and then a blue state because of the demographics because of the population growth. The growth in Texas has been almost entirely driven by non white population growth mostly by Hispanic and Latino population growth. The idea that whites will not be the majority, I mean, it's an exciting transformation of the country. It's an exciting evolution and progress of our country in many different ways. The white population is declining. It was always on the upswing. So that speaks to the beautiful diversity of America.

Donald Trump Texas America
Fresh update on "democratic" discussed on The Officer Tatum Show

The Officer Tatum Show

00:40 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "democratic" discussed on The Officer Tatum Show

"Guest is off the chain. I know y'all been wanting to hear from him. I told you earlier in the show, I hope you got your seatbelt on. We're going to have a really good time. My next guess is the expert and communicate in American exceptionalism to the common man by making political politics personal. He's a Christian conservative, an American that happens to be black, wasn't always a conservative like myself, the man that needs no introduction at all, welcome to the show called Jackson. Hey, Danny. Pleasure to be on. Your Carl, I mean, it's so good to hear from you, man. I can't say nothing but great things about you, I watched the show right before I started and you were so graceful and welcome to me with open arms to the show and I'll tell you what man I really appreciated every single person that I talked to about you that listened to the show said you are such an amazing man and I'm glad to have you here and I wanted to talk to you about the condition of America and what does it mean moving forward for black people in America. Yeah, honestly, man, I got to tell you, America is in a place Brandon where I've written about this stuff and I've talked about it for over ten years and you write about this stuff you talk about it and I know you can imagine this too, but I don't think you can you never get to a point or at least I did where I didn't think that I'd see every scene that I spoke about in other spoke about coming to fruition, especially this quickly. I mean, not just for the black community but for Americans in general, we are in Dire Straits and I know we say this every election cycle, but I mean, from the bottom of my heart, I believe this is true that if we don't win this election cycle and if we don't win 2024 and I'm not just talking about with the Republican brand, I'm talking about with people that are going to go to Washington, D.C., people that are going to go to the state legislatures and straight up fight against evil if we don't win with those type of people. I think this country is pretty much finished. Ladies and gentlemen, you listen to Carl Jackson live with me and I think that Carl, you are on the right track. I mean, I feel the exact same way that you feel about the dire need for us to perform in the midterms because it is over if we do not, because they will lock in their cronies, they're going to get these left wing lunatics in there. They're going to be voting for abortion on demand. They're going to try to put conservatives who stand up for truth to put them away forever. I believe that they are on the path of doing that. But I want to know from you, what do you think the solution is? Because we can talk about the problem we all know what the problems are, but I think people like yourself call that's been in this for a very long time that you know what's going on. You have the post of the people. What is a solution to this problem from your perspective? All right. So I think there's three that are real easy. That's highest constitution capitalism at four courage. So four cities, Christ, consultation, capitalism, courage. I don't think we have to reinvent the wheel. I think we just have to continue to stand up for what we believe. Is there anything you've done it? I mean, you've created black faith with candidates on. You guys have had amazing success as a result of that. You see young black people that are willing to turn away from the Democratic Party and so I just think we need more of that. I just think that we need to continue to speak between I don't think we have to reinvent the wheel. I don't think we have to do anything amazingly special. We just have to stand up for what we believe. And we have to press forward. I think oftentimes conservatives, we just, we shrink back, we're nice. We're you know what? There's a time and a place for that. Especially, you know, you're a Christian. I'm a Christian. We want to we want to obey the lord. We want to do right by people. But I think sometimes people get this impression that Christians have to be weak. And we're not supposed to be weak. I mean, we're supposed to be meek, but we're not supposed to be weak. And I think God has put us on this earth for such a time as this. And I think we're called to fight. I mean, when I think about America, I think about the blessings of America. I know America has its same path, but you know what? The rest of the world. I mean, slavery was universal. All that stuff. I mean, you know the deal. But honestly, we don't have to reinvent the wheel. We just have to fight for what we believe in. And it's conservatives, we go to work, we put our hands and we put our heads down, and we just do the day to day. But now it's time to say, no, push back. This chick that was in the disinformation government, governance board. How conservatives, I know this isn't going to sound nice, but I was happy that conservatives started to mock her. I think that we need to be willing to mock people that aren't serious. And I'm just speaking straight up when it comes to black leftists and black liberals that do more damage to the black community than good, then I'm sorry. You push back against them. You're going to get called names. You know this. You're going to get called names. You're going to get caught everything but you know what? There's no affirmative action plan in heaven. That doesn't exist. God is going to judge every single person individually. And I think he put us in America at this time for such a time as this. And we just got to fight. So Christ put God first constitution and it's the best document ever written or by man, I believe that it's defined in nature. Capitalism. I think capitalism is the best system. I mean, you can go through massive 25 in the Bible. We're going to have to give an account for the talent that God has given us. So we can't count on big government. We can't count on any of that stuff. I think that black people, I hate the fact that black people are the Democrat party has the black population. The vast majority of black the black population are voters anyway. Just submissive to the Democrat party to big government. And I'm like, no, man, it's small government. It's big God. Black people don't have to be oppressed, black people aren't lesser than anybody else. We were just as capable of learning and thriving and doing anything like anybody else. So I got to tell you, just being straight up, the people they call me a sellout, I'm like, no, you're the seller. I'm the one that share in the gospel with people I'm the one like you are doing the same thing, Brandon. I'm the one. They're saying, listen, wait a minute. God created you just like he created everybody else. You're going to be responsible to him. What kids did he give you and use those kiss? It's simple. It's simple. So I don't think we have to reinvent the wheel. Just do Christ constitution.

America Washington, D.C. Carl Jackson Carl Danny Brandon Jackson Democratic Party Democrat Party
Big winners and losers from Tuesday’s primaries

AP News Radio

00:59 min | 2 d ago

Big winners and losers from Tuesday’s primaries

"Pennsylvania's Pennsylvania's Pennsylvania's Pennsylvania's Republican Republican Republican Republican Senate Senate Senate Senate primary primary primary primary between between between between former former former former president president president president trump's trump's trump's trump's pick pick pick pick Dr Dr Dr Dr Mehmet Mehmet Mehmet Mehmet oz oz oz oz and and and and David David David David McCormick McCormick McCormick McCormick too too too too close close close close to to to to call call call call but but but but results results results results are are are are in in in in for for for for other other other other races races races races in in in in the the the the five five five five states states states states voting voting voting voting yesterday yesterday yesterday yesterday staying staying staying staying in in in in Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Pennsylvania John John John John Fetterman Fetterman Fetterman Fetterman won won won won the the the the democratic democratic democratic democratic Senate Senate Senate Senate primary primary primary primary after after after after having having having having a a a a stroke stroke stroke stroke trump trump trump trump picked picked picked picked Doug Doug Doug Doug must must must must Riana Riana Riana Riana won won won won the the the the Republican Republican Republican Republican governor's governor's governor's governor's primary primary primary primary he he he he protested protested protested protested outside outside outside outside the the the the capitol capitol capitol capitol January January January January six six six six in in in in North North North North Carolina Carolina Carolina Carolina his his his his pick pick pick pick for for for for Congress Congress Congress Congress incumbent incumbent incumbent incumbent Madison Madison Madison Madison Cawthorne Cawthorne Cawthorne Cawthorne lost lost lost lost to to to to Chuck Chuck Chuck Chuck Edwards Edwards Edwards Edwards but but but but trump trump trump trump Senate Senate Senate Senate pick pick pick pick Ted Ted Ted Ted Budd Budd Budd Budd one one one one he'll he'll he'll he'll face face face face Democrat Democrat Democrat Democrat Cheri Cheri Cheri Cheri Beasley Beasley Beasley Beasley I I I I know know know know governor governor governor governor Brad Brad Brad Brad little little little little one one one one the the the the GOP GOP GOP GOP gubernatorial gubernatorial gubernatorial gubernatorial primary primary primary primary beating beating beating beating trump trump trump trump backed backed backed backed challenger challenger challenger challenger and and and and lieutenant lieutenant lieutenant lieutenant governor governor governor governor Janice Janice Janice Janice McGee McGee McGee McGee and and and and in in in in Kentucky Kentucky Kentucky Kentucky Republican Republican Republican Republican senator senator senator senator rand rand rand rand Paul Paul Paul Paul will will will will face face face face off off off off against against against against Democrat Democrat Democrat Democrat Charles Charles Charles Charles Booker Booker Booker Booker in in in in the the the the mid mid mid mid terms terms terms terms and and and and did did did did one one one one of of of of the the the the nation's nation's nation's nation's most most most most expensive expensive expensive expensive democratic democratic democratic democratic congressional congressional congressional congressional primaries primaries primaries primaries in in in in Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon that that that that crypto crypto crypto crypto billionaire billionaire billionaire billionaire backed backed backed backed newcomer newcomer newcomer newcomer conceded conceded conceded conceded to to to to a a a a long long long long time time time time lawmaker lawmaker lawmaker lawmaker I'm I'm I'm I'm Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker Walker

Pennsylvania Senate Senate Senate Dr Dr Dr Dr Mehmet Mehmet Mehm David David David David Mccorm John John John John Fetterman Congress Stroke Stroke Stroke Stroke Doug Doug Doug Doug Riana Riana Riana Riana GOP Capitol Capitol Capitol Capito Carolina North North North North Caroli Madison Madison Madison Madiso Chuck Chuck Chuck Chuck Edward Edwards Edwards Senate Senate Senate Ted Ted Ted Ted Budd Budd Budd Cheri Cheri Cheri Cheri Beasle
Edwards ousts Cawthorn, Budd Trumps rivals in GOP primary

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 d ago

Edwards ousts Cawthorn, Budd Trumps rivals in GOP primary

"Madison Madison Madison Madison Cawthorne Cawthorne Cawthorne Cawthorne fumbles fumbles fumbles fumbles the the the the bag bag bag bag in in in in his his his his North North North North Carolina Carolina Carolina Carolina primary primary primary primary well well well well another another another another trump trump trump trump endorsed endorsed endorsed endorsed candidate candidate candidate candidate wins wins wins wins a a a a Senate Senate Senate Senate nomination nomination nomination nomination in in in in north north north north Carolina's Carolina's Carolina's Carolina's crowded crowded crowded crowded Senate Senate Senate Senate race race race race trump trump trump trump backed backed backed backed US US US US congressman congressman congressman congressman Ted Ted Ted Ted Budd Budd Budd Budd won won won won the the the the Republican Republican Republican Republican primary primary primary primary to to to to certify certify certify certify the the the first first first and and and I I I am am am honored honored honored to to to be be be your your your Republican Republican Republican nominee nominee nominee you'll you'll you'll be be be running running running against against against a a a black black black former former former state state state Supreme Supreme Supreme Court Court Court Chief Chief Chief Justice Justice Justice sherry sherry sherry Beasley Beasley Beasley to to to bring bring bring North North North Carolina Carolina Carolina values values values back back back into into into the the the Senate Senate Senate first first first time time time congressman congressman congressman medicine medicine medicine Cawthorne Cawthorne Cawthorne lost lost lost his his his race race race in in in the the the GOP GOP GOP primary primary primary for for for north north north Carolina's Carolina's Carolina's eleventh eleventh eleventh district district district to to to state state state senator senator senator Chuck Chuck Chuck Edwards Edwards Edwards authority authority authority lost lost lost the the the support support support of of of state state state Republican Republican Republican leaders leaders leaders after after after a a a series series series of of of publicly publicly publicly disclose disclose disclose personal personal personal and and and political political political blunders blunders blunders in in in November November November Edwards Edwards Edwards will will will take take take on on on the the the Democratic Democratic Democratic Front Front Front runner runner runner jasmine jasmine jasmine beach beach beach Ferrara Ferrara Ferrara she's she's she's a a a county county county commissioner commissioner commissioner an an an ordained ordained ordained minister minister minister and and and an an an L. L. L. G. G. G. B. B. B. T. T. T. Q. Q. Q. plus plus plus activist activist activist I'm I'm I'm Jennifer Jennifer Jennifer king king king

Carolina Senate Senate Senate Senate Madison Madison Madison Madiso Cawthorne Cawthorne North North North North Caroli Congressman Congressman Congre Supreme Supreme Supreme Court United States Chief Chief Chief Justice Just North North North Carolina GOP Cawthorne Cawthorne Cawthorne Senator Senator Senator Chuck Edwards Edwards Edwards Edwards Edwards Jasmine Beach Beach Beach Ferrara Ferrara Ferrara
Understanding the But-For Principle of Election Fraud

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:16 min | 2 d ago

Understanding the But-For Principle of Election Fraud

"Generally in discussing the subject of order fraud. Courts adopt a principle that is called the butt for principle. And the butt four principles simply says, but for this fraud, would the election outcome have been different. That becomes a critical question. So for example, if the fraud is minor and wouldn't have made a difference, even if it could be proved, courts are likely to say, well, it's moot. It doesn't really matter. Even if this were true, it would not have changed the outcome of the election. But this is not what we're dealing with in 2000 meals because the claim is advanced in the movie with a lot of supporting evidence that we are talking about and enormous magnitude of a fraud. So the question is, when that's the case, when you can meet the butt force standard. Canon election result be overturned? Well, as it turns out, the answer to that question is obviously yes. In 2018, an election was overturned. In North Carolina. Now, interestingly in that case, which by the way is mentioned in the movie, the fraud was on behalf of a Republican candidate. It was done by a democratic operative, the fraud was actually organized by a guy named McRae Dallas, a guy recently died, the late mcgray Dallas. And this is a guy who worked for kind of a black left wing group called the bladen improvement association, and he learned all his tactics of ballot trafficking and being guys and are doing all kinds of shenanigans. He learned it from the Democrats, but then he had a fight with them, he broke with them, they refused to hire him, something like that, so he took his services to a Republican candidate Mark Harris. And that then resulted in Harris winning the election narrowly, but when there was an investigation that were admissions that came out of that and the election result was overturned. Overturned by the way, not by a court, but by the elections board. And then there was a new election, Harris decided not to run again. Another guy named Dan bishop ran on the Republican ticket. He won the election, and so that's what happened. But the reason I mention all this is because it simply doesn't follow that we are stuck with a kind of fade accomplish a done deal that somehow because it's happened, nothing can be done. It's not

Mcrae Dallas Bladen Improvement Association North Carolina Mark Harris Dallas Harris Dan Bishop
J.D. Vance Shares His Feelings Post-Ohio GOP Senate Primary Victory

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:01 min | 3 d ago

J.D. Vance Shares His Feelings Post-Ohio GOP Senate Primary Victory

"Is JD Vance, the U.S. Senate nominee candidate for the great state of Ohio running against Tim Ryan. JD, welcome back to the program. Thanks, Charlie. Thanks for having me. And congratulations, I actually have a chance to tell you that yet. So first just your reaction from your race, you won the shocking victory. I think almost two weeks ago, how are you processing things? How's your race standing now that you're in the general? That's good. I mean, look, the Biden administration has been a disaster in Tim Ryan, my democratic opponent has voted with the Biden administration a 100% of the time. So we feel good about the general. Still got to put in the work. I think the Republican primary the way that I think about it is that it was a referendum on what kind of party do we want to be? Do we want to be a nationalist America first policy? Or do we want a party? Or do we want to go back to the ways of starting stupid wards that we have no reason to be in and shipping our manufacturing base off to China and other countries in the world. So I'm glad that the voters of Ohio rejected the old establishment ways. And I'm excited to take the America first message into the general election. And like I said, I feel pretty good

Biden Administration Tim Ryan Jd Vance U.S. Senate Ohio Charlie America China
Rick Klein's Analysis of the Senate Midterm Elections

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:25 min | 3 d ago

Rick Klein's Analysis of the Senate Midterm Elections

"And they know that the midterm election is coming. Here was ABC's Rick Klein talking to George Stephanopoulos yesterday on ABC's this week. Yeah, George, you know that they were in a tough spot when it comes to holding the House and Senate. But when you look at the Senate, it's a 50 50 Senate. It means Republicans only need to take one seat. But what's interesting is that not all the seats are up. Of course, only 35 Senate seats on the ballot and in that group that's 21 that are now held by Republicans 14 by Democrats. That means that Republicans have to play a lot more defense than they do the opportunities for offense. And when you zoom in a bit on the states that are likely to determine control of the Senate, these are the 9 states that are probably going to tell us who's going to be the majority and who's going to be in the minority. And 5 of them are controlled by Republicans only four by Democrats. That means if you're the Republicans, you've got to not only hold your seats, but then go on offense somewhere. That means picking up maybe an Arizona or a Georgia. Both states, of course, that went to the Democrats in 2020. Or you have to move into deeper blue territory and Nevada or a New Hampshire. That all assumes that the Democrats don't find any places of their own to pick up. And there's a couple of states that were carried by President Biden or were very close last time. They were targeting, including Pennsylvania, the primary on Tuesday, a spirited democratic fight, and an opportunity that Democrats see to win even in a very tough election cycle.

Senate Rick Klein ABC George Stephanopoulos George Republicans House President Biden Arizona Georgia New Hampshire Nevada Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania Senate candidate Fetterman says he had a stroke

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 4 d ago

Pennsylvania Senate candidate Fetterman says he had a stroke

"A a a a prominent prominent prominent prominent democratic democratic democratic democratic candidate candidate candidate candidate running running running running for for for for the the the the U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. Senate Senate Senate Senate seat seat seat seat in in in in Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Pennsylvania has has has has suffered suffered suffered suffered a a a a stroke stroke stroke stroke I'm I'm I'm I'm Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas with with with with details details details details his his his his campaign campaign campaign campaign says says says says lieutenant lieutenant lieutenant lieutenant governor governor governor governor John John John John Fetterman Fetterman Fetterman Fetterman is is is is on on on on his his his his way way way way to to to to a a a a full full full full recovery recovery recovery recovery he he he he went went went went to to to to the the the the hospital hospital hospital hospital Friday Friday Friday Friday because because because because he he he he was was was was feeling feeling feeling feeling on on on on well well well well but but but but in in in in a a a a statement statement statement statement Fetterman Fetterman Fetterman Fetterman says says says says he's he's he's he's now now now now feeling feeling feeling feeling much much much much better better better better doctors doctors doctors doctors have have have have told told told told him him him him he he he he didn't didn't didn't didn't suffer suffer suffer suffer any any any any cognitive cognitive cognitive cognitive damage damage damage damage from from from from the the the the stroke stroke stroke stroke veteran veteran veteran veteran Nancy Nancy Nancy Nancy will will will will stay stay stay stay in in in in the the the the race race race race and and and and his his his his Senate Senate Senate Senate campaign campaign campaign campaign isn't isn't isn't isn't slowing slowing slowing slowing down down down down one one one one bit bit bit bit the the the the six six six six foot foot foot foot eight eight eight eight fifty fifty fifty fifty two two two two year year year year old old old old has has has has been been been been open open open open about about about about his his his his push push push push to to to to lose lose lose lose weight weight weight weight in in in in the the the the past past past past veteran veteran veteran veteran is is is is considered considered considered considered the the the the leading leading leading leading candidate candidate candidate candidate among among among among the the the the four four four four Democrats Democrats Democrats Democrats running running running running in in in in Tuesday's Tuesday's Tuesday's Tuesday's primary primary primary primary I'm I'm I'm I'm Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas

Stroke Stroke Stroke Stroke Pennsylvania U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. Senate Senate Senate Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas John John John John Fetterman Hospital Hospital Hospital Hos Fetterman Fetterman Fetterman Senate Nancy Nancy Nancy Nancy Senate Senate Senate
Show of support for abortion rights expected at US rallies

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 6 d ago

Show of support for abortion rights expected at US rallies

"A a a a major major major major show show show show of of of of support support support support for for for for abortion abortion abortion abortion rights rights rights rights is is is is expected expected expected expected at at at at rallies rallies rallies rallies across across across across the the the the country country country country today today today today from from from from New New New New York York York York to to to to LA LA LA LA organizers organizers organizers organizers say say say say they they they they want want want want to to to to express express express express their their their their outrage outrage outrage outrage over over over over the the the the anticipated anticipated anticipated anticipated Supreme Supreme Supreme Supreme Court Court Court Court decision decision decision decision that that that that would would would would overturn overturn overturn overturn roe roe roe roe versus versus versus versus Wade Wade Wade Wade which which which which would would would would take take take take away away away away a a a a constitutional constitutional constitutional constitutional right right right right to to to to abortion abortion abortion abortion they they they they say say say say they they they they want want want want to to to to mobilize mobilize mobilize mobilize for for for for the the the the fight fight fight fight ahead ahead ahead ahead on on on on Capitol Capitol Capitol Capitol Hill Hill Hill Hill yesterday yesterday yesterday yesterday democratic democratic democratic democratic house house house house speaker speaker speaker speaker Nancy Nancy Nancy Nancy Pelosi Pelosi Pelosi Pelosi led led led led the the the the charge charge charge charge Americans Americans Americans Americans are are are are marching marching marching marching and and and and making making making making their their their their voices voices voices voices heard heard heard heard public public public public sentiment sentiment sentiment sentiment is is is is everything everything everything everything we we we we will will will will never never never never stop stop stop stop fighting fighting fighting fighting for for for for patients patients patients patients and and and and their their their their healthcare healthcare healthcare healthcare providers providers providers providers to to to to defend defend defend defend the the the the rights rights rights rights of of of of women women women women tens tens tens tens of of of of thousands thousands thousands thousands of of of of people people people people are are are are expected expected expected expected at at at at the the the the band's band's band's band's off off off off our our our our bodies bodies bodies bodies events events events events one one one one of of of of the the the the largest largest largest largest will will will will be be be be in in in in DC DC DC DC on on on on March March March March from from from from the the the the Washington Washington Washington Washington monument monument monument monument to to to to the the the the Supreme Supreme Supreme Supreme Court Court Court Court I'm I'm I'm I'm Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker Walker

New New New New York York York Supreme Supreme Supreme Suprem Roe Roe Roe Roe Wade Wade Wade Wade Capitol Capitol Capitol Capito Democratic Democratic Democrat Speaker Speaker Speaker Nancy La La LA Washington Washington Washingt DC Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker
Trump scrambles to fend off Oz challenger in Pa. Senate race

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 6 d ago

Trump scrambles to fend off Oz challenger in Pa. Senate race

"Donald Donald Donald Donald Trump Trump Trump Trump is is is is issuing issuing issuing issuing a a a a warning warning warning warning to to to to Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Pennsylvania voters voters voters voters amid amid amid amid some some some some surprising surprising surprising surprising turns turns turns turns leading leading leading leading up up up up to to to to the the the the may may may may seventeenth seventeenth seventeenth seventeenth primary primary primary primary the the the the former former former former president president president president says says says says only only only only his his his his pick pick pick pick can can can can win win win win the the the the full full full full Senate Senate Senate Senate race race race race against against against against the the the the likely likely likely likely democratic democratic democratic democratic nominee nominee nominee nominee in in in in Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Pennsylvania he he he he went went went went out out out out I I I I would would would would say say say say on on on on a a a a land land land land with with with with Mehmet Mehmet Mehmet Mehmet oz oz oz oz political political political political science science science science professor professor professor professor Chris Chris Chris Chris Borich Borich Borich Borich at at at at Muhlenberg Muhlenberg Muhlenberg Muhlenberg college college college college says says says says the the the the GOP GOP GOP GOP primary primary primary primary had had had had been been been been mostly mostly mostly mostly a a a a costly costly costly costly duel duel duel duel between between between between oz oz oz oz and and and and former former former former hedge hedge hedge hedge fund fund fund fund CEO CEO CEO CEO David David David David McCormick McCormick McCormick McCormick but but but but black black black black conservative conservative conservative conservative and and and and Christian Christian Christian Christian commentator commentator commentator commentator Kathy Kathy Kathy Kathy Burnett Burnett Burnett Burnett has has has has been been been been surging surging surging surging in in in in the the the the polls polls polls polls in in in in a a a a statistical statistical statistical statistical dead dead dead dead heat heat heat heat with with with with McCormick McCormick McCormick McCormick at at at at an an an an office office office office part part part part of of of of that that that that is is is is that that that that over over over over the the the the last last last last three three three three months months months months McCormick McCormick McCormick McCormick in in in in awes awes awes awes have have have have gone gone gone gone after after after after each each each each other other other other and and and and with with with with extensive extensive extensive extensive ad ad ad ad campaigns campaigns campaigns campaigns that that that that are are are are really really really really attacked attacked attacked attacked their their their their weaknesses weaknesses weaknesses weaknesses Barnett Barnett Barnett Barnett has has has has a a a a history history history history of of of of statements statements statements statements hostile hostile hostile hostile to to to to Muslims Muslims Muslims Muslims and and and and the the the the LGBTQ LGBTQ LGBTQ LGBTQ plus plus plus plus community community community community but but but but benefits benefits benefits benefits from from from from an an an an ad ad ad ad campaign campaign campaign campaign from from from from the the the the anti anti anti anti tax tax tax tax club club club club for for for for growth growth growth growth as as as as well well well well as as as as endorsements endorsements endorsements endorsements from from from from Catholic Catholic Catholic Catholic vote vote vote vote in in in in the the the the anti anti anti anti abortion abortion abortion abortion Susan Susan Susan Susan B. B. B. B. Anthony Anthony Anthony Anthony list list list list I'm I'm I'm I'm Jennifer Jennifer Jennifer Jennifer king king king king

Pennsylvania GOP Donald Donald Donald Donald Tr Trump Trump Trump Senate Senate Mccormick Mccormick Mccormick Mehmet Mehmet Mehmet Mehmet Chris Chris Chris Chris Borich Muhlenberg Muhlenberg Muhlenbe Oz Oz Oz Oz Senate Ceo Ceo Ceo Ceo David David Da Kathy Kathy Kathy Kathy Burnet Barnett Barnett Barnett Barnet Catholic Catholic Catholic Cat Susan Susan Susan Susan B. B. Jennifer Jennifer Jennifer Jen
Kari Lake: Arizona Is a Red State, Trump Country

The Dan Bongino Show

01:22 min | Last week

Kari Lake: Arizona Is a Red State, Trump Country

"You're in a really important state A state that was once a reliably red state that rather tragically has kind of turned the shade of purple and some would argue almost blue I mean there are two democratic senators You're running for governor of course But it is a critical state that could determine a presidential election in the very near future What's going on in Arizona that we just lose touch the Republican Party over there No I disagree with you We are a red state I mean we had a very corrupt election And we both saw 2000 mules and we saw just one way Arizona is a red state It's Trump country I don't believe for one second or blue A lot of the people moving in from California are political refugees escaping that zombie apocalypse known as California And so they're coming here for the freedom that we have I think Trump won this election and we are seeing through our forensic audit We're seeing through 2000 mules how they traffic ballots that this election was just dirty and rotten to the core So it's easy to say wow we've turned purple and blue when we just had a nightmare election that was not honest And that's why one of my main issues is restoring faith in our elections and making sure that we get rid of all those loopholes where they can cheat because it was kind of death by a thousand paper cuts how they cheated to feel this election

Arizona Republican Party California Donald Trump
NY to send $35M to abortion providers amid worry over Roe

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last week

NY to send $35M to abortion providers amid worry over Roe

"New new new new York's York's York's York's governor governor governor governor says says says says the the the the state state state state is is is is making making making making thirty thirty thirty thirty five five five five million million million million dollars dollars dollars dollars available available available available to to to to abortion abortion abortion abortion providers providers providers providers for for for for services services services services and and and and security security security security in in in in anticipation anticipation anticipation anticipation of of of of the the the the Supreme Supreme Supreme Supreme Court Court Court Court overturning overturning overturning overturning roe roe roe roe versus versus versus versus Wade Wade Wade Wade democratic democratic democratic democratic governor governor governor governor Kathy Kathy Kathy Kathy ogle ogle ogle ogle says says says says New New New New York York York York must must must must be be be be ready ready ready ready for for for for an an an an influx influx influx influx of of of of women women women women coming coming coming coming here here here here to to to to seek seek seek seek abortions abortions abortions abortions if if if if Scotus Scotus Scotus Scotus moves moves moves moves forward forward forward forward in in in in the the the the federal federal federal federal law law law law granting granting granting granting that that that that right right right right is is is is overturned overturned overturned overturned leaving leaving leaving leaving it it it it up up up up to to to to states states states states to to to to truly truly truly truly ensure ensure ensure ensure that that that that anyone anyone anyone anyone seeking seeking seeking seeking abortion abortion abortion abortion in in in in New New New New York York York York has has has has access access access access to to to to that that that that we we we we have have have have to to to to ensure ensure ensure ensure that that that that the the the the providers providers providers providers have have have have the the the the resources resources resources resources and and and and the the the the capacity capacity capacity capacity to to to to accommodate accommodate accommodate accommodate all all all all patients patients patients patients who who who who walks walks walks walks through through through through their their their their doors doors doors doors twenty twenty twenty twenty five five five five million million million million would would would would come come come come from from from from the the the the department department department department of of of of health health health health fund fund fund fund for for for for abortion abortion abortion abortion services services services services ten ten ten ten million million million million from from from from criminal criminal criminal criminal justice justice justice justice services services services services for for for for clinic clinic clinic clinic security security security security Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker Walker New New New New York York York York

New New New New York York's York Supreme Supreme Supreme Suprem Roe Roe Roe Roe Wade Wade Wade Wade Kathy Kathy Kathy Kathy Ogle O New New New New York York York Federal Federal Federal Federa York Department Department Departme Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker
Political reality: Congress can't save -- or end -- abortion

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last week

Political reality: Congress can't save -- or end -- abortion

"Hi hi hi hi Mike Mike Mike Mike Rossi Rossi Rossi Rossi a a a a reporting reporting reporting reporting the the the the Senate Senate Senate Senate readies readies readies readies for for for for a a a a largely largely largely largely symbolic symbolic symbolic symbolic vote vote vote vote on on on on protecting protecting protecting protecting abortion abortion abortion abortion rights rights rights rights a a a a test test test test vote vote vote vote is is is is scheduled scheduled scheduled scheduled in in in in the the the the Senate Senate Senate Senate today today today today on on on on a a a a democratic democratic democratic democratic bill bill bill bill to to to to protect protect protect protect access access access access to to to to abortions abortions abortions abortions but but but but the the the the vote vote vote vote will will will will be be be be mostly mostly mostly mostly symbolic symbolic symbolic symbolic and and and and it it it it is is is is expected expected expected expected to to to to fail fail fail fail the the the the house house house house passed passed passed passed the the the the women's women's women's women's health health health health protection protection protection protection act act act act last last last last year year year year but but but but it's it's it's it's been been been been held held held held up up up up in in in in the the the the Senate Senate Senate Senate by by by by a a a a Republican Republican Republican Republican filibuster filibuster filibuster filibuster yesterday yesterday yesterday yesterday democratic democratic democratic democratic senator senator senator senator Jacky Jacky Jacky Jacky Rosen Rosen Rosen Rosen of of of of Nevada Nevada Nevada Nevada noted noted noted noted the the the the urgency urgency urgency urgency of of of of the the the the moment moment moment moment or or or or not not not not living living living living in in in in a a a a hypothetical hypothetical hypothetical hypothetical we we we are are are staring staring staring down down down a a a post post post ROH ROH ROH world world world in in in the the the face face face in in in the the the wake wake wake of of of last last last week's week's week's leak leak leak of of of a a a Supreme Supreme Supreme Court Court Court draft draft draft that that that indicated indicated indicated the the the landmark landmark landmark roe roe roe V. V. V. Wade Wade Wade decision decision decision might might might be be be overturned overturned overturned later later later this this this year year year today's today's today's Senate Senate Senate vote vote vote is is is largely largely largely about about about putting putting putting members members members on on on record record record Mike Mike Mike Crossey Crossey Crossey at at at Washington Washington Washington

Senate Senate Senate Mike Mike Mike Mike Rossi Ross Bill Bill Bill House House House House Nevada Women's Women's Women's Women' Senator Senator Senator Jacky Rosen Rosen Roh Roh Roh Supreme Supreme Supreme Court Rosen Roe Roe V. V. V. Wade Wade Wad Senate Senate Senate Mike Mike Crossey Mike Washington
Even Lefties Are Concerned About Rising Energy Costs

The Larry Elder Show

00:43 sec | Last week

Even Lefties Are Concerned About Rising Energy Costs

"Even lefties that are concerned about climate change that are like, ah, melting, I'm melting, I'm melting. Well, you know what? Even the fear of melting melting melting. Is coming in second place to the price of gas and oil. A majority of voters are concerned about rising energy costs in favor increase drilling for oil and gas, huh? What do you say? Who is it that X the Keystone XL pipeline? Would that be a Joe Biden and the Democrat party? Huh? Pretty amazing. Are the most democratic voters do consider reducing climate change a higher priority, but the problem is they're putting they're putting gas in their vehicles and they're like, oh, snap, this is crazy. This is crazy. This is just getting out of hand.

Joe Biden Democrat Party
Chicago's Lori Lightfoot Urges 'Call to Arms' Against Supreme Court

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:24 min | Last week

Chicago's Lori Lightfoot Urges 'Call to Arms' Against Supreme Court

"We're going to lead the show today with Lori Lightfoot. Because it's just, it's just shocking. What's going on? Regarding some of these hysterical left wing reactions to the leaked scotus opinion by justice Alito. Chicago mayor Lori Lightfoot, I'm reading from the post millennial issues call to arms over U.S. Supreme Court. Lightfoot tweeted Monday night to my friends in the LGBTQ+ community. The Supreme Court is coming for us next this moment has to be a call to arms. She followed that up with. We will not surrender our rights without a fight, a fight to victory. Now, what makes this particularly appalling is if you contrast mayor lightfoot's tweets with that of her tweets around January 6th, 2021. During which she tweeted, I am in disbelief with what is unfolding in D.C. right now. President Trump and his enablers incited this violence, shame on every elected official in Congress and elsewhere who fomented this anti democratic insurrection by extremists. This is not democracy. This is a disgrace. So what's good for the goose should be good for the Gander here, miss

Lori Lightfoot Justice Alito Supreme Court Mayor Lightfoot Lightfoot President Trump Chicago D.C. Congress
NY to direct $35M to abortion providers if Roe overturned

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | Last week

NY to direct $35M to abortion providers if Roe overturned

"New New New New York York York York will will will will make make make make thirty thirty thirty thirty five five five five million million million million dollars dollars dollars dollars available available available available to to to to abortion abortion abortion abortion providers providers providers providers for for for for services services services services and and and and security security security security at at at at the the the the Supreme Supreme Supreme Supreme Court Court Court Court overturns overturns overturns overturns roe roe roe roe versus versus versus versus Wade Wade Wade Wade democratic democratic democratic democratic governor governor governor governor Kathy Kathy Kathy Kathy ogle ogle ogle ogle says says says says she'll she'll she'll she'll use use use use an an an an emergency emergency emergency emergency department department department department of of of of health health health health fund fund fund fund to to to to provide provide provide provide grants grants grants grants and and and and reimbursements reimbursements reimbursements reimbursements to to to to abortion abortion abortion abortion providers providers providers providers including including including including twenty twenty twenty twenty five five five five million million million million for for for for increasing increasing increasing increasing access access access access to to to to services services services services and and and and ten ten ten ten million million million million for for for for security security security security upgrades upgrades upgrades upgrades if if if if we're we're we're we're going going going going to to to to guarantee guarantee guarantee guarantee the the the the right right right right to to to to abortion abortion abortion abortion you you you you have have have have to to to to guarantee guarantee guarantee guarantee access access access access to to to to abortion abortion abortion abortion and and and and I I I I said said said said last last last last week week week week we're we're we're we're not not not not just just just just playing playing playing playing defense defense defense defense we're we're we're we're playing playing playing playing offense offense offense offense Google Google Google Google is is is is also also also also backing backing backing backing a a a a proposed proposed proposed proposed state state state state constitutional constitutional constitutional constitutional amendment amendment amendment amendment to to to to guarantee guarantee guarantee guarantee abortion abortion abortion abortion rights rights rights rights a a a a leaked leaked leaked leaked Supreme Supreme Supreme Supreme Court Court Court Court draft draft draft draft opinion opinion opinion opinion that that that that would would would would throw throw throw throw out out out out row row row row and and and and overturn overturn overturn overturn abortion abortion abortion abortion rights rights rights rights has has has has democratic democratic democratic democratic run run run run states states states states scrambling scrambling scrambling scrambling to to to to beef beef beef beef up up up up services services services services Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker Walker New New New New York York York York

Supreme Supreme Supreme Suprem New New New New York York York Roe Roe Roe Roe Wade Wade Wade Wade Kathy Kathy Kathy Kathy Ogle Ogle Ogle Department Department Departme Google Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker
Media Can't Cover up Biden's Failures, Only Protecting Liberalism

The Dan Bongino Show

01:40 min | Last week

Media Can't Cover up Biden's Failures, Only Protecting Liberalism

"And I think they decided at that point that it was better for them long term to get rid of dinkins and to at least try to semi cover what was happening in New York City Then to just destroy the whole Democratic Party by pretending and lying to people in front of their face like no your car wasn't stolen your kid wasn't murdered you were all lying I don't mean to keep bringing that point up I do it often in my podcast and radio show but I bring it up because we may be getting at the point now where the liberal media in an effort to save liberalism Keep in mind this has nothing to do with honesty or if that is Ryan lizza or whoever may whatever lefty leaning journalists They're not asking these questions because all of a sudden they want to be honest and candid That's not what they're doing They're doing it because they realize they have to save liberalism and Joe Biden's become a liability for them I need you to understand the difference It's critical So here here's another question where they're basically like hey man I'm going to give you a chance to answer this but the Republicans basically saying you're really awful you know you're in charge fix it You got something to say These are questions you would have never heard before things start to get really bad Check this out You called out Rick Scott a little while ago in your remarks Earlier than he anticipating your remarks he said and I'm just quoting here that the best thing most effective thing Joe Biden can do to solve the inflation crisis He created his resigning He's the problem Senator The senator at it later Joe Biden is unwell He's unfit for office He's been coherent and capacitated and confused These are his worst Offering him his chance to respond I think the man has a problem Yeah he does Oh Rick Scott Yeah you do have a problem

Ryan Lizza Dinkins Joe Biden Democratic Party New York City Rick Scott
"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"Hello everyone, and welcome to the power three point. Oh podcast looking at authoritarian resurgence and democratic resilience in an era of globalisation. Power Three Point Oh is brought to you by the International Forum for Democratic Studies, the Ideas Center of the National Endowment for Democracy. I'm your host Christopher Walker Vice President for Studies and analysis at the endowment and I'm your co host shanty colossal, senior director Nets International Forum for Democratic Studies. Since the end of the Cold War democracies have operated under certain assumptions regarding China's rise. One crucial assumption was that by integrating China into the global economy and the international system, China would gradually undergo meaningful political reform. But things haven't turned out the way so many observers expected. Instead of reforming in liberalizing the Chinese communist party has deepened authoritarianism and in an era of globalization is turning its authoritarian practices and values outward over time Beijing has refined scaled up its instruments of influence and with them the ability to manipulate the political landscape of countries beyond its borders. To discuss these global influence ambitions were pleased to welcome to the power three point.

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

08:47 min | 2 years ago

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"So Jamie let me just kick things off by asking you for listeners who are unfamiliar to tell us a little bit about our fiero and your mission, and the types of stories are currently pursuing so our theoretical was originally two separate institutions Radio Free Europe, which broadcast during the Cold War to the Soviet satellite states. and Radio Liberty which broadcast to the Soviet Union both were headquartered in Munich for most of the Cold War period and eventually were joined together into one entity and the mission of our IFFY. Our L. is to really provide a local surrogate journalism to public that otherwise don't have that option. We operate in twenty two countries across your Asia currently. Currently twenty six languages through which we cover news and information republics that only have the alternative of state sponsored media. This is a service that we've played for the last seventy years, and even though we're facing different challenges now with different types of pressures on media, as was mentioned earlier, we still believe that the mission that we provide on a daily basis of objective. Information, journalists, providing that coverage in local languages is more important than ever. And, so when you use the term surrogate, you're essentially saying that your journalists are able to act as surrogates for those in the region that are unable to report freely local political and other events. We cover stories that either would not be covered by state. Run media because they run counter to the messaging that a particular government is trying to put out or when there are independent media options in the countries were operating in often those independent media outlets are under such pressure that they have to self censor. They can't cover certain hot button political issues. They can't do long form investigations into sensitive political topics that might might touch on corruption for instance, these are all issues that because we are independent because quite frankly were supported by the US Congress which are primary funder. Allows us the freedom to operate and to tackle issues that otherwise would be off limits, and you know our audience I think appreciates that in pretty much every market that that we're engaged in. And Jamie you alluded to some of the challenges. That emerged in the most recent past for media independence. These are challenges that have been underway for quite some time. What do you see in the current environment as the biggest threat independent journalism? And how are you and your colleagues responding to them? So one of the things that you mentioned earlier are the changing forces in the media landscape, and that has been underway for quite some time even prior to cove it. obviously there's always an issue when you have state run media, which is willing to devote significant resources in a particular market. But in countries where there has been independent press in recent decades. more recent trend is media consolidation partly because of the same market forces that have taken hold in the united. States with local media increasingly you know floundering and not able to five economically we've seen similar trends in parts of our coverage area, including here in central Europe and that media consolidation has created opportunities for political forces to exploit the dwindling number of media outlets. Sometimes you see oligarchy who have a friendly relationship with government by up one of the few remaining independent media outlets and change the editorial line UC outside forces whether the Russian Chinese, perhaps make investments in the media local media landscape. With the interest in either changing the editorial line completely or sometimes taking them away from doing hard news, so that's been around for a while. Even pre corona virus I think the thing that concerns me just in recent weeks. We've started to see that Ron virus's bringing its own economic pressures onto local media, and again I think some of this is happening in the US. We've seen layoffs. In many newsrooms of local news outlets in the United States with advertising dollars drying up just in the last several weeks alone our senses. That's going to continue this trend. Trend of a smaller and smaller number of media options for the consumer, and that's going to be a challenge across Eurasia. Just like it has been in the United States in parts of Western Europe the problem. Is that unless you have outlets like a radio free, Europe Radio Liberty the BBC other Western funded options for people you know. Ultimately the consumers are the ones who lose out on this when they don't have that choice, and ultimately there are certain issues that are not going to be covered by the remaining media outlets that can survive economically. And a part of this equation, certainly over the last several years has been that one of the media information options that's becoming more widespread has been Russian state media is not only dominates within the Russian language space, but also since the annexation of Crimea. Has Been More active throughout Europe even farther afield in places like Latin America. How do you see Russia's engagement in the media space from our EFI OUR ELLS perspective? Yeah, obviously, it's a concerning trend and like you said this has been development. That's been underway for quite some time. Sometimes, the influence is on the covert side, and it's through friendly local oligarchs who may have a Pro Moscow perspective. buying up media, outlets or influencing the editorial line of local media, and then obviously there are Russian outlets like rt, and and most of the markets where we operate the more likely competitor of ours would be split Nick. who are very active, they have a lot of money i. always like to say that the Authoritarians are unfortunately outspending not just the United States, but pretty much every western democracy that funds independent media and they move into markets and They often come in and buy up a lot of the media landscape. Just set up shop and you know hire a small handful of journalists. They'll sometimes come in and really provide given the broad economic trends, the only viable outlet for journalists who are looking for work. They'll hire journalists who don't necessarily always come in with a predisposition. To Parrot Moscow's line, but they'll set up shop by out whole newsrooms and then slowly start to push their propaganda now. Obviously RT SPUTNIK, all of the domestic Russian outlets have a lot of coordination with Russian authorities about their tour line about the types of articles that they're going to push on a daily basis. What sets US apart is our arms length relationship with the US government despite the funding that we received from the US Congress. We have codified in law at Oriel independence from the US. Government is actually a legal for US officials. Officials to call me up and as president of our Fiorello, and try to tell us what to cover, and we jealously guard that editorial independence, and its in every single one of our services, this understanding that we hire good journalists to do objective reporting to follow the facts wherever they lead to side for those local audiences, what stories they wanNA cover, and we're not going to even those of us in management metal in those sorts of decisions, which I think is fundamentally different approach to this business in the way that the Russian outlets operated. Jamie you touched on a number of trends there in particular what we've seen recently in the area where your L. Works, which fans from the Balkans Eastern Europe all the way to South Asia, and beyond there are a number of authoritarian regimes, principally Russia, but also Azerbaijan Iran Turkey the PR, see that are trying to control and manipulate narratives, and because they have coordination with the state, and they're not worried about things like editorial penance, they can sometimes amplify their narratives quite effectively in these narratives. Don't always get called out for being propaganda disinformation. I was wondering from your perch. How do you see.

United States Europe Jamie US Congress Radio Free Europe Soviet Union Asia Russia Munich Eurasia Western Europe president Moscow South Asia BBC Fiorello
"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"What are you reading? I have just finished reading a paper that I've really enjoyed a written by much. Schrader of the GM F. Alliance securing democracies it's titled Friends and enemies a framework for understanding China's political interference in democratic countries and I am also relocate full which are reading a upcoming book by Clive. Hamilton and Morocco Walberg titled Hidden Hand Exposing. How the Chinese Communist Party is reshaping. The world. Tastic. Sean what are you reading? I'm reading a report that was just released by the US. China Economic Insecurity Review Commission entitled China's Smart Cities Development so among other interesting observations it notes that far from being a relatively new initiative. Smart cities are actually part of a decades long pattern of Chinese government programs to digitize and INFORMA- ties cities to improve China's comprehensive national power internal strength I've actually been tracking the PRC's information efforts for several years and this also tracks with my own analysis of the report also notes that Chinese technology companies have been successful in promoting and installing. Smart city technologies around the world citing three hundred ninety eight reported instances of thirty four different Chinese firms. Exporting Smart cities technologies through involvement in various projects in a total of one hundred six countries. So it's a quite detail rich and I'm enjoying diving intimate in for my part. I'm reading really an outstanding article in foreign affairs. Authored by Laura Rosenberger titled China's Corona Virus Information offensive which is highly relevant to the discussion. We've just had and gets into detail on how China's using what's now through years of investment a formidable global media and Information Infrastructure China. Rosenberger rights is experimenting with tactics drawn from Russia's more realistic information operation playbook that strategy seems not so much to promote a particular idea as to sow doubt dissension in disarray including among Americans in order to undermine public confidence and information and prevent any common understanding of facts from taking hold. And I think what Laura does so well in this article is described how China has used. It's very significant. Investments to adapt to meet the interest in preferences of the authorities in Beijing. All for today's episode of the power. Three Point Oh podcast for more on the topic. We discussed today. We recommend reading lucrative JETTIES ESSAY. China's growing political influence in Italy. A case study of Beijing's influencing tactics in Europe part of the Henry Jackson Society December two thousand nineteen report the art of deceit. How China and Russia used sharp power to subvert.

China Chinese Communist Party Laura Rosenberger Russia Beijing GM F. Alliance Schrader US INFORMA national power Morocco Walberg Henry Jackson Society Sean PRC Hamilton Europe Italy
"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

13:49 min | 2 years ago

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"I'm your host Christopher Walker Vice President for studies and analysis at the endowment and on your co host Sean Colossal Senior Director of nets international farm for Democratic Studies in the months since Europe emerged as a hot spot for the covid nineteen pandemic a seeming. Paradox has emerged in the way that Beijing is interacting with countries in the region on the one hand. China has widely publicized shipments of medical supplies and expertise sent to some of Europe's hardest hit areas as part of a massive public diplomacy blitz at the same time PRC diplomats have made ham-fisted statements criticizing. How some European governments have handled the crisis while also amplifying conspiracy theories spread by China's state media outlets about the corona viruses origins as sharper forms of engagement from Beijing had been brought to light. There's been growing pushback against the Chinese government's approach from some European countries to provide a broader perspective on Beijing's mask diplomacy and powerplays in Europe. Were pleased welcome to the power three point. Oh podcast the criteria Jetty analysts based at the Mercator Institute for China Studies and Berlin Germany. The criteria has been studying China's engagement with Europe including in her native Italy the criteria. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you and thanks for having me so right at the outset. The craziest could provide some context on how the Chinese authorities tend to interact with individual EU countries for example as well as with some of the key regional institutions. They're sure I guess we can stop by saying that. Obviously China's favorite way of interacting with European countries ease on the bilateral level because that gives China the apprehend and that way China has much more leverage in general. I think there are two main issues that we can really see in China's engage winning euro. One is that China has been generally quite embitterment about European integration on one hand China says that it welcomes a united stable open and prosperous European Union and supports the European integration process. While at the same time China I said prefers to deal with European countries bilaterally and has also set up subregional formats like the seventeen percent frame went full cooperation and then in general the Chinese government has been very successful at promoting itself as a source of unlimited economic opportunities. Which is something that the Chinese government can really use that leverage in bilateral relations by offering opportunities but then being able to leverage the potential for retaliation. In European policymakers mind. And so you alluded to this effort by the Chinese authorities to promote China within the European context. Could you give us a sense of how they do this? I've noticed that they've used their media outlets more assertively yet. Media in General Media Corporation in Europe has been a prominent feature of China's approach to try and get its message across the European audience. This is something that it is not you? But it's become more prominent now as China tries to control the global narrative on Corona virus. Devils have been a few very recent examples. That might be interesting to look at for these conversation with seeing The state-owned CITIC. Acquired a major stake in the Czech Republic in the media group which seen the Chinese embassy harshly criticizing through an official statement. Hearing in the newspaper built For an article they had written questioning China's handling of the corona virus and asking for reparations. And we've also seen the Telegraph in the UK actually dropping China Watch so the paid supplement produced by China Day. So these are really gives us a sense of the different front on which the Chinese government ease active when it comes to media so investment paid supplements which also aimed to create financial dependencies in the moment especially now when you spades are struggling financially and also trying to package China's propaganda as editorial content and then there is the public diplomacy issue so we've seen in general Chinese diplomat's across Europe been more assertive if not aggressive at points. In the media agencies have been a main target of these efforts and right now during the endemic China has also emerged as a major these information. Acta so not just relying on traditional media to get its message across in Europe but relying on social media by spreading disinformation conspiracy theories and other kinds of propaganda to mostly promoted benevolent narrative about China. China's a successful model for handling covid nineteen and China's generous state to come to the rescue of countries in need and then if a look again at The case of Italy which is quite interesting that it's really been an interesting case. Study of China's disinformation activities. These days with the use of thoughts to do exactly what I've just described with a lot of positive messaging being spread by authentic twitter accounts But also being able to rely again on more traditional media corporation agreements and this is something that goes back to a few years ago and More specifically also to just last year when Italy signed on to China's belt and road initiatives and during Jiang's visit Italy actually signed multiple media corporation agreements. So on one side on the commercial level Italy only managed to get about two point. Five billion euros in commercial deals while at the same time out the Agreements are their institutional agreements. West signed for example. Those between UNSA Italy's leading news wire service and Seen Coie but also RAI. Italy's national broadcaster and China Media Group A Sullivan T. Quattro Italy's paper and China's economic daily and different classes Tori again with China Media Group. Selenium ask a little bit maybe following up on what you said about these media tie ups between the and the PR C. Which it seems have gone back now. Years If you can talk a little bit about how these types of tie ups may have been received in Italy over time. And maybe more broadly in Europe and maybe going beyond just media but to broader engagement. How have public perceptions in Europe towards China shifted over time and particularly in the context of the covid nineteen pandemic? Has there been any shift in perceptions both in Italy and then in Europe more widely right so maybe to do that. We need to go back to when China's engagement with the regions thought it to be more prominent and that's around twenty twelve which is when Chinese investment in Europe started to increase creating then some concerns about state-led investment in Strategic Industries here in Europe. Which is what led to a discussion to set up a pawn European foreign investments creating framework. So that's when we saw Chinese activities in Europe becoming more visible any general perception has always been one of China's associate economic opportunity in general when we talk about Europe China relations. The agenda tends to be quite heavy on the economic issues Then something happening. Twenty sixteen that made European governments. And the you itself realized that. China's economic leverage could also come with political influence in twenty sixteen Hungary and Greece will down in you statement that was meant to criticize the Essy's behavior in the South China Sea and we ended up with a statement that didn't mention the pse at all again the following in twenty seventeen the you was unable to voice its criticism of China's human rights record at the UN Human Rights Council because grace decided not to supple that statement So these examples made governments in Europe realize that that would be also political consequences full closer relations with China and something that I referred to earlier was how China has been successful at promoting itself as a socio economic opportunities in using that leverage. And I think these has also given the sense to a lot of governments in Europe that getting close to China politically would be away to unlock economic benefits. This is something that I think was in the mind of governments in central and Eastern Europe which I joined the fray seventeen frame which is led by China and twenty twelve. And also signed. Brl US and the same rationale was supporting Italy's decision to join. Elton Road last year. And he I guess these leads me to the media question and del busy media just being one outlet for China to get. Its message across because let's not forget that there are also other ways that the Chinese government is able to use to Foster self-censorship here in Europe about certain issues just through a diplomatic offensive so a more assertive diplomatic apparatus here in Europe but also for example by leveraging access to the Chinese market vis a vis our own companies. So something that. I picked up on racing in example again from Italy was that of a percent Kufa. The business owner had published recently a letter on an Italian newspaper. Asking FOR CLARITY FROM THE CHINESE GOVERNMENT AND Putting INTO QUESTION. China's handling of the corona virus and as a response Chinese importers blocked its products. So this is just to say that while we off focusing on media there are obviously the ways that that the Chinese government can use to try and get certain topics removed from the public debate on China countries And looking again at the case of Italy and also then maybe moving onto the perception issue. I didn't think that these kinds of agreements have received much scrutiny immediately and elsewhere in Europe to be honest if we think about the Casals so of sister city agreements all Confucius Institute so fast. We didn't has been the only country to console all these kinds of partnerships whereas these heaven received the same level of scrutiny in many other European countries and the same goes for Italy. So I mentioned the case of on the leading news wire service in partnership with Seen Quad which is effectively an agreement to cross post material produced by Sin Quavo coverage of China and these transparently communicated so on an says website coverage of China done by seeing Cua is communicated as unsettling production at the same time. I think we are overestimating people in Europe. Note about the Chinese Communist Party. The way things it operates in its propaganda agencies and media and state media agencies So I think we shouldn't assume that ANYTIME RAIDER RATING UNSEEN. Kwa will necessarily be able to understand that that say product of the Chinese propaganda parameters and the same goes full. The other media cooperation agreements signed between the national broadcast. The End China Media Group but also classically toity again and China Media Group and other papers which might as well as in the case of UNSA. Communicate transparently the collaboration and the products of these collaboration. But at the same time again I think that needs to be more clarity about the potential financial dependencies and how these affect content and more clarity about who these agencies on the Chinese side participating in this collaboration and what they do and just to be clear. There's no requirement that these PR see state owned or state affiliated media groups be identified as such. Is that right that there's no link to to show that they're essentially state media organs? Not from what I see right now from what I see. It's really just a mentioning of the names of for example but without any specification about them being affiliated with the Chinese government. And maybe if I cannot one more example that I find relevant for these conversation is also that of the blog of Who's the founder of the Five Star Movement? Which has been in the headlines over the past few weeks and already lost year for its from China positions in coverage of China agree. Lose block has changed quite drastically over the past few years. It used to be about protein. Bet Free Tibet. In general supporting freedom been quite critical about China for example in the debate about granting China market stages these kinds of things whereas now the blood of pillow has been reposting content produced by the global times and specifically actually written by a talion contribute to the global times and these pieces than to raise the Chinese government for example for its policies in Sin. Jang and these kinds of things so that's another example where I think more transparency would be required..

China Europe Chinese government Italy China Media Group Mercator Institute for China S End China Media Group South China Sea hand China China Day General Media Corporation Beijing Chinese Communist Party European Union Eastern Europe Christopher Walker Chinese embassy UNSA Italy
"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

12:52 min | 2 years ago

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"On breaking the Truth Sam is an assistant professor at the University of Texas at Austin and program director of Disinformation Research at UT Austin Austin Center for media engagement he's also co author with Katie Joseph of a new report published by the International Forum Democratic Studies titled Demand For Deceit. How the way we think drives disinformation his new book? The reality game is on shelves now great to have you with US him. Thanks for having me glad to be here so SAM. Let's kick things off by talking about why psychology might factor into the global conversation. We're having about this information right now. So we've heard a lot about tech platforms it forms and about authoritarian and liberal actor spending disinformation. But why should we pay attention to psychology of all things. I think it's really important for us to understand as researchers as civil society organizations within government as well why people spread disinformation. What is it that makes them tick? What what what is is it about disinformation? That's particularly interesting to people end. Why do they share it online When we get into the psychology of this we start to understand that there's a lot of underlying lying factors? It's very easy to assume that people spread misinformation which is accidentally spread information or disinformation. which is purposefully? Spread false information because because they have a particular politics but when you begin to understand and look into psychology you see that it's to do more with things like a sense of belonging to do with things associated with trauma or with repetition and psychology can show us a lot about why this information is on the rise around the world in the paper. You talk about dividing demand man for disinformation into passive an active aspects of psychology. And then you talk about how it influences news consumers could you talk a little bit about these passive inactive drivers. Here's what that means so. Passive drivers for spreading information. Psychologically would be things that don't require too much cognitive work. On behalf of the person it would be something thing like Say for instance belief perseverance effect. which is a situation in which someone looks at things that are agree with their politics and continue? Continue to agree with them. And it's a very basic way of thinking about information and the way that we access it. Active drivers of disinformation have more to do with someone seeking information out and and going through a cognitive process when accessing that information so something would like confirmation bias which suggests that individuals seek out information that is in agreement with them through pre the existing beliefs which is related to the passive driver but is more of an active process. Where the person's actually looking for the information if that makes sense and so when we take these things together what we see is that sometimes people spread Mr disinformation passively without really thinking about it very much and sometimes they actually do it? Because they need to feel a sense of belonging for instance bandwagon effect is another one where people people spread certain content because they want a sense of belonging and you often hear observations generally speaking that. We've always had disinformation. Maybe you could just say a word about why why this is so much more parent and presumably acute in the digital age. That's a great question. Get this question all the time. We've always had this information but the answer. The now is that we've never had disinformation misinformation or say propaganda computational propaganda at the scale we have at now it's technologically enhanced is to a degree that we see tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of messages that are permeating social media. That are false. We see the circulation of fake images or or fake videos that are doctored with fairly sophisticated technology. That make it very difficult to ascertain as to whether or not the images real or not. And so there's the technological reasons but then there's is also the social reasons so if you combine that advanced technology and the large scale of these things with people's psychology. What you get is constant repetition of images and from a very basic psychological standpoint seeing imagery over and over and over again is a very good way to get someone to just basically believe it and and so in? Today's world the confluence of powerful technology with continued polarization a decrease entrust and institutions around. The world These things are very powerful and are creating kind of a perfect storm in a way if I'm understanding that correctly in a sense the pace and the ubiquity and the intensity the of today's technology has outpaced our ability to put it into context or two to process it in a way. That's a human scale that's right. There's a lot of noise out there in other words and so people have a really hard time sussing out good versus bad information true versus false information And also it's a lot easier to share something that you agree with or someone that you agree with on social media that it is to really engage in debate online. This is especially true When it comes to things like anonymity iniquity anonymity allows for a hater? That would otherwise probably not acceptable either online or offline but when you factor in anonymity people are able to sort of behave in a trolling manner. They're able to docs to do things like swatting for political purposes and things get very messy and violent and dangerous. So as we're thinking about all these ways in which disinformation has become much more prevalent. Of course you can't help but think about some of the most recent and troubling examples of influence operations perations orchestrated by authoritarian regimes for instance like Russia interfering in electoral processes and so on disinformation. How might authoritarian tearing regimes leverage? This demand side of disinformation within target countries or to try to play upon these particular aspects. That's a fantastic. It has to question We're seeing the rise of foreign entities especially authoritarian countries using computational propaganda as tactic abroad So it's no longer just Russia. That's that's making use of this or or the Internet research agency and so countries like China or Saudi Arabia or Iran have made use of social social media as a tool for the manipulation of public opinion and one of the things that they try to do on a demand side is that they try to make it much more acceptable oh for people in the United States seemingly to share positive information about Russia or positive information about Iran. What they'll do is they'll seed and fertilizer conversations -tations on social media and things like facebook groups pages that are very Very abusively supportive of Vladimir Putin or of Iranian policy and then get regular people here in the United States to pick it up and spread it as if it was normal because of things like the bandwagon effect because basically if you see people doing it it in a way it's doing what called in the past manufacturing consensus creating the illusion of popularity for an idea when the idea didn't have popularity before and because we you have things like body which can bolster amplify content without many people being involved. People are able to actually access stuff and think that it's it's it's there because is a popular support. I guess the outgrowth of that then is what does that mean for the ways that were thinking about these issues. A lot of the emphasis had been on fact checking which is predicated on the assumption that if people are confronted with a fact they will then adjust their belief system to accommodate the new fact. And so so. What you're talking about seems to suggest that that's not sufficient? Yeah and in fact. The research shows a lot of the research on fact checking shows that if you do it after something has already happened. It can actually cement people's beliefs and so in fact checking as we've kind of created it can prove to be not useful because you can imagine a situation in which someone on facebook shares district misinformation. And then they're approached by the associated. Press there's no one of the partners face because worked with And they say you've shared this information formation. Well it feels as if it's coming from the top down and it feels very sort of invasive and if you're already given to conspiracy or already given to distrust institutions. It's pretty likely that if a fact checker comes to you and says you're you're being bad you're you're sharing bad content that you will react pretty poorly lead to that And so what this means for us is that we have to think about new ways of building information literacy of creating media literacy platforms of promoting critical thinking. That don't address things. After the fact that that aren't just opposed Hawk approach to dealing with this information years later or something we have to actually do do things real time and there's organizations that are that are starting to get this like first draft and also buzzfeed news is doing fantastic work. Actually taking their breaking news model and taking it to social she'll media and then saying these are the things that are going on that are fake before people even share them saying beware about sharing XYZ image because it's three years old. It's not actually from today. The other other thing is that it's extremely important. Psychologically that we address the underlying root issues as to why people share this kind of stuff or why people behave the way they do and one of the biggest things about this information and the reason why people share political propaganda is they need to feel a sense of belonging for instance if you think about extremist groups around the world. There's there's there's people that are involved in these groups for variety of reasons but one of them is because of a sense of belonging and when we say you shouldn't be sharing discerned misinformation year. You're kicked off the platform. You're not allowed to do this. The stuff where basically pushing those people out of society but we're not giving them any kind of alternative to the community that they've been in as it says in the art of war you've got to build a golden bridge on which sure enemies can retreat. And and if we don't do that then we're actually going to fail and we're going to make these people more extreme as you've described the scale and the saturation I and the speed and the level of sophistication that's coming from malign actors who can make the inauthentic seem authentic and so forth really puts an incredible burden written on any given consumer of news and so maybe you could just talk a little bit more about what some of the other ways to address this in more systematic way so that the burden is more or easily distributed. I'm really wary. And I think you're right to point this out. I'm really wary of people who say this is just a user issue that people spread misinformation or disinformation information because they're not smart because they're unintelligent oftentimes counter in Silicon Valley is folks who say we can solve this issues simply by giving people for more information or by building a patch or a new APP You know these sort of technologically deterministic ways of solving the issue. I think that really this is not not just user issue that the social media firms themselves made very specific choices when it came to design and those decisions about design can be changed in some ways from from what I've heard. FACEBOOK and Youtube are attempting to fix the airplane while the airplanes being flown and so I wonder sort of what new forms of social media will be created created that are actually designed with democracy designed with human rights in mind beyond that. I think there has to be specific. Changes made the algorithms that prioritize information to people the algorithms Play a very key role with the ways in which we discern information the ways in which we share it and the algorithms have to be rebuilt. Because they're designed with the people who built them's ethics in mind with their values in mind and what it comes down to in the case of say facebook is that those those values and ethics are about Prophet thereabouts scale. And they're about engagement and we need to not optimize our next wave of social media for engagement to make people stay on it as long. It's possible we don't need to maximize profit. There's always going to be some of this. Of course we live in by and large Across the West and in a capitalist society and that's you know that that means that we're going to have to constantly fight back against this kind of thing because it makes more money but there's a real demand for something something else amongst young people amongst regular people and so that's why you're seeing the rise of things like encrypted chat APPs and you're seeing the rise of things like Mastodon and other technologies but in a way the the challenge that has presented broadly understood. Is that many of the social media firms collectively actively. We didn't anticipate that they would find themselves in this kind of public trust role with respect to news and information that was handled by other forms of media generation ago home before then and it seems like they're still coming to grips with the tension between their need to make a profit and this significant public trust element element of how societies understand the world around them and increasingly ordinary users of these technologies. Understand the world around them through these platforms and so going going forward. This is really going to be one of the paramount issues. We need to come to grips with. I think you're absolutely right If I had a dollar for every time I'd heard from the social media companies were not the arbiters of truth..

FACEBOOK Disinformation Research Russia Austin University of Texas UT Austin Austin Center assistant professor Katie Joseph International Forum Democratic program director United States Iran Vladimir Putin Silicon Valley buzzfeed Hawk China
"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"The low everyone and welcome to the power three point. Oh podcast examining authoritarian resurgence and democratic resilience in an era era of globalization power. Three Point Oh is brought to you by the International Forum for Democratic Studies. The idea center the National Endowment for Democracy. I'm your host Shantha Colorful Senior Director of Nets International Forum for Democratic Studies Recording from our studio in Washington. DC and. I'm your co host Chris Walker Vice President for Studies and analysis analysis at the endowment in recent years the use of digital information to subvert democracy has become a subject of widespread concern. Initially people focused on identifying the sources of disinformation and the narratives and techniques. Used what you might call the supply side of the equation. The initial response from policymakers media organizations and civil society also focused on the supply side of disinformation hoping news consumers. Understand what it is and where it comes from but this left out the other other side of the equation. Let's call that the demand side now. Those who are trying to inoculate societies against formation are asking. Why do people seek out believe and share this content here to share his experience and expertise on the subject? We're pleased welcome Samuel E to the power three point. Oh podcast for today's discussion discussion..

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"Saudi Arabia An abuse of their a male family members in in Saudi. But in order to do that they had to hack into an APP that Google Google and apple have refused to remove from their APP stores so again that was like the real life. They're incredibly dramatic story. Really revolved around this. To the piece of technology again created created in the West So yeah here. These are just a couple of examples but there are so many others others. I think it's important to understand and I think we'll see this increasingly that the technology dimension is folded in seamlessly to people's real lives. And so I you know. I hope that we can find those human dimensions of these stories more easily because increasingly we're not going to be relating technology through screens and through our phones and so on But simply through the course of living and you know that's an important dimension to the authoritarian technology story that hopefully you know it's a really important dimension to reflecting coverage as well one of the reasons so much of this works is because it's terribly convenient and we actually just rent a story about social credit system in China and how you know while it has been painted this or Walian awful scary thing. Plenty of Chinese are finding it incredibly convenient and comfortable so they. That's another perspective that is really important to take into account. I mean you never know but it's very very unlikely that our society will go to being analog. You're right I think the trajectory that we're on now is that we're going to lose the devices and the digital. Oh will become you know it will be just life and I sort of realized. Recently that even the description digital authoritarianism at some point it just going to be authoritarianism. A and it's going to be different from the Authoritarians with known before all the more reason to have the great sort of work. You and your colleagues are doing available to audiences Mrs Absent. I I will take that plug so before we wrap up our conversation. I'd like to conclude with with our final segment called. We're reading where we discuss. What's the top of our respective reading this in Mike Parker Mentor.

Google Saudi Arabia Mike Parker Mrs Absent apple China
"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"Hello everyone and welcome to the power three point. Oh podcast examining authoritarian resurgence and democratic resilience in an era of globalization power. Three point zero is brought to you by the International Forum for Democratic Studies. The idea center the National Endowment for Democracy. I'm your host is Christopher Walker Vice President for Studies in analysis at the endowment recording from our studio in Washington DC and Co host shanty colossal senior director of the international national. Fine new information technologies are raining decidedly mixed results for democracy around the world there empowering civil society in a number of ways but also creating new new opportunities for authoritarian regimes to monitor and survey populations and manipulate public discourse. Repressive regimes are harnessing technology to project influence abroad abroad while at the same time propagating new forms of technology corrosive to democratic freedom worldwide the dual trends of digital authoritarianism and disinformation and present challenges to the health of democracy at both global and local levels yet both phenomena have been difficult to track and convey in ways that make cleared audiences the scale severity of the problem. This is in part because different sets of topical and regional or country level expertise may be required to connect the dots between technologies. Listen disinformation narratives from distinct settings. One media outlet called Kota Story is taking an innovative approach that helps audiences.

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

11:38 min | 2 years ago

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"And on your co host. Sean collectible senior director actor of Nets International Farm as democracies around the world contend with new forms of digital disinformation many observers are looking ahead to the implications of deep fakes aches computer generated video and audio impersonations of real people advances in artificial intelligence enabling ever more convincing synthetic video uh-huh and audio. This in effect is content that seems quite authentic but is in fact inauthentic as barriers to the creation of deep fake shrink. The opportunities for disseminating disinformation grows with the potential effect of further deepening distrust in the information ecosystem here to discuss how best to understand understand and prepare for the potential impact of this emerging technology. We're pleased to welcome to the power. Three Point Oh podcast. Sam Gregory Program Director at witness for today's discussion Chen on demystifying deep fakes Sam. Welcome to the PODCAST. Hi I'm delighted to be so. We've heard so much disgust about this idea of deep fakes six and finding an ironclad definition isn't so straightforward. It seems perhaps you could just tell the audience a little bit about how you define deep fakes and how they work. I think for most people deep fake summons up this idea of this full face swap. It's what we've seen with Nicholas. Cage is and all those kind of celebrity ones and and the problem there is it doesn't cover for some of the other ways in which you can use artificial intelligence to create realistic simulations of just someone's lips or of a voice or combine those or if someone's movements So we have to be giving people broader definition and so they can understand where the risk factors are beyond face. Swab which right. Now you can unusually still see. And then the other side of it as their areas of what we might call synthetic media which is basically how the ability to edit audio and video has got easier by by by means of the same artificial intelligence techniques so the ability to for example remove an object in a video is much easier now if you want to for example temp with a piece of video video evidence and it's part of the same John Laura of advances in artificial intelligence and I think we should think of it in the same light and so in a way we're talking about The authenticity of the content were seeing in an age where things are moving so quickly in the digital sphere where people are so overwhelmed with data and information mation. What are some of the things that we need to bear in? Mind as we start to grapple with the implications of deep fakes so so the first thing to know is when we're not yet in the eye of the storm with fakes that's important because a lot of scaremongering when they've done surveys people think they're surrounded by fakes already and that's not true now how there was a report that just came out that showed that there are maybe fifteen thousand deep fakes out there in the public space and ninety five percent of them. nonconsensual sexual images of women of celebrities of ordinary people. And that is a real problem right now but for the for the majority of people that not encountering deep fakes on a day to day basis and What's really important that as we've now got the opportunity to say? How do we prepare better for this than maybe some of the other waves of misinformation and disinformation that are really washing over us? Now and frankly. We didn't. What do that well in dealing with? Let me back it up a little bit. It seems as though deep fakes and this broader category of synthetic media is part of an overall disruption in the information formation space. And I think you've you've previously discussed different categories of disruption including for instance reality edits credible d'appel sanger's news remixing remixing and plausible deniability. D think you might explain some of these categories and explain. How deep fakes fit into them? Yeah I think one of the ways one of the things that's really important right now is to help communities most likely to be impacted by this. Tell us what the threats are. And it's we've already been focused on over the last eighteen months at at witness And so to do that. We've really been presenting people with potential scenarios and often the most think about how threats expand on what they encounter already so really had it substantially a phrase coined by by Research Gordon Viva via. Dr Is really looking at this question of adapting pieces of content in a way that is seamless And that might challenge their entry value or their ability to show someone saying something In an untruthful way I think the credible d'appel ganger idea is one that we've we've we've heard a lot about in the political sphere right people worry about you know someone impersonating a president or a senator. What we've heard in when we've done these threat model and most recently? We did a series actually in in Brazil listening to community activists national journalists. was they worried about how this would be used to expand the ways. There are existing attacks using photoshop. And things like that against women activists and journalists and they said. Let's worry about that as much as about you know the senior politicians. It's the attack on the vulnerable people And then when we've talked to news was journalists and we've organized a number of meetings alongside groups like the BBC and the partnership on Ai. They've pointed to existing problems they face around how in an era where you can easily shah video in a closed messaging APP. What's APP that people swapped logos on say a piece of media or claim? Something comes from an outlet. Attend the all these techniques. Start to facilitate those tools of manipulating. The you know the indices of trust we have or the remaining indices of trust maybe like the logo of the BBC not or or a similar national level news outlet. And so as we've started to look at this. I think it's really important to think about threats as evolution of existing threats. We shouldn't sort of create these sort of phantasm 's things that are out there when in fact you know people who facing threats already because of misinformation disinformation as individuals or as organizations Already see how these can evolve and want to think about how they can try and solve or at least partially solved them. Now and I think you've also talked about that it's not just Face swapping or video manipulation that there's a much broader range of tools including audio as well and other ways of editing. Do you think you might talk about some of these. He's the the tools that are available now as opposed to in the future. Yeah so so. So part of the reason. Why deep fakes on a not as widespread as pets people think they are whereas that at least over the last eighteen months you know? Most of the requirement to create a deep fake particularly a face swap is required. You know engaging with you know open source code repositories. It's quite a lot of training of your model to make it work well to create the fakes What we've been seeing the last six months particularly is a speeding off of the process of creation And it's a speedy up on the technical side it speeding up on the availability side. So it's happened on the technical side as we're seeing the ability to create these Face swaps but also the ability to manipulate facial expressions that rely on less what we call training data which is basically examples of your Ri- that Fed into You know the machine learning algorithm. We've also seen rapid advances in audio. So it's getting easier to do audio and then on the other side we're starting to see this commoditised so you can go to a website and some we'll do it for you. Started to see versions of this in APPs like notoriously in the last few months the APP sow in China. An all of these are basically basically you know also the leap to mobile which as we know is is a huge accessibility open a- when it's an APP on mobile on this same threat of thought one of the concerns that people have and you see in the mainstream media discussion of this is that the dissemination of the technology the ability to develop these skills is now going to be diffused to people who are sitting in their basements and can do this. So that's one part of this. But the other presumably that states with enormous resources and the data eight at their disposal and the interest in doing these things will likewise be developing this. If we look at the challenge from today's perspective. What concerns you more is it it The lone person sitting somewhere with their own computer pulling this together or is it the state with near limitless resources pursuing doing their own ends with this. I wish I could pick one. But when we've talked to people about this they you know they identify threats of both ends of the spectrum and threats that are both very individualized and also about volume. So maybe if we got a dynamic individual to state act we also have kind of like sort of a dynamic between very individual like it really matters what a particular piece of content looks like versus. Let's just create lots of this and just pollute the information environment. It doesn't really matter about the quality of just pumping it out. And I think we should worry a both ends like clearly. If we look at what's happening with gender-based violence towards women the accessibility of tools to harass bully will be used by individuals and it will be used is by states And it'll be used for fraud right in the business world as well but also when we talked to folks they really emphasized. They're concerned about the public sphere when you talked to journalists when you talked to civic civic activists the concern that this will make the public sphere even more crowded with content that is not believable or is only partially believable and overwhelms both obviously this Xijiang public trust but also the ability of journalists in fact finders to do the verification at that level of scale And I think one key element in this sort of volume question in which I think we don't think about it. That much with fakes now is we tend to think of them as kind of like maybe autism no like these crafted objects that you know. Someone really spent a lot of time building well. They they won't be they'll be much easier to make volume to make subtle variance on them much. As at the moment you can do things like generate text And when you think of it in those terms then the the worrisome factor of how this goes into a culture that's built around visual images built around fos sharing and where we don't really have many cognitive barriers to undestanding manipulation Is troubling and could be from either actress could be a militia. Business accurate could be an individual whose neighbor could be a state actor and at the outset of the discussion. You you alluded to this challenge saying that. We haven't been so good in setting the norms and the standards around much of the technology. That's been in diffused globally to date in its present form and on previous episodes of this podcast we've had any number of discussions that have looked at aspects of this challenge. Given what you've seen so far what do you feel would be most beneficial and important to enhance the likelihood that democratic and human rights norms star a to find their way around this deep fake technology. Yeah it's it's going to be a really interesting balance of solutions so I don't believe that's GonNa be one sort of technical silver bullet here And in fact the histories of technical bullets often I was going to say they backfire so a I think we need to be very cautious. Really interesting moment where we need to ask what we need from platforms and we need from people who build the tools of this. Like what do we want from facebook. You know they're going to be very well placed to detect deep fakes because they're going to see a range of them similarly youtube twitter widow. What do we want them to tell us? In a way that is useful and what we want them to moderate and what we wanted to take down and that's really important democratic compensation the that does have to learn from the history of the last five years and when I referred to previous problems of misinformation and disinformation. I was thinking of place. Where you know like the Responsi- platforms uh-huh was late and inadequate And so I think the platforms and people who build tools player really critical role here and how legislators make decisions about how to push. There's going to be critical and I think it's it's really important sitting here in DC to think about what the decisions taken on the hill here or in Brussels how will impact globally So I'll give an example of that. A lot of people talk about asking for kind of ways to to track the origins of pieces of video..

BBC Sam Gregory Sean facebook sanger Nets International Farm Fed Chen Nicholas Cage Gordon Viva Brazil Brussels fraud
"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

09:04 min | 2 years ago

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"Oh even Baiji justice dog control to continue to control their country right. They they'll ask they'll during ask the rain in Ecuador again. There's no free press but he has a radio station and he would ask you know what. Why should French Alah? Oh Taylor's how we should be spending our money. Why do French care how we spend? We African spend money so they're being able to change people's minds to be able to make this at least for the average Iq. What Guinean ain't a fight between France who wants to continue to dominate equatorial the US wants to continue to tell Africans what to do instead us of being able to focus on the reality which is that millions and millions of money they should benefit average? Equatoguinean are being conde conor being stolen by one person to buy cars and yachts right so they'd be able to do that. I think the way to change that narrative that out presidents residents are pushing out there is to ensure that you know people contrary understand defy people in our country are involved in that fight from the beginning meaning right so for me is critical to think about okay from the beginning. How do we insure that people in our communities on the stand that corruption is now call the Lemberg in is an yacht instead of the non mccue the cooler kid on the block that what is called is spending what is right so I think what where we should be focusing our energies on and this is what the volleyball pep residential and there from the beginning of this cases we are devoting the right the resources enough resources to educating people in communities about the damage that clip Tuxedos for our communities right if people understand that then they understand? What you're doing is doing is wrong? They begin to understand. The lambruschini should not belong to the rain. Should belong to us de ed begin to understanding of before you even tell them that. inositol repatriation should be about ensuring the those monies combat the comedian not stay in France so involving involving them from the beginning through media. If you have media throw campaigns in social media through in gets guess off Equatoguinean. We didn't use a comic book to people so whatever resources you have to engage people from the beginning. He seemed to me a critical and should be used right. People in the hospitals have the added advantage of having even more resources and the time to engage in the fighting ways. That people are inside Malabo. Oh by the these are president equatorial. Do not right. Social Media's more readily available to someone in Madrid from equatorial so one in the US Then someone in my liable and so many Marie someone in my level Kengo to events can go to protest can do things that ensure that the international community not know that you know we are not going to stand idly by our government our elected officials in some cases. Most this elected officials continue to squander resources of omissions and it may be that some of the Diaspora members may be most attuned to some of the way that abuses are taking place in can say. Oh actually I know which mansion it is and I point that out and maybe that might help even alert that to law enforcement and respective locations locations as well because Nubia Malachy case you know he was asked poorer people he was Congolese and Gabonese and Cameron's believing in Perez who work with their solitaire to identify in fact they started the process of identifying or the resources in Perez in Belgium and elsewhere so they are critical in the world that we're doing right now. NGO With Easy Justice. Know why things that we're trying to do is you get young Equatoguinean living in the US. They know who the kids of the people in government are to tell care. We know that these song of the means of justice is in Houston or the son of surgeon. General Easy Easy Not Linda and we follow them on facebook and we can see all the lexus or the pictures of Lexus and Lamborghini. They're posting and identifying those in and and figuring out Ways how we can begin to sham. These kids why of those of us they have the legal training can figure out how we can go. After those assets legally in a way what you've described as this very important feature of helping local populations in the countries that suffer the most from this where the resources are taken out by leaders with unchecked power but in an era of globalization. I think what we're discovering is. This is really two sides of the same coin. Join because the corrosive and corrupting impact of Kleptocracy finds its way into open societies where you can find the mansions. You can't find the cars you. You can't find the opportunities essentially to enjoy the benefits of rule of law environment And Stash your ill-gotten gains in these places. What Nelson your view do? We need to do that. We haven't done to date to help. Open societies re large. Whether we're talking about North America Parts of Europe To better put this in perspective and to understand why it's important for them as well so I a couple of things come to mind line right the one. I think we need to figure out how we bring a mall. Foundations more people with resources. Dawn the Stan Dan. How damaging clip crisies right? There are many organizations out there supporting funding human rights. You know and I'm thinking you know for foundation in Macarthur Foundation. I think you could invest a lot of money in fixing Kibera impoverished neighborhoods in Nairobi on got now in Ecuador You could also invest resources in holding government government officials in those countries accountable in the US in other places that ensure that you know then those monies should have gone to these neighborhoods in Africa. Go there right. We do not have in my opinion enough foundations enough funders paying attention to the holistic damage dead kleptocracy those in our countries we should be demanding more from the European Union known from the USA ID and others and the war Bankin may have they give money to these countries equatorial. Guinea's you know is a very kleptocratic country eighty. I don't think there is any way to explain why the IMF is about to loan seven hundred million dollars theatre Guinea right. What foundations owns the foundations? They pay attention more bank. Doing what condition is right now. Speaking about that right the justice as you probably gotta you know this. I'm not doing anything. New is very small organization. I do not have the resources to move. IMF away from that loan the our organizations over here for the Open Open Society under the have the Gravitas the power to get IMF to rethink Russell. We need more big fish organizations Russians foundational People thinking about this right so for me. That's one the other one that comes to mind. Other way he's a nebulous. I mentioned at the beginning that these kleptocrats work with a network of Accountants Lawyers Escrow agents many of the people the facility that right many of these third party agents there have set up on this show. The companies are in Delaware on in Reno. Nevada is showing the US or somewhere in Europe and stuff. We need more resources going tours. Holding some of these enables accountable. So you know they're gatekeepers. Are there other people out there ensuring that descriptors continues including lobbying firms here in Washington. DC that we need. I need to figure out how we go after them and for me. That's the next stage of the fight. Northwest you just. Don't have the resources seventy I mean for those institutions. They do have the resources I I think we need to figure out how we go after these grads part of that is telling the whole story of Kleptocracy and showing that. It's not just something that happens far away if you're in the the US or far away if you're in western Europe but it's something that's actually a global network and so inevitably you're impacted in one way or another whether it's through increased housing in prices or or some other reason I mean I think you see this in London and other places quite quite strikingly so maybe that story needs to be told more effectively so people don't just see it as a problem that doesn't affect them if they're not living in those countries that's correct.

US IMF Ecuador France Equatoguinean Europe president volleyball Taylor Malabo facebook Macarthur Foundation Washington Guinea Kleptocracy Lamborghini Diaspora Perez
"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

14:49 min | 2 years ago

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"Ferraris Aston Martins and Bentleys a Malibu pad with its own golf course tennis court and two swimming pools and private jet. That'll set you back a cool thirty million. So what's the connection. They're all linked to Equatorial Guinea a small nation in Central Africa. That's emblematic of curious. Paradox it ranks near the bottom of the Human Development Development Index yet boasts the highest per capita income in Africa. In fact the president of Equatorial Guinea Teodoro Obiang has ruled the oil-rich countries since nineteen nineteen seventy-nine making him the second longest serving ruler in the world. After vast oil reserves were discovered in the Mid Nineteen Ninety S. The country was quickly flooded with oil revenue on paper Equatorial Guinea one of the richest countries in Africa but the majority of citizens live in extreme poverty. Instead of investing oil revenue in the people political elites pocketed the cash Senate offshore and invested it in places like Brazil France and the United States. The Classic Steel Stash spend pattern of transnational talker. See The impact of this theft. Inside Equatorial Guinea is obvious. While President Obiang inner circle proudly flaunts. Its wealth on social media average citizen citizen struggle to survive President Obiang and his network control all lovers of power silencing dissent and committing human rights abuses in the process internal accountability mechanisms such as the judiciary and media are not allowed to act independently leaving few options to count kleptocracy from inside the country. In these is cases. Civil Society activists have tried to match kleptocrats globe spanning tactics with their own efforts to work collaboratively across borders and two thousand and eight a coalition of the Quad Ghanaian civil society activists and international allies initiated groundbreaking case of Strategic Litigation and France against president. Obiang Son Teodoro Obiang. A young for corruption related offenses ultimately. After an eleven year effort. He was found guilty by the French court earlier this year and here to share with us. How Civil Society diety can work creatively to draw attention to the corrupting influence of KLEPTOCRATIC leaders in combat trans-national Kleptocracy? We're pleased to welcome to the power. Three Point Oh podcast broadcast to to our executive director of EEG justice for today's discussion countering kleptocracy from the inside out. Welcome to a to thank you very much. Chris Thank you. Shanty is always a pleasure so to to let's start off with Maybe you could talk a little bit about Katori. Guinea in it's most recent report. Human Rights Watch raised concerns about human rights violations in the country including of civil society groups and opposition politicians and so on. I was wondering if you could talk a little bit about the link between Kleptocracy and longevity authoritarian rule in Equatorial Guinea. Yes it is it is at least Nichols off Ecuadorian. It is clear that the government the president that we have right now and the people that support him have managed to stay thanks to the wealth of the nation. Thanks to natural resources and things. Unfortunately their ability to use use of the resources jaws for self-enrichment they have used of resources to ensure that they control the military the used resources to ensure sure there is no position they've used resources to ensure there is positive media about that regime not just inside the country but also regionally and abroad. They've used resources. Dope paint an image about Equatorial Guinea. This presidency including places like New York Times time in Washington. Boston other places dead is not the reality. Most people live in the country. Now so there is no doubt that you know The ability of the government to to force monopolize of the natural resources of the country and use those dope portray image internationally. The those not keep the reality has allowed to continue to exist for forty years now so issues of arbitrary detentions issues Zhu's of extrajudicial killing torture and other things happen very Egregious violations happened in Equatorial Guinea at known on outside the Guinea because of the control of the government has of natural resources. It sounds like there's a very direct link between the repression inside the country and the sort of whitewashing. The image outside the country without a doubt. Equatoguinean has always been repressive nation right but in India Messina's region between image time between nineteen sixty eight and nineteen seventy-nine during the first period does egregious human. What is violations well known there was a UN reporter especially In charge of Equatorial Guinea. Right between nineteen sixty seventy nine or beyond in comes to power and we discover. Oil Young is the current president and we discover oil in all of a sudden the UN suppresses the mission of this special report there for the Real Guinea So there's no doubt that oil has allowed the government to get away with literally get away with murder get away with Repression of of of human rights. And you mentioned two to. Essentially the authorities have taken these massive resources and repurpose them for a whole host of other aims and the list you described as pretty extensive it was media finance. Pr Support Influencing international organizations. Can you say a little bit more. About how a government that creates. Its own rules at home tries to do this sort of thing beyond its borders. I think that is a debut. The perhaps the off well off Kleptocracy right in that first of all you. A Port Oregon is a very small country And even if it was a big country I mean I think where you still still double resources that these governments allowed to steal. You need some way to spend that money they're not dealerships in Ecuador. Where you can buy my sororities? The number again is in that sort of thing so you end up having a most necessarily know having to go to France having to go to the US in other places you know there's no top of mansions refunding molly breathe on finding Equatorial Guinea. So you end up having to go elsewhere to spend that money unfortunately you know Does government from the no work alone right. You need someone that's going to facilitate money's there stolen in a place like equitorial Guinea ending up in Perez ending up in the US ending up in London and elsewhere. You need lawyers. You need accountants you need. Host host of enablers that ensured. Were they all. These wheels are operating You need people they're going to advise you on basically know how to become a better Kleptocrat you know how to to avoid detection by law enforcement wedding the USO in France in whatever to ensure The the citizens of your country are on on now. Wear of the egregious news of that of that. The stealing of that Kleptocracy Unfortunately the machinery of people people that have kleptocrats do their work is so huge. That I don't know we're facing an uphill battle veritable battle and in in many ways. I think what we've come across in discussions on this topic with others who are trying to combat. It is that you really face a challenge Alan in the sense. That Equatorial Guinea were these. Massive resources are available to the authorities who monopolize political and economic power at home. It's actually quite difficult at the local level to make inroads to provide any checks on that behavior that misbehavior. And you have some experience. And you've worked on initiatives that tried to use the external mechanisms of rule of law in some of the places is where the KLEPTOCRATS are operating in this case Equatorial Guinea. But I think this concept can apply in other areas. Can you say a word about what is important in trying signed to make a dent in kleptocracy from the outside looking in what sorts of things should we understand in order for that to be effective so initially if your point about the challenge of holding the government accountable. Equatoguinean is a place in which the president basically the president himself. Control the judiciary right. He's the first magistrate edged magistrate of the Nation himself appoints every single lawmaker so holding kleptocrats accountable in a place like Ecuador Guinea or in a place like Congo reservation or chatto any of these tightly controlled countries is impossible In a diet is the beauty of a case like the Malecki case ace right or the possibility of coming to the US it will have no nation and using the court system here to go after the assets of this Kleptocrats in terms of you know what what is important. I mean I think there are many things in pulmonary. We have to identify those assets in whatever they are whether they're here in the US we don't have to if the US for instance you know you need someone that can tell you look in Potomac there too much over. There Piranha the president and in these missions. We know there are two or three Lamborghini's UNIDO. Oh that that information in the case you know we. There was a report put out by a tear solitaire. They're spelled. Ah these different mansions in cars in yachts in things in luxury items on Baio beyond in the APOB family and the uh-huh Bongo family and the family and all these other Dozens of African states right. So you need someone who's going to do research in whether they're journalists investigative journalists or whether they just citizen from those countries affected then you need a whole host of a journalist in the people they will will put that information in those in the nose mechanism people need to know about this egregious violations. You need lawyers. I know people that can then begin to think. Okay what are the laws in this country. They allow citizens of that country to hold government accountable for the resources they have taken Out of the country and transfer elsewhere. You need lawyers there on the stand. Okay do who has The legal capacity who has jurisdiction to go after these assets. What laws do you use? You'll need the people that know the political system you know I wanNA difficulties in going after some of these dictators these the strong relationship exists between these dictators and presidents or any institutions business enterprises for Exxon Mobil and others where these governments so you need people they understand you know how to undo the damage that lobbying firms in oil companies in politicians in other places are spending years and years you know tying up so you need to host huddled things. I think the critical the thing for me is having a network of people that are committed to the fight that it takes. You know these five that is you have to address it as the marathon. Oh No this print so you need people commute ensuring that okay at any given point that we are going to need different type of resources in different types of intelligence to the war in the fight against disclosure Kratz Indian. Malik as as you are very well know that case went on for ten years and what started as Joe Serpine serpine Transparency International France going after These assets turn in Toy Group of Equatoguinean Zijie justice and many other quarter Guineans. They knew being aboard going after they need turn into also bringing Humanize Watch and the Open Society Justice Initiative in many organizations to join forces and all of us from different points of strength figuring out how we can first of all painting image awards the going on in Equatorial Guinea. What damage cryptocurrencies doing and the benefits of having government or rather Judicial the system addressing the issue right. And even after you get to that point as the. Dan needs to start thinking about a we. Should we be able to recover all all these assets. How do you answer these? I said no end up with a comeback from howdy ensure that these are do not stay in friends in the US. How do you answer ensure this acid can benefit the victims in the country? What these are stolen from you know so there you starting okay Do we have laws using players. They're did ensure as repatriation. And if not who should we be one. Lawmakers or watered institutions or organizations will be working with Dole Oh convinced our lawmakers announce site the that this money should not stay in the French National Treasury rather should go back to ensure that there's education AS Roma's have gearing Ecuadorian. So that network of organizational they should come together is critical. You know it's interesting because I think frequently. When we think about ways to combat about trans-national kleptocracy the attention naturally focuses on law enforcement and indeed all those Those fancy cars that I mentioned at the beginning. We're all things were seized by law enforcement. But what you're describing is something that's a much more comprehensive civil society inclusive type of approach and I was wondering you know if you've argued that local populations and I aspirin populations can and should play a role in these types of investigations in this type of exposure. Could you talk a little bit more about the specific things that diaspora groups groups and also maybe even local civil society as constrained as they are within countries. Is there a role for them as well. One thing that the they'll rob young in Ecuador giving some guys on others have been very successful at doing east painting these cases Malecki case or the forfeiture perfect case at the US Department of Justice against the assets of artillery in the US or the recent seizure of cars in Switzerland dead. The president in our countries have been able to. I won't say successfully. Both oral skillfully paint these as mm-hmm nail colonial intentions whether by Transparency International France by Business like the Justice Initiative..

Equatorial Guinea president government United States Equatorial Guinea Teodoro Obia Guinea kleptocracy France Ecuador President Obiang Africa Ecuador Guinea Equatoguinean equitorial Guinea Central Africa Transparency International Fra Mid Nineteen Ninety
"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

10:56 min | 2 years ago

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"And also kind of the costs Rela- I mean what are you gonNa what what's going to happen you're going to get bone to some some trolling means you know the what's going to happen it's micro say some bad and I still think the information is good the problem of the Russian stuff is not the meddling the act of being another country it's the nature of these campaigns you want to soften internet which is there you know that that they're fluffy way of saying they want to reimpose since chip to re draw back victories in nineteen eighty nine I don't think that's what we need I think the regulation that we need has to be baseless of meals ask you based action on demand for more information less but what kind of information not content of which is as of continental another through to the sort of deceptive coordinated campaigns should be regulated yeah it's deceptive behavior which is important content we should be able to know what we see online whether it's a real person or a F- a fake persona we should be able to understand whether something was organic campaign we should know who's behind it which understand you know all the money that's gone into it we should be understand who it's being targeted ads when our own data's used to target us which which is data's used if a political campaign election is targeting us with one ad which built see all the other ads they're doing in case in case targeting is contradictory which is often it's so we live actually in a new form of censorship? I would say well we don't understand her the information environments around us is being shaped that should be on demand and that that's the is to promote Kremlin News said that as a democratic logic that's the logic of freedom of expression and we can regulate that we can say okay if you've created a coordinated inauthentic campaign that's illegal that comes down before we wrap up our conversation I'd like to conclude with our final segment called we're reading where we discuss what's at the top of our respective reading lists and might recommend to our listeners Peter What are you reading so I'm Marie reading and rereading an art book of history because actually my book even talked about it from the perspective of the struggle for democracy it's it's kind of essences how'd you describe reality so the books thrive ton back to try to describe other people lived in similar situations where all language has been eaten up and how do you describe reality how do you remain a realist. In this context the book getting to the Quite Boris gross his his art historian called history becomes form which is about the Moscow conceptualist which was a Russian art movements into the seventies and eighties they were grappling with this with this problem the Soviet Union has eaten up all forms of representations all forms of describing yourself in the world around you how'd you find reality is amazing to me how much they're such resonated with with what I'm trying to attempt in the book because the book is also a mild piece of experimental fiction where I'm trying to think about conservatives gender. How do I describe reality when when this language left describe it it so it's great spray from that and it's really really fascinating book I think there's so much we can learn from the distant movements the check didn't movements the Russian nonconformist art movements which which are much more subtle than the old stories we always told between freedom and oppression an and and widely related today's world and Cianci what are you reading well I'm also going back to a book from the relatively recent past I'm rereading a book called radical technologies by my friend Adam Greenfield who and I am biased. He is a friend mind but I I do think he's one of the world's most thoughtful observers of the societal and political implications of technology his previous book was called everywhere the Dawning Age of ubiquitous computing and it was published in two thousand six and in many ways essentially predicted our current era and the ways that we are being constantly surveilled all the time line by everyday objects this one radical technologies was published in two thousand seventeen and it serves as it's billed as a field guide to the technologies that are transforming our lives so Adam examines the Internet of things augmented reality machine learning and artificial intelligence among other issues and really forces the reader to our to ask hard core questions about how our impulse toward convenience has obscured fundamental questions about control governance and agency and I'm reading a report titled The world wide web of Chinese and Russian information controls which has authored by Valentine Weber we recently released this report here at net at an event organized by our colleagues at the Center for International Media Assistance This report offers a systematic analysis of drivers and outcomes of the global diffusion of Chinese and Russian an information control technology and techniques it lays out for instance how the B. R. I the Belton Road Initiative functions as a vehicle for the spread of such technology eighty from China and among other things the report is really quite useful it provides a graphic representation in the second half of the report how China and Russia are diffusing different forms of this technology across dozens of countries think for anyone who's interested in this as well worth look well that's about Chinese and Russian internet controls we need much worn astounding both of these technologies that use but also the way that you know that being pushed in the political sphere on various regulatory ideas being pushed as well that's all for today's episode of Power Three Point Oh podcast for more on the topic we discussed today we recommend reading computer pomeranz says new book this is not propaganda adventures in the war against reality for further analysis of the themes we discussed today and we'll be examining in future past episodes visit our blog power three point oh understanding modern authoritarian influence we also invite.

Adam Greenfield China Peter What Kremlin News Moscow Soviet Union Belton Road Initiative Valentine Weber Center for International Media Russia
"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"Hello everyone and welcome to the power three point. Oh podcasts examining authoritarian resurgence and democratic resilience billions in an era of globalization power three point..

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

15:15 min | 3 years ago

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"By the international former democratic studies the center of the national endowment for democracy. I'm your host sean shot. The colombo senior director neds international forum for democratic studies and i'm your co host chris walker vice president for studies and analysis at the endowment recording the studio in washington d._c. Recent international debate has centered on china's largest technology firms the relationships with beijing and the implications of their growing involvement in global markets concerns over hallways role have dominated the discussion a growing body of reporting and analysis suggests the broader intersection of china nine and technology is far more complex and far reaching within china chinese firms are developing surveillance systems facial and voice recognition technology social social credit systems and advanced censorship capabilities even as the government aspires to global superpower status in artificial intelligence. All of this is happening. In the absence sense of robust domestic scrutiny by independence society will at the same time china's belt and road initiative and related digital silk road project are helping disseminate these capabilities globally to shed further light on the nature of this increasingly complex web of relationships and to explain the nuances of how china's authorities may be interested misted in leveraging these new technologies. We're pleased to welcome to the power three point. Oh podcast samantha hoffman a fellow at the australian strategic policy institute you'd be for today's discussion china's technology enhanced authoritarianism. Thank you for having me so sam. Lemme kick it off by referring to <hes> you recently testified alongside chris before the house permanent select committee on intelligence at a hearing on china's digital authoritarianism so in your testimony you of noted that the chinese party state is trying to control international discourse on china and that it expects technology to enhance the sophistication of this process so i was hoping you could go into into a bit more detail on this particularly on the role in vision for technology by the chinese party state absolutely <hes> so i think it's best to start framing <hes> what this means domestically and then look at how that expense out worth technology is essentially a tool that allows the chinese communist party to enhance its existing methods for controlling and managing society the objective is to essentially allow technology to be used used as a tool that come increasingly blurs the line between the parties <hes> consensual and coercive forms of control the party in order to maintain empower also needs to expand power because the way that it sees security. It's not a concept that ends at china's borders so it's not a domestic domestic or international security. It's actually inside the party and then everything outside of it and so as china grows globally the party also needs to expand its power to protect it and so technology is a way of improving <hes> the parties ability to for instance understand its external attornal environment so that it can shape it <hes> oftentimes in the debate on highway five defer instance where nearly focused on on national security threats but the problems associated with this are a lot broader. Civil liberties is a major issue and so the one thing that's chinese communist party talks about is that it can use data collected from the projects which include things related to five g. and smart cities development to understand the local environment to help the businesses directly involved in the projects that then also to allow the party to understand its political environment and ultimately mentally shape it the way people think about china and the chinese communist party in particular well you know in your commentary just now it echos a <hes> a line that you used in your testimony which i thought was really striking so let me just read it back to you and get your reaction to this you said for the c._c._p. The border that matters most is is not the border between the p._s._e. And the world but rather the border between the party and everybody else more channels that open up between china and the outside world the more the party has to fill in <hes> and ensure those channels are controlled so can you just talk a little bit about the ways that the party does fill in these these gaps in these openings and wyatt sees this says imperative sure i'll start with wyatt sees this as imperative <hes> it has to do with the way that the chinese communist party defines national security or really better the described in the chinese context party state security and it says that at the basis of this concept is political security which is guaranteed not by ideological security and cultural security and then there are other elements that would be a lot more familiar to us military security environmental security pretty <hes> but with political security at the basis of that concept that means that the party has to prevent threats from emerging urging in order to protect its ideological space so domestically that means not only putting down on rest once it emerges that actually really creating the conditions to disincentivize any problems from ever having the opportunity to arise whether through consensual means or co course it means were necessary that extends outward because the party's ideological space doesn't stop at china's borders and threats to the party politically domestically you can emerge from the outside so it's not a concept that stops just because china's territory ns it continues outward because of protecting the party is is the objective than there is no border and internal because the party also has to control itself it has to manage <hes> <hes> help policies are implemented it has to manage corruption has the manage all these traditional issues if maintaining and expanding power the objectives and sam sam. You've ridden that oversees the c._c._p. Doesn't seek to exert control through direct coercion through cooperative versions of control. I'm wondering if if you just describe a little bit more what you mean by that short it's a bit of both cooperative is mostly focused on shaping discourse. <hes> you mentioned the beginning of the podcast and discourse has to do with shaping how people engage with china <hes> shaping the channels of communication if you're a student how you're ear engaging with china how if you're a businessman or woman how how you're engaging with with china if you are a government official <hes> if you're looking to be elected elected and you have a large overseas chinese community in your district. How are you engaging with that community. Are you engaging with a very diverse community. That isn't representative of only the party or you. Engaging with channels at the party tends to control. It's all of those things combined. There's also course of elements of this for instance. I mean this is nothing new the party harasses political opponents overseas it also is mainly focused on overseas in ethnic chinese but it also extends extends to individuals who are working on issues that are sensitive to the chinese communist party. That's why you see academic self censorship or self censorship in think-tank environments because in order to maintain access. You have to conform to what the c._c._p. Describes as normal behavior and and why in your view and maybe this is an obvious question but why is it necessary <hes> whether in the coercive or in the cooperative categories of this manipulation and control for that sort of control to be exerted in the first place what what exactly are they seeking to sideline from the discussion or prevent from ever being taken up. That's so crucial so a few look at the way. The chinese communist party describes breath. It's a threat perceptions. One of the consistent themes is is always the idea of say a color revolution type event taking in place in china and if an event like that is the type of threat that the chinese communist party perceives one. That's primary political <hes> they also see that as something that can emerge from outside at china whether it's a government or entities that are interfering that are giving a voice two political opposition to the party creating an opportunity for individuals inside and outside of china to mobilize around an idea that is different than what the party says is true or right and that can take place outside of china before it takes place inside of china and so it needs to control those spaces inside and outside of china in order to prevent that type of threat from merging because if you get to the point that the party has lost political legitimacy or ideological legitimacy or at least that it can't control that <hes> it doesn't matter whether or not a shot is fired if it's lost that to begin with then it sees itself as losing on the ultimate battle so implicit in what you said is an emphasis on on this term discourse and you've written about the concept of discourse power in the way that the chinese party stayed defines it. Can you talk a little little bit about why this concept of discourse power is relevant to the global information ecosystem and why would it be applicable to for instance international credit rating engage in sees or international technical standard setting bodies <hes> which are all places in which you've said that you know discourse power is is trying to manifest itself ruin which the c._p._a. Wants to manifest as course power the idea of discourse power or the right to speak is essentially the described by the party as a way of ensuring the effectiveness and power of its speech in order to have that the party needs to collect data uh in order to enhance its ability to influence local environments and places outside of china needs to collect data in order to understand normal political and economic risks and it sees it sees collection power as the ability to sort of collect information from all areas of the world in real time nine and then communication power as something that decides the parties ability to influence and both of those things are directly related and data collection supports that process <hes> so data collection comes from smart cities data collection comes from places like confucius institutes. It comes from the c. P. describes collecting information from back doors and <hes> also other means <hes> from infrastructure projects projects from things like hotels and telecoms companies as well as a way of improving this knowledge and it's not that the data can be effective immediately but when it technology catches up and predictive capacity improves than it has that data in order order to make it usable or when it decides that it wants to have a particular set of information or it wants to pull a string it can do that more easily than and if it didn't have this to begin with specifically the party talks about data collection from belton brute initiative projects and this is actually louis something that it already claims to be doing it takes data from these projects and sends it back to five major data centers in china and uses that to inform. This is kind of analysis so it's not just an idea. It's something that the party claims is already happening. It's interesting that this idea of discourse is not limited to what we would typically think of discourse as a telling story or part of you know the party stated objective to tell china's story better to the world but it's really about <hes> technical technical standards it's about actual sort of data collection and the nuts and bolts of communication affecting not just the story that's told but the technology through which that story flows almost exactly and the c._c._p. Is really ahead in trying to set technical standards in <hes> international bodies. He's you know not only is developing technology locally important to the c. p. but it's also setting standards internationally and also setting norms <hes> and controlling the rules for engagement and a lot of ways with china in one way of doing that is being ahead of the united states and other western in liberal democracies in this particular <hes> space an example of what this course power actually looks like you can point to the civil aviation administration of china last year <hes> sending a letter to believe it was thirty three major national carriers and they said that we need you to change the way that you talk about taiwan on your airlines website. If you don't do this then we will accuse you of serious dishonesty st for not following through with this particular order and that dishonesty will be recorded on your airlines credit record and once that's recorded and then that'll be forwarded to the chinese credit agencies and that mark will be there for also other government entities to to potentially find you for instance so the cyberspace space administration of china was specifically listed in <hes> a letter teen lines <hes> but then other laws the orleans could have been accused of violating were the surveying and mapping law or advertising law and by connecting the violation to a credit credit record. It's essentially enhancing the efficiency of the c._p._s. Existing methods for shaping how entities <music> are willing to behave and it's worth noting that the airlines weren't told the chain to china specific website they were told to change their global websites because when they tried to change just it or tried to create just a china website to respond to this demand they were actually told no and so it's not that companies are not used to being told old to talk about taiwan in a particular way. It's that with these systems using technology to enhance existing forms of control the all encompassing nature and the effectiveness is intended to improve and really what you've described <hes> just more fundamentally is is to get the edge in artificial intelligence. You need to have the data collection and curation capacity and then you need to be able to test it in order or to develop the algorithm. Ick edge and china has in many ways and unlimited ability to do this..

china chinese communist party chinese party chris walker sean beijing washington colombo australian strategic policy in vice president senior director samantha hoffman taiwan representative c. P. sam sam
"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

13:29 min | 3 years ago

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"I mean this should be of high priority to certain european countries to the united states as well it took the united states longtime to publish <hes> our strategy and it's mostly still in the military space on not in the space of ethics and norms and rules goals but you know we are falling behind in that so unless democracies are able to get a grip meaning that we need to come to the table income up with a common set of norms and practices around the specific issue around took us around <hes> technological exports especially the end imports in the u._s. Now <hes> very aggressively trying to push back against the use of technology for example the many european already pretty adopt this technology and so this is gonna come at a great cost for them to roll that back but i think we have been asleep at the wheel for a very long long time and now going to much much harder to roll back the incursions something to throw a train regimes made into our democracies through a look like legitimate ah technology sales but we have to keep in mind that technology sales from authoritarian dictatorial regimes always come with strings attached so in that vein you know if we're trying to think about weaknesses in the authoritarian strategy i was intrigued by your example of telegram program and how the russian authorities were not able to successfully manage that <hes> and i'm wondering if there are any lessons from that either about approaches to the private sector her ways that companies can play a role that might be applicable outside russia's borders but do you think that you could briefly describe what happened with telegram and then if you think there's anything to be learn from that. This is a really fascinating example. I'm glad i'm glad you brought it up. So for listeners there may not be aware telegram one of these <hes> private messaging apps. That's a highly encrypted so similar to signal or <hes> or what's up <hes> and it was <hes> designed and made by a russian entrepreneur <hes> and normal government. I'm a democratic government that values entrepreneurship. This should be lauded as a great achievement. You know that you have a successful tech company. This used by lots of people around the world of course in the russian context. This is seen as a threat to the regime because it allows people to communicate and set up a channels or groups groups <hes> just to shan formation. That's not official or control information and when the russian intelligence services the f. b. <hes> <hes> tried to enforce a russian law that actually forces all companies that have operations within russia to allow access to there and corrupted channel so they had to basically provide the encryption keys so bad the russian f._s._b. Services will be able to monitor and track communications telegram graham obviously don't want to do that. It will lose all legitimacy people calling nine use it anymore so for them. This was an existential question and they fought it tooth and nail l. meaning that they refused to do this and they found various work arounds to try to route their data in various other ways with the russian government did was was a complete embarrassment. They responded by trying to shut down millions of i._p. Addresses and that were not related telegram below relate to other cloud services like an amazon amazon <hes> other <hes> large <hes> <unk> data holding companies and the end of actually screwing over there on banking <unk> sector for example some people's on banking broke down people can get an amazon. They couldn't do that online shopping. <hes> you know it was a huge effects across crossed the economy and it was a huge embarrassment to the government. I think that clearly signals is that in countries like russia that have not kept up with imposing these repressive rules and practices as the internet was developing as these new technologies. We're developing now now. They're also not well prepared to bring an all to put all back in the box right and so this fight would telegram. I think was really instructive because i think it exposed imposed some of the uncoordinated <hes> kind of ad hoc bajd incompetence of the regime eamon again. This is why i started the conversation. If you look at what's happening russia domestically you've quickly see that the government is not ten feet tall because they're naming capable of dealing with a relatively small company buddy would that tells us is then countries that are quite controlled authoritarian question. There is still space for entrepreneurial companies especially for oh. The tax sector to use its own lovers is only leverage against the government against these repressive norms as a way to expose will. They're capable not incapable of doing <hes>. I think other companies <hes> a lot of western companies have been complicit in this and they've signed up to these repressive rules. Dave conformed to the russian. Government's demands the installed these so-called black boxes allow the f._b._i. To monitor activities from their servers they sign up for the same with china china's a huge market so we need to be much from aware of our own western tech companies are complicit in facilitating beating the growing digital authoritarian regime in russia and china and i think implicit in your responses that <hes> we have largely largely perceived this degree of integration between authoritarian regimes and democracies as working well according to our revamped view now in the democracies is working against as the democracies but to some extent if there were some realize ation at this and if companies decided to think collectively about how to work against this there is a degree of leverage to be had from that integration absolutely <hes> you know the entire world is increasingly more connected tune in digital space and it's not governments that control that space for the most part it is private companies and as a result <hes> because individuals want the new phones. They win the new apps. They want google facebook and whatever else there's a lot that these companies can shouldn't be doing. I think that is in line with democratic values and principles and for too long <hes> we've let these big firms off the hook because i think think we in the united states have been too afraid <hes> to mandate to legislate regulatory practices to force these companies to come to terms with the fact back that they're not just <hes> being used for good. They are being used for evil as well. I mean we have to be very clear about the morals and principles of democratic societies because these are the muslim principles are deeply under threat and the private sector has a huge role to play in this and have a great deal leverage. I would argue more than many governments and they need to start stepping up. I think you've touched on an issue that so centrally in which is on the one hand in the norm setting realm the governments in beijing and moscow riyadh and elsewhere. They're very purposeful this full about what they'd like to see of all in the online space in terms of <hes> the way it's thought of in terms of his ideas such as internet sovereignty whereas the democracies for a host of reasons some of them quite understandable. They don't have the same unitary <hes> approach to these things haven't quite figured out how to defend their interests when it comes to things as basic as norms of a freedom of expression and i think what we've seen over the last couple of decades cades is a a slow erosion of that because the <hes> less free countries have been more <hes> mindful and purposeful and what they're trying to achieve and so if you were to identify <hes> one or two things that would be most useful to set the wheels in motion in doc in the democracies in a more practical way to start a more meaningful defense of these sorts of standards and values what comes to mind well. You know one thing that <hes> i discussing another paper <hes> with a colleague ambassador daniel freed call democratic defense against this information. Just bring a plug out there. <hes> is this notion that first and foremost democracies and we can start with europe in the united states but of course it should be expanded to low bowl. We'll <hes> democratic countries. <hes> need to come to the table and come up with again starting with a set of norms and principles and it shouldn't just be governments involved in this because this is not a problem. It's going to be solved just by policy loan. <hes> it may sound cliche but this is a whole of society question shen and what that means is that you have to bring the social media and tech companies to the table. You have to have civil society at the table exactly because <hes> will you mentioned chris that democracies don't work top down way thus cod authoritarians democracies work best from bottom of the optimize were slower but the often also means that we're in the long-term more resilient and so we need to start thinking about it in this whole of society <hes> kind of mentality and one thing that we propose in the paper i mention is at least in the information space we can start there because most people have an everyday experienced with that through their social media the we should think about setting up a counter disinformation coalition that could look a lot like isis coalition for example because the threat is is that syria's <hes> it may seem less urgent than the threat of isis of course but in the long term it can have much more dire consequences and the very core in our democratic societies before we wrap up our conversation. I'd like to conclude with our final segment called what we're reading where we discuss what's at the top lavar respective reading lists and mike recommend to our listeners lena. What's on your list well.

russia united states russian government shan formation amazon europe graham official eamon china china google mike Dave chris beijing
"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

16:23 min | 3 years ago

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"I'm your host christopher walker vice president for studies and analysis of the endowment recording studio in washington d._c. And i'm your co host shot the colossal senior director talknet international forum for democratic studies over the past few years policymakers in public audiences have begun devoting more attention to the ways in which powerful anti liberal relaxers are exploiting technology driven changes to today's information landscape in this episode will explore how authoritarian governments are devoting immense resources sources to improving their capacity in this arena as a means both to consolidate power at home and project influence far beyond their borders. Although authoritarian teheran regimes the world over are adopting such approaches to stand out as leaders the russian and chinese authorities alike have used new communications technologies to deepen their ability to manipulate the public discussion using these technologies both have emerged important incubators for the development of modern forms of censorship for for its part. The chinese party state is on the leading edge of this effort to deepen control moving with great speed and no meaningful checks on its ambitions to implement a comprehensive apparatus for policing political discourse in the democracies at least until now there's largely been a failure of imagination to recognize the growing global implications of the rapidly advancing digital prowess of the authoritarians many analysts have covered these trends from the perspectives of national security and economic it competition that relatively few of considered the implications for human rights and political freedom for this reason. We're delighted to welcome to the show one such expert who has been very thoughtful in this regard alina polyakova the david rudenstine fellow for foreign policy at the brookings institution here to discuss digital authoritarianism emelina. I'd like to start alluding looting to an article you wrote last november <hes> on russia and its ambitions in the technologies fear and a in particular you noted that <hes> there may maybe some real obstacles to russia developing its its abilities in the tech sphere among other reasons as a result of the public corruption poor rule of law and an oppressive <hes> regulatory environment <hes>. How should we see this. Will they be limited in pursuing their objectives to to curb dissent or will they simply invest in what they think is most important and therefore make real advances. Well thank you for that question. Chris and thank you <hes> shanty for <hes> <hes> hosting me on this fantastic podcast today so speaking directly to your question craps about russian future capabilities in new and emerging technologies space as i think we'll become quite obvious is russia looks like it's ten feet tall but it's not and what i mean by that is in the russian economy. Emme is about the size of spain's country. That size is a huge disparity. It's not really projected to grow economically. Foreign direct investment is is not likely to increase because of some of the factors you mentioned the difficulty of doing business the public corruption etc in terms of a._i. Startups russia really lags behind the rest of the world and if we nearest darlie lucon valley most of us find russian-speakers there and there's a reason for that because people that have great it skills and many many russians do have very good technical skills can find work elsewhere so thanks for those reasons we can expect that russia will continue to fall behind especially countries like china and when that comes to the government's own desire to emulate what the chinese have been doing certainly in terms of social surveillance and digital authoritarianism at home. They are already deeply deeply limited. They been doing certain things and ad hoc basis the chinese they have not been able to be strategic so as a result what they're able to do is not so much filter information meanings of the chinese do <hes> they're able to censor information before the populations even able to see it in the russian case. They're not capable of doing this because they lacked the ability you to process that much data but they are increasingly doing is monitoring and surveilling <hes> what citizens are talking about online whether text into each other over the phone phone and they're doing this through a variety of intimidation means including a quite a intimidating repressive legal structure. That's been slowly forming under the president putin and i i think in that respect it seems that <hes> while china is operating. Maybe at a unique level in this space and perhaps it isn't <hes> quite the right frame of reference for for russia's ambitions when one looks <hes> from the point of view say ten years ago of some of the things that <hes> russia has done despite the fact it's been under sanctions and it's had a weak economy and it has all the features that you described. It's actually proven to be quite quite active internationally and so should we underestimate <hes> given the fact that this the authorities in russia which really have no meaningful checks on their decision making <hes> that they won't be purposeful investing the limited resources they have in areas. I think are most important. I mean that that's exactly exactly the key point <hes> you know just because they have certain constraints and limitations many of those financial resources when we think about the the kremlin strategic intent abroad odd again. This is where russia differs from china russia's strategic contend the government strategic intent is to try to undermine <hes> any countries that sees as potential competitor's and of course from the kremlin's perspective that is the democratic west first and foremost and so we've seen russia again unlike china use of these new technologies these new tools to try to undermine western democracies and why are they doing. This again makes perfect sense from their perspective. If you're a country that has limited resources but you see you're so-so slipping and falling behind. You'll do what you can that is most low cost and high impact to try to stay day ahead or at least catch up or at least push everybody else down just a little bit so if we look into the future what i expect and what my research has been suggesting is is there were going to see the kremlin investing more and more limited resources specifically into these asymmetric threats meaning <hes> using a._i. Driven adamant technologies as a form of foreign influence operations. You know just a pickup on this. So much of the current conversation has been around china. Ed's artificial intelligence capabilities that you've written that artificial intelligence has the potential to hyperpower russia's use of disinformation referring to the intentional spread at a false and misleading information for the purpose of influencing politics and you also say that democracies are ill equipped to respond to this. Can you elaborate what you mean on both points so at this point. I think many people are aware of the term deep fakes <hes> but this storm is relatively new and i do wanna talk. A little row with that is because that's really what i'm talking about when i'm talking a._i. Powered disinformation so of course a is a neutral tool. You could says the dual use tool ominous multi-layer layer reserved for shaw intelligence rex referring to whole suite of various technologies that we'll have both positive negative consequences for society's basically every single sector her <hes> but i think it's really important to understand how this new technology in the suite of new tools will also be used for me by militias actors <hes> to try to pursue <hes> the kind disruptive foreign policy john the russians have been pursuing for some time so specifically <hes> when when it comes to russia's usa v i n deep fakes defects are manipulated audio and video content but they're not like photoshop auto shop right at people often say well. You know we've had in manipulation of images for a long time. We've had people doctrine pictures of photoshop doctoring videos and various other ways but right now. Those kinds of manipulations are very easy to detect software that can do that. We have some artificial intelligence tools that can do that very quickly. Fix a whole new level of audio video and image manipulation there are they are generated which means it's not manipulated you did. You're not taking an existing image. Doctoring actually producing a brand new image brand new audio brand new video based on a ton of data on these new artificial official intelligence algorithms can process very very quickly and currently we don't have the technical response meaning were not able to detect act the this kind of video audio manipulation. If you think about what's on my mean for disinformation. I think the implications are quite like profound. You know we can see a video of a world leader making offensive remarks for example <hes> and that could spread viral on twitter on social media all the other platforms and we can debunk him because they know you know <hes> president trump didn't say chelsom urkel density that but the damage is usually done because it's like playing a game of whack them all and i think this is the new challenge there were going to face increasingly over the next two to three years and one thing that you've you've written about which i think is quite fascinating is you've highlighted. The fact that the kremlin has focused its efforts already over the past many years on a tactic of moscow fca and <hes> that this is something that predated the machine learning era. Could you talk doc little bit about this concept and why you think that this will be dramatically enhanced by machine learning so thank you for bringing some rushing into the conversation and none of those great <hes> so the term you used muscular fca <hes> loosely translated into english basically refers to tactics tactics of military deceit so this was something that was often you love to news in the soviet era <hes> so for example you try to sort of ruse your enemy to to make them think that your forces are at one place in fact in another place it can take the form of things like actually making fake blow up tanks airplanes <unk> airplanes missiles so that from satellite images adversaries might see that you have a tank in one location with us actually a false the you know misleading purposely misleading <hes> way of trying to deceive so these are all tools all taxes around for a very long time to try to destabilizer enemies position mislead them various ways but the new digital tools there were discussing actually in the twenty first century version of that on what i mean by that is when you see just some the russian disinformation campaigns we've seen already you saw russian trolls masquerading as americans as europeans operating many accounts <hes> setting up these networks on twitter amplify false content to miss exactly to mislead scene and deceive people and when we see in russia's in fact it is the russian ministry of defence has taken the lead on artificial intelligence capabilities season development <hes> so squarely <hes> the russian government seized as much as part of its military arsenal and i think that's important to understand that from the russian perspective <hes> you know things like disinformation new forms of information warfare a. i. powered information warfare is part and parcel of his bar military a strategy that goes very much in line with long tradition of trying to deceive your enemy mislead enemy misguide your enemy in various ways. You've you've you've raised how these approaches and methodologies have been developed at the domestic level one of the wrinkles that were confronting in an era of globalization -sation and where our political speech and political discourse is now <hes> integrated so seamlessly especially through the open platforms that have emerged <hes> from the west coast of the united states and in other settings <hes> and this is where this activity that you just described as happening so could you talk a little little bit about how these domestically developed capabilities through trial and error experimentation by by incubating them have now been diffused beyond russia's borders. It seems just about everywhere now well. That's right again you know from the russian precise also a business component component here. I i do wanna make that clear. So now we see a lot of companies. That look like p._r. Firms allow them happen to be rushing but you can go online. Look this up. I don't really want to advertise them <hes> <music> but you can actually buy a hundred thousand twitter accounts. <hes> twenty verified facebook accounts. You can buy a g mail accounts to step maratha vacation included <hes> they'll even the age of the accounts allow these companies will try to take over old accounts have been abandoned and then caserta zombie fly them if you will and turn them towards a different purpose and they'll tell you this account is one year old is account as five years quite sophisticated <hes> but the the point is that it's very cheap so we see now is that from the russian trial and error of trying to influence manipulate democracy especially running elections but not just just around elections. We see others learning from this. I you know we see countries like iran. Perhaps north korea certainly china. I think at some point point will enter this space as well any aspiring authoritarian can basically buy a package now of you know however many bots on twitter <unk> have many trolls and accounts and pages on facebook and launched their own influence information campaign aimed at the domestic audience or the foreign audience audience so we see this package of information manipulation tools now diffusing across the world and and do you want to call it when other things we were talking about going to the export of digital authoritarianism from from countries across asia one thing that we're talking about earlier this this notion that the russians are falling behind the you have certain limitations constraints and the resources that's all true but if we look at the world you know there's no other country looks looks like china right a very fast growing wealthy incredibly technically capable authoritarian regime but there are many countries countries that look a little bit russian some sense resource poor <hes> not very centralized run more like a kleptocracy than you know hard hard to tell the charity dictatorship and what that signals the technologies the russia's develop for its own specific purposes at home. He's monitoring technologies actually much compatible with the rest of the aspiring authoritarians who face similar constraints as the russians do so i think for that reason as a big market for the russians to export these surveillance tools because they are cheaper because they who have higher impact and frankly because most countries aren't china you mentioned earlier that <hes> we don't have the technological response to some of these emerging technologies including <hes> deep fakes in the artificial intelligence context but it also it seems like we don't have the the norms and the accountability to deal with so even if we were to develop the technical response how would we you get to the point say in the democracies to know how to use these what the boundaries are because it seems to me at least maybe you can speak to the selena right now the the discussion around a._i. And how it's applied is either coming from the military side or from the commercial side which is really driving the development of a._i. But there's very little talk at least relatively speaking in terms of the norms that should shape the use of of these new terminologies that that's right..

russia china kremlin twitter christopher walker brookings institution teheran president chinese party united states senior director washington china russia vice president facebook spain russian ministry of defence
"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

15:10 min | 3 years ago

"democratic" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"Many of these investment activities have been announced under the banner of china's belt and road initiative. I should've which we've also heard referenced over the years as new silkroad and one belt one road sean why have been so many different names over the years for this initiative mm-hmm well chris. It's now been five years since the official launch of the belt and road initiative or b. r. i originally it was promoted as a way to connect china across central asia all the way to a europe through a series of transportation infrastructure linkages over time. This vision seems to have expanded to encompass countries far beyond these regions with more than sixty five countries now signing inning on to be our i agreements of various forms more recently investigative reports have dealt into some of the higher profile bolton road projects which have begun to trigger an apparent backlash increased criticism of the terms under which these projects have been arranged between the chinese government and national governments. The government seems to be trying to adapt how they frame. The bolton road initiative initiative as a result here to help us better understand the evolution of china's belt and road is our featured guest nigel one senior fellow for political insecurity affairs affairs at the national bureau of asian research and author of the book china's eurasian century political and strategic implications of the belt and road initiative nejd. Thanks so much much for joining us in your thank you very much for having me so i think it might be helpful to start with a little bit of background on what spurred you to investigate this project to begin in with you. Were looking at this long before it burst onto the scene as a hot topic what about it piqued your interest and <hes> what you know. How did this project object itself. The belt and road initiative get started so what spurred me to look at this <hes> project by the chinese authorities <hes> i started to look at it very carefully in twenty fourteen when i first came to the u._s. <hes> it seemed back then as it was <hes> something very important <hes> from beijing's perspective but not very well known or understood in the commentaries that i could find <hes> either in the media media or in the academic publications so really what <hes> what started <hes> my own interest was more to understand what beijing wanted to do with the belton road <hes> back then two thousand fourteen was just the beginning. <hes> people were mostly skeptical about it. <hes> will china be able to reconnect your asia. Those projects are too big too expensive. <hes> is this an empty label. <hes> isn't it just the <hes> the usual chinese <hes> <hes> expansion <hes> towards its neighborhood <hes> so many questions that came with answers that didn't really satisfy me <hes> i wanted to know what were the the drivers <hes> and for that <hes> i spent almost two years <hes> reading a lot of what the chinese experts that's where writing about belton rude i went to china several times to have discussions with experts from universities universities think tanks research centers but also got meant officials <hes> people in banks to try to understand <hes> what belton and was all about and in the meantime as you and others have started to shine a greater light on the belt and road initiative. It's come under more scrutiny. <hes> how how do you see this the pushback to the b._r._i. Taking shape well as shanti said <hes> now. It's it's <hes> it's been five years. Since xi jinping launched the initiative <hes> which back then was not really called in initiative it was <hes> it it was presented in two different <hes> speeches <hes> one in kazakhstan and the other one in indonesia so very probably more <hes> more focused on china's own continental and maritime neighborhood <hes> and since then there's <hes> there's it's been there's been many projects that have been launched others that were launched before twenty thirteen that now have the label belton road on on them. <hes> and as china has deployed so much effort <hes> diplomatically economically financially <hes> <hes> <hes> in really all the different directions. It's kind of circular now. It's not just <hes> through eurasia through the indian ocean. It's it's really <hes> expanded <hes> through the arctic <hes> towards africa the words <hes> south america <hes> towards oceania so it's it's really a global initiative now well of course <hes> reactions from these countries. Have i've been a bit different. Some of them have <hes> welcomed it from the beginning and still do welcome it because they see they see it. As an opportunity opportunity for economic development <hes> others have i welcomed it and then now are starting to to emit some doubts about about the conditions at china has been posing in terms of <hes> <hes> reimbursement of the loans or the <hes> the conditions or other conditions that were not really clear earlier in the beginning that start to emerge now <hes> so there are some examples of pushback against the initiative <hes> that have occurred in the last few months pakistan malaysia nepal just to name a few <hes> at the same time though <hes> china's still l. continues to make progress in to expand the partners and partnerships that he <hes> that it has built around the belton initiative there are saying almost on a daily basis <hes> to to <hes> to implement or to or to frame framed cooperation between china and some countries. I'm thinking here of africa. <hes> there's a ammo you that has been signed a couple of days ago <hes> <hes> or a few weeks ago <hes> with the government of victoria in australia so there's a pushback but at the same time there's progress being being made and maybe you can say a little bit more about the the case in victoria. My understanding is that part of the reason that was controversial because the local authorities he's centrally kept the conditions of the agreement secret. Is that correct. That's correct the government of australia <hes> didn't endorse the belt and initiative officially. They're not against but they're not for it either. They haven't endorsed it officially <hes> but <hes> what china is doing doing is not <hes> just going to central governments they don't just negotiate with central governments more and more what you see is sort sort of localization of china's diplomacy <hes> and and what happened in victoria is exactly that go to local governments <hes> municipalities that may be are not as knowledgeable <hes> maybe don't have the political economical <hes> or geopolitical you political framework to understand what china wants them and so <hes> the they signed this agreement team and yes it secret they refused to publish it and i'm not sure whether it's because of something that china told them to do like an agreement that they had with the chinese authorities that this agreement would remain secret or is it something that they decided <hes> for themselves. I'm not klay about what happened. In the short period since the agreements <hes> conditions came to light or the inability of during bring them to light <hes> <hes>. It's really been journalists and some of the leading figures in australia who've been talking about this. How does the sort of thing play out in a setting where there isn't as much coach <hes> either civil society or the sort of policy expertise to talk about some of these big deals yeah well. That's a very good question because in in in cases where <hes> the deals with with china have come to the surface and to the public knowledge. It's thanks to the to the work of these journalists and civil society groups that have <hes> managed to to bring knowledge to the broader public and that's very important because again <hes> the the way china works usually the chinese authorities were is going directly to the elite level and they don't involve local populations or civil society within their deals so yeah in another in in countries where are they don't have that network or that <hes> <hes> fabric <hes> it sits much more difficult to report. Let me <hes> let me refer for back to a blog post that you wrote for our power three point oh blog about the phrase community of common destiny which was being used at the time to describe. I i suppose china's vision of a win win scenario for everybody involved with the belt and road. I've noticed that in the intervening period they've dropped that phrase largely the english translation of the phrase and are now using in the english translation community common future <hes>. Why do you think that they did that and what does that. <hes> tell us about what they're trying to project. Yeah it's <hes> it's one of my favorite topics. Thank you for bringing it up. <hes> it's the same with belt and road really the term in chinese hasn't changed it. Still <unk> lewitt's one belt one road <hes>. It's just that it china's discourse is <hes> his two-fold. There's one internal in chinese language for <unk> domestic consumption and this one for the outside world that goes through the filter of propaganda and so <hes> <hes> the way china the chinese authorities frame <hes> those big concepts for external final purposes one of my friends. Kohl's that the exile prop. It's the external propaganda purpose. I think this is a very appropriate term. <hes> is it's meant for <hes> foreign consumption in the community of common destiny might have sound may be gene so they launched this out outside and maybe then they reassess how it's <hes> the assess about how it's been unwelcomed by foreign audiences and then they bring that back to beijing and you know people don't understand what you mean or people are reluctant right and they don't really see what's common destiny is all about so now it's has it has been <hes> repackaged into this shared future. Maybe the shared shared future is a better concept that foreigners can accept <hes>. It's i dunno. I think this is why they changed. It is just is to make sure <hes> that foreign consumption that the that the foreign con <hes> sorry that the foreign consumers understand standard better you know i noticed in your book that you talk about <hes> what you saw as the chinese authorities <hes> emphasis on how they would make sure that belt and road could be accepted more easily and strategic communication was a part of that and but then you contrast us that with these numerous jingles and really ham handed attempts to popularize belt and road <hes> you know you can find any any of them quite easily if you do a quick search for belt and road rap video princeton's <hes> so do you have a sense that they are learning from these efforts the your example of shifting from common destiny to shared future implies some kind of sophistication around the messaging but yet when you look at the vast majority of what's being put out there. It still seems not that sophisticated <hes> you know. Is it likely that they'll keep refining their approach in that that will prove effective in the end <hes> yeah i. I'm struggling with that. It's it's a very interesting question and i haven't spent enough time <hes> looking looking at it very very carefully in in detail and see whether there's an adaptation and why and when this adaptation <hes> happens happens but <hes> i think there is i think <hes> because of the <hes> constant reassessment or assessment of if the situation things go back to beijing they get steadied <hes> there are some feedback and then there's some readjustment <hes> <hes> being done and this is also what we see not just in the <hes> strategic messaging on or or the external propaganda but also in in the way that for example reacting to <hes> to the pushback that the authorities start to perceive <hes> there is also an adjustment and <hes> of the discourse <hes> of the should i put it of the external <hes> image that china wants to <hes> project outside <hes> you know discussing more with with countries and saying yes of course we can we can we adjust we can adapt our deals so there's <hes> <hes> there is i think there is an up tation and whether it is is <hes> i'm i'm not so sure we'll have to look in the longer term to see whether it's appropriate and officiant <hes> but i think the effort is there and it's interesting that public opinion management and public opinion guidance those were both <hes> domestic issues shoes that the party is very just aware of but as always prioritized <hes> so it's not as though they're not thinking about these that's very true. Yes and i think <hes> we we sometimes when you look at china from the outside you think that it's very <hes> congealed or <hes> or very structured lectured and frozen but in reality <hes>.

china beijing australia chinese government bolton europe national bureau of asian resea belton victoria official africa senior fellow nigel shanti jinping kazakhstan oceania indonesia